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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  May 22, 2018 11:00am-1:00pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm annita mcveigh live in manchester as the city prepares to remember those who died here a year ago today. the headlines at 11. events are held to mark the first anniversary of the manchester arena suicide bombing in which 22 people were killed during a concert attended by thousands of children and young people. at first, i thought it was a balloon because she let down loads of balloons, like, that big. and then i heard a girl in front of me shout, "it's a bomb." prince william and theresa may will attend a memorial service this afternoon in manchester cathedral, and there will be a mass sing—along in the city's albert square this evening. i'm joanna gosling. our other main stories this morning. the second day of the grenfell inquiry begins, with further tributes from families of the 72 victims who died in the fire. more store closures
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at marks & spencer — the retailer says it will shut 100 stores by 2022. air pollution from home wood burners is under scrutiny as the government publishes its latest clean air strategy. and cooling off? a warning that too many tourists could be putting iceland's landscape at risk. good morning. welcome from manchester city centre where a year ago today thousands of people were going about their day looking
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forward with great excitement to the ariana grande concert at manchester arena that evening. an event from which 22 of them would not return. the youngest victim just baked, saffie roussos, who died alongside teenagers —— the youngest victim, just eight. alongside them, it is estimated more than 800 people suffered physical injuries as a result of the suicide attack, some of those life changing, and deep psychological trauma. later on this afternoon, at manchester cathedral, there will be a national service of commemoration. it will remember the victims, theirfamilies commemoration. it will remember the victims, their families and friends, it will remember the first responders and medical teams, the councillors, communities, so many people who came together, notjust in the immediate aftermath of the attack, but in the long, hard months
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since. there will be a nationwide minute's silence at 2:30pm and the service will be attended by fitzwilliam and theresa may. —— prince william. in a moment, i will be talking to the first paramedic on the scene at the manchester arena on the scene at the manchester arena on the night of the attack, but before we go toa the night of the attack, but before we go to a report from our correspondent, i want to mention a tweet from ariana grande. she was one of the stars at a star—studded event a couple of weeks after the attack, pulling together stars at the event at the old trafford cricket ground, today she sends her love and support to everyone. she tweeted, "thinking of you all today and every day. i love you with all of me and am sending you all of the light and warmth i have to offer on this challenging day." fiona trott looks back to the 22nd
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of may last year and she talks to a mother and daughter who were at the concert. pips sound. police in manchester say a number of people have been killed and others injured at manchester arena after at least one explosion was reported. we've just heard from greater manchester police that they are linking this to terrorism. every time i close my eyes, ijust see it and hear it. the only way i can describe it was ants out of a colony. that noise went off and then everyone just went silent and then everyone just started running. for leanne and her daughter, lainey, it's still very raw. i heard a massive bang. at first i thought it were a balloon because she let down loads of balloons, like, that big. and then i heard a girl in front of me shout, "it's a bomb!" it was a terrorist attack that claimed the lives of 22 people.
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the youngest was just eight years old. hundreds like leanne have needed intensive therapy. i went suicidal, i couldn't cope any more. if i wouldn't have gone to that session, i don't think i'd be here. that's the first time i've said that in front of lainey. the attack was carried out by this man, salman abedi. the bomb he carried contained nearly 2000 pieces of metal. prosecutors have asked for his brother, hashem, to be extradited from libya. there is a warrant for his arrest. negotiations are tricky, they're delicate, they're being carried out by the government and it's for them and the libyans to work that through. i would just hope that we are able to see a trial in the uk because of the families of the victims, and those injured and traumatised. one, two, three. after her experience, leanne is studying to be a mental health nurse.
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both she and lainey are travelling to manchester today, a city coming together to reflect. you're going to have to teach me this stuff, lainey. i will try to hold this up into the sunshine so you can see it, the front page of the manchester evening news, the worker bee, symbolising the community spirit and the solidarity of people coming together in response to the attack at manchester arena and below the bees, the names of those who died in the attack. with me now is a man from the north west ambulance service, the north west ambulance service, the first paramedic on the scene at manchester arena on the 22nd of may
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last year, thank you forjoining us. perhaps first of all you could take us perhaps first of all you could take us back to that night and your memories of it. well, it was an unprecedented night, something that although we were prepared for it, nobody was really prepared for it, just the scale, the devastation, what an awful terrible incident it was. it was a totally overwhelming experience from the number of people who were injured, the number of people who tragically were killed, just the total number of people involved, the level of their injuries, on all levels, completely unprecedented, and especially because it was targeted at people so young, it was a horrific incident for everybody who was there and everybody who responded. for everybody who was there and everybody who respondedm for everybody who was there and everybody who responded. it must have brought to the forefront every aspect of your training, as you try
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to decide who you should attend to first? yeah, it is something we have all trained for, but the reality is so all trained for, but the reality is so difficult, partly because people we re so difficult, partly because people were so young, so difficult, partly because people were so young, but also because the instinct in everybody is to help and when you are faced with people who are beyond help, it is an incredibly difficult thing to deal with. and i know you were incredibly impressed that night by the ordinary by standards doing their utmost to help the injured. —— by standards. absolutely. we are lucky that we have the commitment and we are prepared but what struck me that night were the people who run into that environment with no training but with an instinct to help —— we have the equipment. even people who camejust a have the equipment. even people who came just a comfort people afterwards, to help reunite people, all of these acts of kindness were
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just incredible, it goes to show the spirit of people in manchester and in the uk. how have you been preparing, how have you been feeling as we approach the first anniversary? i think i can speak for all of my colleagues when i say that, for me and for them, over the past few weeks, as the anniversary comes closer, a lot of thoughts and feelings from last year have been resurfacing. it is something i do not think any of us will fully deal with, certainly never forget. just how awful it was and what happened the year ago. it certainly does not seem a the year ago. it certainly does not seem a year ago, the year ago. it certainly does not seem a year ago, amazing how quickly it has come around. but really it has just been a case of trying to remember what was important, remembering the 22 people who lost their lives, remembering all of the people injured, still dealing with
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their injuries, and all of the families and friends of those who lost their lives and what they are dealing with. and you are a professional but i'm sure you and your colleagues have talked to each other about this to support one another and perhaps even sought counselling yourselves? yeah, i certainly do not mind saying i have had counselling and it helped me deal with the incident. i have not moved on from it completely, but certainly counselling and talking to collea g u es certainly counselling and talking to colleagues who understood, it is something that has helped me hugely andi something that has helped me hugely and i am incredibly grateful i work foran and i am incredibly grateful i work for an organisation that is full of so for an organisation that is full of so many people who care, really very grateful for all of the support i have had and i'm sure my colleagues would say the same, or support they have had, friends, family, other colleagues, invaluable. on the half of the viewers, thank you for talking to us. as i mentioned, there
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will be a national service of commemoration at manchester cathedral behind me at 2pm this afternoon. the duke of cambridge and the prime minister will be attending the prime minister will be attending the service. at 2:30pm, there will bea the service. at 2:30pm, there will be a minute's silence, nationwide, to remember the victims, and then later on tonight, in manchester, the other centrepiece event of the day, if you like, a huge singalong in albert square in the city. a number of choirs including the manchester arena attack survivor choir, joining voices to remember the people affected by this awful attack. just after 10:30pm tonight,
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the bells will ring out around the city to mark the time that the bomb went off. to stay with us throughout the day on bbc news because we will be marking all of these events with you, talking to lots of people caught up in the events of that night, the 22nd of may last year, and those who have been responding to the impact of it ever since. for now, from manchester, back to the studio. thank you. we will be back with you a little later. the public inquiry into the grenfell tower fire continues into its second day this morning. family and friends will remember the dead in what have been called pen portraits made up of speeches, photos and videos about their loved ones. the presentations are designed to ensure that the inquiry never loses sight of what its work is for, and why it is important. 0ur news correspondent, tom burridge, joins us now
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from the inquiry in west london. it began yesterday with very moving tributes and we will have more of the same today. again, it has been an incredibly moving and i would say humbling sitting inside the hotel and listening to the tributes this morning on day two of the public inquiry. hugely sad but respectful atmosphere inside, we have so far heard two tributes, the first was about debbie, a5, she lived in flat in grenfell tower, and she was described as someone who would rarely be seen without a smile, someone rarely be seen without a smile, someone whose laughter could be heard when she came into any ring or building, someone who loved life —— any building. the beautiful tribute, toa any building. the beautiful tribute, to a very beautiful person, as i learnt. we heard a tribute from her
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mother, miriam, 79, who said she could not actually bring herself to read it out, understandably, so the words you are about to hear from michael from the holland park opera and debbie lamprell worked at the holland park opera, a festival in the summer every year in this part of london, she was much loved by all of london, she was much loved by all of the people there. we we re we were an incredibly close and happy family, we loved debbie and debbie was devoted to us. we... we we re debbie was devoted to us. we... we were blessed with debbie in a way thatis were blessed with debbie in a way that is very special. she lived at home with us but the travelling to we st home with us but the travelling to west london, especially late at night, very early in the morning, got to be too much. it was not particularly safe for a young woman travelling on her own, so she moved
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out to be near her work. i was always worried about her living in the bedsit or the studio flats, as she called it. it was not appropriate for someone in her 305 who worked so hard, the conditions we re who worked so hard, the conditions were not good and i used to badger her to put her name down with the council, to get somewhere proper to live, somewhere 5afe council, to get somewhere proper to live, somewhere safe and decent. 0f cour5e, live, somewhere safe and decent. 0f course, it feels terrible to have done that now because she was given the flat in grenfell. she loved her little flat and she kept it lovely but the refurbishment became a nightmare and she had problems with the electricity, the heating and she wa5 the electricity, the heating and she was very upset about having a ball in the corridor right when you open the front door. that was very upsetting —— a boiler. but i used to think, at least when i go, she has got a roof over her head. a statement read on behalf of miriam, the mother rob debbie
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lamprell. in the last few minutes, we have been having from nicholas burton, the mother of someone considered to be the 72nd victim of the grenfell tower fire, she died considered to be the 72nd victim of the grenfell towerfire, she died in january of this year, she had long—term health problems, and as her husband described, she suffered from dementia from 2015 and he has been saying about the huge trauma and the effect that the fire, the terrible night, had on her dementia. he said, how can you explain to someone he said, how can you explain to someone with such a serious illness that their whole house has gone, all of their possessions gone, their dog is no more, so of their possessions gone, their dog is no more, so many of their possessions gone, their dog is no more, so many people and friends inside the building have died too? we also heard a beautiful tribute from nicholas burton to his wife, someone he described as a big personality, someone who knew eve ryo ne personality, someone who knew everyone on the portobello road, someone very everyone on the portobello road, someone very talkative, someone who he said would go into a lift and by the end of getting out of the lift,
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she would know everyone inside. really the beautiful character and i think we have got two weeks set aside for these very moving tributes to the 72 people whose deaths are attributed to the fire at grenfell tower in the summer of last year and their idea is that when the inquiry moves forward in the coming weeks and months and even years, the victims will remain at the forefront of the work of the inquiry. thank you. if you want to find out more about the grenfell tower inquiry, eddie mair is presenting a podcast every day the inquiry sits — which looks in detail at what's been said and heard each day. you can download it from the bbc iplayer radio app, itunes or your podcast provider. the headlines on bbc newsroom live. events a re events are being held to mark the first anniversary of the manchester arena suicide bombing in which 22 people were killed. the second day of the grand full
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inquiry begins —— the grenfell inquiry begins —— the grenfell inquiry begins. marks & spencer is to close 100 stores by 2022 as part ofa to close 100 stores by 2022 as part of a reorganisation that it says is vital for the retailer's future. of a reorganisation that it says is vitalfor the retailer's future. in sport, harry kane will be the youngest captain of england at a world cup, manager gareth southgate has announced he will take the armband in russia next month because of his belief and high standards. arsenal set to appoint a new manager, the former paris st germain manager, the former paris st germain manager has been chosen ahead of the previous favourite. a new manager at west ham, former man city boss manuel pellegrini has signed a three—year deal. i will be back with more on those stories just after 11:30am. air pollution caused by wood burning stoves
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is being highlighted in the government's new clean air strategy. the stoves have become increasingly popular in recent years, but they are also a source of airborne particles, which can cause serious health problems. 0ur environment analyst, roger harrabin, reports. filthy air has become a national crisis with angry parents demanding action. the government has been dragged through the courts over failures to tackle nitrogen dioxide pollution, mainly from vehicles. today's consultation, though, concentrates mostly on other pollutants. take solid fuel fires — a big problem in winter. the government says it will prevent the dirtiest of solid fuels being burned, but it doesn't say how. wood burners add to air problems too. a government source said they would not be banned but people would be encouraged to burn dry wood, which pollutes less. campaigners say the plans, so far, are too vague. ministers reject that. by taking steps both to reduce petrol and diesel cars on our roads but also to deal with everything from wood—burning stoves to the pollution generated by ammonia in agricultural land,
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we are doing everything we can in order to ensure the next generation lead healthier lives. here's one area where the government has promised decisive action. farms are the main source of ammonia — an irritant gas that forms particles which get sucked deep into the lungs. farmers will be paid to clean up. but the air pollution issue is not settled yet. roger harrabin, bbc news. i can now speak to baronessjenny jones from the green party, who is in our westminster studio. thank you forjoining us. what do you think about the proposals? do they go far enough? when you realise we have been breathing and illegal air in the uk for over eight years, it is rather a poor effort, it does not include measures to road traffic which is the biggest polluter for all of us, and it gives extra responsibilities to councils but it does not give them any extra money
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to fulfil responsibilities. lastly, it does not mention a tough watchdog, it does not replace the safeguards we will lose when we exit the eu. do you think it will make a difference? when you say extra responsibilities to councils but no extra money, what is the incentive for them? well, i am going to help the government, i'm going to table a clea n the government, i'm going to table a clean air build this year making it a human right and as far as i'm concerned, the government is welcome to ta ke concerned, the government is welcome to take all of the measures i will be explaining —— clean air bill. it is good they are tackling woodburning stoves, 30% of the pollution in the winter, and could they have thought about farming because it has not been tackled before. but quite honestly, it is all talk and very little action, when they talk about woodburning stoves, they a re when they talk about woodburning stoves, they are not planning wet wood, one of the forms of polluting
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wood. they have opted out of the small measures they could have taken andi small measures they could have taken and i would say it is if pretty fla bby and i would say it is if pretty flabby piece of work. do the arguments need to be made strong first about the impact of air pollution because it is interesting to hear today air pollution is the fourth biggest killer after cancer, obesity and heart disease, and it made me think of michael caine, not many people know that? you are talking about illegal levels of air pollution in this country, it is not something that is discussed as widely as the other key curlers. something that is discussed as widely as the other key curlersm is true. i think we need a blue planet programme on it or something to raise this as an issue —— key killers. it has been estimated cost the nhs £20 billion and that is from people with problem hearts who are affected, people with lung conditions, children whose lungs
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will be permanently smaller because of the dirty air they are breathing and that will impact on their future lives and the nhs, so it costs us a lot of money and the sooner we get the message out, the better. the government is talking in this strategy about saving £1 billion, thatis strategy about saving £1 billion, that is not much when you realise the burden of air pollution is 20 billion on the nhs alone. jenny jones, thank you very much. marks and spencer has announced further store closures this morning as it continues a reorganisation. it plans to close 100 more by 2022. 21 stores have already closed since november, 2016. it wants to move the third of sales online and it plans to have fewer but larger clothing and homeware stores. joining me now is our business correspondent. a huge change for them and us and they are
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putting their strategy firmly behind going online is the future —— a huge change for marks & spencer. they have revealed the stores closing today, across the country, and the idea is to shrink the shop floor, shrink the space they have devoted to high street selling of fashion and homeware and tried to convert it into digital sales. they have struggled with that. what has been happening in the stores? we have seen happening in the stores? we have seen marks & spencer has struggled in terms of sales, as have other retailers. in the last week, mothercare, house of frasier, they are shutting down stores, in terms of the broader picture, consumer spending going down, inflation is high. but marks & spencer is specifically, looking at, say, 0cado, online retailer, they have managed to grow in market value and now they are worth more than marks & spencer. their position now in the
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ftse100, spencer. their position now in the ftse 100, top 100 companies in the country, now looking fragile, lost a quarter of its share price and they could risk relegation to ftse 250 in terms of sporting analogies, a bit like being relegated from the premier league to the first division, looking like man united being relegated, it seems incredible, but it is on the cards. how far it has fallen, how things have changed, it used to be the bellwether that we would all look to for the signs of wear the high street was going. exactly. over ten yea rs street was going. exactly. over ten years ago, turning quite a healthy profit, but the high street has changed so much in the last ten, 12 yea rs changed so much in the last ten, 12 years and online sales taking the lead and they have not been able to adapt and even the likes ofjohn lewis, for example, in terms of relativity of what they have converted to online sales, john lewis is doing better, next is doing better, so it has a lot of work to
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do and the chief executives and chairmen have been pretty open about that. thank you very much. ministers are considering whether to scrap some of the controversial nhs reforms introduced in england in 2012. the changes sought to give gps more control over health budgets but critics say they have been damaging and expensive. journalists from western and chinese news organisations have flown into north korea to witness the closure of the punggye—ri nuclear test site. pyongyang had earlier said that reporters from the south would be permitted to attend this week's ceremony, but they were excluded at the last minute. ben tracy from cbs news is among the journalists heading to the test site. of course, the reason we are here is to witness north korea shutting down its main nuclear test site and that is where north korea has conducted all six nuclear tests in recent yea rs. all six nuclear tests in recent years. it is a very remote and mountainous part of the country and we are told the journey may begin tonight, 11 hours on a train, four
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hours on a bus, an hour—long hike to the site itself. in addition to journalists, we are told north korea has not invited outside experts to witness what they claim is the closure of this facility. cbs news from bbc news in north korea. in hawaii, people are being warned to stay indoors with the windows closed, to limit exposure to toxic gases, as flows of molten rock have gathered pace. the kilauea volcano on the big island started erupting on may the 3rd but shows no signs of slowing. around 2,000 people have already left their homes. chris buckler is on the island. you can see just how deep the cracks in the ground go, close to where the fissures have opened up. this was a residential area road, now com pletely residential area road, now completely blocked, and the road itself has split apart, such is the force of the lava, and we are some distance from the fissures it sells.
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the devastation does not stop there. power lines have come down which of course is dangerous but one of the big concerns going forward are all of the toxic smoke and fumes coming off the fissures still active. that is why we are standing here with gas masks. at the moment, the wind is blowing in a different direction, but if it was to change direction, we could be in danger, that is why we could be in danger, that is why we are taking precautions. it is not just there, it is close to the sea, the sea water and the lava meet. that can create problems because again you get this toxic atmosphere with hydrochloric acid, known as the lava haze. but you get a real sense here when you just look at the road and you see the cracks that have emerged, just how powerful the volcano really is. let us catch up with the weather. many have sunshine at the moment
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especially across england and wales. more cloud further north in scotland, northern ireland. for many, look at the blue skies in bolton. that is a scene replicated for most of the country. in the far north—east of england, still coastal mist and fog, bit of cloud for scotland, northern ireland. north—western scotland and parts of northern ireland, it should be warmer than yesterday, chilly on the north sea coast. england and wales, temperatures into the high teens and low 20s. like yesterday, chance of heavy perhaps thundery showers in the south—east later this afternoon, they will clear for the evening, then we have coastal mist and low cloud moving in, further west through the night into central and eastern parts of the uk. that will tend to burn away through wednesday, for many of us, dry and bright with warm sunny spells, temperatures again in the high teens and low 20s.
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bye— bye. you are watching bbc news. ariana grande has tweeted thinking of you all as manchester marks the first anniversary of the arena bombing. hurricane has said it is a proud day for him to be named as england captain, the youngest to go to a world cup at 24. he thanked his friends, family and signed off. arsenal are set to appoint a spaniard as their new manager. he spent the last two seasons in charge of paris st germain and he has been unanimously chosen by the decision—makers at the
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emirates. patrick geary looks at his credentials. big break in management came at valencia. there was then a less successful time at spartak moscow before coming back to spain to manage sevilla, where he won the global league three times ina where he won the global league three times in a row. that impressed french side paris st germain. he missed out on the week in his first season, but then broke the world tra nsfer season, but then broke the world transfer record to sign name are. this season, he won all three domestic trophies in france, but have not impressed in europe. he will now move to his seventh job in management in his fourth different country. well, the appointment comes as something of a change in direction from arsenal. they had looked set to appoint their former player mikel arteta, who's now part of pep guardiola's coaching team at manchester city. 0ur sports news correspondent david 0rnstein explains the change of tack. we don't know the exact process
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behind arteta not getting the job, but it is clear that arsenal were. to completing the deal, and my understanding as they could have pressed the button at any point. they conducted a full and thorough interview process to find the best candidate, and i am told that emery was the unanimous choice of arsenal's decision—makers. they put their choice to the board of directors and it was decided that emery was the right man for the job. arsenal aren't the only club doing business in the managerial market. west ham have hired the former manchester city boss manuel pellegrini. here's how the club announced it on social media. pellegrini won the title with city in 2014, and takes over from david moyes, who left the club last week. he says he's excited, and is aiming to bring in "four or five" players to have a "strong team". jos buttler says he considered quitting white ball cricket to try and force his way back into the england test set up. buttler‘s been focussed on the short form of the game for the last couple of years, but has now been brought back into the england test squad
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for the first time since 2016, and will play against pakistan later this week. .it . it shows that people are very open—minded and that is not on one way into national selection. if anything, it should benefit guys because you can do it your way, you shouldn't be worried about taking the risk of saying, you know, if i go and play in a tournament somewhere that that is my red bull ambitions finished with. and a mammoth task faces great britain's ice hockey players at next year's world championship — the draw has been announced today. they'll face canada, the usa and finland in the group stages — world heavyweights of the sport and teams packed with superstars. gb were only promoted to the world group for the first time last month, and given this draw, they've been given little
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chance of staying up. though they say they'll travel to slovakia for the tournament — aiming to surprise people once again. that's all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. i will be back with more in the next hour. let's get more on our top story today — the first anniversary of the manchester arena attack. my colleague annita mcveigh is in manchester and joins us now. welcome back to manchester. manchester cathedral, just behind me. where this afternoon at 2pm, there will be a national service of communication, for the 22 victims of the manchester arena bombing. theresa may and prince william will be joining
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theresa may and prince william will bejoining theirfamily theresa may and prince william will be joining their family and friends at the service, along with many of the first responders, and others who helped in the immediate aftermath of the attack, and in the years since then. this will be one of two centrepiece events of the day in the manchester to commemorate this first anniversary and those who died. the p0p anniversary and those who died. the pop singer ariana grande, who had just finished performing at the manchester arena when the bomb was detonated, has treated to say she is thinking of the victims today and is sending her love and support to them. joining me now is rogers govender, the dean of manchester. thank you for your time today. could you begin by talking us through how you begin by talking us through how you have put this service together today? such an important event for the city. the service today is one
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of remembering together. that is a theme, one that has been developed with the families together with other officials in the city who have worked with us, and we tried to ca ptu re worked with us, and we tried to capture the need, to celebrate the lives of those who have died. at last at the same time holding on to the message of hope as we move forward together. it has taken a long time to develop the service, but i believe every minute working on it has been very worthwhile, and i think today we will see the culmination of that collaboration, those conversations in the service today. how important do you think it is for the people of manchester that we have national figures is for the people of manchester that we have nationalfigures like prince william coming to the service? the atrocity down the road from here is atrocity down the road from here is
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a national event, a national tragedy, and i think it is very important that the nation acknowledges what has happened in this city, and i think it is really good that the prime minister will be with us and that prince william will be with us together with the leader of the opposition, and nicola sturgeon and others. it shows that the care, and i think the people of the care, and i think the people of the city needs to know that there are leaders care about their situation. and their pain and their grief at this time. and leaders from different faiths will be taking part in the service, i know that is a very important aspect of it, that solidarity in the face of attacks that try to divide people. yes, we have a member of the hindu community, a member of the sikh community, a member of the sikh community, a member of the sikh community, a jewish rabbi community, a member of the sikh community, ajewish rabbi as community, a member of the sikh community, a jewish rabbi as well as somebody from the muslim community, one of imams will be participating
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in the service. and that interfaith element is very important, because the attempts to divide the community is something we want to thwart. we will not allow our city to be divided in any way, and i think interfaith participation in the service makes that very clear. saw it is good that we have members of different faith communities sharing in this act remembrance today. —— act of remembrance. thank you very much. you're very welcome. as one of the entrances to the cathedral, the pla nts the entrances to the cathedral, the plants and trees of hope, attached to them of the hexagonal honeycomb shapes, pieces of card, with m essa g es shapes, pieces of card, with messages written on them. one i noticed this morning said, it is ok noticed this morning said, it is ok not to feel 0k. and of course,
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talking of honeycomb and bees, the symbol of the humble worker bee, such a strong symbol of manchester before the attack, has been adopted since the attack as a strong symbol of unity. the past 12 months has seen the manchester bee come to represent the resilience that has characterised this city's response to the bombing. i used the logo of the "i heart mcr," and used a bee instead of the heart, so it is like manchester, so the bee is like the heart of it, and that was what kept us all going. adam was in the audience at the manchester arena concert last year. i heard a really loud bang, and everyone stopped for a second or two. then people started running in different directions. his school is one of six in manchester painting pebbles for the blue peter garden.
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it is a way for the students to remember, to commemorate, but also to honour this city's resolve. shauna was also at the gig. i think it is important that even a year later, we make sure that everyone knows, we are not forgetting about the people who passed away. i think for the victims and the families, it is important that we remember and we carry on raising money so they can get back on their feet as well as other people that have been affected by it. greater manchester police now say that 800 people were physically or psychologically affected by the attack that took 22 lives. the fund set up to help the victims has now reached more than £21 million. we have actually spent around £20 million of that out to families both bereaved and those seriously injured, as well as those with psychological trauma in the attack. i think it's notjust manchester, although of course i am very proud that manchester people gave very generously. we had money from all across the country and all across the world. people were really moved and wanted to offer support, but also solidarity with the people, with the victims of the attack.
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one of the most indelible ways people showed their support for those at the concert, and for their city, were the tattoos of the worker bee, a long—standing symbol of this industrious community. as queues formed outside tattoo shops, the donations rolled in. there were people queueing down the street. it was good how everyone was pulling together, everyone was in a good frame of mind really, so it was good to do something. and even as they queued, friendships were formed. this family have stayed in touch with others waiting in line last year. when the call comes, people just get together, and we all contribute and help one another. that is beautiful, all races, creeds, colours, genders, doesn't seem to matter. to be a collective having that one thing that unites everyone, and when
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you see someone with another tattoo, you say, "oh, i've got the bee". so it's a great thing to do. lovely. after an act that exemplified humanity at its cruellest, at its worst, so many stories now demonstrate humanity at its best. joining me now is diana fawcett, chief executive of victim support. thank you, and it is good that victim support has had such a role to play in the last year. a huge files. the incredible events in manchester, but within the context of other events in the country as well. so it has been a challenging time for our staff and volunteers, a real tea m time for our staff and volunteers, a real team event and a team effort that we have really come together to support the people who have been
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affected. tell us about the types of support you have been offering. three real rules, we have a 24—hour support line, open every day of the year, which began to take calls within a couple of hours of the event. —— three real roles. we also doa event. —— three real roles. we also do a lot of practical, organising transport for victims' families to come and visit them in hospitals, so thatis come and visit them in hospitals, so that is a very immediate response. we have a homicide service, which provides support to those who are bereaved, we work with families, and we have committed services around the country, who are today working with over 100 families who were affected by the manchester events alone. and in the aftermath of horrible events like this, anniversaries in particular can be a really difficult time for people. how specifically have you been
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helping people to deal with this anniversary? we have worked very closely with each individual client of ours to work out what their needs are. everything we do is completely focused on a specific individualised package, and everyone's needs are different. so we have been speaking to them ahead of the events as to what they would like to have put around them. in some instances, it has been one to one support, and summons and since, it has been group work. we have from group sessions for children and for adults, and particularly parents who asked porting their children going through this. these events can be uplifting, but they do sometimes bring it all back, so we have to prepare a release carefully to make sure but we are ready to meet the needs that present. thank you very much for yourtime, present. thank you very much for your time, diane forsythe, present. thank you very much for yourtime, diane forsythe, chief executive of victim support. —— diana fawcett. just to recap on those events today — the service at manchester cathedral starts
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at 2.00, with the national minute's silence at 2.30. that service will be attended by prince william, theresa may and jeremy corbyn, mothers, but the focus very much on the family and victims. —— among others. there's a choir sing—a—long in albert square at 7.00. some of those survivors have found it difficult to be in big crowds, so for many of them tonight, this may be the first time they have taken pa rt be the first time they have taken part in an event where there is a big crowd, so that'll be quite a for them. —— quite a moment. and at 10.31, bells will ring out across the city, marking the moment the bomb went off
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a year ago. and on the bbc news channel, at 1.45, we will bring you special coverage of the national service of commemoration here at manchester cathedral. and then this evening from 7.00, we bring you coverage of the manchester together commemoration event, marking one year since the manchester arena attack. back tojoe back to joe murnan back tojoe murnan now. ——back to joanna now. in a moment, a summary of the business news this hour, but first, the headlines on bbc newsroom live. events are held to mark
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the first anniversary of the manchester arena suicide bombing, in which 22 people were killed. the second day of the grenfell inquiry begins, with further tributes from families of the 72 victims who died in the fire. marks and spencer is to close 100 stores by 2022, as part of a reorganisation that it says is "vital" for the retailer's future. in the business news — marks and spencer has announced that it will close 100 stores by 2022, accelerating a reorganisation that it says is "vital" for the firm's future. more on this in a moment. the new york stock exchange has appointed its first female leader more than two centuries after it was established. stacey cunningham will be elevated to the leadership role from her current position of chief operating officer. her appointment means that both nyse and the technology—focused nasdaq exchange will now be run by women.
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tesco is removing "best before" labels from many of its fresh produce lines, which it says will help reduce waste. the supermarket will remove the advice from about 70 pre—packaged produce lines to avoid "perfectly edible food" being thrown away. the items that will lose the label include apples, potatoes, tomatoes, lemons, other citrus fruit, and onions. as we've been hearing, marks and spencer has announced today it's to close more stores. so what do we know? in all, 100 stores are to close by 2022. of the 100 stores, 21 have already been shut, and m&s has now revealed the location of 14 further sites to close. they include kettering, bayswater, and stockton. this is all part of a revamp that was started in november 2016. joining us now is maureen hinton, global research director at globaldata. why have they not been able to adapt
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toa why have they not been able to adapt to a digital age? because this is what it is all about, shrinking the shop floor and moving online.|j think it is notjust about moving sales online. they need to close the stores because they are unprofitable. costs are rising but sales are going down, so the need to get those sales online and also to its larger destination stores. but its larger destination stores. but it still has to deal with the fundamental issue of the fact that sales, especially in non—food, are falling. but it is not the retailer having trouble in the last few months. we have heard from mothercare and house of fraser that they are shutting down stores. is this part of a wider picture, or is marks & spencer in particular trouble? i think it is part of a wider picture. people are being much more careful with our spending, much
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more careful with our spending, much more selective, salts and the like primark which is doing well and is not even online. so the likes of house of fraser, those are more legacy stores that are doing so well, they are finding it much tougher. -- not doing so well. marks & spencer is known for its food store, there is the old adage of going into marks & spencerfor a dress and coming out with a salad, but they are also good to be closing some of theirfood but they are also good to be closing some of their food stores in the expansion. —— going to be closing. yes, surprisingly, it has found that food sales have not been going so well over the last couple of quarters. we will find out more tomorrow about how that is panning out. but it is looking at the overall picture and really, you have to look at your profits because there is so much squeeze on food prices at the moment, it has to be profitable, and space is expensive. we believe it there, thank you very
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much. marks & spencer not doing too well on the back of that news, and is in danger of being delegated from the ftse100 to danger of being delegated from the ftse 100 to the ftse 250. that's all the business news. since the global financial crisis, iceland has managed to turn itself into a major tourist destination. visitors from around the world are attracted by its natural wonders and low prices. so much so that there are now increasing warnings that the tourism boom is getting out of hand, endangering the natural environment and its way of life. lucy hockings went to find out more. icelanders call their country the land of fire and ice. mountains, geysers, glaciers and hot springs — iceland has it all.
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now the rest of the world is cottoning on. tourists now exceed the national population by 7—1. i was not prepared for how beautiful they are. i mean, just breathtaking. they're just absolutely gorgeous. i understand why they come here, because it's beautiful here. people come to gooafoss falls to marvel at the natural beauty and, of course, to get the ultimate selfie shot here in iceland. but it's hard to find a spot on your own. this is actually a quiet day, but on a busy day in the high season, up to 10,000 people can descend on the site. alone on the atlantic between europe and the us, iceland has become a dream stopover, and it's attracting a new type of traveller — the short—stay selfie tourist. we are getting a lot of tourists that stop here very briefly the environment isn't their first
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priority in any way and we are seeing a lot of littering but a lot of it, of course, isn't intentional. the recently elected prime minister is also concerned about the sustainability of such rapid growth and the damage to the environment. it's been very fast and we haven't actually managed to keep up when it comes to infrastructure around our natural spots of beauty. for example, building up the transport system, etc. so one of the key projects of this government is rebuilding that infrastructure. despite the criticisms, tourism has played a big part in helping iceland's economy get back on its feet after the financial crash in 2008. nearly 40% of employment is now related to tourism, and it has given the country's young people a reason to return home. i have been a waiterfor around ten years right now. so coming back, it's a good feeling. it's like coming home to your mum! so, and it is a great opportunity
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for my own career because of this — these tourists coming into the country. just like their viking ancestors, icelanders are adaptable. this is one of many new eco—hotels drawing people away from the hugely popular sites around the capital, reykjavik. but while tourists are focused on photos, icelanders know they have to find a balance between the explosion in tourism and preserving this magical country forfuture generations. lucy hockings, bbc news, iceland. there are a number of events happening today to mark the first anniversary since the manchester arena bombing. a service starts at 2.00, with a national minute of silence at 2.30. at 10.31 tonight,
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bells will ring out across the city marking the moment the bomb went off a year ago today. we will have full coverage of those events on bbc news. the headlines are coming up on the bbc news channel. in a moment, we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. first, we leave you with for a look at the weather. sun is shining across manchester at the moment, as it is across many parts of england and wales. this is the scene at devon at the moment, a bit of cloud in the sky, but further north and east, we have got some more cloud. some rather misty and murky conditions across some of these north sea coast areas. in scotland, quite a bit of cloud this afternoon, some cloud for northern ireland, but drier and brighter than yesterday. temperatures will be higher in the west. for england and wales, some cloud, and the risk of
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some sharp showers with some thundery downpour in the south—east this afternoon. many temperatures up into the high teens and low 20s, but cooler on the those north sea coast in the north—east. that will move southwards down the north sea coast into central areas for wednesday morning, so could be a great start to the day in central and eastern parts of england. but further west, some clearer spells. going into wednesday, high pressure firmly in charge once again. the overall picture is that it is dry and settled, but it will be some variations will call it at that. as i mentioned, some cloudy skies and murky conditions in central and eastern areas. elsewhere, the cloud will break up, but for many of us, some sunshine, and the temperature gradient, you can see the temperatures rising up, so a warmer
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day for many. temperatures around 20, 23 celsius, day for many. temperatures around 20,23 celsius, 19 day for many. temperatures around 20, 23 celsius, 19 celsius in the central belt. but the north sea coast, was a bit chilly, temperatures in the low teens. into first, this weather front moves in from the new continent, introducing some thundery rain as we go through thursday. so across southern england towards wales, the risk of some quite heavy downpours for a time as we go into the afternoon. elsewhere on thursday, more dry weather, more sunshine, a better day for scotland and northern ireland, and those temperatures for many once again up into the high teens to the low 20s. so as we go through this week, things are warm for many of us, but watch out for those heavy and thundery showers from time to time in the south. goodbye. this is bbc news. i'm annita mcveigh, live
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in manchester, as the city remembers those who died here a year ago today. the headlines at midday. events are held to mark the first anniversary of the manchester arena suicide bombing in which 22 people were killed during a concert attended by thousands of children and young people. at first, i thought it was a balloon because she let down loads of balloons, like, that big. and then i heard a girl in front of me shout, "it's a bomb!" prince william and theresa may will attend a memorial service this afternoon in manchester cathedral, and there will be a mass singalong in the city's albert square this evening. i'm joanna gosling. our other main stories this afternoon. the second day of the grenfell inquiry begins, with further tributes from families of the 72 victims who died in the fire. more store closures at marks and spencer — the retailer says it
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will shut 100 stores by 2022. hello and welcome from manchester where the city is marking the first anniversary of the manchester arena suicide bombing in which 22 people we re suicide bombing in which 22 people were killed. over my right shoulder in the background is the arena itself and immediately behind me, manchester cathedral, where a national service of commemoration will take place this afternoon, attended by the families of those
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who died and also by the prime minister and by the duke of cambridge who will deliver one of the readings. in the service at two 30p, and the nipples that silence will be observed across the uk —— at 2:30pm, a minute's silence will be observed. messages have been attached to the trees written on pieces of hexagonal card, honeycomb shaped, reminding us of the worker bee, the symbol of industrial manchester, but a symbol that since the attack has come to remind us all of the solidarity and community spirit shown in the wake of that attack. of course, it was after a concert by ariana grande that the suicide bomber detonated his device and she has the people of manchester
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in her thoughts today. she has tweeted, saying she is thinking of all of those affected, thinking of the altered —— thinking of you all today and every day. well, our correspondent has been looking back to the 22nd of may last year and she has been talking to a mother and daughter who were at the concert that night. here is their story. pips sound. police in manchester say a number of people have been killed and others injured at manchester arena after at least one explosion was reported. we've just heard from greater manchester police that they are linking this to terrorism. every time i close my eyes, ijust see it and hear it. the only way i can describe it was ants out of a colony. that noise went off and then everyone just went silent and then everyone just started running. for leanne and her daughter, lainey,
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it's still very raw. i heard a massive bang. at first, i thought it were a balloon because she let down loads of balloons, like, that big. and then i heard a girl in front of me shout, "it's a bomb!" it was a terrorist attack that claimed the lives of 22 people. the youngest was just eight years old. hundreds like leanne have needed intensive therapy. i went suicidal, i couldn't cope any more. if i wouldn't have gone to that session, i don't think i'd be here. that's the first time i've said that in front of lainey. the attack was carried out by this man, salman abedi. the bomb he carried contained nearly 2000 pieces of metal. prosecutors have asked for his brother, hashem, to be extradited from libya. there is a warrant for his arrest. negotiations are tricky,
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they're delicate, they're being carried out by the government and it's for them and the libyans to work that through. i would just hope that we are able to see a trial in the uk because of the families of the victims, and those injured and traumatised. one, two, three. after her experience, leanne is studying to be a mental health nurse. both she and lainey are travelling to manchester today, a city coming together to reflect. let me show you the front cover of today's manchester evening news, the symbol everywhere around the city, the worker bee, forming a heart—shaped, the names of the 22 victims were below. the mayor of
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manchester andy burnham has been speaking and reflecting on the past year. obviously difficult day for everybody, mixed emotions. you go back to how you felt at the time. i remember walking up to the town hall and what i call the most difficult of dawns after the darkest of nights and the feelings come back today. but as i say, one year on, we are stronger. what i feel is that feeling i have had all year of pride in this place, in the people. manchester was and is a beacon of hope i think around a very divided world, that in those moments, it is possible to find a unified response and that makes me intensely proud. and a little earlier, i spoke to a paramedic from the north west ambulance service, the first paramedic on the scene at manchester
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arena on the night of the attack and i began by asking him for his recollections of the night. i think i can asking him for his recollections of the night. i thinki can speak for all of my colleagues when i say that for me and for them, over the past few weeks, as the anniversary comes closer, a lot of thoughts and feelings from last year have been resurfacing. it is something i do not think any of us will fully deal with, certainly neverforget, not think any of us will fully deal with, certainly never forget, just how awful it was and what happened year ago, it certainly does not seem a year ago, year ago, it certainly does not seem a yearago, it year ago, it certainly does not seem a year ago, it is amazing how quickly it has come around. but really it has just been a case of trying to remember what was important, remembering the 22 people who lost their lives, remembering all of the people injured, still dealing with their injuries, and all of the families and friends of those who lost their lives and what they are dealing with. and you are a
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professional but i am sure you and your colleagues have talked to each other about this to support one another, perhaps even sought counselling yourselves. yeah, i certainly do not mind saying i have had counselling and it really helped me deal with the incident. i have not moved on from it completely, but certainly counselling and talking to collea g u es certainly counselling and talking to colleagues who understood, who were there, something that has helped me hugely. that was a paramedic from that the north west ambulance service. let me recap for you the events coming up. two big set piece events. the service at manchester cathedral starts at 2pm with the national minute's silence at 2.30pm. there's a choir singalong in albert square at 7pm. reminiscent of the vigil and the
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singalong in the immediate aftermath of the attack last year. and at 10.31pm, bells will ring out across the city, marking the moment the bomb went off. and on the bbc news channel, at 1:45pm, we will bring you special coverage of the national service of commemoration here at manchester cathedral. and then this evening from 7pm, we bring you coverage of the manchester together commemoration event marking one year since the manchester arena attack. i spoke earlier to the dean of manchester cathedral, the very reverend, and he was talking about the various faith leaders who will be making a contribution to the service this afternoon and he said to me, we will not be divided, and i think that has been very much the
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message that has come out of manchester right since the attack last year and in the long, hard months since then, as the community has really united and shown solidarity and support for those affected, the bereaved and those who suffered injuries, some life changing, and deep psychological trauma as a result of the terrible night. more from as soon. —— more from us soon. the public inquiry into the grenfell tower fire continues into its second day this morning. family and friends will remember the dead in what have been called pen portraits, made up of speeches, photos and videos about their loved ones. the presentations are designed to ensure that the inquiry never loses sight of what its work is for, and why it is important. 0ur news correspondent,
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tom burridge, joins us now from the inquiry in west london. i think it is worth mentioning the courage, the huge courage, i think, the families yesterday and so far today have shown in coming to this hotel and the beginning of the public inquiry to pay tribute to their loved ones killed in the grim —— the grenfell fire. they have shared incredibly personal moving stories that go back throughout the lifetime of those people that they tragically lost. this morning, we first heard about debbie, flat 161 of g re nfell tower first heard about debbie, flat 161 of grenfell tower and we have heard the words of her mother, mary, 79, read out on behalf of her by her friend, and we learnt about debbie being someone with a smile on the face, someone whose laughter could be heard before she even entered a
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building, someone who was a joy to be with, and in the words of her mother, mary, she described herself now as an old lady who has been left with nothing since the death of her daughter —— her mother, miriam. we heard from nicholas burton, the husband of a 74—year—old, she was described as someone who was flamboyant, she loved to dress with a great sense of style, known well within the area, a big personality in the hospital she worked in, but she suffered from dementia in the final years of her life and nicholas burton described the sheer trauma, the effect the fire had on his wife before she died saturday injanuary of this year. she was a very beautiful and could have chosen anybody, really. ido beautiful and could have chosen anybody, really. i do not know why she chose me. we both fell asleep on the sofa watching a dvd and i work
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to discover the building was on fire. but i can say it was impossible to carry my wife down about 40 flights of stairs. so we had to wait to be rescued. when i got to the royal free, she was in a terrible state. i was suffering badly from the effects of inhalation, i later learned her body was cut and bruised all over. but the trauma had a terrible effect on her dementia. and she was very distressed. how do you explain what had happened to a person in a condition like hers, that our house had gone, that our dog had gone, our good friends and neighbours may have passed and many friends were
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missing? and that her parents pupils ashes which we kept in the flat had gone —— her parents' ashes. everything was gone. describing in such powerful terms the effect the fire had on his wife before she sadly died in january. fire had on his wife before she sadly died injanuary. we havejust heard about three members of the same family who died, a woman and her two young daughters, aged five and three, and we heard from her sister who described her as a generous person, someone who sister who described her as a generous person, someone who would buy an expensive piece of clothing and then someone might say they liked it and she would give it to them, insisting. she was a beautiful soul, said her sister, someone who love to laugh, and she shared those personal details about growing up in egypt where they were born, making
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pizza together, fighting with the flour, the kind of personal details we have heard yesterday and today which give you a sense of how important these first two weeks after the public inquiry, setting the tone and it is hoped the tone will remember through the public inquiry, which will last possibly into 2020, it will consider hundreds of documents, technical details about the refurbishment of grenfell tower in the years running up to the terrible fire, the effect of the cladding, the plastic call which was flammable, what effect it had on the rapid spread of the fire which claimed so many lives. when the inquiry gets bogged down by precise details inevitably, scientific details, i guess, then it is hoped the victims, the 72 victims, will remain at the forefront of the work of the public inquiry. thank you very much. if you want to find out more about the grenfell tower inquiry, eddie mair is presenting a podcast every day the inquiry sits
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which looks in detail at what's been said and heard each day. you can download it from the bbc iplayer radio app, itunes or your podcast provider. the headlines on bbc newsroom live. events are held to mark the first anniversary of the manchester arena suicide bombing, in which 22 people were killed. the second day of the grenfell inquiry begins, with further tributes from families of the seventy two victims who died in the fire. marks and spencer is to speed up a programme of store closures, shutting more than 100 by 2022. sport with john watson. good afternoon. the build up to the world cup continues, news today of harry kane's appointment as england captain. the world cup next month, he will be the youngest captain england have ever had at a world cup
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the and manager gareth southgate says he has belief and high standards setting an example to the rest of the team. this is what he had to say on social media, he said it isa had to say on social media, he said it is a proud day to be named as england captain, the youngest ever at 24. he also thanked his friends and family and signed off with three lion emojis. arsenal are pointing the new manager. he has been unanimously chosen by the decision—makers at the emirates over the former arsenal player. the story was broken yesterday. he does not speakfluent was broken yesterday. he does not speak fluent english so that could bea speak fluent english so that could be a potential issue but he does fit in quite nicely to arsenal's new continental structure, happy to work in that. people say he is unproven in european competition because he could not take paris st germain beyond the last 16 of the champions league. manuel pellegrini won the title with
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manuel pellegrini won the title with man city in 2014. he takes over from david moyes. he said he is excited. aiming to bring in fourfive players to build a strong team. he will miss england's tour of south africa. he received his first call—up earlier this month. a mammoth task faces great britain ice hockey players. the draw has been announced today world heavyweights of the sport and team is packed with superstars. team gb were only promoted to the world group for the first time last month and they say
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they will travel to slovakia for the tournament to surprise people once again. you can keep up—to—date with the latest on the bbc sport website. ministers are understood to be considering whether to scrap some of the controversial nhs reforms introduced in england in 2012. the changes handed gps more powers over budgets by abolishing primary care trusts and replacing them with local, nick leg commissioning groups. the reforms were widely criticised. 0ur health editor is in westminster. tell us what they are thinking about. it was back in 2013 when the reforms were introduced, highly controversial, there was a big political debate and row at
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westminster over them, but the coalition pushed them through and essentially the power over commissioning groups largely run by gps and other aspects were not popular private medical companies coming in to take tenders conservative ministers have acknowledged they have not worked and they have been completed and costly. we' re and they have been completed and costly. we're hiring it wildly about whitehall about possible changes, now it is emerging that as part of a long—term funding plan which theresa may and jeremy hunt want to announce probably this summer, there will be changes to the original reforms and that will be largely aboutjoining up that will be largely aboutjoining up local care so locog health organisations and hospitals and other health trusts can work better
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and provide a morejoined up solution and bits of the reforms will be scrapped which is quite a big acknowledgement that it was not done as well as it should have been backin done as well as it should have been back in 2013. send government but a different person in charge. was this expensive to put in place. —— same government. it cost millions of pounds to create all these new groups and entities like public health england, that was too costly and the benefits have never really been proved. it will not be the whole thing being scrapped, it will be bits of it, ally morejoined scrapped, it will be bits of it, ally more joined up local care to emerge. but it will be embarrassing, jeremy hunt was part of the government that voted in, as was may. hunt took over as health secretary as the act was being
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informative and has had to defend it for the last few years. now there will be some aspect of it which will be dropped, and the line will have to be, those bits all we got wrong. but we will have to see precisely what bits are dropped or we legislated that when this overall plan for the nhs in england is unveiled, probably from july onwards. thank you. north korea is on the verge of fulfilling its promise to de—commission what's thought to be the world's only active nuclear testing site. around 20 reporters from western and chinese news organisations — seen here at a beijing airport — have been invited to witness the event. this is what we know about where they're going. the punggye—ri facility is north korea's dedicated test site for nuclear weapons. it has a system of tunnels — which journalists will see being collapsed. the complex has been used for six nuclear tests since 2006. the site was last used in september when pyongyang claimed to have tested a hydrogen
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bomb, triggering a 6.3 magnitude earthquake. last month, chinese geologists claimed the nuclear site had partially collapsed under the stress of multiple explosions, rendering it unusable. 0ur colleague at cbs news ben tracy is going to be visiting the site. he filed this brief update from north korea. of course, the reason we are here is to witness north korea shutting down its main nuclear test site, where it has conducted all six of its nuclear tests in recent years. it is a and mountainous part of this country, and we are told that ourjourney there may begin tonight. it is 11 hours on a train, four hours on a bus, and an hour—long hike to the site itself. in addition to journalists, we are told that north korea has not invited any outsiders to witness this. since the global financial crisis, iceland has
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managed to turn itself into a major tourist destination. visitors from around the world are attracted by its natural wonders and unusual landscape. so much so that there are now increasing warnings that the tourism boom is getting out of hand, endangering the natural environment and the country's way of life. the country's prime minister has expressed her concern about the growth into risen. it has been very fast, and we have not managed to keep up when it comes to infrastructure around our natural spots of beauty, for example. although the transport system etc. so one of the key projects of this government has been —— will be building up that infrastructure. well, to discuss this and the wider issue of over—tourism i can speak to harold goodwin, who is the founder of the international centre for responsible tourism. are you concerned about the impact of tourism in iceland?”
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are you concerned about the impact of tourism in iceland? i am. i do not think it is unique to iceland. 0ne not think it is unique to iceland. one of the difficulties as tourists are able to travel more cheaply because of the growth in budget airlines and the charters and the consequences people are spending a lot of time travelling to many different destinations for a short period of time and when they get there, they want to go to the honeypot sites and iceland has the golden ring which means it is significantly over visited. what impact does it have? when you say over visited, we are looking at pictures which showed a small group of tourists and very wild areas with very little habitation. what does over visited mean in numbers terms. the pictures you are showing are mainly of the natural sites and you we re mainly of the natural sites and you were showing the sheer beauty of them, they are very beautiful, but them, they are very beautiful, but the tourist themselves are contained in quite small areas around the sites so you get trampling impact
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and you get people jostling to take photographs of themselves, they are after a trophy photograph, you get a lot of discontent among the tourists and you are looking at the tourists here in the broad, natural environment, but when they go back into the capital, they come to dominate what is a small city very quickly. that takes away the sense of it being a social space for the community as well as for tourists. which other areas have been similarly affected? the most famous is barcelona, closely followed by venice. it became a political issue in barcelona in the elections a couple of years ago. although in fairness to barcelona, they had seen the problem coming, showing pictures now from barcelona, they were aware of the issue long before it reached political prominence and they had begun to work on ways of dealing with the problem. how does it get dealt with? in the end, as you say, cheap flights, people like to go the
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mini breaks, cheap accommodation too? yes, all of those things, and the growth of air b&b and the other parts of the economy, increases space available. it is difficult, you end up dealing with particular issues at particular times, issues around the particular sites, issues about what kinds of transport you allowed to arrive, in what numbers. you could restrict the number of cruise liners coming in. in the end, you're dealing with a whole series of different issues, no one way of dealing with this. thank you for talking to us. air pollution caused by wood burning stoves is being targeted as part of the government's new clean air strategy. the stoves have become increasingly popular in recent years, but they are also a source of airborne particles, which can cause serious health problems. 0ur environment analyst, roger harrabin, reports. filthy air has become a national crisis with angry parents demanding action. the government has been dragged
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through the courts over failures to tackle nitrogen dioxide pollution, mainly from vehicles. today's consultation, though, concentrates mostly on other pollutants. take solid fuel fires — a big problem in winter. the government says it will prevent the dirtiest of solid fuels being burned, but it doesn't say how. wood burners add to air problems too. a government source said they would not be banned but people would be encouraged to burn dry wood, which pollutes less. campaigners say the plans, so far, are too vague. ministers reject that. by taking steps both to reduce petrol and diesel cars on our roads but also to deal with everything from wood—burning stoves to the pollution generated by ammonia in agricultural land, we are doing everything we can in order to ensure the next generation lead healthier lives. here's one area where the government has promised decisive action. farms are the main source of ammonia — an irritant gas that forms particles which get sucked deep
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into the lungs. farmers will be paid to clean up. but the air pollution issue is not settled yet. roger harrabin, bbc news. now the weather. good afternoon. do not take the spring sunshine for granted. 0ne minute, you might be enjoying blue skies, and then the storm clouds could gather, potentialfor thunderstorms today and particularly the rest of the week, especially thursday and friday. this afternoon, just one or two very isolated showers and storms that could break out in southern england, wales, and elsewhere, a fair amount of sunshine. tonight, missed and mark rolling in from the north sea —— mist rolling in. by the west, largely clear skies. not particularly cold. tomorrow could
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get after quite a great —— a great start. then we will see a lot of sunshine tomorrow, brighter than it is today. and in northern ireland, again, small chance of thunderstorms in the south. plenty of warm sunshine taking us into the weekend but still the risk of thunderstorms, particularly in the south. this is bbc newsroom live. our latest headlines — ariana grande has tweeted "thinking of you all" as manchester marks the first anniversary of the arena bombing. 22 people were killed and hundreds injured in the attack at the concert attended by thousands of children. at first, i thought it were a balloon, because she'd let down loads of massive balloons, like that big. and then i heard a girl in front of me shout, "it's a bomb". the second day of the grenfell inquiry has begun, with tributes continuing from families to some of the 72 victims who died in the blaze. marks and spencer has
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announced it is to close 100 stores by 2022, accelerating what it calls a "vital" reorganisation. 21 have already been shut and a further 14 have been named today as being earmarked for closure. ministers are considering scrapping some of the controversial nhs reforms introduced in england six years ago. the reforms handed major spending powers to gps. the symbol of the humble worker bee has always represented manchester, but after last year's arena bomb attack, it brought feelings of unity. john maguire reports. the past 12 months has seen the manchester bee come to represent the resilience that has characterised this city's response to the bombing.
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i used the logo of the "i heart mcr," and used a bee instead of the heart, so it is like manchester, so the bee is like the heart of it, and that was what kept us all going. adam was in the audience at the manchester arena concert last year. i heard a really loud bang, and everyone stopped for a second or two. then people started running in different directions. his school is one of six in manchester painted pebbles for the blue peter garden. it is a way for the students to remember, to commemorate, but also to honour this city's resolve. shaunna was also at the gig. i think it is important that even a year later, we make sure that everyone knows, we are not forgetting about the people who passed away. i think for the victims and the families, it is important that we remember and we carry on raising money so they can get back on their feet as well as other people that have been affected by it. greater manchester police now say that 800 people were physically or psychologically affected by the attack that took 22 lives.
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the fund set up to help the victims has now reached more than £21 million. we have actually spent around £20 million of that out to families both bereaved and those seriously injured, as well as those with psychological trauma in the attack. i think it's notjust manchester, although of course i am very proud that manchester people gave very generously. we had money from all across the country and all across the world. people were really moved and wanted to offer support, but also solidarity with the people, with the victims of the attack. one of the most indelible ways people showed their support for those at the concert, and for their city, were the tattoos of the worker bee, a long—standing symbol of this industrious community. as queues formed outside tattoo shops, the donations rolled in. there were people queueing down the street. it was good how everyone was pulling together, everyone was in a good frame of mind
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really, so it was good to do something. and even as they queued, friendships were formed. this family have stayed in touch with others waiting in line last year. when the call comes, people just get together, and we all contribute and help one another. that is beautiful, all races, creeds, colours, genders, doesn't seem to matter. to be a collective having that one thing that unites everyone, and when you see someone with another tattoo, you say, "oh, i've got the bee". so it's a great thing to do. lovely. after an act that exemplified humanity at its cruellest, at its worst, so many stories now demonstrate humanity at its best. let's go live now to manchester. i
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am outside the cathedral where the service will take place at 2.00 this afternoon. i am joined service will take place at 2.00 this afternoon. iam joined by service will take place at 2.00 this afternoon. i am joined by two survivors of the manchester arena bombing, robbie and his daughter teagan, who is 12. your doctors called you the miracle lad. yes, but i think he is a miracle workerfor what he did to me. you are incredibly gravely injured as he waited to collect your children. incredibly gravely injured as he waited to collect your childrenlj waited to collect your children.” was ina waited to collect your children.” was in a comma for three weeks in hospitalfor was in a comma for three weeks in hospital for four months. perhaps you could tell the viewers that a piece of shrapnel hit your heart. yes, i had it waged between my front and back wall. and teagan, how are you doing? what help of you received
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since the night of the concept? the school arranged counselling for me to help for what happened, to make sure i'm 0k. to help for what happened, to make sure i'm ok. and i bet your friends have been a big support. what have they done for you? just asking if i wa nt they done for you? just asking if i want to go places and asking if i'm ok to want to go places and asking if i'm 0k to go somewhere. they asked me just yesterday if i'm 0k. 0k to go somewhere. they asked me just yesterday if i'm ok. really good friends, and how is it for you being amongst crowds?” good friends, and how is it for you being amongst crowds? i went to my first concert after the bombing, and andl first concert after the bombing, and and i was a bit panicky and all that, but at the end of the night, it was all right. ijust got used to it. you are very brave, and i am sure you are very it. you are very brave, and i am sure you are very proud of your daughter, robby. tell us how the year since the attack has been. daughter, robby. tell us how the year since the attack has beenm has been tough, but we cannot let them beat ours. he crossed a line,
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he went for kids, so we have to prove that we cannot be beaten. tegan has come to concerts and she will go again, and i will go with her. what do you think of the support, the solidarity that has been shown in the last year? unbelievable. i am from merseyside, it is in my dna not to get on with manchester people, but they have been fantastic, they could not do enough for me. i've had no help from the government but the bond fund has enough for me. i've had no help from the gove up—to—date he bond fund has enough for me. i've had no help from the gove up—to—date figures, fund has enough for me. i've had no help from the gove up—to—date figures, thei has enough for me. i've had no help from the gove up—to—date figures, the we 5 the most up—to—date figures, the we love manchester emergency fund, that
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raised over £2 million injust the first 24 hours after the bombing. the total now is £21 million. i have now joined i have nowjoined by the chair of the we love manchester fund. after we had raised £2 million in the first 24 hours, we realised we would need something bigger than the justgiving page. so with the help of the red cross, we set up the fund. how did you go about managing something of this scale and making sure that the money went to people who needed it when they needed it? it was difficult. we learned from other funds that have been set up, but there has not been anything on this scale in the uk. so we concentrated on believed families
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and people who had been injured and need financial support. we made the first payments from the fund within a week. what else is that money towards apart from going directly to bereaved families and injured people? it has mainly gone to bereaved and injured people, but also for psychological trauma as well, which we think israeli important. we are now looking support networks for people affected by the attack so we can help as many people as possible. we know that every penny need to go to the families and the people who need it most, and we are determined to do that. do you think this fund is something that will last? will it be a permanent thing helping other worthy causes? there is lots of discussion about that. we have spent almost all the money we've received, and we want to make sure that it still goes to people who need it. what will happen in the future, i'm not sure, but the fund itself shows how generous people are and they
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wa nt to how generous people are and they want to show their solidarity, and how people will really stepped up to help others. good to talk to you, and thank you for your time, councillor sue murphy chair of the we love manchester fund. just over there at one of the entrances to the cathedral, those are just two of the trees of hope that you can see, those hexagonal honeycomb shaped cards that people have been able to write messages on attached, and that forms part of a trail of hope, the trees of hope trail, stretching from the cathedral all the way down towards victoria station and of course manchester arena, which you can see just beyond in the background. allow me just to take you through the timetable for the event threw today. here at the cathedral at 2.00, at national service of commemoration. it will be attended of course by the families,
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the believed families, and many people involved in the emergency effort after the attack, but also will see theresa may, jeremy corbyn, and prince william, who will do love one of the regions. during the service at 2.30, there will be a nationwide minute's silence to remember the victims. a little later, at 7.00 in the city centre, there will be a singalong reminiscent of what happened in the days following the attack, everyone remembers that the jewel where the crowd spontaneously broke into song,, don't look back in anger, and then the one love concert organised by ariana grande and her manager, and then the song again tonight when clients including the manchester survivors, willjoin their voices
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together in remembrance of course, but also in a celebration of life continuing and people getting through difficult times. and at 10.31, the exact moment that the attack happened, bells will peal out across manchester to remember the arena attack. we will have special coverage of the national service of commemoration from 1.45 on the bbc news channel and also at 7.00 tonight, special coverage of the choir is coming together, manchester together, from 7.00, so please stay with us throughout the day, the first anniversary of the manchester arena attack, for all of that coverage. from me, back to you in the studio. marks and spencer has announced further store closures this morning as the company continues a re—organisation which it says is "vital" for its future.
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currently, it has just over 1,000 stores, and it plans to close 100 stores by 2022. 21 stores have already closed since november 2016. m&s wants to move a third of its sales online, and plans to have fewer, but larger, clothing and homeware stores. earlier i spoke to our business correspondent vishala sri—pathma and asked her about the reason behind this closures. the idea is to shrink the shop floor, shrink the space they have devoted to high—street selling of fashion and homeware and try to convert it into digital sales and online sales. they have struggled with that in the past few years. what has been happening in the stores? we have seen is marks & spencer has struggled in terms of sales, as have other retailers. in the last week, mothercare, house of fraser, they are shutting down stores, in terms of the broader picture, consumerspending is going down, inflation is high. but marks & spencer specifically, relative to its peers, looking at, say, 0cado, online retailer, asos,
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they have managed to grow in market value and now they are worth more than marks & spencer. their position now in the ftse100, top 100 companies in the country, is now looking fragile, lost a quarter of its share price and they could risk relegation to ftse 250. in terms of sporting analogies, a bit like being relegated from the premier league to the first division, like man united being relegated. it seems incredible, but it is on the cards. how far it has fallen, how things have changed. it used to be the bellwether that we would all look to for the signs of where the high street was going. exactly. 0ver ten years ago, turning quite a healthy profit, but the high street has changed so much in the last 10, 12 years and online sales have taken the lead and they have not been able to adapt and even the likes ofjohn lewis, for example, in terms of relativity of what they have converted
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to online sales, john lewis is doing better, next is doing better, so it has a lot of work to do and the chief executives and chairman have been pretty open about that. the headlines on bbc newsroom live — events are held to mark the first anniversary of the manchester arena suicide bombing, in which 22 people were killed. the second day of the grenfell inquiry begins, with further tributes from families of the 72 victims who died in the fire. marks and spencer is to close 100 stores by 2022, as part of a reorganisation that it says is "vital" for the retailer's future. police drivers in england and wales could soon have more legal protection if they are involved in a crash. the home office has developed the plans after a surge in crimes involving scooters and motorbikes in the last three years. our home affairs correspondent,
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danny shaw, reports. should a police officer behind the wheel be treated differently to other motorists? these police in kent are taking part in advanced driving training. in this exercise, the white skoda is the target vehicle. the three police cars perform what's known as a hard stop, boxing the skoda in and arresting the suspect. but police are concerned their skills in training are not recognised by the law. they carry out 10,000 pursuits across england and wales every year. if they break the speed limit orjump a red light while pursuing a criminal, they can be prosecuted — just as a member of the public can. now the home office is planning to change that. police driving skills and training will be taken into account by investigators. police will have to show their tactics are necessary and proportionate and they will be assessed by the standards of other competent police drivers, not by the standards of other motorists.
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police officers will always operate within the training, within the law. and what it will mean is that they will have the confidence that, when they are discharging their duties, that they are going to be judged against somebody with the same amount of training and knowledge and skill that one of their colleagues would have rather than a member of the public. the home office also wants to dispel what it says is the myth that police can't pursue a moped or motorcycle rider who isn't wearing a helmet. the law will be amended to make it clear that a biker without a helmet is responsible for their own decision to drive dangerously. danny shaw, bbc news. the funeral of supermarket sweep host dale wilton is taking place later today. the tv presenter will be laid to rest in a humanist memorial service in london on what would have been his 63rd birthday. many celebrities are expected to attend, including his close friend christopher biggins. he died last month aged 62. an australian court has found a catholic archbishop guilty
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of concealing child sexual abuse in the 1970s. philip wilson, the archbishop of adelaide, is the most senior catholic in the world to be charged and convicted of the offence. our correspondent hywel griffith has more from sydney. and this cincinnati one, n australia, not only because of the elevated position of archbishop philip wilson, but also because of the precedent it sets, and the possibility that more complainants may come forward to say that they, too, were ignored or their claims of abuse were not handed on to the police in time. we have heard a lot about this in the evidence to the royal commission here in australia over the last few years. philip wilson's case goes back to the 1970s when he was an assistant parish priest. a 15—year—old boy came to him saying he had been sexually assaulted several times by a paedophile priest in the parish. philip wilson did nothing. instead
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of going to the police, he simply did not act. we also understand that three other victims came forward, but again he did nothing, and when there are cases were urgently investigated by the police are decades later, again, he did nothing. a magistrate said that he decided, instead of handing over any evidence, to protect the name and reputation of the church. now he has issued a short statement saying he will take in today's decision. he does have the opportunity to appeal, but the next court date for him will be sentencing next month, the prosecution saying that they will look for a jail sentence, and that could be for up to two years. philip wilson is still the archbishop of adelaide, a very senior figure wilson is still the archbishop of adelaide, a very seniorfigure in australia, and the college of bishops has said he has maintained his innocence throughout, therefore he has not yet been condemned by the
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established church here. but this will pose the question, not only maybe for the church in australia, but for the vatican, too. how does that response to allegations of concealing abuse allegations? it is an accusation which the catholic church has faced in several countries. now to hawaii, where people are being warned to stay indoors with the windows closed to limit exposure to toxic gases, as flows of molten rock have gathered pace. just to give you an idea of how much lava is coming out of the ground — take a look at these arial pictures. the fissures are as wide as roads, and stretch for hundreds of metres. the molten rock has now made its way to the sea, creating a new danger for people living nearby. it reacts with the water to create a toxic, acidic cloud of steam, and also forms tiny particles of glass, which can be highly hazardous to those who breathe them in. 0ur correspondent chris buckler is on hawaii's big island, and sent this report. after a rotting from deep beneath
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the ground of the silent, lava has now reached the ocean, and to get here, it has destroyed all in its path. —— erupting. molten rock stands more than 20 feet high, where it has claimed the land, still burning and still deeply dangerous. you can see how roads have become cut off, because this is a huge mound of lava that has made its way down from the various fissures, the cracks in the ground that has opened up, and the lover has simply filled it out. the smoke and fumes are toxic, but that is not the only worry. “— toxic, but that is not the only worry. —— the lava. sections of this scorched surfers are still being split apart. we are concerned about the possibility of additional fissures opening up, or even lava that might be travelling below the surface. the lava is continuing to
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jet out at a ferocious rate, and the flow of molten rock is on the getting faster. geologists are predicting that the fountains of lava could reach more than 180 metres in height, three times higher than before. even to get into the evacuation area, you had to be escorted by the hawaiian national guard. and all who live near here know that they cannot ignore the volcano. you can hear the fissures, you can hear the explosions, all night and all day. lately, we have had about 100 earthquakes a day. the biggest one we have had so far was 6.9. this is a spectacular landscape, but beneath these craters, it is continuing to be shaped. preserve
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craters, it is continuing to be shaped. - preserve the urgent action to preserve the monument. it is one of the seven wonders of the world, but is the taj mahal looking slightly less wonderful than the four? the monument was constructed from white marble in the 17th century, but activists say it is now turning yellowy—green, thought to be due to pollution. the taj mahal is one of the world's leading tourist attractions, drawing as many as 70,000 people a day. but campaigners fear increasing numbers are being put off. because of the taj mahal is dying, we are getting worse day by day, so we request that the government does something to protect the taj. the government has been
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criticised for not doing enough to protect the moderate. it has ordered authorities to take urgent action to fix what it describes as a worrying change in its colour. we are proud of it, but if indian scientists can't fix this, they should be able to contact foreign experts. in the meantime, the clean—up is already under way to return india's monument of eternal love to its gleaming best. the tv streaming service netflix is forming a storytelling partnership with barack forming a storytelling partnership with ba rack 0bama forming a storytelling partnership with barack 0bama and michelle 0bama. it says that the couple will work on documentaries and other issues the pursued in office. the banners will have the option to produce scripted and unscripted series. —— the 0bamas. in a moment,
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the news at one, but first, the weather. don't take sunshine for granted this week, because you may enjoy a scene like this one minute, the storm clouds may then gather with a threat of some summer storms. “— thunderstorms. we have also got cloud around across parts of scotland, northern ireland and north—east england, some murky conditions close to some north sea coast. further south, some more sunshine, temperatures up to 23 or maybe 24 celsius, but going through the rest of the afternoon, the increasing risk of one or two showers. i say one or two, this is how it looks in our high—resolution weather model, some isolated showers but if they do crop up, they could be heavy with some thunder and lightning mixed in, particularly across the south of england, but perhaps in two parts of wales as
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well. going through this evening and tonight, staying largely dry, any showers in the south will fade, but the fog will move in from the north sea towards many eastern and central parts of the country, not particularly cold as we start wednesday morning, but quite murky across some central and eastern areas. that should move back towards the north sea coastal areas throughout the rest of the day, and then a lot of sunshine to be had. a brighter day for scotland and northern ireland. cooler. the eastern coastal areas, something of an easterly breeze, but away from here, warmer, temperatures up to 23 or maybe 24 celsius, 19 celsius in edinburgh, the one relatively widespread. 0n edinburgh, the one relatively widespread. on thursday, the potential for this band of showery rain to move northwards. could be some thunder and lightning mixed in, and some heavy downpours, too. further north, dry weather with some sunshine, temperatures in belfast and edinburgh up to 20 or 21
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celsius. that sort of whether texas to the end of the week, bands of showers pushing up from the south could bring summer storms, but the high pressure could keep things in the north largely dry with some sunshine. and some very warm air coming in from the near continent. so the forecast for the weekend, a loss of one sunshine, but still the risk of some thunderstorms, particularly in the south. —— lot of warm sunshine. remembering the 22 victims of the manchester terror attack, a year ago today. a special service at manchester cathedral will be held this afternoon — attended by the families of the victims and survivors of the attack. i've been invited to go to the cathedral, so i have to go to that, you know what i mean? for them people, i have to go. because they will never be forgotten, ever. i'm here at the cathedral, where
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hundreds of people are due to begin arriving soon before the national service of commemoration which is due to begin in the next hour. we'll be hearing how survivors are coping one year on. also this lunchtime: marks and spencer is to close 100 stores over the next four years — it says the closures are vital for the compa ny‘s future. rules to curb pollution from household woodburners are part
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