Skip to main content

tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  May 22, 2018 3:10pm-6:00pm BST

3:10 pm
she would visit me every saturday morning and she would always bring me two scratchcards, and she would say, "i don't know why i'm bringing you these scratch cards because we don't need money. we are so lucky with what we've got." that is how she was, happy. she was happy with her friends, with herjob, with her life, with her neighbours, with living in ladbroke grove. and that's the cruel thing, she did not want more. she felt blessed. debbie was an exceptional, extraordinary person. and i was completely blessed to have her as my daughter. this is my husband... originally from spain, pily burton was one of the first people to live in grenfell tower in the 1970s. she and her husband were rescued from the burning building but she died in hospital. i adored her, and we shared it with everybody around us. she was an exceptional
3:11 pm
person, and that... this tragedy took away her dignity and everything that we had in this world. rania ibrahim and her daughters fathia and hania hassan lived on the 23rd floor. through an interpreter, rania's sister is now looking for answers. to this day, the questions remain in my mind and plague me about what exactly happened. it is very important for me to take part in this process of questioning, of finding out the truth. it is so important for me to understand how it could come about that i have lost rania. lives from around the world were the heartbeat of the grenfell community, people who travelled far and wide and made west london their home.
3:12 pm
adina campbell, bbc news. tom burridge is at the inquiry in west london for us. a second, very difficult day, tom? yeah, ithink a second, very difficult day, tom? yeah, i think it's important for us to recognise the courage relatives are showing common here, because they are notjust are showing common here, because they are not just showing short tales about loved ones. most of the state m e nts tales about loved ones. most of the statements we are hearing about those who were killed in the fire long personal tributes. there are poems sometimes, there are stories, very personal stories, about childhood, details of lives, family holidays. this afternoon we've been hearing from relatives. we've heard from more relatives this afternoon following yesterday. a picture of two incredible more women, happy, ambitious, successful. mary was a
3:13 pm
mother and they lived together in flat 173 grenfell tower. the voice you are about to hear is that of a solicitor speaking on behalf of her cousin. i want to say a few words about my sister, mary, and my niece. they both lived on the 20th floor of g re nfell tower. they both lived on the 20th floor of grenfell tower. tragically, they both lived on the 20th floor of gre nfell tower. tragically, both they both lived on the 20th floor of grenfell tower. tragically, both of them passed away in the file on the 14th ofjune them passed away in the file on the 14th of june 2000 them passed away in the file on the 14th ofjune 200017. —— in the fire. mary was the first of my siblings to settle permanently in this country. she came over here with my mother many years ago. by the time i moved here, mary was already living in gre nfell tower and i used to spend a lot of time with her there i used to spend a lot of time with herthere and i used to spend a lot of time with her there and with my niece. when i heard about the fire at granville, i
3:14 pm
was full of dread. —— at granville tower. and when i heard mary and my niece were missing, i was devastated. i simply could not and cannot come to terms with their loss. they were bothjust cannot come to terms with their loss. they were both just such lovely women. a tribute there. earlier this morning we also heard about other victims of the fire. we heard about debbie lum pro, described as somebody who always had a smile on herface. a lot of described as somebody who always had a smile on her face. a lot of that could be heard even before she got into a room or a could be heard even before she got into a room ora building. we could be heard even before she got into a room or a building. we also heard about maria del pilar burton, who was in the tower, she was rescued along with her husband, nicolas, but she suffered burns and she had been suffering from dementia and the fire had a traumatic impact
3:15 pm
on her, and we heard a very moving tribute from her husband. she was described as an incredible woman, somebody flamboyant, somebody who seemed to know everyone on the famous portobello road here in west london. and we also heard about three members of the same family, a mother and her two daughters aged five and three. a family whose roots we re five and three. a family whose roots were in egypt. we knew the mother came over with her sister and we heard a very moving tribute from her sister. we can hear part of that now and the voice you are hearing is that of an interpreter. it is very difficult for me to think or talk about what came next. it has been so hard. after that terrible night came a cruel time of full scope and i’uitioui’s. a cruel time of full scope and rumours. i came
3:16 pm
a cruel time of full scope and i’uitioui's. i came here a cruel time of full scope and rumours. i came here thinking i would be able to lay my loved ones to rest. there were months of uncertainty before they were identified and buried. to this day, questions remain in my mind and plague me about what exactly happened. it is very important for me to take part in this process of questioning, of finding out the truth. it is so important for me to understand how it could come about that i have lost her. my beloved sister. my children, who are still so sister. my children, who are still so young, have lost their cousins. i cannot lay them to rest yet. the voice of an interpreter speaking on behalf of the sister of a woman who died in the fire. like yesterday, it has been incredibly moving all day. the tributes are hard to hear but inspiring in many ways, and you have to just feel for the family members. they've come with great courage and
3:17 pm
determination in their quest to find the truth because the public enquiry will go on from here. there are two weeks when all family members have the opportunity to give tributes to their loved ones who were lost in their loved ones who were lost in the fire and after that the real evidence, if you like, about the fire and the causes and the construction of the building, the refurbishment of the building, why the fire spread so quickly in claiming so many lives, that will begin. the idea is that these two weeks will serve to keep the victim is high in everyone's minds as the enquiry macro proceeds. and if you wa nt to enquiry macro proceeds. and if you want to find out more about this, the mayor is doing a pod cost every day which will look into the detail into what is being heard and said every day. you can download it from the app or from your pod cost provider. just to bring you some breaking
3:18 pm
news. just hearing that in the first conviction of its kind, a mother from birmingham has been found guilty of two council forced marriage. she caused her daughter into marrying a man 16 years older than her in pakistan. she threatened the teenager with black magic if she didn't do what she said or told anybody about the marriage. neither can be named for legal reasons. 45—year—old defendant has been convicted and her daughter, who is the third of four children born in britain, they return to the uk. it transpired the girl was also pregnant. the woman faces two counts of forced marriage and is also charged with perjury. she originally told the girl when she was 17 she was being treated to a family holiday but it transpired she planned for her to marry her new husband's nephew, a 33—year—old pakistani national. we will bring you more on that later. the food industry has failed to meet
3:19 pm
a sugar reduction target set by the government, a report by public health england has found. retailers, manufacturers and restaurants were told to cut 5% of sugar by august 2017 in a bid to tackle the uk's childhood obesity crisis, and cut 20% of sugar from a range of products by 2020. let's cross to salford now and talk to our health correspondent dominic hughes. this is very embarrassing, isn't it? it doesn't look good, does it? the food industry was challenged, as you say, to make these reductions in a number of different groups of foods, particularly aimed at children in a bid to sort of try to tackle the growing epidemic of childhood obesity, and so these were looking at things like cereals, chocolate bars, things that are particularly popular with children, and it covered both manufactured goods, own brand goods in supermarkets and food thatis brand goods in supermarkets and food that is served in restaurants, cafes and the like. what it has found is
3:20 pm
that public health england has done a review of what has happened over the first year of this effort to try to reduce the sugar by a fifth by 2020. the target for the first year was 5%. it has found the goods it looked at only managed 2%. and obviously it says, well, public health england says it is an encouraging first step but a lot of groups campaigning on obesity says this is extremely disappointing and a lot more pressure needs to be put on the food industry. i should add that public health england has said there are many changes, re—formulations, changing the ingredients of food on sale, on offer, in the pipeline. that hasn't a lwa ys offer, in the pipeline. that hasn't always been reflected, or those changes have been reflected in the first year they were looking at. they say those changes are still to come so they say those changes are still to come so it's an encouraging first step. but is this a case of
3:21 pm
companies can't reach the targets or can't be bothered to reach the targets 7 can't be bothered to reach the targets? it is interesting. some food groups like cereals or yoghurt 01’ creme food groups like cereals or yoghurt or creme fraiche or sugary spread, there have been some significant improvements. they have met or exceeded that 5% target for the first year. but if you look at the top 20 bestselling sugary brands, more than two thirds of those either saw no reduction or even an increase in sugar content! so obviously it's a very, very mixed picture. thank you very much. marks & spencer has announced it will close 100 stores across the uk by 2022. the retailer says the closures are part of a reorganisation which it says is "vital" for the firm's future, after several years of disappointing financial results. the store closures will affect m&s clothing and home stores. here's our business correspondent emma simpson. it's been a presence in this corner of north london
3:22 pm
for more than 100 years, but not for much longer. this shop is going, along with 13 others, the latest m&s stores to close. i think it's terrible. i'm always in the shop. it's a great shop, why is it closing? i'm really shocked, i'm totally gutted. it's going to change the community completely. when my local branch closed down, it felt like the whole of wood green just shut down as well. it'sjust such a shame. marks & spencer has seen falling sales and rising costs, and more of its shoppers going online. in november 2016, the new boss announced an overhaul of its stores. what we want to do is change marks & spencer and become more relevant for our customers, so we are reflecting the changes of people shopping more online, and probably in the future marks & spencer will need less space for its clothing and home ranges. back then, he said there
3:23 pm
would be 60 fewer clothing and home stores by 2022. today, that's been upped to 100. it's got too many stores that aren't making enough profit for it. costs are going up but sales are going down, so it needs to look at its store estate and get rid of the unprofitable ones. here is one of 21 stores that have already closed. a business that wants to be in fewer but better locations. our high streets are undergoing unprecedented change. people are shopping less in physical stores, but the costs of running them have gone up. eroding profitability and pushing some other traditional retailers to the brink. today, the bank of england governor spoke of the challenges facing the industry. the steady growth of online, much less foot fall, and as a consequence of that, there are a number of retailers left with legacy assets and costs that make them uncompetitive.
3:24 pm
marks & spencer says these changes are vital for its future, but it will mean yet more gaps to fill on high streets already under pressure. and yet more jobs at risk. emma simpson, bbc news. campaigners say a government plan to halve the number of people exposed to high—particle pollution in england by 2025 does not go far enough. ministers wants to curb smoke from wood—burners as well as pollution from diesel machinery. critics say there is a lack of detail and that the government is passing the buck to local authorities. here's our environment analyst roger harrabin. filthy air has become a national crisis with angry parents demanding action. the government has been dragged through the courts over failures to tackle nitrogen dioxide emissions, mainly from vehicles. today's consultation says too little about car pollution
3:25 pm
for the liking of campaigners. what the strategy fails to do is provide incentives and support to people to move away from just using vehicles. we need cleaner vehicles and fewer vehicles on the road. in fact the government's consultation document today deliberately takes a broad approach to many sorts of pollution. by taking steps both to reduce petrol and diesel cars on our roads but also to deal with everything from wood—burning stoves to the pollution generated by ammonia on agricultural land, we're doing everything we can to ensure the next generation lead healthier lives. that's a welcome relief for the motoring lobby. we welcome michael gove looking at other sources of pollution, what we are looking for is drivers, 37 million of them not getting hit hard in the pocket again. here's another area the policy will address — farms are the main source of ammonia, an irritant gas that forms particles that get sucked deep into the lungs. the gas comes off animal slurry. farmers will be paid to curb it.
3:26 pm
household fires are addressed, too. along with wood stoves, they cause 38% of sooty particle pollution. the dirtiest sort of coal is likely to be banned nationally, although the open fires will still be allowed. wood burners will still be permitted but the government will encourage people to burn dry wood that emits less smoke. how do you tell whether wood is fit to burn or not? this silver birch was cut recently, there are a fewer marks on it where it's drying but it's not ready yet. this, on the other hand, was cut much longer ago, it's got heavy cracks, and this is what's known as starring. this wood is dry enough to burn. the question is, how on earth can the government enforce rules over what people burn in their own homes? today's document will address some pollution issues in the uk but it leaves many questions in the air. roger harrabin, bbc news.
3:27 pm
spectacular fountains of lava continue to erupt from hawaii's mount kilawya. civil defence authorities are preparing to evacuate local residents and geologists say the volcano is expected to become even more active, spewing greater volumes of lava and toxic gas into the atmosphere. 0ur correspondent chris buckler is on the island. after erupting from deep beneath the ground of this island, lava has now reached the ocean, and to get here it has destroyed all in its path. molten rock stands more than 20 feet high, where it has claimed the land. still burning and still deeply dangerous. you can see how roads have become cut off, because this is a huge mound of lava that has made its way down from the various fissures, the cracks in the ground that have opened up and the lava has simply fountained out.
3:28 pm
the smoke and fumes are toxic, but that's not the only worry. sections of this scorched surface are still being split apart. we are concerned that there is the possibility of additional fissures opening up, or even lava that might be travelling in tubes under the surface that could spring up elsewhere. the lava is continuing to jet out at a ferocious rate, and the flow of molten rock is only getting faster. geologists are predicting that the fountains of lava could reach more than 180 metres in height, three times higher than before. even to get into the evacuation area, we had to be escorted by the hawaii national guard. and all who live near kilauea know they can't ignore the volcano. you can hear the fissures, you can hear the explosions, all night and all day.
3:29 pm
lately we've had about 100 earthquakes a day, the biggest one we had so far was 6.9. this is a spectacular landscape, but beneath these craters it is continuing to be shaped. chris buckler, bbc news, on the big island of hawaii. time for the weather with ben rich. good afternoon. don't take the spring sunshine for granted over the next two days because while there will be more scenes like this there will be more scenes like this there will be more scenes like this there will be storm clouds ahead at times as well, with the risk of some scattered thunderstorms. a few showers and thunderstorms breaking out this afternoon across southern areas of england and perhaps into wales. elsewhere, lots of dry weather, lots of sunshine and some cloud across northern ireland and scotland. rather murky conditions spread in from the north sea into
3:30 pm
central parts of the british isles. further west, clearer spells. a murky start the central and eastern areas during tomorrow. that will then roll back towards the north sea coast and then a lots of sunshine to be enjoyed. still the potentialfor heavy showers down towards the south and temperatures at 19, 23 in cardiff and london. towards the weekend, a lot of sunshine but showers and thunderstorms at times. this is bbc news. our latest headlines: hundreds of people have attended a service in manchester cathedral to remember the 22 victims of last year's bomb attack at an ariana grande concert. survivors and relatives of the victims were joined by the prime minister and prince william. relatives of some of the 72 victims of the grenfell fire have been giving moving tributes to their loved ones, as the inquiry into the grenfell disaster enters its second day. marks and spencers is speeding up plans to close stores. the business is to close
3:31 pm
100 stores by 2022, 21 of which have already been shut and a further 1a have been named today. the food industry has failed to meet a sugar reduction target set by the government to tackle childhood obesity. public health england says that in many cases food retailers have managed just 2%. air pollution from wood burning stoves may be targeted in the government's new clean air strategy. local councils in england may be given new powers to curb their use. sport now on afternoon live withjohn watson. and harry kane is the captain of the england squad. less than a month to go until the world cup, england's squad are in their training camp, and we now know who'll captain the side in russia. harry kane becomes the youngest ever captain for england at a world cup at the age of 24. he's scored 12 goals in 23
3:32 pm
appearances for his country, manager gareth southgate says he has "belief and high standards" and that will set an example to the rest of the team. kane has been on social media this morning, he says that it's a proud day for him to be named as england captain. he also thanked his friends, family, and signed off with three lion emojis. the sqaud preparing to depart for russia on the 12thjune. thank you for that. let's talk about arsenal. they seem to be quite close to naming a replacement for arsene wenger. arsenal are set to appoint the unai emery as their new manager. the spanish coach has spent the last couple of seasons incharge of paris saint—germain, and before that sevilla. despite former player mikel artetat in the running, emery was said to be the "unanimous choice" of the arsenal board. patrick gearey takes
3:33 pm
a look at his credentials. unai emery‘s big break in managing came at valencia. he took them to third in la liga. he was then at moscow before coming back to spain to manage seville. he won the europa league three times in a row. he missed out on the league in paris, but broke the transfer record to sign neymar. they haven't impressed in europe. he will now move to his seventh job in europe. he will now move to his seventhjob in in europe. he will now move to his seventh job in management in europe. he will now move to his seventhjob in management in his fourth different country. and they would turn to the champions league will be a must if he takes over. arsenal aren't the only club doing business
3:34 pm
in the managerial market, west ham have hired the former manchester city boss, manuel pellegrini. here's how the club announced it on social media. pellegrini won the title with city in 2014, and takes over from david moyes who left the club last week. he says he's excited, and is aiming to bring in "four or five" players to have a "strong team". let's have a look at some of today's other sports news. the wasps flankerjack willis could be out for up to a year because of a knee injury. the 21—year—old was hurt during saturday's premiership semifinal. it means he'll also miss england's tour of south africa after recieving his first call—up earlier this month. a number of scarlets players haven't trained ahead of their pro 1a final because they suffered burns during the semifinal. scarlets say the burns happened on glasgow warriors' artificial pitch. the warriors say they're happy with the pitch but one scarlets player says such surfaces should be "illegal".
3:35 pm
british number three cameron norrie will play in the singles at queen's after being awarded a wildcard. six of the world's top ten are due to play in the tournament this year. spinner dominic bess says he won't be putting any pressure on himself if he makes his test debut against pakistan at lord's on thursday. bess has only played 16 first class matches for somerset but was called into the england squad last week. he's only been to lord's once before, and didn't even play. i was iwasa i was a 12th man, so i enjoyed lunches and stuff. we were tucking into lunch last year. i think i put on quite a bit of weight then. amazing, and amazing occasion. it was my first time properly up here in london. i was a bit of a tourist as well. a big moment ahead of his first
3:36 pm
test. that's all the sport for now. we'll have more for you in the next hour. ijust want i just want to bring you ijust want to bring you some news from the newswires, that tesco is shutting down tesco direct, which will put 500 jobs at risk. there will put 500 jobs at risk. there will be plenty more that in our business news, i'm sure. a national service of remembrance has taken place in manchester to mark one year since the attack at manchester arena. my colleague, annita mcveigh, is in manchester and joins me now. thank you very much. we are still outside the cathedral where that national service of commemoration ended about half an hour ago. prince william and theresa may are still
3:37 pm
inside the cathedral. we knew beforehand that they would be staying to talk to breed families and survivors, so those conversations are continuing right 110w conversations are continuing right now inside the cathedral. it was an incredibly moving service. we heard from amongst others from students who read a poem entitled four lost friends, may we lose no one from our lives. we heard from representative is of multiple faiths, recognising the solidarity that manchester has shown in response to this attack one year ago today. movingly, we saw those 22 candles, one for each of the victims. those candles were made from the wax candles left by members of the public innocent and square ——
3:38 pm
in saint anne's square. there was one lit candle on the altar, for those who remain. you will remember in the days following the attack at the arena, there were many conversations about how to talk to children about all of this. of course, so many of children about all of this. of course, so many of the victim support children, the youngestjust eight, and many teenagers as well amongst the victims. and also amongst the victims. and also amongst the victims. and also amongst the injured. joining me now. . . anna krala is childline's service manager based in salford and shejoins me now. thank you for taking the time to talk to us. you will remember those conversations going on about how to talk to children about something like this. in the days after the attack, you received hundreds of
3:39 pm
calls from children, didn't you? we received over 200 calls in the days afterwards from children and young people of many ages, different ages, most of them talking about fear and anxiety, feeling scared. really, they couldn't understand why this had happened. no, a lot of confusion. i think, had happened. no, a lot of confusion. ithink, as had happened. no, a lot of confusion. i think, as you said earlier run, these are children and young people and in their world they have never experienced anything like this before. why would someone set out to deliberately attack somewhere where there would be so many young people? yeah, completely not understanding why there are so many bad people and why they would want to do this. there was a lot of confusion, a lot of fear and a lot of questions that needed answering. what we need to remember is that we need to go back to that child's world, do what they understand. this is the first time they will have
3:40 pm
experienced something as traumatic as this. we need to remember that there are lasting effects. when you talk to children, you need to talk to them in their language. for you and your staff, this must have been incredibly difficult. 0bviously, you're trained to deal with difficult conversations and subjects, but you must have been going through this as well. of course. we have some amazing councillors, but our main aim is to listen. we are there out child lying to listen to what children and young people are saying. we can support them if we feel we cannot do that, we will refer them somewhere else. but we are there to listen to them. at least for those conversations, putting your own feelings to one side. absolutely. there is support for our councillors as well. we need
3:41 pm
to be there when young people want to be there when young people want to talk. in the months since then, have the numbers of calls tapered offa have the numbers of calls tapered off a little? i don't know that figure. we monitor calls all the time, but! figure. we monitor calls all the time, but i wouldn't know the exact figures. i would time, but i wouldn't know the exact figures. iwould imagine time, but i wouldn't know the exact figures. i would imagine they will be rising after the events of today, and we will have people ready to listen to young people. 0k, thank you for your time. amongst the crowds gathered outside the cathedral as he waited for the service to begin, and during the service, i saw many t—shirts with the worker bee symbol, which became a symbol of the solidarity and the huge community spirit that emerged. it was always there, of course, but
3:42 pm
was at the forefront after the attack as people rallied around the injured and the survivors. and the families of those who were last in that awful event. john maguire has been looking at the worker bee symbol, and this is his report. the past 12 months has seen the manchester bee come to represent this city's response to the bombing. i'd used a bee instead of the heart shape. it is at the heart of it and thatis shape. it is at the heart of it and that is what has kept us going. adam was in the audience at the manchester arena concert last year. i heard a really loud bang and everyone stopped for a second or two. people just started running in different directions. his school is one of six painting pebbles for the
3:43 pm
blue peter garden. it is a way for people to remember, commemorate and remember the city's resolve. sean was also at the gate. it is important that even a year later it make sure we have not forgotten people who have passed away and the families. it is important that we carry on raising money so they can get back on their feet, as well as other people who have been affected by it. greater manchester police now say that 800 people were physically or psychologically affected by the attack that took 22 lives. the fund set up to help the victims has now reached more than £21 million. we have actually spent around £20 million of that on families, both grieved and those are seriously injured, as well as people with psychological trauma. it is notjust manchester, although i am proud of the manchester people giving generously. we have that money from
3:44 pm
all across the country and the world. people were really moved and wanted to offer support and solidarity with the victims of the attack. one of the most indelible ways people showed support for those at the concert and their city were the tattooed is of the worker bee, a long—standing symbol of this industrious city. the donations rolled in. there were people queueing down the street. it was good how everyone was pulling together, and it was all in good spirits and everyone was in a good frame of mind with each other. it was good to do something. even as they queued, friendships were formed. the dayton family have stayed in touch with others waiting in line last year. when the call comes, people get together. we all contribute and help one another. that is beautiful. all races, creeds and colours, genders. it is great.
3:45 pm
having that one thing that unites eve ryo ne having that one thing that unites everyone and when you see someone with another tattooed, you think, i have got the bee. it is a great thing to do. after an act that exam provide humanity at its coolest and its worst, so many stories now demonstrating humanity at its best. john maguire reporting, and that worker bee symbol you saw is sure to be in evidence tonight at the mass singalong, which starts in albert square at 7pm this evening, where the atmosphere here at the national service of commemoration was obviously and fittingly a very sombre one, i suspect the mood tonight will be an altogether different one, perhaps more akin to that manchester concert that we saw a couple of weeks after the attack.
3:46 pm
thousands of voices raised in harmony we expect, lots of choirs involved, including the survivors choir, made up almost entirely of survivors of the arena attack. behind me in manchester cathedral, the prime in a standard prints willie, neither of them has left yet. they are still talking to the briefed families was the —— the prime minister and prince william. behind me, you can see the westgate, those trees of hope, that trail that extends here from the cathedral all the way along towards victoria station at manchester arena. as i mentioned earlier, we had for many people in the service today but also from the bishop of manchester, david walker, who said one of his main aim
3:47 pm
is today in the service was to let all of the bereaved families know and to let all of the survivors know that there was going to be a co nsta nt that there was going to be a constant care for them, a promise to a lwa ys constant care for them, a promise to always remember them and help them going forward. for the moment, from manchester, back to you. thank you. police drivers in england and wales could soon have more legal protection if they are involved in a crash. the home office has developed the plans after a surge in crimes involving scooters and motorbikes in the last three years. our home affairs correspondent, danny shaw, reports. should a police officer behind the wheel be treated differently to other motorists? these police in kent are taking part in advanced driving training. in this exercise, the white skoda
3:48 pm
is the target vehicle. the three police cars perform what's known as a hard stop, boxing the skoda in and arresting the suspect. but police are concerned their skills in training are not recognised by the law. they carry out 10,000 pursuits across england and wales every year. if they break the speed limit orjump a red light while pursuing a criminal, they can be prosecuted — just as a member of the public can. now the home office is planning to change that. police driving skills and training will be taken into account by investigators. police will have to show their tactics are necessary and proportionate and they will be assessed by the standards of other competent police drivers, not by the standards of other motorists. police officers will always operate within the training, within the law. and what it will mean is that they will have the confidence that, when they are discharging their duties, that they are going to be judged against somebody with the same amount of training and knowledge and skill that one of their colleagues would have rather than a member of the public. the home office also wants to dispel what it says is the myth that police can't pursue a moped or motorcycle rider who isn't wearing a helmet. the law will be amended to make
3:49 pm
it clear that a biker without a helmet is responsible for their own decision to drive dangerously. danny shaw, bbc news. in a moment, the business news with ben bland. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. hundreds have attended a service in manchester cathedral to remember the 22 victims of last year's bomb attack at an ariana grande concert. 0n the second day of the grenfell inquiry relatives of the victims of the fire have been giving moving tributes to their loved ones. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. marks and spencer has announced that it will close 100 stores by 2022, speeding up a reorganisation that it says is "vital" for the firm's future. more on this in a moment. it's always nice having more money coming in and having to borrow less —
3:50 pm
and that's the position the government finds itself in. it borrowed £7.8 billion in april — sounds a lot but that's actually the lowest april figure since 2008. the deficit — the difference between what the government gets in and what it spends — was 2% of gdp last year, the lowest it's been since 2002. it's after years of austerity and restricted spending to try and reduce public borrowing. breaking news in the last few minutes — tesco says it will close its loss—making site tesco direct. tesco says 500 jobs are at risk. let's have it now, because we are getting more news about tesco. this isa getting more news about tesco. this is a bit ofa getting more news about tesco. this is a bit of a surprise to a lot of people, because it was issued that anything to do with online was an asset. let's be clear about this. they are talking about tesco direct. this is
3:51 pm
the armed that sells technology, homewares and clothing, separate from the grocery shopping site, which will remain. so this is not food. no, it wants to concentrate on food, which is why it will close tesco direct. they say that 500 jobs will be at risk. this is our after they reviewed the whole site, and they looked at ways of making it profitable but they cannot see a way to do that. they are saying that a lot of the challenges it faces have come from the high costs of fulfilment and delivery and online marketing. that is why it is taking this decision. they say they remain committed to bringing a range of merchandise to customers in—store and online, at tesco .com. that is the grocery store online. the boss
3:52 pm
says they want to offer their customers the ability to buy groceries and non—food product in one place, which is why they are focusing their investment into one online platform. it looks like streamlining. they will not get rid of all of their online offering, because that will be another move given that the focus seems to be online rather than in—store. that is something you will be talking about two guests later run. marks & spencer. this is radical. as we've been hearing, marks and spencer has announced today it will close more stores as part of its restructuring programme. in all, 100 stores are to close by 2022. this is all part of a plan by m&s to move a third of its sales online and it plans to have fewer, larger clothing and homeware stores in better locations. now, of the 100 stores, 21 have already been shut and m&s has now revealed the location of 1a more sites that will close, and they include kettering, bayswater, and stockton.
3:53 pm
this revamp started in november 2016. but the retail stalwart has a fair way to go to turn around its fortunes. this seems to fit within the wider picture of a struggling retail sector, doesn't it? you're right, some big names — toys r us and maplin both fell in to administration in february. carpetright and new look are planning to close stores, and the restaurant chains jamie's italian, prezzo and byron burger are also doing the same. a few weeks ago, we heard that house of fraser is also closing stores to try and stay afloat. but back on the m&s closures specifically, we've been at the holloway road store, which is closing after 105 years, asking shoppers there for their response. iam i am really shocked. i'm totally gutted. it will change the community completely. wendy wood green rudge,
3:54 pm
my local branch, closed down it felt like that the whole of wood green shut down as well. it is a shame. like that the whole of wood green shutdown as well. it is a shamelj don't see why it is closing. i'm sorry about that, i think it is terrible. i think it isjust the way that neighbourhoods change, isn't it? people want different things. if people are not using the shop, it's good if something they want more comes instead. the view of some shoppers at the holloway road stall of marks & spencer. joining us now is lara marrero, the global retail practice leader at the design, planning and consultancy firm, gensler. what is it they have done to end up in this position? it is not what they have done wrong as much as they need to stay ahead of the pace of change and take a strategy about looking at the assets they can reposition to fit consumer
3:55 pm
need. there was a feeling that there we re need. there was a feeling that there were some things they could have done, and their online offering was not as good as it could have been in the face of competition. you have got to think of it as a cohesive journey throughout the entire customer experience and what has happened is it was bifurcated to some extent. now they are placing a focus on the online experience, getting back to the court, it gives them an opportunity to make the stores matter more and become more experiential and give people a reason to come back in. the other thing is squeezed incomes, and there was not much that the retailers can do about that. we have onlyjust seen wages do about that. we have onlyjust seen wages starting to overtake price rises on average. sure their offer is seen to be good value, that is one of the tricky things that has been facing the high street in recent yea rs. pa rt recent yea rs. part of it is that people with about
3:56 pm
—— people will vote with time. you have an option as to whether you can spend your time in a place we can hang out and eat with friends or whether you buy a product or goods that exchange. you have choices to make about time, and that is why it is more important that people really deliver on experiences. thank you. the ftse100 has ventured further into record high territory. m&s shares down after announcing their store closure plans. a tile company has seen their prices
3:57 pm
go up. 0il rose towards $80 a barrel. time for a look at the weather. here's ben rich. good afternoon. don't take spring sunshine for granted this week, because while you may be enjoying a scene like this, one minute with some blue skies overhead, the storm clouds may then gather with the threat of some thunderstorms. that will take us through the rest of this week. we also have quite a lot of cloud around for parts of scotland, northern ireland and north—east england. some misty, murky conditions close to the north sea coasts. further south, a fair at a sunshine with temperatures up to 23 or 2a degrees. through the rest of the afternoon, the increasing risk of one or two showers and thunderstorms. this is how it looks on the high resolution weather model, some very isolated showers, but if they do crop up they could be really ha p py but if they do crop up they could be really happy with thunder and lightning mixed in, especially
3:58 pm
across the south of england but perhaps reaching into wales as well. this evening and tonight, it will stay largely dry. any showers will fade. this mist and murk and fog will roll in from the north sea towards many eastern and central parts of the country. not particularly cold as we start wednesday morning, but it will be murky across central and eastern areas. through the day, that should roll back towards the north sea coastal areas and then a lot of sunshine to be had. a brighter day for scotland and northern ireland. cool close to eastern areas with an easterly breeze. away from that, some decent temperatures to be had, 23 or 2a degrees. 19 degrees in edinburgh. the warmth relatively widespread. thursday, the potential for some showery rain to move northwards. some thunder and lightning could be mixed in with some heavy downpours. the further north you are, looking at better
3:59 pm
conditions. this is what takes us through to the end of the week. bands of showers push—up from the south, with some thunderstorms, but the further you are, the closer you are toa the further you are, the closer you are to a area of high pressure. we will also be dragging some warm air in from the near continent. the forecast for the weekend brings a lot of warm sunshine, but still the risk of some thunderstorms, particularly in the south. hello, you're watching afternoon live. i miss imissa i miss a call. today at four — prince william and the prime minister join families and survivors for a national service of commemoration at manchester cathedral to mark the first anniversary of the arena bombing. a minute's silence was held to remember the 22 people who were killed by the attack at the end of an ariana grande concert. in manchester, the city looks ahead
4:00 pm
to the manchester together with one voice event this evening where thousands will gather in the city centre to remember the anniversary. relatives of the victims of the grenfell fire make moving tributes to their loved ones, on the second day of the inquiry into the disaster. marks and spencer is to close a hundred stores over the next four years — it says the closures are vital for the compa ny‘s future the food industry fails to meet a sugar reduction target set by the government to tackle childhood obesity. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport withjohn watson. harry kane is the name. it is the totte n ha m harry kane is the name. it is the tottenham striker who will lead england at the world cup. gareth southgate announcing to his squad last night that he will captain the tea m last night that he will captain the team in russia. and ben rich has all the weather —
4:01 pm
ben some good weather but also some thunderstorms to come. i will have all the details to come. thanks, ben. also coming up — we'll be talking to the bbc‘s local news teams about how they've been covering the anniversary of the of the manchester arena attack. hello everyone — this is afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. a national service of remembrance has been held in manchester to mark the first anniversary of the attack at manchester arena last may.
4:02 pm
22 people — many of them children — were killed in a suicide bomb attack. families and friends of those who died, as well as survivors, politicians and the duke of cambridge attended the service at manchester cathedral. my colleague annita mcveigh is there. simon, thank you very much. good afternoon from manchester. around 800 people attended the hour long service at manchester cathedral prince william and the prime minister theresa may are still in there, about an hour after the service ended, talking to bereaved relatives and survivors of the attack on the 22nd of may last year. during the service we saw 22 candles on the altar lit in memory of the victims. those candles, interestingly, made from the wax of the candles left by members of the
4:03 pm
public in the saint and's square in the days after the attack. —— saint anne ‘s square. there was another candle. that we were told is for those who are left behind. we heard from two students during the service. they read a very moving poem for lost friends reflecting on the loss of so many young lives after the ariana grande concert that night. closed between us may we be able to view our lost friends with eyes wise with calming grace forgive them the damage we were left to inherit free ourselves from the chains 0f forlorn resentment bring warmth again to
4:04 pm
where the heart has frozen in order that beyond the walls of our cherished hurt and our chosen distance we may be able to celebrate the gifts they brought learn and grow from the pain and prosper into difference wishing them the peace where spirit can summon beauty from wounded space. among the politicians and dignitaries in attendance was the duke of cambridge, there was an appreciative round of applause for him earlier from the people who gathered and waited respectfully while the service was taking place. during that service prince william read from some very
4:05 pm
well—known bible verses. the gift of love. ifi if i speak in the tongues of mortals and of angels but do not have love i am a noisy gong or a clanging cymbal. and if i have prophetic powers, and understand all mysteries and all knowledge, and if i have all faith, so as to remove mountains, but do not have love, i am nothing. and the address was given by the reverend dr david walker, the bishop of manchester. he said he wanted to assure those left behind of a constancy of care. for some big teams the priority for the period ahead —— some victims
4:06 pm
will be fighting the loss they have suffered. for some it will be about accepting a new direction for life. in both cases, relationships will be different and friendships forged that were not otherwise the case. yet each and every life has full and equal value. 0ur task as the wider community gather around the manchester victims and their family is to enable each to the make their choices and live their lives to the fullest extent. the magnificent sum raised by the charity appeal will help but it will be our emotional support in good times and bad along with our utter determination to see them as not reduced or made lesser iwobi have suffered that makes the real difference. the bishop of manchester. joining me now is mohamed abdul—malek — chairman of libya watch —
4:07 pm
a human rights organisation. thank you very much for talking to others. before this attack a year ago today, manchester's plebeian community may not have been a particularly visible community. no, it's one of those hidden communities. there are many hidden communities. there are many hidden communities within the population, the italians for example —— de libyan community are among those hidden communities. i would like our contribution to have been discovered through art, culture, music, dancing. that's what i would have loved. of course, obama was born in
4:08 pm
manchester of libyan family. libyanfamily. —— libyan family. —— the bomber. u nfortu nately. as libyan family. —— the bomber. unfortunately. as we have just agreed, the libyan is a hidden community. if i walked down the street nobody would know that i am libyan. they would guess that i am muslim but not a libyan. it is the wider muslim community that is more visible to the nation. but the attack came from the community known as libyan. in the old days, if the
4:09 pm
libyan community wanted to book a place in the mosque or an islamic community, we would have been made guilty somehow for this act which we are not. what efforts have been made by libyan muslims in manchester to be part of the response and part of the solidarity in the wake of that attack. we have heard from different faith leaders during the service. lot was being done. many libyans at doctors and a lot of them have put in extra timejust doctors and a lot of them have put in extra time just to be with the casualties and the injured. we also formed organisations, youth organisations, women's organisations to look at what we can do. a film,
4:10 pm
for example was produced to reintroduce the libyan community. they are part of this diverse community. we linked with the police and tried to help as much as possible. we linked with the council and tried to find a solution so that this thing never happens again. we did our part given the fact that our resources a re did our part given the fact that our resources are limited. i think we have... young libyan people have shown that they have done a lot and can offer a lot immediately in the wa ke can offer a lot immediately in the wake of the incident. thank you very much for your time today. we know of course that the police continued to seek to extradite the bomber‘s brother from libya where
4:11 pm
seek to extradite the bomber‘s brotherfrom libya where he is at the moment. manchester's thoughts are turning to the event in the city centre this evening. manchester together with one voice, thousands of choirs together adding their voices to those of members of the public. 0ne special choir will be the survivors choir. many of them, you can imagine the thought of going into large crowds has been very difficult. it will be the first time for many of them that they are gathering in such away in a large crowd. so a very big moment for them. you can see special coverage of this evening here on the bbc news channel from 7pm. right now, we are
4:12 pm
still waiting to see the prime minister and and the duke of cambridge, prince william, leaf. continuing those conversations and taking their time to talk to as many people as possible, as many of the bereaved families and survivors as possible. for the moment, bereaved families and survivors as possible. forthe moment, back bereaved families and survivors as possible. for the moment, back to you simon. the families of more of the 72 people who died in the grenfell tower fire have been remembering their loved ones, on the second day of the public inquiry into the disaster. among those speaking this morning was the husband of maria del pilar burton, who died seven months after the fire, having never left hospital. our community affairs correspondent adina campbell reports. # amazing grace how sweet the sound. ..#. debbie lamprell worked as a safety officer at holland park 0pera. this was one of the songs sung by the group at her memorial service.
4:13 pm
a tribute by her mother was read by the opera's director. she would visit me every saturday morning and she would always bring me two scratchcards, and she would say, "i don't know why i'm bringing you these scratch cards because we don't need money. we are so lucky with what we've got." that is how she was, happy. she was happy with her friends, with herjob, with her life, with her neighbours, with living in ladbroke grove. and that's the cruel thing, she did not want more. she felt blessed. debbie was an exceptional, extraordinary person. and i was completely blessed to have her as my daughter. this is my husband... originally from spain, pily burton was one of the first people to live in grenfell tower
4:14 pm
in the 1970s. she and her husband were rescued from the burning building but she died in hospital. i adored her, and we shared it with everybody around us. she was an exceptional person, and that... this tragedy took away her dignity and everything that we had in this world. rania ibrahim and her daughters fathia and hania hassan lived on the 23rd floor. through an interpreter, rania's sister is now looking for answers. to this day, the questions remain in my mind and plague me about what exactly happened. it is very important for me to take part in this process of questioning, of finding out the truth. it is so important for me to understand how it could come
4:15 pm
about that i have lost rania. lives from around the world were the heartbeat of the grenfell community, people who travelled far and wide and made west london their home. adina campbell, bbc news. tom burridge is at the inquiry in west london for us. a second day of very emotional testimony. very much so. we've been hearing from one of the most powerful stories from two people who lost six members of their family in the fire. the choucair family. they were all killed, living in two flats in g re nfell tower. killed, living in two flats in grenfell tower. we were played a
4:16 pm
short video that featured sawson choucair i lost my loved ones, my mum, my sister, my cousin, my nieces everything. this is my mum. this is the whole family that died. sirria choucair, nadia choucair, bassem choukair, mierna choucair, fatima choucair and zainab choucair. ijust i just wanted to ijust wanted to put i just wanted to put the ijust wanted to put the people who died in the tower. no one else. we
4:17 pm
also heard from her brother who said that the family were inseparable. he talked of their mother being kind, patient. he spoke of their sense of loss and quest forjustice demanding that the enquiry find the truth and bring them justice. i lost my mother who was 60. my oldest sister nadia choucair who was 33. her husband was my cousin also who was 40. and three children, my nieces. mierna choucair, fatima choucair
4:18 pm
and zainab choucair. my mother lived on the 22nd floor of the tower opposite right near flats 193 on the same landing where my sister nadia choucair lived with her husband and children. all who perished in the fire my mum was a proud woman. a devout mormon whose life was family and work, who never said a bad word about anybody. she lived her life for others despite the hardships she suffered. she was
4:19 pm
kind, and caring, and i will miss her for ever. i was never happy with the building. ialways her for ever. i was never happy with the building. i always had a bad feeling about it. nadia and her husband tried to by the flat. they had saved the deposit but no bank would give them the mortgage as soon as they found out that they were on the 22nd floor. this led me to believe that the banks were aware of something within high—rise social housing that we were not aware of. he lost six members of his family to the greg foe fire on that overnight.
4:20 pm
we heard heart—wrenching stories throughout the day. we heard about debbie lamprell described as someone who was always smiling, whose life could be heard before she came into a room. described by herfamily as an incredible woman with an amazing character. a beautiful person with an amazing personality. we heard from nicholas burton who described his wife as a beautiful person known by almost everyone on the portobello road. she had suffered from dementia and he spoke of the sheer trauma of that night. she was a very beautiful person and could have chosen anybody
4:21 pm
really. i don't know why she chose me. we had both fallen asleep on the sofa and i went to discover the fire. i want to say that it was impossible to carry my wife down about a0 flights of stairs so we had to wait to be rescued. when i got to the royal free she was in a terrible state. she was suffering badly from the effects of inhalation. i later learned that her body was cut and bruised all over. but the trauma had a terrible effect on pily‘s dementia. she was very distressed. how do you describe what has happened to a person in her
4:22 pm
condition that our house had gone, our dog had come, our good friends and neighbours had passed and many friends were missing. and that her pa rents friends were missing. and that her parents and ashes which we kept in the flat had gone. everything was gone. nicholas burton who lost his wife maria del pilar that night. it has been difficult to hear but this time set aside for tributes to the people whose deaths are a chippy did to the fire in the tower. when the enquiry proceeds in the weeks, coming months, and even years, they will remain central to the enquiry. it is worth just mentioning in the last few minutes as i came out of the hotel, listening to the tributes
4:23 pm
of the families. we didn't show you some images that show quite graphically what happened. we could hear audibly that it was too much for some of the families who saw it in the enquiry. it was quite traumatising for them. the enquiry has taken a break in light of that. quite a difficult and traumatic moment for the families listening to the enquiry on this day two. thank you very much. let's return to manchester where a special service of remembrance to is taking place on the first anniversary of the manchester bomb attack. let's return to annita. in the days following the
4:24 pm
attack the hashtag #bemoremartin was trending, in reference to one of the victims of the attack martin hett. he was a coronation street super fan and i'm very pleased to say that his father has joined as who has been speaking to theresa may and prince william. they were very generous with their time. prince william spokein with their time. prince william spoke in his piece about love and i was saying that the message that has come very strongly in manchester and across the country following the attack. before it, i wasn't an openly loving person but strong
4:25 pm
value, just ticking together as friends. the messages i've had today, people sending messages. people i've known from childhood sending me messages colleagues, everybody i've met. from all around the world. people i've never met before. just chatting to you a few minutes ago, you said that today you'd rather be at home with the rest of the family with your feet up but you really wanted to be here to give thanks for the support that has been shown since the attack. most definitely. it is very mixed feelings. inside me, ijust want to be, we've got a big family network, friends, ijust be, we've got a big family network, friends, i just want to be with them in the garden on a nice day like this. just reminiscing, stories of
4:26 pm
martyn which we will be doing until late anyway. but the opportunity to come and say thank you. what people have done has just been fabulous. that needs to be said. have done has just been fabulous. that needs to be saidlj have done has just been fabulous. that needs to be said. i remember so vividly people talking about martyn in the days after the attack. you just know that if he survived, he would have been there offering that support. what would he have made of all of this, everything that's happened since last year?|j all of this, everything that's happened since last year? i think... he would just be amazed by it. the amount of things that have happened. the tributes, coronation street, mariah carey, the chip units that have come in. the play. the boy with the dead tree tattooed. who would
4:27 pm
have thought there would be a play about him, going to london. it is just overwhelming. so many things have happened. 0nline. people writing poems, sending messages, singing songs. net only for martin. we've all had our little stories of support of figures that have happened. it certainly helps get you through it. saying that, it has been difficult. i hope the cameras didn't catch me but there were certainly a few tears in the service when i heard 0ver few tears in the service when i heard over the rainbow. it was one of martyn's favourite songs. seeing the pictures of him there. nobody could blame anybody for a few tears during that very moving service. indeed. stuart murray, thank you
4:28 pm
very much for taking time to talk to others. we wish you and your family well. stuart was just saying how generous the prime minister and prince william have been with their time after the service. he said prince william was spending a good five minutes or so with each family. that explains why, where are we now? an hourand a that explains why, where are we now? an hour and a half after the service we still haven't scene need of them emerge from the service. it was really interesting to hear from stewart. he is expressing many of the views of the bereaved families here today. part of the reason for being here today was to say thank you for the enormous support that they have received in the wake of this first anniversary of the
4:29 pm
attack. a quick reminder about the manchester together with one voice eventin manchester together with one voice event in albert square in the city this evening. many thousands of people in the choir is joining together. another big set piece a dent for the day. simon, together. another big set piece a dent forthe day. simon, back together. another big set piece a dent for the day. simon, back to you. time for a look at the weather. we had been talking about thunderstorms here in our forecast, but we don't know what thunderstorms are, really, compared with shrill anco, where they have had huge amounts of rainfall over days and weeks. it is getting to that time of year where the wild weather is going to beach or in these slots, because we are getting into the hurricane season soon we are getting into the hurricane season soon in the atlantic and the monsoon season in south asia. you have some big this, don't you? these are the scenes we have seen in the last few days. some places have
4:30 pm
seen the last few days. some places have seen about 150 millimetres injust 2a hours, but that has been going on for many days. you can see there are severe flooding. they are used to flooding in this part of the world. the monsoon advances at this time of year. but the rain has been more intense than we expected and sooner than we would expect. quite a lot of loss of life already. what is going on? this is in large pa rt what is going on? this is in large part to do with the monsoon. that is the south—westerly winds that develop at this time of year. you can see the storm clouds on a satellite image have just been piling in across sri lanka. the maldives as well, if people are thinking of going on holiday there, just not at this time of year. that will feature more and more in the news in the coming weeks. what is happening closer to home? there are some blunder storms in our
4:31 pm
forecast, but not on that scale. for most of us, it has just been a story of blue skies and sunshine. a bit cloudy in places. through the rest of the week, as i mentioned, there is the increasing risk of some waeéiflfig is the increasing risk of some mamfiflfii this is is the increasing risk of some th'ir‘i‘gzt‘ii this is how it looked thunderstorms. this is how it looked in northern ireland a little bit ago. much drier than it was yesterday. there is also mist and murk creeping in from the north sea coast. away from here, a lot of dry weather. we are also keeping an eye on things to the south—east, there are weather systems being formed in the south—east of england, which could give some showers. 0therwise dry with some clear spells. that mist and work in the north sea looks like it could creep inland, across eastern and central parts of
4:32 pm
scotla nd eastern and central parts of scotland and england. tomorrow morning, don't be surprised in piece areas if you wake up with mister and murk. a lot of that burns back to the coast as the day goes on. we are looking at a largely dry story. just the odd afternoon thunderstorm towards the south. most of us will stay dry. temperatures generally speaking doing quite nicely, up to 23 or 2a degrees. high pressure tries to hold firm at the moment, keeping us fine and settled. but this little frontal system creeping into the south will likely bring more widespread heavy, thundery downpours on thursday. you can see those creeping slowly northwards. could be quite a lot of rain in a short amount of time if you get these showers. the further north you are, a decent day, 21 degrees in edinburgh, cooling off to the south. into the weekend, the bank on
4:33 pm
weekend, we are expecting more clu m ps of weekend, we are expecting more clumps of showers pushing into the south. the further north you are, you are closer to an area of high pressure, so more you are closer to an area of high pressure, so more dry weather. all of us getting into this feed of south or south—easterly winds, bringing warm air in our direction. into the weekend, they'll be a rise in temperatures, up to 27 or 28 degrees. there will be good spells of sunshine, what the continued threat of thunderstorms, especially across the south. this is bbc news. our latest headlines: hundreds of people have attended a service in manchester cathedral to remember the 22 victims of last year's bomb attack at an ariana grande concert. survivors and relatives of the victims were joined by the prime minister and prince william. relatives of some of the 72 victims of the grenfell fire have been giving moving tributes to their loved ones, on the second day of the inquiry into the disaster. marks and spencers is speeding up plans to close stores. the business is to close
4:34 pm
100 shops by 2022 — 21 of which have already been shut, and a further 1a have been named today. the food industry has failed to meet a sugar reduction target set by the government to tackle childhood obesity. public health england says that in many cases food retailers have managed just 2% overall. sport now on afternoon live withjohn watson, nd good news for british cyclist simon yates, who is attempting to win the first grand tour of the year? simon yates has ridden the time trial of his life, to keep the leader's pinkjersey at the giro d'italia — remember he's hoping to become the first british rider to win the race.
4:35 pm
he led the race by over two minutes this morning, but although yates is fantastic at going up mountains, time trials aren't something he's great at. and the man in second place overall, tom dumoulin, is the world time trial champion — he was always expected to gain on yates today. the englishman could only give it his best shot and hang in there — he was 75 seconds slower than dumoulin's time, but that was enough. yates still leads by 56 seconds with five stages to go. and that puts in him in a very strong position to clinch victory. let's talk football. the world cup, and we now have an england captain named. perhaps no great surprise, it is
4:36 pm
hurricane. —— harry kane. less than a month to go until the start of the tournament, gareth southgate announcing the tottenham striker will lead the team in russia he becomes the youngest ever captain for england at a world cup at the age of 2a and was picked over jordan henderson and eric dier who have both captained england in recent matches. he's scored 12 goals in 23 appearances for his country, but gareth southgate saying he sets high standards for himself and will lead the squad by example. kane has been on social media this morning, he says that it's a proud day for him to be named as england captain. he also thanked his friends, family, and signed off with three lion emojis. the squad preparing to depart for russia on the 12thjune. arsenal are set to appoint the unai emery as their new manager. the spanish coach has spent the last couple of seasons incharge of paris saint—germain, and before that sevilla. former midfielder mikel arteta was also in the running, but emery was said to be the "unanimous choice" of the arsenal board. patrick gearey takes a look at his credentials: unai emery‘s big break in management
4:37 pm
came at valencia. he defied challenging financial circumstances to ta ke challenging financial circumstances to take them to third in la liga. there was a less successful time in moscow before he came back to spain to manage seville. there he won the second competition, the europa league three times in a row. that impressed in paris. he missed out on a leak in his first season, but broke the transfer record to sign neymar. this season, psg won all three domestic titles. arsenal aren't the only club doing business in the managerial market, west ham have hired the former manchester city boss manuel pellegrini. here's how the club announced it on social media. pellegrini won the title with city in 201a, and takes over from david moyes, who left the club last week. he says he's excited, and is aiming to bring
4:38 pm
in "four or five" players to have a "strong team". europe's ryder cup captain thomas bjorn has picked lee westwood, graeme mcdowell, padraig harrington and luke donald as vice—captains for this year's ryder cup against the united states. westwood has won seven—times winner as a player. the quartet could still qualify to play in the tournament, but westwood is the only player currently ranked inside the world's top 200. the ryder cup starts in paris on 28th september with europe looking to regain the trophy. the wasps flankerjack willis could be out for up to a year because of a knee injury. the 21—year—old was hurt during saturday's premiership semifinal. it means he'll also miss england's tour of south africa after recieving his first call—up earlier this month. a number of scarlets players haven't trained ahead of their pro 1a final because they suffered burns during the semifinal. scarlets say the burns happened on
4:39 pm
glasgow warriors' artificial pitch. the warriors say they're happy with the pitch but one scarlets player says such surfaces should be "illegal". spinner dominic bess says he won't be putting any pressure on himself if he makes his test debut against pakistan at lord's on thursday. bess has only played 16 first class matches but was called into the england squad last week. he's only been to lord's once before, and didn't even play. i was the 12th man, so i enjoy to the lunches! we were tucking into the lunches! we were tucking into the lunches! we were tucking into the lunches last year. i put on quite a bit then. it is amazing. an amazing occasion. that was my first time properly up here in london. i was a bit of a tourist as well. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. now on afternoon live,
4:40 pm
let's go nationwide and see what's happening around the country in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. in manchester, rogerjohnson and annabel tiffin join us live from albert square as events take place across the city to mark the first anniversary of the manchester arena suicide bombing in which 22 people were killed. roger and annabel. we are seeing a unity in the city, similarto we are seeing a unity in the city, similar to what we see immediately after the attack. how are they marking this? you are right. it has been the way since the night 12 months ago. the city of manchester has stood together in the wa ke manchester has stood together in the wake of what happened at manchester arena. today at 2pm, there was a service of commemoration at manchester cathedral. the duke of cambridge did a reading, theresa may was there as well. friends and
4:41 pm
families and the emergency services we re families and the emergency services were there as well. it was a multi—faith service, even though it was held in the cathedral. we heard from the hindu, seek and muslim constituencies of the city, all part ofa constituencies of the city, all part of a multi—faith service in a city which has been united. what impact has this had on the city in the last year? the mayor, andy burnham, said earlier today that he thought it had made the city stronger, that it had brought communities together. to be honest, i think manchester is like that anyway. it is a huge city, but at its heart it is a small community. when something happens to the city, we all come together. it happened after the riots, after this terrible attack at the arena last may. one—year tomorrow, we were here on this exact spot, on a night like tonight, clear blue skies when thousands of people stood in this
4:42 pm
square is an axe of defiance to show that they will not be beaten and told how two live their lives to stop but you cannot forget that 22 people lost their lives, and 800 people lost their lives, and 800 people were affected mentally and physically by this attack. we have been speaking to one of those, adam lawlor, who went to the concert with his friend, who sadly died. adam was very badly injured, but he told us that he isjust trying to rebuild his life now. both of my legs, i lost 70, i nearly lost my right eye. i have regained the vision in that now thanks to my doctors. that night, when you are faced with a life or death situation, you often start to reflect a lot on how your life is. i saw the end and i don't want it to
4:43 pm
be for nothing. i have seen the end once, i don't want to see it again without feeling complete. i decided that night to do what i want to do. i will open a barber ‘s shop, i want to be an entrepreneur, why want to make money my way. if i could go back, i would change everything, but i can't, so i will go and try to live my best life. we have just seen theresa may get into her car. she stopped at bowes trees that have popped up outside the cathedral. there have been a large number of tributes, haven't they? you remember i'm sure the pictures we saw last year of flowers in saint anne's square, which became the focal point for the commemorations in the aftermath of what happened. there is a line of those trees, all with little messages attached to them that the people of manchester have left. some of those i saw today we re have left. some of those i saw today were about being proud to be a
4:44 pm
mancunian, but never proud around this year. lots of people showing their pride and support. ariana grande, whose support was the target last —— whose concert was the target last —— whose concert was the target last year. she said a message on social media. andy burnham is the mayor of greater manchester, and had only just become mayor of greater manchester, and had onlyjust become the mayor a few weeks before. he said today that we will run but the lives of those that we re will run but the lives of those that were taken. theresa may who was here today, she said, my thoughts are those —— with those who lost their lives. also worth mentioning, we present northwestern night, the regional news programme, but the manchester evening news, the newspaper for this city, has a
4:45 pm
front—page. it won a lot of plaudits for its coverage last year. it has a cover with a number of bees in the shape of a heart. what is happening tonight? you can probably hear behind me, there are the choirs practising for the concert this evening. a number of choirs came together in the aftermath of this incident. we will be here at 6:30pm, but the new channel will be broadcasting this singalong, where lots of music that means a lot to the people of manchester will be sung by several different choirs. we have the honour of introducing one of the choirs, the health care choir. later on in saint anne's square, we will be live there again and at 10:31pm, the
4:46 pm
precise time that that bomb was detonated at the arena, bells will ring out across manchester, 22 times, to remember each of those who lost their lives. worth remembering, behind the camera, the square is empty but there are scores of people lining up ready to come in and join the celebrations from 7pm. we will be here with lots to reflect on. remarkable day of tributes in what we know as a rock ball city. we will be joining we know as a rock ball city. we will bejoining you at 6:30pm. thank we know as a rock ball city. we will be joining you at 6:30pm. thank you both worry much for that. if you'd like to see more on any of those stories, you can access them via the bbc iplayer. we go
4:47 pm
nationwide every weekday afternoon at a:30pm. marks and spencer has announced it will close 100 stores across the uk over the next four years. the retailer says the closures are part of a reorganisation which it says is "vital" for the firm's future, after several years of disappointing financial results. the store closures will affect m&s clothing and home stores. here's our business correspondent emma simpson. it's been a presence in this corner of north london for more than 100 years, but not for much longer. this shop is going, along with 13 others, the latest m&s stores to close. i think it's terrible. i'm always in the shop. it's a great shop, why is it closing? i'm really shocked, i'm totally gutted. it's going to change the community completely. when my local branch closed down, it felt like the whole of wood green just shut down as well. it'sjust such a shame. marks & spencer has seen falling sales and rising costs, and more of its shoppers
4:48 pm
going online. in november 2016, the new boss announced an overhaul of its stores. what we want to do is change marks & spencer and become more relevant for our customers, so we are reflecting the changes of people shopping more online, and probably in the future marks & spencer will need less space for its clothing and home ranges. he said there would be 60 fewer clothing and home stores by 2022. today, that's been upped to 100. it's got too many stores that aren't making enough profit for it. costs are going up but sales are going down, so it needs to look at its store estate and get rid of the unprofitable ones. here is one of 21 stores that have already closed. a business that wants to be in fewer but better locations. our high streets are undergoing unprecedented change. people are shopping less in physical stores, but the costs of running them have gone up.
4:49 pm
eroding profitability and pushing some other traditional retailers to the brink. today, the bank of england governor spoke of the challenges facing the industry. the steady growth of online, much less foot fall, and as a consequence of that, there are a number of retailers left with legacy assets and costs that make them uncompetitive. marks & spencer says these changes are vital for its future, but it will mean yet more gaps to fill on high streets already under pressure. and yet more jobs at risk. in a moment, the business news with ben bland. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. hundreds have attended a service in manchester cathedral to remember the 22 victims of last year's bomb attack
4:50 pm
at an ariana grande concert. 0n the second day of the grenfell inquiry, relatives of the victims of the fire have been giving moving tributes to their loved ones. the food industry fails to meet a sugar reduction target set by the government to tackle childhood obesity. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. marks and spencer has announced that it will close 100 stores by 2022, speeding up a reorganisation that it says is "vital" for the firm's future. more on this in a moment. it's always nice having more money coming in and having to borrow less, and that's the position the government finds itself in. it borrowed £7.8 billion in april — sounds a lot but that's actually the lowest april figure since 2008. the deficit — the difference between what the government gets in and what it spends — was 2% of gdp last year, the lowest it's been since 2002.
4:51 pm
it's after years of austerity and restricted spending to try and reduce public borrowing. breaking news in the last hour — tesco says it will close its loss—making site tesco direct. 500 jobs are at risk. more on this in a moment as well. you are promising a lot, we have to crack on. let's talk about marks & spencer perceval. this has come as a bit of a shock, hasn't it? in all, 100 stores are to close by 2022. this is all part of a plan by m&s to move a third of its sales online and it plans to have fewer, larger clothing and homeware stores in better locations. now, of the 100 stores, 21 have already been shut and m&s has now revealed the location of 1a more sites that will close, and they include kettering, bayswater, and stockton. this revamp started in november 2016,
4:52 pm
but the retail stalwart has a fair way to go to turn around its fortunes. and another retailer announced possible job losses within the last hour or so. yes, tesco said it's going to close it tescodirect website — that's the arm that sells technology, clothing and homewares online. that puts 500 jobs at risk. tesco direct has been loss—making and the retailer says it can't find a way to make it profitable. it wants to focus on its main website, the grocery one, which will remain. just a little bit of good news, the deficit decreasing. joining us now is russ mould, investment director, at aj bell.
4:53 pm
i hope we have him. keep us in suspense! let's talk about the government borrowing. in some places, this is partly thanks to the fizzy drinks sugared tax bringing revenue win. but other factors as well. corporate tax reve nu es factors as well. corporate tax revenues are increasing. things are getting tighter on corporate tax avoidance schemes. the chancellor is keeping a tight rein on things. will he become more generous as time goes by? there is political and social pressure to do so. he has announced a spending review that will start in 2019, the end of which will be in 2020. if he started to turn the taps on, it would bejust 2020. if he started to turn the taps on, it would be just before a general election. the big news that
4:54 pm
has dominated the business agenda today, marks and spencer and its store closures will stop symptomatic of wider struggles for the high street. but it also gives us a flavour of the consumer mindset. we have heard from the chief executive talking about how it needs to be more multichannel, how it needs to improve its website. it can be done. next, which is remembered for its high street stores, it gets half of its profits from its online stores now. it can be done, it is not easy and is painful. there are 600 jobs on the line. times are still generally quite tough, wage growth is quite limited. times are tough for the big retailers who with the benefit of hindsight massively
4:55 pm
overexpanded in the last ten years. flipping the coin, to use an odd metaphor, there is tesco direct, an online store closing. it was a confusing situation for customers. tesco and tesco have macro direct. this hardware and clothing business is brutally competitive. tesco are telling you that today. they are getting cost efficiencies where they can get them. it shows that under dave lewis the company's on doing of the diversification, they are all going. it is a statement of intent from charles wilson, who owns the uk business to be much more efficient and the shares are now trading at a
4:56 pm
high. the ftse100 has ventured further into record high territory. m&s shares are down after announcing their store closure plans. topps tiles shares are up — that's despite their latest results showing pre—tax profits fell almost a third in the six months to the end of march — but they said their profit guidance for the full year still stands. 0il rose towards $80 a barrel. that's all the business news. thank you very much. the latest pictures from manchester. in the last few minutes, prince william has put a message on one of those trees, one of the 28 planted between victoria station and saint and's square in manchester,
4:57 pm
remembering the 22 victims of the suicide bomb attack there last year. as he left the cathedral, where he spoke at some length to families of the bereaved and survivors, he put his own message on that tree before getting in his car and heading away. a moving ceremony at manchester cathedral today. as we were hearing, we willjoin northwestern night with their special coverage at 6:30pm. that is it from the team for today. next, the news at five. time for a look at the weather. good afternoon. don't take the spring sunshine for granted in the next couple of days. while there will be more scenes like this, they'll be storm clouds at times. 12 showers across southern areas this
4:58 pm
afternoon, perhaps into wales as well. —— one or two showers. this evening and overnight, we will see some misty and working conditions spreading in from the north sea towards many parts of the british isles. quite a murky start for some of the central and eastern areas during tomorrow. that should roll back towards the north sea coast, and then a lot of sunshine to be enjoyed. still the potentialfor some heavy showers towards the south, and temperatures 19 degrees in edinburgh and 23 in london and cardiff. some sunshine with thunderstorms and showers at times as well. today at five — the people of manchester unite — in silence — to remember those
4:59 pm
who lost their lives in the bomb attack one year ago. it took place during a service of commemoration at manchester cathedral, with tributes to those who died and those whose lives were changed by injury. each of the 22 victims were named in the service, as the bishop of manchester underlined the extensive impact of the events of a year ago. all who were affected have a lasting place in our hearts. you have become part of the story of our city, and we will be part of yours. we'll be hearing from some of those whose lives were changed on the 22nd may last year. the thing is, you have to be thankful you're still here. wake up every day, no matter what the weather is, be happy. start every day new again, because we're here and we're the ones who can make the most of it. i'm shaun ley, with the other main stories on bbc news at 5.
5:00 pm
marks & spencer is to shut 100 stores over the next four years. it says the closures are vital to the company's future. cleaning up ourair. campaigners say government plans to cut pollution don't go far enough. and the duke and duchess of sussex attend their first public engagement as newly weds, as part of prince charles' 70th birthday celebrations. it's five o'clock — we're in the heart of manchester, where the people of this city have been remembering the dreadful
5:01 pm
events of a year ago, and the 22 lives lost, when a suicide bomber attacked the crowd at a pop concert in the manchester arena. the prime minister and the duke of cambridge joined the families and friends of the victims, many survivors, and members of the emergency services — at a memorial service — where they led a nationwide one—minute silence — 0ur correspondent ben ando reports on the day's events. asa as a city they came together. remembering a day everyone wished they could forget. so would you please stand with me, as we observer the one minute's silence... then a minute's silence. thank you. 22 people, the youngestjust eight died when a bomber targeted a pop concert at the manchester arena. many of those who survived were in
5:02 pm
the congregation at the cathedral, together with leaders of other faiths: united in other common grief, we pray to god by many names. we seek the power we need to find, to hold us in this time of stress. also present were the prime minister, theresa may, the leader of the opposition, jeremy corbyn, and the opposition, jeremy corbyn, and the leaders of the liberal democrats and scottish national party. representing the royal family the duke of cambridge, who read from st paul's letter to the corinthians. we see ina paul's letter to the corinthians. we see in a mirror, dimly, but then we will see face to face. now i know only in part that i will know fully even as i have been fully known. and now faith, hope and love abide, these three and the greatest of these is love. words that resonated for the
5:03 pm
stepfather of victim martin hett. 0ne stepfather of victim martin hett. one of the things i said to prince william was he did talk in his piece about love, and i said the message of that has come very strong in manchester and across the country, following the attack, the support we have had. 0utside have had. outside in the city st ann's square a focus for mourners in the days after the attack well—wishers laid flowers a n after the attack well—wishers laid flowers an cards and thousands of m essa 9 es flowers an cards and thousands of m essa g es of flowers an cards and thousands of messages of support have been written on the tags on the trees of hope. it was just after a concert by the singer ariana grande had finished that the bomber detonated a bag containing explosives is and nearly 2,000 shards of metal in the foyer today she tweeted a message of hope and support, for those who lived like leanne and
5:04 pm
her daughter, the bombing continues to traumatise. i heard a massive bang. at first i thought it was a balloon because she let downloads of balloons like that big and then i heard a for those who lived like leanne and her daughter, the bombing continues to traumatise. i heard a massive bang. at first i thought it was a balloon because she let downloads of balloons like that big and then i heard a girl in front of me shout "it's a bomb". this choir every member a survivor of the bombing returned to the hospital where they were treated to give thanks in song. # i'll rise up... today they will sing again with other choirs from across the city in albert square. at 10.31pm bells will ring out to mark the exact moment the bomb went off and to remember the 22 lives that we re and to remember the 22 lives that were lost. good evening, from albert square in the heart of manchester, some very
5:05 pm
nice singing taking place now. local school—children, they are preparing for the event that will take place here at round 7.00, culmination of the day's event, a moving service of commemoration in the cathedral, and among those taking part, the bishop of manchester. the right reverend david walker is bishop of manchester, and he's here now. that is going to be the flavour of this evening manchester children showing how song brings us together. what has today meant for the city? it is clearly an incredibly difficult milestone for many and yet you and others earlier today also had a message of might i say hope or optimism in o some circumstances? had a message of might i say hope or optimism in 0 some circumstances?m isa optimism in 0 some circumstances?m is a message of solidarity we weren't just there for those who suffered last year, we are there for them now and manchester will go on being with them. they are part of our story, our city and will always be so. the spirit of this city, the
5:06 pm
spirit the city has always had came into his unlast year and has continued. for me as a christian there is a hope in good as well. tell us more about this evening's event. what is it going to achieve? what is it meant to achieve?m parallels the event we had last year, on the day after the arena attack when the city centre was thronged with people. it is says yes, we come together again, we repeat that, but we are a year on, emotions have moved on but we are still there as much for the people today as we were then. song is so much a part of manchester's story. we are going to do that again tonight and poetry, as there was a powerful poem from tony walsh last year. those words and songs we share. what is the me sang to those who suffered terrible loss, those whose lives were change forever because of injury or they lost loved one, what
5:07 pm
is the message? we know your lives are going to be different but we will be there as enough as we can be. we don't expect do you get over it according to some wider type table. it will be a lifelong task. some people will never feel they have got over it. we have to be as much there for some of them, so many young people, decades ahead, that is what is the important message to get out today. what is it about the spirit of this city that you think has defined its character, over the past year, because lots has been written, said about it, lots of people of course watching us, may not know manchester very well, so what would you say to them?|j not know manchester very well, so what would you say to them? i think it is deeply embedded in the history of manchester. i am born and bred in manchester. i used to walk past here on the way to school. there is that communal side. here is where the suffragette movement began, the trade union movement, the industrial revolution, we do things together and we did things together last year
5:08 pm
and we did things together last year and the way we have cared more for the homeless this last winter, a sign of how we show our shared love for those in the greatest need. the music sounds wonderful. let us hope it is is a lovely evening. nice to see you. thank you very much. thank you very much. the concert a year ago was a much—anticipated performance by ariana grande, who said today she was sending light and warmth to the people of this city. among those at the arena that night were robby potter and his girlfriend — waiting for their children in the foyer after the concert. they were standing just a few metres away from the bomber. 0ur correspondentjudith moritz has been speaking to robby — and to the surgeon who saved his life. the only problem i've got left, i've got no feeling in my left foot. i've got like, a drop foot and i've been told i'm disabled in that foot. i'll never have the use of it properly again, lwrtt make it warm. ' ’ ' " " {57:5 isn233535355215???"gift/5:71j: ,lf;"
5:09 pm
gagged ere-5! hi; 5525}; 9.4?54955. it punctured my lung and obviously i had a couple of bolts stuck in my heart. doctors called me the miracle lad. it was wedged between the back wall and the front wall of the two blood vessels. so, a millimetre either way at any velocity and — thankfully, it didn't — but we wouldn't be having this conversation. morning, ladies! robby‘s daughter teagan has never been far from his side throughout the whole healing process. she's been the adult. she's the one supporting me. she's been absolutely brilliant. she's actually been back to another concert, she's took other kids to the concert who were scared. she said, "they're not going to beat us, daddy." and she's there. she's been a rock. you've got to be thankful you're still here. wake up every day, no matter what the weather is, be happy. you know what i mean?
5:10 pm
start every day new again, now. because we are here and we are the ones who have got to make the most of it. you said at the beginning, your goal is to play rugby again. still is. it's been set back a bit. i keep on training, training. i'll get back somehow. people who've sold raffle tickets, paid to come for a dinnerfor me, knowing their money is going to help me to get rehab, looking at them people, that's when it's really overwhelming. those who didn't survive are never far from his thoughts. i've been invited to go to the cathedral, so i have to go to that. for them people, i have to go. they will never be forgotten, ever. robby potter talking to my colleague. we will also have we will also have
5:11 pm
rise. tau—1; each for — f other, to support each other, sing together and show that we are actually resilient and moving forwards. can i take you back to the weeks before the attack a year ago, and you know, the start of this musicaljourney you are on. tell us about how that happened? we joined the police set up and online social network to let people chat and support each other online, we realised lots of the children were fantastic musician, they loved music and that is what brought them together. and we just thought, you know, why don't we do a choir, wouldn't that be lovely? instead of meeting to talk about the case or meeting to talk about the case or meeting to talk about the case or meeting to say about mental health support groups let us meet and do something positive so we went for
5:12 pm
it, so we found funding from a local company, and i found it, so we found funding from a local company, and ifound a choir leader, somebody else found a space and we put it out there and said please come. 15 people came originally and we are up come. 15 people came originally and we are up to nearly a0. come. 15 people came originally and we are up to nearly 40. that is fantastic. yeah. that is is really good. at what point did you realise that you had a bet of a success on your hands? -- bit. the very first moment we sang together, i suddenly thought, wow these young people are amazing. so we have drawn together, we are a whole group of different people from different parts in the north—west of the uk, and i thought we are north—west of the uk, and i thought we a re really north—west of the uk, and i thought we are really good, but for ages, we just kept ourselves to ourselves, it was set up for us by us, but then we agreed to do a performance on songs of praise and it flourished from there. that was it. yes. no escape from that. no, no, no. after today's event which is such a big milestone what does the future hold for the choir? we are going to carry on, we
5:13 pm
we re choir? we are going to carry on, we were doing it before anyone was interested in it. we now call each other the bee family so we will continue to sing together, look after each other and hopefully do some performance, we have performances coming up, so we are excited about those, but we are just as excited about singing on a regular basis and keeping supporting each other. that is nice to be speaking while this is going on. it is beautiful. it isa this is going on. it is beautiful. it is a beautiful evening. i am looking forward to singing later. it is a beautiful evening. i am looking forward to singing latenm isa looking forward to singing latenm is a lovely day. people have some sad memories but it's a lovely day to be commemorating. yes, it has been tough for us today. we have had one of the toughest days of all the groups performing because many, all of us were there, and some of our group were injured, some have lost friends, so it has been a very emotional day for us and it is still a big toe dealfor us to emotional day for us and it is still a big toe deal for us to sing emotional day for us and it is still a big toe dealfor us to sing in front of a big crowd but we are determined to do it because we want to show we are positive and strong, so we are to show we are positive and strong,
5:14 pm
so we are doing it for manchester and for everybody involved in terror attacks. you will do brilliantly. nice to see you. good luck tonight. thank you. during the service in the cathedral, students george herbert and remsha asif recited the poem, lost friends byjohn 0'donohue. as twilight makes a rainbow robe, from the concealed colours of day, in order for time to stay alive, within the dark weight of night, may we lose no—one we love from the shelter of our hearts. when we love another heart, and allow it to love us, we journey deep below time, into that eternal weave where nothing unravels. may we have the grace to see, despite the hurt of rupture, the searing of anger, and the empty disappointment, that whoever we have loved, such love can never quench.
5:15 pm
though a door may have closed, closed between us, may we be able to view our lost friends, with eyes wise with calming grace, forgive them the damage we were left to inherit. free ourselves from the chains of forlorn resentment, bring warmth again, to where the heart has frozen, in order that beyond the walls of our cherished hurt, and our chosen distance... we may be able to celebrate the gifts they brought. learn and grow from the pain. and prosper into difference. wishing them the peace where spirit can summon beauty from wounded space. 0ne one of the sections of that memorial
5:16 pm
sr haves that took place earlier today. we can speak to the mayor of greater manchester — andy burnham. thank you forjoining us. viewers, there will be a special event in ain't albert's square. let us have a quick look at the children who are singing. it is a nice scene. let us look at that. # i know! look at that. # i know i can make it # i know i can make it # you're doing me so wrong, so wrong # you're doing me so wrong, so wrong # something so strong # something so strong # 0h, # something so strong # oh, oh # oh, oh # something inside so strong # i could could applaud i would. what does it tell us about this evening's vent? that it will be very much about the community, if younger generation, the whole city coming back together as we did last year, it has been a difficult day today, huw, very mixed emotions in the
5:17 pm
city, in the cathedral, in many ways we are back in that moment last year, but, you know, the city a year on is stronger, and more together thanit on is stronger, and more together than it has ever been.” on is stronger, and more together than it has ever been. i asked the bishop a few minutes ago, just to try to define a bit of the character of manchester, as it's really emerged for lots of people over the last year, people who maybe don't know the city very well. how would you describe it? it is a city based on togetherness, on solidarity, and if you cast your mind back to that vigil, a year ago, that came out, that character of the city, it was a very clear message, terrorists will not break the people of this city, they will not change who we are or how we live our lives and that has only got stronger as the year has gone on, that is the character of manchester, you know, a city that believes in equality, believes in people standing together. it has only grown throughout the year. the service was a lovely service it was, it combined obviously poignant
5:18 pm
moments, people reflecting on the lives lost, and yet there were m essa g es lives lost, and yet there were messages as well of trying to step forward , messages as well of trying to step forward, and trying to step forward a year on. yes. did you think that worked? i think so. a year on. yes. did you think that worked? ithink so. ithink it a year on. yes. did you think that worked? i think so. i think it was well pitched i worked? i think so. i think it was well p to |ed i of those individual 22 people lives of those individual 22 people and who - were, lives of those individual 22 people and who- were, and their lives of those individual 22 people and who - were, and their love of and who they were, and their love of life, and that was hard to see their pictures but sometimes services can feel impersonal and this one wasn't. you are right. it was in the bishop's message about looking forward. here we are asking the difficult questions too about what more we can do to tackle extremism. it is myjob do that as mayor of greater manchester. we will have a big report on that next month, but we, because of our strength, we are able, i think, we, because of our strength, we are able, ithink, to we, because of our strength, we are able, i think, to take on those difficult questions. 0n difficult questions. on that point, because i was going to raise it with you, it is too
5:19 pm
early a year on to talk about possible lessons from it? some people are still saying it is, takes a long time for people to work through their grief, make it is too early to draw lessons from dealing with terrorism. my experience from dealing with other tragedies is that you must not leave people searching for the truth. searching for answers many years down the line. the right thing to do is to open up, and to give them the information they are looking for. and yes, ask the difficult questions. i commissioned a review into the emergency response because we need to make sure this city is as strong as it can be, pretea red city is as strong as it can be, preteared —— city is as strong as it can be, pretea red —— prepared city is as strong as it can be, preteared —— prepared as it can be, we have done some of the difficult things in the last year. they weren't easy. no, but we would say the right thing to do. at all times, you know, we worked very closely with the families, we think about them all of the time. as the bishop
5:20 pm
of manchester said today, they will forever be part of the story of this city, around we will always look after them. hope the event goes well today. thank you. nice to talk to you again. andy burnham and by the way if you would like to see the events great music, we have heard from the children already, they will be broadcast live from 7.00. so don't miss that. local choirs performing including the manchester survivors' choir, we heard from cathy hill, choirs from the emergency services and the finale will bring everyone together for a and the finale will bring everyone togetherfor a big and the finale will bring everyone together for a big communal singalong. it will be worth you tuning in at 7.00 on the news channel. with that back to you shaun. president trump is meeting the south korean president, moonjae—un — as part of preparations by the white house for a planned summit in june between washington and north korea.
5:21 pm
donald trump has said that north korean de—nuclearisation must go ahead despite threats made last week by the north to walk away from the talks. mr trump hasjust said it would be "great" if the summit happens but if it doesn't that it may happen "another time". relatives of some of the 72 people who died in the grenfell tower fire have been speaking about their loss, on the second day of the public inquiry. among them nicholas burton, whose wife maria del pilar burton was in hospitalfor seven months until she died. our community affairs correspondent adina campbell reports. # amazing grace # how sweet the sound...#. debbie lamprell worked as a safety officer at holland park 0pera. this was one of the songs sung by the group at her memorial service. a tribute by her mother was read by the opera's director. she would visit me every saturday morning and she would always bring me two scratchcards,
5:22 pm
and she would say, "i don't know why i'm bringing you these scratch cards because we don't need money. we are so lucky with what we've got." that is how she was, happy. she was happy with her friends, with herjob, with her life, with her neighbours, with living in ladbroke grove. and that's the cruel thing, she did not want more. she felt blessed. debbie was an exceptional, extraordinary person. and i was completely blessed to have her as my daughter. this is my husband... originally from spain, pily burton was one of the first people to live in grenfell tower in the 1970s. she and her husband were rescued from the burning building but she died in hospital. i had 3a years with pily, and they were beautiful,
5:23 pm
glorious, wonderful years. filled with happiness, love and laughter. i adored her, and we shared it with everybody around us. she was unique, beautiful, exceptional person, and that... ..is who this tragedy has taken away. rania ibrahim and her daughters fathia and hania hassan lived on the 23rd floor. through an interpreter, rania's sister is now looking for answers. to this day, the questions remain in my mind and plague me about what exactly happened. it is very important for me to take part in this process of questioning, of finding out the truth. it is so important for me to understand how it could come about that i have lost rania. lives from around the world were the heartbeat of the grenfell community, people who travelled far
5:24 pm
and wide and made west london their home. adina campbell, bbc news. 0ur correspondent, tom burridge, joins us from the inquiry in west london. there have been some distressing scenes in the last few minutes. yes it has been particularly hard, it has been a difficult couple of days but this afternoon has been particularly hard. we have been hearing from a brother and sister, their story is incredibly sad because they lost six members of theirfamily in because they lost six members of their family in the grenfell tower fire. they lost their mother, their younger sister nadia, her husband and their three young children, the youngest who was three. they were described as an inseparable family, close knit, a mother who was determined to give her children everything and the brother talked
5:25 pm
about going to the tower, told there was a fire, going down and in his words, he said, we had to watch for hours, while our loved ones were burnt to death. now, we were played a video at the inquiry which was prepared for the family, in conjunction with the family, it featured one member of the family. we heard a lot about the three young girls in that video, who were killed. this is my sister, and the family, all of them together, out. we were fighting for her just all of them together, out. we were fighting for herjust to free her or hold her, you know, that is when she was young, you know. and then as he got older and everything, me and my sister were very close, you know, very close, she would tell me a lot of things, secrets and everything. we had an apology from pernand
5:26 pm
richmond, the deputy counsel to the inquiry because during thatted by owe what we didn't show was draf fibbing images of fire, we heard the screams of people trapped and the silhouettes i think of people, it was too much understandably for some of the relatives watching inside the public inquiry, many left in distress, we heard one woman crying, very loudly, and they were given medical attention while the public inquiry paused and bernard richmond said he had forgotten to warn eve ryo ne said he had forgotten to warn everyone about the graphic images in that video. earlier we heard from hisam, he lost his mother, his younger sister, his brother—in—law, and three of his nieces. my mum was a proud woman. a devout woman, whose life was family and work. who never said a bad word and
5:27 pm
anybody. she lived her life for others, despite the hardships she suffered. she was kind and caring, andl suffered. she was kind and caring, and i will miss her forever. we heard from tom at the grenfell tower the queen is hosting a garden party at buckingham palace this afternoon, to mark the 70th birthday of prince charles. the day itself is in november, but this afternoon is for charity workers and representatives of the military. the duke and duchess of sussex are also attending — i suppose it is a bit of a danger them overshadowing the main man whose birthday is being celebrated. yes, there is a risk of that. i think they were probably aware more than aware in fact of the commemorations in manchester as
5:28 pm
well, and i don't think there was any desire on the part of the royal family to overshadow any of that. so this was a relatively low—key event, a garden party as you say, to thank so a garden party as you say, to thank so many of the people who work for charities connected to the prince of wales, he has enormous amounts of charitable work and has done for decade, the prince's trust has helped many people, so in the lovely envery rons of the lawns of buckingham palace, a garden party to thank them and also to thank the prince of wales for the amount of time and work and in the words of his son, harry, the amount of passion that he has put into decades of charitable work an appearance too for prince harry and meghan markle as were the duke of duchess of sussex as are, their first public appearance, the duchess wearing a dramatic sweeping off white gown, and an introduction i suppose for her, to something at least of the rest of her life, because it is
5:29 pm
events like these that will dominate much of her life, her public life for the years to come. time for a look at the weather. ben rich is here. we have had some spring sunshine to enjoy today but once again just some thunderstorms that have developed in the afternoon. that is the same whether for the rest of the week, warm sunshine but again at times the risk of some thunderstorms. across the last couple of hours this was the last couple of hours this was the scene in the south—east of england and some of these showers pretty intense. but they were isolated. then going through the night staying largely dry with some mist and low crowd coming in towards
5:30 pm
past of eastern scotland. that misty weather tends to burnbank towards the north sea coastline and tomorrow is another cracking day for most. just a small chance of a late date thunderstorm in the south—east. and for the weekend plenty of warm sunshine but still the threat of some thunderstorms especially in the south. this is bbc news — the headlines. people in manchester have come together to remember the 22 victims of the manchester arena attack. hundreds of others were also injured when a bomb was detonated at an ariana grande concert one year ago today. marks & spencer has said it will close 100 stores in the next four years — the company said the restructure of its business was vital to its future. campaigners have said the government's plans to cut air pollution don't go far enough —
5:31 pm
critics say the clean air strategy puts too much responsibility on local councils. the duke and duchess of sussex have attended their first public engagement as newly weds — the couple were at a buckingham palace event to celebrate prince of wales' 70th birthday. let's get more on our top story today — although sports news now. simon yates has taken a huge step towards becoming the first briton to win the giro d'italia. he rode the time trial of his life, to keep the leader's pinkjersey earlier. he led the race by over two minutes this morning, but although yates is fantastic at going up mountains, time trials aren't something he's great at. and the man in second place overall, tom dumoulin, is the world time trial champion — he was always expected to gain on yates today. the englishman could only give it his best shot and hang in there — he was 75 seconds slower than dumoulin's time,
5:32 pm
but that was enough — yates still leads by 56 seconds with five stages to go. australia's rohan dennis won stage 16 by the way. with less than a month until england kick off their world cup campaign, gareth southgate has confirmed harry kane will lead the team in russia. the tottenham striker becomes the youngest ever captain for england at a world cup. the 2a year—old was picked ahead ofjordan henderson and eric dier who've both captained the national side in recent matches. southgate says kane sets high standards for himself and will lead the squad by example. we area we are a bit afraid of the reaction of the media if we say we want to win so that as made it into a bit of shell. but we are not afraid to say we wa nt shell. but we are not afraid to say we want to win it. we have to be brave and take it on the chin. whether we go out in the group stage
5:33 pm
or semifinal it is the same. that is what we've got to try to discuss as players, just to have no fear. to a story we broke last night... arsenal are set to appoint unai emery as their new manager. the spaniard, who's spent the last couple of seasons in charge of paris saint—germain, is said to have been the ‘unanimous choice' of the arsenal board. patrick gearey takes a look at his credentials. leuluai embry had his pick break at valencia. he took them to third despite financial challenges. then he came back to spain and one the second competition in europe, the by second competition in europe, the rugby league, three times in a row. that impressed paris st germain. they broke the wealth transfer record to sign neymar and this season psg took all three domestic trophies in france but have not
5:34 pm
impressed in europe. he will now move to his seventh job in management in his fourth different country. arsenal aren't the only club doing business in the managerial market... west ham have hired the former manchester city boss manuel pellegrini. here's how the club announced it on social media... an arty and moody looking video. pellegrini won the premier league with city in 201a, and takes over from david moyes who left the club last week. the chilean says he's excited, and is aiming to bring in ‘four or five' players to have a ‘strong team'. golf, and europe's captain thomas bjorn has picked lee westwood, graeme mcdowell, padraig harrington and luke donald as vice—captains for this year's ryder cup against the united states. westwood has won the event seven times as a player. the quartet could still qualify to play in the tournament, but westwood is the only player currently ranked inside the world's top 200. the ryder cup takes place in paris in september, with europe looking to regain the trophy. the wasps flankerjack willis could be out for up to a year because of a knee injury. the 21—year—old was
5:35 pm
hurt during saturday's premiership semi—final. it means he'll also miss england's tour of south africa after recieving his first call—up earlier this month. meanwhile, a number of scarlets players haven't trained ahead of their pro 1a final because they suffered burns during the semi—final. scarlets say they occurred because of glasgow warriors' artificial pitch. the warriors have responded saying they‘ re happy with the surface, but one scarlets player says such pitches should be ‘illegal.’ that's all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. let's get more on our top story today — the first anniversary of the manchester arena attack. my colleague anita mcveigh is in manchester and joins us now. good evening from albert square and
5:36 pm
lots of space around me right now but later this evening this area will be packed with 3500 singers from 80 plus choirs taking place in the event this evening. the second of these set piece events today to mark the first anniversary of the arena attack. manchester together — with one voice. and we have three stages to accommodate all of those requires taking part in this event. as well as the singing we will hear from poet tony walsh who read that: at the vigil in the days after the attack and also performed it at the manchester concert. we will have videos with special messages, a videos with special messages, a video montage featuring ariana grande who has sent her support to eve ryo ne grande who has sent her support to
5:37 pm
everyone here in manchester on this challenging day. around the periphery of the square i can see lots of people gathering i'm just going to get the camera two point darn their down beyond where the media is gathered. lots of people gathering for the event. and listening to the sound checks a little bit earlier i heard one children's choir doing one of those sound checks and it was so poignant to hear the young voices, the kind of voices who very much where the target of the attack at manchester arena. the children of manchester the past in the aftermath why someone the past in the aftermath why someone would deliberately target us. let's see what the atmosphere is like this evening as it evolves. imagine it will be poignant and we will also have an mood of celebrating life reaffirming life. in contrast to the more sombre mood
5:38 pm
naturally at the service, the national service of commemoration earlier today at manchester cathedral. after that i spoke to stuart merry, the stepfather of one of the big rims of the arena attack, martin pat. i began by asking him about the conversation he had after the service with prince william and the prime minister. one of the things i said to prince william was he did talk in his piece about love and i saw the same, that the message of that has come very strong in manchester and across the country following the attack, the support we've had. before it i wasn't an openly loving person, but it's sort of taught me how important that is to help you get through, strong family values. as a family we sort of stuck together and all the friends and just messages we've had has been incredible, really. today my phone has just started pinging al day long and people are sending messages. people i've known from childhood
5:39 pm
sending me messages, to colleagues, just everyone i've met before. and not only that, from around the world, people i've never met before. and just chatting to you a few minutes ago you were saying in some ways today you would rather be at home with the rest of the family with your feet up, but actually you really wanted to be here to give thanks for the support that has been shown since the attack? most definitely, yes. it is very mixed feelings because inside me ijust want to be, we have got a big family network, a lot of friends, ijust want to be with them in the garden on a nice day like this. and just reminiscing, stories of martyn, which we will be doing until late anyway. but, yes, the opportunity to sort of say thank you, it's like what people have done has just been fabulous. and i think that needs to be acknowledged. well we're going to see choirs on
5:40 pm
these different stages with many people gathering around to listen and watch. then in the last half on our of the event the big finale, those 3500 singers gathered on the stages and in this area around me, manchester together — with one voice demonstrating that continued community spirit and continued solidarity, the message that the voices will not be silenced. and the combination of really a couple of major events first anniversary of the attack but also lots of other events going round the city beginning tonight over in sandown
5:41 pm
square. poems, poignant lines from poems and songs will be projected onto buildings around saint and square and that will be going along for a few days. and as for tonight, a reminder you can watch special coverage from seven a reminder you can watch special coverage from seven o'clock of manchester together — with one voice here on bbc news. marks and spencer has announced it will close 100 stores across the uk by 2022. it's part of a reorganisation the firm says is ‘vital‘ for the firm's future. the company has experienced several years of disappointing financial results. the store closures will affect m&s clothing and home stores. here's our business correspondent emma simpson. it's been a presence in this corner of north london for more than 100 years, but not for much longer. this shop is going, along with 13 others, the latest
5:42 pm
m&s stores to close. i think it's terrible. i'm always in the shop. it's a great shop, why is it closing? i'm really shocked, i'm totally gutted. it's going to change the community completely. when my local branch closed down, it felt like the whole of wood green just shut down as well. it'sjust such a shame. marks & spencer has seen falling sales and rising costs, and more of its shoppers going online. in november 2016, the new boss announced an overhaul of its stores. what we want to do is change marks & spencer and become more relevant for our customers, so we are reflecting the changes of people shopping more online, and probably in the future marks & spencer will need less space for its clothing and home ranges. he said there would be 60 fewer clothing and home stores by 2022. today, that's been upped to 100. it's got too many stores that aren't
5:43 pm
making enough profit for it. costs are going up but sales are going down, so it needs to look at its store estate and get rid of the unprofitable ones. here is one of 21 stores that have already closed. a business that wants to be in fewer but better locations. our high streets are undergoing unprecedented change. people are shopping less in physical stores, but the costs of running them have gone up. eroding profitability and pushing some other traditional retailers to the brink. today, the bank of england governor spoke of the challenges facing the industry. the steady growth of online, much less foot fall, and as a consequence of that, there are a number of retailers left with legacy assets and costs that make them uncompetitive. marks & spencer says these changes are vital for its future, but it will mean yet more gaps
5:44 pm
to fill on high streets already under pressure. and yet more jobs at risk. emma simpson, bbc news. facebook‘s founder and chief executive, mark zuckerberg, has promised major changes to protect people's data. he was answering questions from leaders of the main political groups from the european parliament. he admitted that facebook had been too slow to respond to russian interference in the us president election. at the session in brussels this evening, he's promised to use new technology to tackle fake news accounts and the spread of misinformation — and apologised for past failures to protect personal data. it has become clear in the last couple of years we have not done enough to prevent these tools being used to harm us. that goes for fake news, foreign interference in elections and develop those misusing
5:45 pm
people information. we did not take a broad enough view of responsibility and that was a mistake and i'm sorry for that. in 2016 we were too slow to identifying russian interference on facebook in the us presidential election the time we were more focused on more traditional kinds of cyber attack like fishing and malware and we identified those and told people. we we re identified those and told people. we were not carried enough for the kind of coordinated misinformation operations that we are now aware of. this is bbc news at five — the headlines: services are held to remember the 22 people who died in a bomb attack at manchester arena one year ago today. marks & spencer plans to close 100 stores in the next four years, as it restructures its business. tributes continue to the 72 victims of the grenfell tower fire, on the second day of the inquiry into the disaster. an update on the market numbers for you — here's how london's and frankfurt
5:46 pm
ended the day. and in the united states this is how the dow and the nasdaq are getting on. an archbishop in australia has become the most senior roman catholic priest to be convicted of covering up child sexual abuse. philip wilson was found guilty of failing to report crimes committed by another priest, james fletcher in the 1970s. fletcher died in prison in 2006. from sydney, hywel griffith reports. convicted but still trusted by the church to be one of its leaders — archbishop philip wilson left court knowing that when he returns next month, he could be jailed. the 67—year—old was found guilty of protecting a paedophile priest, even though he was alerted by four victims in the 1970s. peter creigh came to him as a 15—year—old to say he had been sexually assaulted and he was turned away, even when his abuser was investigated decades later, the archbishop did nothing.
5:47 pm
today, he finally feels vindicated. huge sense of relief. a very significant day for all victims and their families. the priest who carried out the abuse, jim fletcher, died injail. the legacy of his actions is still felt deeply, partly because it took so long for his victims to be believed. if this bloke had done something in 1976, which was the year i was born, my life would have been a lot different than what it is today. fletcher was already abusing me by then, but he could have... wilson could have stopped it, he could have got me help. we are talking about children being sexually abused and the archbishop knew. that, to me, demands a custodial sentence. archbishop, were you surprised by the verdict today? if the archbishop is jailed, pressure will grow on the vatican to act. the catholic church has been accused of covering up abuse in several countries, putting its own reputation ahead of those in need.
5:48 pm
hywel griffith, bbc news. campaigners say a government plan to halve the number of people exposed to high particle pollution in england does not go far enough. ministers wants to curb smoke from wood—burners as well as pollution from diesel machinery by 2025 critics say the plan lacks detail and the government is passing the buck to councils. our environment analyst roger harrabin explains. filthy air has become a national crisis with angry parents demanding action. the government has been dragged through the courts over failures to tackle nitrogen dioxide emissions, mainly from vehicles. today's consultation says too little about car pollution for the liking of campaigners. what the strategy fails to do is provide incentives and support to people to move away from just using vehicles. we need cleaner vehicles and fewer vehicles on the road. in fact the government's consultation document today
5:49 pm
deliberately takes a broad approach to many sorts of pollution. by taking steps both to reduce petrol and diesel cars on our roads but also to deal with everything from wood—burning stoves to the pollution generated by ammonia on agricultural land, we're doing everything we can to ensure the next generation lead healthier lives. that's a welcome relief for the motoring lobby. we welcome michael gove looking at other sources of pollution, what we are looking for is drivers, 37 million of them not getting hit hard in the pocket again. here's another area the policy will address — farms are the main source of ammonia, an irritant gas that forms particles that get sucked deep into the lungs. the gas comes off animal slurry. farmers will be paid to curb it. household fires are addressed, too. along with wood stoves, they cause 38% of sooty particle pollution. the dirtiest sort of coal is likely to be banned nationally, although the open fires
5:50 pm
will still be allowed. wood burners will still be permitted but the government will encourage people to burn dry wood that emits less smoke. how do you tell whether wood is fit to burn or not? this was cut recently, there are a few marks on it where it's drying but it's not ready yet. this on the other hand was cut much longer ago, it's got heavy cracks, and this is what's known as starring. this wood is dry enough to burn. the question is, how on earth can the government enforce rules over what people burn in their own homes? today's document will address some pollution issues in the uk but it leaves many questions in the air. roger harrabin, bbc news. spectacular fountains of lava continue to erupt from hawaii's mount kilauea. civil defence teams are preparing to evacuate local residents, and geologists say the volcano is expected to become even more active, spewing greater volumes
5:51 pm
of lava and toxic gas. 0ur correspondent chris buckler is on the island. after erupting from deep beneath the ground of this island, lava has now reached the ocean, and to get here it has destroyed all in its path. molten rock stands more than 20 feet high, where it has claimed the land. still burning and still deeply dangerous. you can see how roads have become cut off, because this is a huge mound of lava that has made its way down from the various fissures, the cracks in the ground that have opened up and the lava has simply fountained out. the smoke and fumes are toxic, but that's not the only worry. sections of this scorched surface are still being split apart. we are concerned that there is the possibility of additional
5:52 pm
fissures opening up, or even lava that might be travelling in tubes under the surface that could spring up elsewhere. the lava is continuing to jet out at a ferocious rate, and the flow of molten rock is only getting faster. geologists are predicting that the fountains of lava could reach more than 180 metres in height, three times higher than before. even to get into the evacuation area, we had to be escorted by the hawaii national guard. and all who live near kilauea know they can't ignore the volcano. you can hear the fissures, you can hear the explosions, all night and all day. lately we've had about 100 earthquakes a day, the biggest one we had so far was 6.9. this is a spectacular landscape, but beneath these craters it is continuing to be shaped.
5:53 pm
chris buckler, bbc news, on the big island of hawaii. the photographer who took the official wedding pictures for prince harry and meghan markle has described the opportunity as an ‘incredible honour and privilege‘. alexi lubomirski also took the couple‘s official engagement portraits last year. his pictures of the newly married duke and duchess of sussex were released yesterday. 0ne one word i kept throwing around in my head was familiar, you get that sense that they were together embracing and you felt that love. i think with this family picture i wa nted think with this family picture i wanted it to feel like a family picture and not too much like a sports team photo or sort of army photo. very regimented and linear.
5:54 pm
so we talked about how to get some rhythm into the picture and some asymmetry and it all came down to little tiny things, nothing crazy. but just little tiny things, nothing crazy. butjust in terms of how you shop the room rather than going straight on and making everything symmetrical week twisted it a bit and also how week twisted it a bit and also how we placed people, some sitting, some standing, some children on their pa rents standing, some children on their parents lap, just to get that real feeling. then we went to the reception and if the couple had any energy after that we were going to ta ke energy after that we were going to take some shots in the rose garden. so we went out and had about three minutes to take some pictures for the and it was just one of those magical moments when you are a photographer and everything falls into place. i said just sit down on the stairs and she just slumped between his legs and there was this
5:55 pm
moment where they were just laughing, joking about how they were exhausted and glad it was all over and they just looked at exhausted and glad it was all over and theyjust looked at each other laughing, a beautiful moment. when you‘re taking pictures you know you have something but the sleep you do not have time to look at it so it was not until i got back to the hotel when i looked at it and it was just great. time for a look at the weather. talking of pretty pictures, gorgeous scenes are buried today in the spring sunshine for the day. we had some clouds developing in the sky and in places enough to give some thunderstorms. that is the story for the rest of the week, plenty of
5:56 pm
sunshine but the risk of thunderstorms that kind of dog and just in the last couple of hours we‘ve had some showers in parts of south—east england. they seem to be drifting off now into the english channel. so heading into the evening and overnight largely dry for just about everyone but we will have some missed keeping in from the north sea. not a very cold night at seven, 10 degrees. tomorrow begins quite grey a cross 10 degrees. tomorrow begins quite grey across some parts of central and eastern england and eastern scotla nd and eastern england and eastern scotland but much of that cloud burning back towards north sea coasts and then we‘re looking at a great day with some 1‘s belt of sunshine. cooler close to some north sea coasts but away from those areas and other one day. 2a degrees in the
5:57 pm
south but even further north around 1920. high—pressure trying to hold on as we get deeper into the week at this weather front trying to move in. that could introduce some more widespread downpours and thunderstorms as we go into thursday. the further north you are largely dry with long spells of sunshine and for northern areas things continue to warm up. around 20, 21 degrees in belfast and edinburgh. some rain further south but feeling quite humid and that continues into the weekend. more thundery and heavy rain in the south, and with that we also tap into some increasingly warm air from the near continent. suffer the weekend, rank holiday weekend, some high temperatures, well into the mid—20s. some styles of sunshine but
5:58 pm
still the threat of some thunderstorms especially in the south. today at six — the people of manchester unite in silence to remember those who lost their lives in the bomb attack one year ago. it took place during a service of commemoration at manchester cathedral, with tributes and later applause in memory of those who died. each of the 22 victims was named in the service, as the bishop of manchester underlined the extensive impact of the events of a year ago. all who were affected have a lasting place in our hearts. you have become part of the story of our city and we will be part of yours. we‘ll be hearing from some of those whose lives were changed on 22nd may last year.
5:59 pm
6:00 pm
6:01 pm
6:02 pm

64 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on