Skip to main content

tv   Breakfast  BBC News  May 24, 2018 6:00am-8:30am BST

6:00 am
hello, this is breakfast, with steph mcgovern and charlie stayt. increase taxes to prevent nhs "misery". a major report warns services won't improve unless every household pays an extra £2000 to keep the health service afloat. good morning. it's thursday 24th may. also this morning... jobs for prisoners — more inmates could be temporarily released to do work experience, in a bid to cut re—offending. engage in talks or risk a nuclear stand—off — north korea threatens to pull out of a planned summit with the us. good morning. of the 100 biggest british companies on the stock market, still only seven are run by women. i've been talking to the youngest of those, liv garfield at water company severn trent, about her rapid rise to the top. in sport, it's the first day of england's cricketing summer and they have a new spinner —
6:01 am
dom bess will make his england debut in the opening test against pakistan. thousands of students will be taking their maths gcse today and naga jayne and tim will be sitting it alongside them. we'll have some final tips for keeping calm. and we'll be finding out what's in store for the weather over the bank—holiday weekend. good morning. first, our main story. taxes are going to have to rise to maintain the current level of care offered by the nhs, according to a major new report into the future of the health service. the institute for fiscal studies and health foundation warn that every household will need to contribute an extra £2,000 a year by 2033, as people live longer and the number of patients with long—term health conditions rises. our health editor hugh pym reports. the prime minister has promised a long—term funding plan for the nhs. it's expected within weeks. but there's high—level wrangling across whitehall over how much more money will be required.
6:02 am
today, two leading think tanks working with the nhs confederation have come up with proposals. their report says significant funding increases will be needed because of demographic factors, and that will probably mean higher taxes. the number of people aged over 85 will go up by 1.3 million over 15 years — almost as much as the increase in the entire population under 65. average uk health spending increases between 2014 and 2016 were 2.3% per year, but the report says 3.3% per year will be needed over the next 15 years just to sustain current levels of care. even slight improvements will need increases of 4% a year. if paid for by higher taxes, that could add £2,000 to household bills in 15 years‘ time. the real challenge here is that health and social care spending is easily the biggest thing that government does, and over time we've spent
6:03 am
more on it. looking forward we've got more older people, increased costs, we're going to need to spend more over the next ten, 15 years. you increase the biggest bit of government spending, that's very costly and, in the long run, that must mean higher taxes to pay for it, because it's very hard to see what else you could cut. the nhs confederation said it was time for honesty and a wider public debate to try to avoid a decade of misery for the old, the sick and the vulnerable. hugh pym, bbc news. let's get more on this from our political correspondent chris mason who's in westminster. what's the government going to do about this? this is a massive challenge for the government. it is a new dilemma. 0n average many of us
6:04 am
government. it is a new dilemma. 0n average many of us live longer with long and complicated health conditions. it is an age—old problem at the heart of it. the owner pays? as we were hearing from you, any number associated with the nhs is vast and has an innumerable number of noughts on the end of it because of noughts on the end of it because of the cost of preparing health across such a big system. the government is saying it wants to come up with some sort of long—term funding system for the nhs as opposed to these ongoing rows that we regularly cover around funding. there have been fraught discussions within government between the health secretary, the chancellor and the prime minister over exactly this kind of thing. 0thers prime minister over exactly this kind of thing. others make the argument and say, ok, given that lots of people will accept that it's worth putting money into the nhs, why not have what is known as a hypothecated tax, attacks which effectively says this is for the nhs, then you get those in government to say that gets too
6:05 am
complicated and there will because to do it for everything and that will be something of a headache. this discussion is not going away. there is not a revolution yet as we look towards the 70th anniversary of nhs, coming up in the summer. more than 60% of nhs accident and emergency departments are not doing enough to keep patients safe, according to the health watchdog. the care quality commission says pressures on services mean some patients are receiving unacceptable levels of care, and that action is needed. the department of health says it's committed to a long term plan to help the nhs cope with increased demand. a complaint about the commons speakerjohn bercow has been referred to the police. a spokesman for the metropolitan police said an allegation of misconduct in public office was being "assessed". mr bercow, who is facing calls to stand down, was reported to the commons‘ standards watchdog this week over the claims he called the leader of the commons, andrea leadsom, "a stupid woman". he has also been accused of bullying two former private secretaries — claims he denies. more prisoners could be released
6:06 am
to work on a temporary licence as part of a new government plan to cut re—offending. it's part of a new ministry ofjustice plan to help former offenders find and keep jobs after they leave prison. jon ironmonger has been to hmp hindley to see how the scheme works for inmates there. this busy workshop is inside hindley prison and the men making house panels are all serving jail sentences. keenan o'neill got three years for smuggling drugs, but now he's got a job and says he wants to keep it. had a babyjust before i came to jail, and my girlfriend, so i want to sort my life out and not end up back in here like everyone else. it's probably changed my life, jail, really. probably more determined to get a job when i get out than i was before because i know what it's like to come here now. hmp hindley has built workspaces and enticed local employers to help inmates get their lives back on track. it's a model the government hopes can help to curb reoffending.
6:07 am
under a new strategy announced today, there'll be a consultation on getting more prisoners into workplaces on temporary licences. businesses will be lobbied to employ ex—offenders and could be given tax incentives. and governors will be given more control over education programmes. reoffending is a huge problem — nearly half of all adult prisoners commit another crime within 12 months of being released, costing the taxpayer around £15 billion a year and keeping more pressure on a prison system that is already overcrowded. prisons are beset with problems from drug use to rising violence, and the prison officers' association said ministers needed to get the basics right first. north korea is once again threatening to reconsider taking part in a summit with president trump next month. in a sharply worded statement, a close aide to kim jong—un said it was up to the united states
6:08 am
whether the two countries meet at the negotiating table or engage in a nuclear showdown. china, meanwhile, has urged to the two nations to make history saying "now is the time" to reach a peace deal. the russian embassy has asked the uk for permission to speak with yulia skripal — who was poisoned in a nerve agent attack along with her father sergei in salisbury earlier this year. an embassy spokesperson said russia wanted to check that yulia is not being held in the uk against her will. the request comes after she gave an interview to the reuters news agency about her experience and recovery. translation: we are so lucky to have both survived this attempted assassination. i don't want to describe the details but the clinical treatment was invasive, painful and depressing. 0ur recovery has been slow and extremely painful. police are questioning a 19—year—old man on suspicion of preparing acts of terrorism. he was arrested last night
6:09 am
in bishop's stortford in hertfordshire — where a property has been searched by officers. scotland yard said their enquiries were linked to two further arrests in london last week. jeremy corbyn says the labour party won't support any brexit deal that includes a return to the hard border between northern ireland and the irish republic. mr corbyn will make his first trip to belfast as labour leader later today. he's expected to argue that a new, comprehensive customs union between the uk and eu would prevent communities being divided. if you were watching breakfast yesterday you may remember we told you about an appeal for information after an elderly couple lost their car somewhere in cheltenham. friends and family of hilda and emmanuel spent four days looking for the ford fiesta after the pair parked up near a hospital before an appointment. but a call for help on their local bbc radio station paid off and the car was found almost as they'd left it,
6:10 am
900 metres from the hospital but with three parking tickets! it's all been very wonderful and everybody‘s been so kind. yeah. without exception. the police, even that traffic warden we spoke tojust now. everybody in the media has been so understanding and supportive. cheltenham borough council told the bbc that the couple would still need to appeal the parking fines but promised to "look at their appeal sympathetically". i think it's easily done, leaving the car summer, when you are waiting ona the car summer, when you are waiting on a hospital appointment and you have got your mind on other things. i've done a hundred times, in shopping centres. i did it about two weeks ago. could not remember where i left the car. it is stressful. you wa nt to i left the car. it is stressful. you want to be able to ring it, don't
6:11 am
you? i think that the nights are getting shorter, the sun is shining, it is warm. it is the start of the summer season it is warm. it is the start of the summer season for cricketers. hopefully it should mean a change in their fortunes after the winter they had had. it was a disaster. their fortunes after the winter they had had. it was a disasterlj their fortunes after the winter they had had. it was a disaster. i think you meant the nights are getting shorter and the danes are getting longer! —— the days. they will focus on fitness and discipline. there was talk about extracurricular activities over the winter, as well. hoping the team will be more focused this time round. they take on pakistan at lord's in the first of two test matches — and spinner dom bess will make his debut. he's only 20 and he's played just 16 first—class matches but simon yates is still
6:12 am
in the pinkjersey — he's four days away from becoming the first british rider to win the giro d'italia, with a lead of 56 seconds. unai emery is the man to drive the next chapter at arsenal, according to chief executive ivan gazidis. the spaniard says he can't wait to get started with the gunners. and england defender lucy bronze is aiming to win the women's champions league for the first time. she'll be part of the lyon team who face wolfsburg in kiev this evening. plenty of champions league action this weekend. looking forward to that. thanks very much. ben rich has the weather this morning. hello. there is plenty more spring sunshine in the forecast for the next few days. it'll feel warm in the sunshine, as well, but it's not quite that simple because,
6:13 am
in southern areas particularly, there is the risk of some thundery showers. we'll see some of those during the day on thursday, courtesy of this little weather front that's been sneaking its way in from the continent. it doesn't like much but itjust introduces that extra kick of energy and moisture that the asp needs to generate some of these showers and storms. they'll be quite hit and miss but they'll be drifting westwards as we go on through the day. for eastern scotland and north east england, quite a lot of low cloud and fog to start off, but that'll tend to burn its way back towards the coast. things brightening up as the day goes on. here's how it looks on our high resolution weather model in a bit more detail across wales, parts of england, as well. we'll see these showers and thunderstorms drifting their way westwards. should brighten up by the afternoon, though, for east anglia, the south—east and eventually much of the midlands. northern england, northern ireland and scotland seeing long spells of sunshine, but still some of that mist and murk and low cloud lapping onto the north sea coastlines as we go on through the day. so as a consequence,
6:14 am
temperatures in aberdeen and newcastle will be pegged back to around 1a or 15 degrees. but elsewhere, some real warmth to be had, particularly in the best of the sunshine. highs of 22 or 23. now, during thursday night, we are expecting further showers, perhaps thunderstorms, to drift up from the near continent. moving a bit further north at this stage. north—east england, eastern scotland holding onto some of that coastal mist and fog and low cloud rolling a little bit further inland as the night wears on. we start friday morning on quite a muggy note, actually. temperatures generally around eight to 1a degrees. during the day on friday, we'll see further pulses of wet weather. some thunderstorms drifting further north, perhaps getting all the way up into northern england at this stage. to the north of that, northern ireland, scotland seeing long spells of sunshine. further south, i suspect it'll be quite cloudy for much of the time. quite muggy, as well. 19 degrees in plymouth and in cardiff, 20 in the sunshine there in belfast. those temperatures look set to climb as we move on through the weekend. we're going to tap into this very, very warm air sitting in place across the near continent. it's going to waft up
6:15 am
in our direction but what we're also going to bring up from the south is further areas of heavy, perhaps thundery rain. particularly, we suspect, drifting towards the south—west of the uk as high pressure has more of an influence further north. so northern areas mostly dry, some dry weather and sunshine further south, some real one, as well, but the risk of some thunderstorms. let's take a look at today's papers. let's go through the front pages first. starting with the times. this is yulia skripal, who has spoken for the first time about that poison attack which she was picked by, with her father. she attack which she was picked by, with herfather. she described it attack which she was picked by, with her father. she described it as an assassination attempt yesterday as she faced the cameras for the first time, after that attack in salisbury. that image on the front page of all the papers, pretty much.
6:16 am
the mail talks about a plot to subvert brexit being exposed. the daily telegraph talking about brexit, and jeremy corbyn heading to belfast for the first time as labour leader. it says that he has been accused of defying the will of the people by expressing support for the unification of ireland. yulia skripal also on the front page of the sun. the mirror has gone with a story about the 1966 world cup, which went missing for a week. and then was redfern. —— it was returned. it has been reported a few times since then. it is one of those curious stories. is the world cup starting? it is getting under way.
6:17 am
everyone is getting a little bit excited about it now. i think it hasn't quite kicked in yet. there we re hasn't quite kicked in yet. there were conversations amongst friends at the weekend plotting theirjune diary, pozzo family events clashing with games. 0ne diary, pozzo family events clashing with games. one man dominated the back pages, unai emery, the newcastle manager. this was the photograph taken to launch him, similarto photograph taken to launch him, similar to one from 1996, the exact same thoughts photograph. they are hoping that he might have the same career in the early days —— venue arsenal manager. it'll be interesting to see how it goes next season. it is the start of the pga championships. rory mcilroy does not like being famous, he will not like the fact that he's in all the papers talking about not wanting to be
6:18 am
famous! he was named an apollo as the most famous uk sportsperson, above the likes of gareth bale and lewis hamilton, and he says he doesn't want to be famous, he just wa nts to doesn't want to be famous, he just wants to be a brilliant golfer. he must have known, you're going to be world number one at some point... it isa shame, world number one at some point... it is a shame, if you're good at something, you have to be splashed all over the papers every day. i guess. in the world of business, if you're one of the best in the world at that, talking about inflation prices, windows results came out yesterday, inflation falls again. that's good news for people generally, that prices haven't been rising as much as previously. and the times has put a picture of a shark next to it, because airfares was a big reason that prices were
6:19 am
not rising as much the shias last year. you certainly wouldn't see a shark on holiday. it was a tory, cuddly one. not everyone. the consumer group which? has done a report on sunscreen. they reckon some of the budget brands are just as good as some of the more expensive ones. interesting, they tested two on named water resistant sunscreen is an found that once they had gone in sea water, the rating for spf fell by up to 60%. if you go infora for spf fell by up to 60%. if you go in for a bit, and you come out, the industry says it only falls by a few %, but they are saying that you can see quite drastic changes. they haven't named the two that they looked at. what's the point in
6:20 am
testing them eff you aren't going to name them? clearly, there are some doubts behind the scenes, when we cover the stories, you have to be careful. it raises that question about what you are buying, how much your spending on sunscreen, you have one at £2 and one at £6, which one do you go for? thank you. has anyone had those e—mails coming in about data protection? so many of them. if you've checked your email inbox over the last few weeks you won't have been able to avoid messages about new data privacy rules known as ‘gdpr'. the general data protection regulations, which come into effect tomorrow, are designed to give us greater control over who holds our personal data, but one of the side—effects has been a stream of emails from companies desperate to hang on to our details.
6:21 am
so how have people been dealing with their overflowing inboxes? phone alerts not responded i feel like that was kind of spam, so i've not really done it. i've been getting loads from, like, fried chicken shops and gambling things and all kinds of stuff but ijust tend to ignore them. the major ones i've done, i've clicked except, but the majority, i'm just overloaded with it. my phone's going off every couple of minutes. they're inconsistent. half of them want you to e—mail back if you want to state subscribed, half of them want to e—mail back if you don't want to stay subscribed. i didn't really fully understand it. ijust assumed it was the same as before for a bit better from the point of view of privacy. it's a good way to clear off the junk mail from the inbox. i apologise if you were checking
6:22 am
your phone during that! we'rejoined by data protection consultant annabel kaye, who can tell us a bit more about why we're getting so many of these emails, and what to do with them. do people ignore, respond, what is going on? it is complete madness. it has been set off by the changes to data privacy. but some of the people doing it have misunderstood it and at least half of those companies have no need whatsoever to be e—mailing you, because there has been such a muddle about how it is communicated. i've had 500 please stay with me e—mails this morning. in theory, they should stop e—mailing you. in practice, because people have such a hazy grasp of the new rules, they have asked you to reply if you don't want, which is the opposite of what should be going on so
6:23 am
the opposite of what should be going on so i'm just not answering any of them. is it a case of you needing to them. is it a case of you needing to ' 7 them. is it a case of you needing to opt in? the majority of the e—mails i've had, if you do not opt in you will not get any more e—mails from us, but other company say if you don't respond to this e—mail, then you will stay with us, you will be kept in. what is the actual truth about this? the truth is that the rod two types of e—mails, marketing is, from companies you have ever bought anything from, you should not stay on the list unless you say, yes i want to stay on the list. there are also e—mails from people you've done business with who have no need to send you this e—mail because all they ever needed to for you under they ever needed to for you under the new rules was the right to leave, which you get on the bottom of every e—mail, it is called unsubscribe. but they have got this ina unsubscribe. but they have got this in a muddle and they have sent you these. it is very easy to make a muddle and the ones you wanted to
6:24 am
keep you didn't, and get it the wrong way round. what significance ofjune to this? it comes into force this friday, i cannot answer 15,000 e—mails so i'm going to let it settle down until june, e—mails so i'm going to let it settle down untiljune, then i will search my e—mail box using keywords to hear from organisations search my e—mail box using keywords to hearfrom organisations i want to hear from to hearfrom organisations i want to hearfrom and just to hearfrom organisations i want to hear from and just answer those. just to go back to what you said, if you ignore all the messages, what is the worst that could happen? you will be on some lists you don't want to be on, and you will not be on some lists you want to be on. so it is no difference from that? that is what the situation is now. it is everybody getting ready not to be fine. there has been a massive panic about that. people have got it into their head that they have got to
6:25 am
e—mail you get you to click a box before friday, and they have done at. it is scary. annabel, there will be more questions. you are going to come back later. we will get people to write in write in with their questions. so many businesses are worried about what to do. and it is all a bit of a muddle at the moment. tomorrow we'll be bringing you much more about the changes as they come into force, and speaking to the information commissioner, elizabeth denham. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. still to come this morning... sports supplements are increasingly being marketed as a key part of exercise regimes, with claims they can help build muscle or trim fat — but now there's a warning they could contain a dangerous cocktail of chemicals and lead to unexpected side—effects. we'll talk to the uk anti—doping authority a little later. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sara 0rchard. black people in london are four
6:26 am
times more likely to have force used against them by the met police than white people, new figures suggest. 0fficers used force against black people 23,000 times last year — the first full year that they had to record each time that force was used. these figures are very alarming. if the met really is using this level of disproportionate force against black people, that is not a recipe for good police community relations. the metropolitan police has been approached for comment. a 19—year—old man has been arrested in hertfordshire on suspicion of preparing acts of terrorism. met police say the arrest took place in bishop's stortford last night. an address in the town is being searched. scotland yard says it's linked to the arrest of an 18—year—old in north london on friday. an exhibition which captures the lives of the first generation of caribbeans to have settled in london goes on display from today. the photos were taken
6:27 am
by award—winning photographer jim grover for the collection called windrush: portrait of a generation. they'll be on display at london's south bank until the 10th ofjune. the elizabeth line has taken another significant step towards completion with its 200—metre—long trains being tested on the tracks beneath east london. the construction of the new line is the biggest infrastructure project in europe, and is due to open in central london this december. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there are severe delays on the picadilly line this morning. a good service on all other lines. 0n the roads there is northbound traffic on the blackwall tunnel. southern approach is slow from the woolwich road flyover. heading out of acton towards park royal, traffic on the aao is down to the outside lane westbound at the junction with mansfield road where there is flooding across all three lanes. let's have a check on the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. you may well have been woken up by thunderstorms last night. it's pretty wet under foot this morning and there are some rather
6:28 am
large puddles around, too, through the morning rush hour. now, there will be further heavy showers on and off through the course of the day, a rumble or two of thunder. lots of dry weather around, as well, and bright spells for many later on this afternoon, especially towards the north. now, important not to take this too literally, really. just understand there will be further showers on and off through the day. something a bit brighter emerging through the late morning into the afternoon, particularly for northern areas. the further south and east you are, the cloudier it's likely to be, but showers expected just about anywhere, really. through the afternoon, temperatures in the best of the brightness will still get up into the low 20s in celsius. it is going to feel rather humid. now, there's more showers expected through this evening's rush—hour. some of them again heavy, thundery. further downpours overnight, too, so a rather wet start to the date tomorrow for many of us and really quite cloudy, but it will be a mild start, too — between 12 and 1a celsius. now, it should brighten up tomorrow afternoon, we'll get some good spells of sunshine and temperatures will rise over the bank holiday weekend — 26 to 28 celsius with possibly
6:29 am
some isolated thunderstorms. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to charlie and steph. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with steph mcgovern and charlie stayt. it's thursday 24th may. we'll have the latest news and sport injust a moment but coming up later in the programme: what will the nhs look like in 2033? and how are we going to fund it? we'll ask what the future holds for our health care and whether higher taxes are the only way to pay for our ageing population. i know you've been working hard toward your maths gcse and i want to give you a vote of confidence. i know you can do it, you know deep inside you can do it so best of luck. brave members of our breakfast
6:30 am
team. naga, jayne and tim will take all the luck they can get as theyjoin thousands of students around the country in taking their gcse maths exam today. and after 9.00, we speak to the former metropolitan police 0fficer revealing the good, the bad and the ugly of a decade spent maintaining london's thin blue line. all that still to come. but now a summary of this morning's main news. taxes may have to rise to historically high levels over the next 15 years in order to properly fund the nhs, according to a major report by two leading think tanks. the institute for fiscal studies and the health foundation say the average household tax bill may need to rise by £2,000 just to maintain current standards of health and social care. they also warn that pressure on the system will increase because of a growing and ageing population. we are at a tipping point now. the ageing of our population and the rising burden of long—term health conditions means that we can't go on
6:31 am
with the historically low funding we've had for the last eight years. we need to return to a level of funding commensurate with the first 60 years of our nhs, and we need to make sure that we have the skilled workforce that we need to deliver that care. a complaint about the commons speakerjohn bercow has been referred to the police. a spokesman for the metropolitan police said an allegation of misconduct in public office was being "assessed". mr bercow, who is facing calls to stand down, was reported to the commons' standards watchdog this week over the claims he called the leader of the commons, andrea leadsom, a stupid woman. he has also been accused of bullying two former private secretaries — claims he denies. more prisoners could be granted temporary release to work, under a new government strategy to cut re—offending. thejustice secretary has announced plans to match employers with inmates, and encourage businesses to take on ex—offenders. no extra funding has been allocated to pay for the changes, leading the the prison 0fficers' association to claim that
6:32 am
the announcement "lacked detail". north korea has declared that it is up to the united states whether the two countries now meet at the negotiating table — or engage in a nuclear showdown. in its sharply worded statement, pyongyang said it would not beg for a us dialogue ahead of a landmark meeting between the two nations next month. meanwhile a group ofjournalists, selected by the north korean regeime, have travelled to a remote region of country to observe the dismantling of a nuclear test facility. 0ur asia correspondent rupert wingfield—hayes is in the south korean capital seoul. good morning. iwonder good morning. i wonder if you could ta ke good morning. i wonder if you could take us through what we should make of these latest statements. yeah, well, it certainly contains some choice phrases, particularly in its attack on the us vice president mike
6:33 am
pence, calling him a political dummy and saying that he engaged in ignorant, stupid remarks gushing from his mouth. so, you know, it's the sort of thing we used to hear from north korea quite a lot but haven't for a number of months. this is really about the vice president going on a news show in the us and referring to the libya model for denuclearisation of north korea and it's very clear that pyongyang does not want to hear the word libya weight comes to these negotiations that are supposed to take place in singapore, that north korea is different and the libya model is not for north korea, there will never accept it. i think that's what it's about ahead of the singapore summit. at the same time here on the korean peninsular, things are moving forward. this group ofjournalists have gone into north korea, we think, should have arrived at the nuclear site sometime in the last hour or two, deep in the mountains of north korea, and they will witness the destruction of a number of tunnels deep in the mountain that that have been used for north
6:34 am
korea's six nuclear tests, a really historic moment, suddenly a symbolic moment when we get pictures of that coming out of north korea. for the moment, thank you. at least two people have been killed and 18 injured after a truck crashed into a passenger train in northern italy. the incident happened at a level crossing near the town of turin. it's believed the train driver is amongst the dead. the most seriously injured have been airlifted to hospital. improving northern rail's performance is now the departments of tra nsport‘s number one performance priority, according to chris grayling. the transport secretary's comments come amidst widespread criticism of the company over cancellations, delays and the implementation of a new timetable earlier this week. the company has apologised to passengers but said many of the problems had been caused by delays in electrification work being carried out by network rail. the government is also investigating whether northern has breached its franchise agreement to run trains. hundreds of schools across england have not been inspected for more
6:35 am
than ten years according to a study by the national audit office. it follows a decision by the government in 2012 that schools previously rated as 0utstanding don't require routine inspections. the report also found a drop of 52% in government spending on inspections since the year 2000. 0fsted said it "gets the balance right" in allocating dwindling resources by focusing on poor—performing schools. and the californian surfboard has undergone a makeover. this is foil—boarding. that's an odd image, isn't it? a wing under the water helps it rise up in the air as it gains speed. and because there's less drag it can travel much faster — even on the smallest of waves.
6:36 am
but it won't stop you falling off every now and again. is it easier, do you think, to actually do it? my impression is it's more difficult, but i don't know. they seem happy, don't they? they've had a nice day on this earth. yeah, they're absolutely buzzing, charlie, aren't they? they're going to have a nice warm soup. why is it called foil boarding?” thought it would be wrapped in tinfoil! i didn't get that. it looks much harder. hopefully things will not be harderfor much harder. hopefully things will not be harder for england's cricketers. we are ready for the summer season. cricketers. we are ready for the summer season. that was one heck of a winter we had in every sense of the word. for england cricket fans it was head in hands. not the winter we we re it was head in hands. not the winter we were expecting at all. six out of seven defeats. sorry, in seven tests. it's not great, is it? there
6:37 am
we re tests. it's not great, is it? there were a lot of things happening off the field, as well. extracurricular activities, i gets there to say a lot of accusations about drinking and anti—social behaviour. now it's about fitness and discipline and they feel good when it's come pakistan later today. a young squad, too. like the england world cup squad. a lot of people making those comparisons. a young, fit side. there has to be a future in this. england take on pakistan at lord's in the first of two tests. somerset spinner dom bess will make his debut. bess is just 20 and — you might remember this — he received his surprise call—up while out shopping for a sofa. root says bess is ready for test cricket. he's really clear about what he wants to do in the game and how he's going to approach this week. and that's all you can really ask of someone making their debut. it's really exciting for me, as captain. all you want to do is get given your cap and get out there, so he has approached this week really well and hopefully he can have a good start to a good, long career. simon yates is four days away
6:38 am
from making history at the giro d'italia as he tries to become the first briton to win the race. he finished in the main bunch on a wet stage 17, to keep his 56—second lead intact. today will be tough — the first of three mountainous stages that will decide who finishes on top of that podium in rome. unai emery can "drive the next chapter" at arsenal after being introduced as the club's first new manager in 22 years, according to the club's chief executive. emery had his first look around the emirates stadium since being chosen to succeed arsene wenger. the spaniard said he can't wait to get going. i am very excited for this opportunity. a big club, a great city, a grand stadium and also, a great player.
6:39 am
there's no british team involved but there is a star british player in this evening's women's champions league final. lucy bronze, named this week as the bbc women's footballer of the year, scored for lyon in the semifinals. her side — the defending champions — face wolfsburg. you can watch the match on the red button or bbc sport website. now, some of you might remember the impressive stylings of enzo vieira — the eight—year—old son of real madrid's marcelo — in what's been dubbed the bin challenge. here's a reminder. enzo went viral online last week after his dad posted this video on instagram. the idea being that you head the ball — in this instance, with every madrid player — without letting it fall or catching it... before popping it in the bin at the end. there it goes.
6:40 am
well, now he's thrown down the gauntlet to his dad. here he is with enzo's real madrid youth team taking on the same bin challenge. and it's a case of "like father like son". cue wild celebrations in spain. it's quite hard to do if you've ever tried it. i wonder how many attempts to do that. have you ever tried to head a ball, let alone get it on target? it's not that easy. head a ball at all? it's not always coming at you in the right direction. we should give it a go. where not going to do it here! thanks very much. we've talked about this a lot on brea kfast, we've talked about this a lot on breakfast, women who havejobs we've talked about this a lot on breakfast, women who have jobs at the top of business, of which there
6:41 am
are few. yes, and the types of businesses that all our top 100 companies in the ftse100, the businesses that all our top 100 companies in the ftse 100, the type of businesses they are and how they affect us. water is one of those big deals in that. liv garfield is the ceo of severn trent water. she was the youngest ever ftse 100 chief executive when she got thatjob at 38 but before that she was head of open reach so she knows about trying to get stuff to our doors, whether it's wi—fi or broadband. now she's in charge of 8 million customers they have to get water supplied to. she recently won a pretty prestigious businesswoman of the year award, as well, so she's highly thought of. one of those chief executives, already got a huge job at such a young age, you wonder where she might end up. yesterday, the company revealed it had had to pay a few penalties. £30 million
6:42 am
worth because of various burst pipes. there was a big thaw after all that snow. that was an issue for severn trent boult i caught up with her at one of their reservoirs. just outside the snowdonia national park. we are at a beautiful spot for a ftse100 chief executive to have to look after, but the serious side of it, what are the big issues in the water industry at the moment? so the two big issues are currently population growth and climate change. so you've got those two, how on earth do they affect those bills that people are getting on their mats? so every customer wants every bill to be as low as possible, of course they do. and if you've got population growth you have to invest in new assets, you need to make sure you've got all the pipework in place. is the criticism of the industry fair, about too much dividend is paid back to shareholders, not enough competition in the industry? we've invested twice the amount as it was before privatisation. £150 billion of private money. you look at this gorgeous asset here, this was built by the victorians but it's going to need infrastructure spend. you look at bills, they've been steadily going down. when you say going down, i mean,
6:43 am
people, are they seeing a smaller number on their bill each year? in some places, they're seeing a smaller number and it depends, i guess, how much water you use. the honest reality is there is a bit of shared quid pro. if you look at the cost of water, it's good value at less than £1 per day. so how much of a heads up did you have about the thaw that caused so many problems for the industry? at the time we could already see amber warnings coming through and what you tend to do then is begin to gear up. so you begin to say, are there enough reservoir available to put water into? 0ften those weather warnings just dissipate. in this case, it went the other way, it accelerated. and you had to end up asking some businesses to ease off on their use. how difficult is that? you've got a customer and you're saying to, like jaguar land rover, can you not use as much water, please? keep in constant dialogue, make it as short a duration as possible, and then work with them to manage the timing of that to make it feasible for them to do as much of their work as they can. did you think, when you were at university, or just after, that you would ever be the boss of one of our biggest companies?
6:44 am
absolutely not. i've got two career ambitions. i wanted to be a blue peter presenter, which has still not yet occurred. possible. well, neversay never, right? and i wanted to be the manager of everton. once i realised they were unlikely career options for me, then i went and did something which is what most people do. a graduate training scheme. if you happened to be appointed manager of everton... what would you take into a managerial role of a football club? i think i'd be good at listening and saying, tell me all the stuff that clearly isn't working right now and i'd be in a position to then say, ok, what do we take from that? where do we take it next? and how are we going to change it so that we're all brought into what should be an amazing top four clubs. what are the things that you try to implement wherever you've been? so, everyone deserves to know their boss cares about them as a person and their boss is going to help their career become really good. and the second thing is you have to enjoy work, so i try to look at, what are the irritants that are bugging people, and how do we solve those and make work a fun, better place? we spend a lot of hours at work and you've got to love it. so what sort of a boss
6:45 am
is liv garfield ? oh. i guess she's an enthusiastic one. i love myjob, i wake up every day bounding out of bed, knowing i'm going to work. she talks quick, so she probably gets lots done during the day. and i would like to think, people say i'm loyal. so, you ftse100 bosses, do you all talk to each other? is there some kind of whatsapp group that you all chat on? so we don't go on daily runs and we don't have whatsapp groups, but of course you're going to know a good number. you've probably worked in different companies, you might have sat on boards with others, so you're going to know some of them but that'll be no different, i suspect, than tv producers are going to know people at itn, itv, so no more, no less than any other job in the land, i'd say. liv garfield. what a gorgeous backdrop, that being your office. most chief executives are in the city of london. that isn't her office, but still. to spend a lot of time going around there, quite different. interestingly, they don't capitalise that much on tourism. it was a beautiful spot just capitalise that much on tourism. it was a beautiful spotjust outside the national park snowdonia. and an
6:46 am
interesting interview, as well. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning. taxes will need to rise by £2,000 per household per year by 2033 to fund the nhs according to a major new report into the health service's future. thousands of prisoners could be released to work on a temporary license under a government strategy to cut re—offending. matt is in cambridge this morning with a look at this morning's weather. what a beautiful backdrop you have there, good morning. i certainly do. jane, tim and naga have a morning ahead of them with maths gcse. their a—level is going on, finals at university. we have gone to cambridge this morning, a beautiful sight behind me, the river cam, that is the bridge of sighs
6:47 am
built in 1831 and it was named after the bridge of size in venice, even though, architecturally, other than being covered, age doesn't share too many similarities. it will brighten up many similarities. it will brighten up later, but what of the forecast for the rest of the country? let's look at what will happen. there will be more warmth in the sunshine around, temperatures widely into the 20s. as some of you have discovered already, a few thundery showers around, particularly so around the south. drifting through southern england, south midlands, towards wales. a lot of that is, a dry start to the day. clear skies across central and western areas in scotla nd central and western areas in scotland but it will warm up to a cracker this afternoon. lots of cloud in eastern part of scotland but north—west england, northern ireland, sunny start due thursday morning and it will stay that way all day long. a lot more cloud as we drift into wales, the midlands and across east anglia. i'm optimistic
6:48 am
of the coming hours. we should to see the cloud break up the crossbars of east anglia. parts of wales, the south midlands, towards central and southern inwood, some heavy showers in places. the odd rumble of thunder. not everyone will see it uncertainly towards some southern coastal counties we could see a bit of brighton ‘s breakthrough at times. that focus for some heavy, thundery showers will be towards parts of central and southern england, towards wales. maybe the south—west later on. brightening up across east anglia and the south—east, temperatures could be 22 or 23. warmest spots today likely to be the highlands of scotland, 23 or 24 be the highlands of scotland, 23 or 2a degrees. always cooler weather cloud lingers along north sea holes. tonight, the cloud will drift back inland after a bit of respite from showers and thunderstorms, morgan developed, this time further north. east anglia into parts of lincolnshire, yorkshire. a greater chance of seeing the odd rumble of thunder into tomorrow morning. a cool night again to the north—west of scotland. tomorrow, i thundery
6:49 am
sandwich. anywhere through east anglia, parts of northern england, mainly lincolnshire, yorkshire, towards the greater manchester area, across wales. this is where we could see heavy thundery downpours through the day. to the south, southern coastal counties will seek sunshine out so a better day than today and feeling warm, quite humid. to the north of that thundery band across pa rt north of that thundery band across part of the far north—west of england, parts of central western scotla nd england, parts of central western scotland and northern ireland, you should see a fair amount of sunshine. thejobs should see a fair amount of sunshine. the jobs of a shower through northern ireland. sunshine tomorrow, temperatures into the mid—20s in scotland, coolerfurther south and the prospects for the weekend not looking too bad. some thundery showers but for many a cracking bank holiday on the way. i'll keep you updated. where is the best place to be this bank holiday weekend? this bank holiday weekend, probably the north—west of england, west of scotland and northern ireland. temperatures there into the mid—20s. feeling lovely indeed quite days.
6:50 am
rather looking forward to seeing some people punting later on. looks quiet on the waterway at the moment. they are sensible, early, they are in bed. see you later. the mother of a disabled 11—year—old boy is suing a theme park for failing to provide an appropriate disabled toilet for her son. rachel george claims flambards theme park in cornwall failed to make reasonable adjustments for her son adam because it did not provide a specialised changing places toilet. but the park's manager says installing such a facility would be unreasonably expensive. our legal correspondent clive coleman reports. three, two, one, go. adam george was born with a genetic condition that wea ke ns born with a genetic condition that weakens his muscle, affect his voice and makes him a full—time wheelchair user. he also has autism but it hasn't held him back. in order to
6:51 am
use the toilet, you need a hoist, changing table and more space than you'd find in a standard disabled toilet. adam loves going to flambards theme park, but it doesn't have a toilet with changing facilities suitable for his needs. so when the family visit they need to hirea so when the family visit they need to hire a mobile toilet which can cost hundreds. changing places, group trying to change access for an estimated 250,000 group trying to change access for an estimated 250 , 000 disabled group trying to change access for an estimated 250,000 disabled people in the uk who need this kind of equipment and space to use the toilet safely. i think a place like flambards, a theme park, where you expect people to arrive in the morning, stay all day, eat, drink, stay late in the evening, remain for the fireworks, i think i personally would expect it reasonable that i could use the toilet when i go
6:52 am
there, so why shouldn't adam? why shouldn't all disabled people the able to have their toileting needs met with dignity and safety? this is a fixed changing place. it's big, with a powerful hoist, but its bit for adam. under the equality act, all service providers are under a duty to make reasonable adjustments for those with disabilities. so, question. is requiring a business to provide something on this scale reasonable? flambards says it isn't and is defending the legal action brought by rachel george. inclusivity is beastly important for us to make sure everyone has access to our park and rides. we have to bearin to our park and rides. we have to bear in mind there is an overall cost to putting in a full on changing places unit and we've been quoted for the building as well as the equipment in excess of £110,000. that would have an effect on jobs, possibly. what we have done as a
6:53 am
sort of interim stage is put in a mobile post, changing bad. adamjust wa nt to mobile post, changing bad. adamjust want to spend days out with his friends, but that depends in part on what the law decides is reasonable for others to provide in making sure you can use the toilet. if you were watching breakfast yesterday you may remember we told you about an appeal for help after an elderly couple parked their car somewhere in cheltenham — and then couldn't find it again. well the mystery has been solved. steve knibbs picks up the story: the little silver fiesta sat all alone for five days. it's only human contact, council parking wardens, who kindly visited three times. all hilda could remember that it was on a road with some trees and nice houses, and she was right. that night i must have dreamt of this
6:54 am
wonderful place i'd left the car, but it wasn't this place! after hilda dropped a manual —— a manual doing across hospital, she came here. it's quite a trek back and the kabul don't know cheltenham well at. yellow i walked back to tell him i couldn't find the car. i has to keep asking people which weighed to the hospital and they told it's me in chunks. all the efforts that came in for the delightful hilda and emmanuel... the appeal was found after an appeal on bbc radio gloucester which went viral and soon listeners like rob who had seen it called in. i heard it on the radio this morning and i pulled into the car park five minutes later and there it was. happy. relieved. ican sleep now and it's all been very wonderful. everybody has been so kind. so, a happy ending for emmanuel and hilda and the fiesta,
6:55 am
of course. you can totally see how it's done, the way hilda described it, she was told directions to the hospital and on her way couldn't work out her way back. and everyone has done its! maybe not five days... we've all it for a while. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. still to come this morning... if you've recently been inundated with desperate emails from every company you've ever had contact with online, chances are you're already aware that new data rules come into affect on friday. we'll find out what gdpr means for your privacy and your inbox. should you respond ? should you respond? should you say yes, should you say no? let's us know your thoughts. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sara 0rchard. black people in london are four times more likely to have force used against them by the met police than white people,
6:56 am
new figures suggest. 0fficers used force against black people 23,000 times last year — the first full year that they had to record each time that force was used. these figures are very alarming. if the met really is using this level of disproportionate force against black people, that is not a recipe for good police community relations. the metropolitan police has been approached for comment. a 19—year—old man has been arrested in hertfordshire on suspicion of preparing acts of terrorism. met police say the arrest took place in bishop's stortford last night. an address in the town is being searched. scotland yard says it's linked to the arrest of an 18—year—old in north london on friday. an exhibition which captures the lives of the first generation of caribbeans to have settled in london goes on display from today. the photos were taken by award—winning photographer jim grover for the collection called windrush: portrait of a generation.
6:57 am
they'll be on display at london's south bank until the 10th ofjune. the elizabeth line has taken another significant step towards completion with its 200—metre—long trains being tested on the tracks beneath east london. it's due to open in central london this december. let's have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tubes there are severe delays on the picadilly line and a part suspension on the london 0verground. south—eastern have a bus replacement service... let's have a check on the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. you may well have been woken up by thunderstorms last night. it's pretty wet under foot this morning and there are some rather large puddles around, too, through the morning rush hour. now, there will be further heavy showers on and off through the course of the day,
6:58 am
a rumble or two of thunder. lots of dry weather around, as well, and bright spells for many later on this afternoon, especially towards the north. now, important not to take this too literally, really. just understand there will be further showers on and off through the day. something a bit brighter emerging through the late morning into the afternoon, particularly for northern areas. the further south and east you are, the cloudier it's likely to be, but showers expected just about anywhere, really. through the afternoon, temperatures in the best of the brightness will still get up into the low 20s in celsius. it is going to feel rather humid. now, there's more showers expected through this evening's rush—hour. some of them again heavy, thundery. further downpours overnight, too, so a rather wet start to the day tomorrow for many of us and really quite cloudy, but it will be a mild start, too — between 12 and 1a celsius. now, it should brighten up tomorrow afternoon, we'll get some good spells of sunshine and temperatures will rise over the bank holiday weekend — 26 to 28 celsius with possibly some isolated thunderstorms. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom
6:59 am
in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to charlie and steph. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with steph mcgovern and charlie stayt. increase taxes to prevent nhs "misery". a major report warns services won't improve unless every household pays an extra £2000 a year to keep the health service afloat. good morning — it's thursday 24th may. also this morning... jobs for prisoners — more inmates could be temporarily released to do work experience, in a bid to cut re—offending. engage in talks or risk a nuclear stand—off — north korea threatens to pull out of a planned summit with the us. good morning.
7:00 am
the restaurant business is tough with many high street names closing across the country this year. rb talking to someone from dragons' den about how small restaurant can survive and even thrive. in sport, it's the first day of england's cricketing summer and they have a new spinner — dom bess will make his england debut in the opening test against pakistan. good morning, breakfast is back to school. we are sitting maths gcse today. why have we put ourselves through this? we are cramming. we will see later. and matt is out and about for us this morning with the weather. lots of sunshine and one for the bank holiday weekend, but a few showers to come, thunderstorms across the south, sunshine to the north and west. the details in 15 minutes. good morning.
7:01 am
first, our main story. taxes are going to have to rise to maintain the current level of care offered by the nhs, according to a major new report into the future of the health service. the institute for fiscal studies and health foundation warn that every household may need to contribute between £1,200 — £2,000 in extra tax by 2033, as people live longer and the number of patients with long—term health conditions rises. our health editor hugh pym reports. the prime minister has promised a long—term funding plan for the nhs. it's expected within weeks. but there's high—level wrangling across whitehall over how much more money will be required. today, two leading think tanks working with the nhs confederation have come up with proposals. their report says significant funding increases will be needed because of demographic factors, and that will probably mean higher taxes. the number of people aged over 85 will go up by 1.3 million over 15 years — almost as much as the increase in the entire population under 65.
7:02 am
average uk health spending increases between 2014 and 2016 were 2.3% per year, but the report says 3.3% per year will be needed over the next 15 years just to sustain current levels of care. even slight improvements will need increases of 4% a year. if paid for by higher taxes, that could add £2,000 to household bills in 15 years' time. the real challenge here is that health and social care spending is easily the biggest thing that government does, and over time we've spent more on it. looking forward we've got more older people, increased costs, we're going to need to spend more over the next ten, 15 years. you increase the biggest bit of government spending, that's very costly and, in the long run, that must mean higher taxes to pay for it, because it's very hard to see what else you could cut. the nhs confederation said it was time for honesty and a wider
7:03 am
public debate to try to avoid a decade of misery for the old, the sick and the vulnerable. let's get more on this from our political correspondent chris mason, who's in westminster. it is one of the big questions in politics. how do you pay for the increase in costs of the nhs, and this appears to be at detailed, calculated answer. there is an a cce pta nce calculated answer. there is an acceptance on all sides that it is bigger than calculated, and it was a huge figure. whenever people look at health service budgets, they looked like telephone numbers with no end of noughts on the end with reference to billions here and there. we have regularly reported it on this programme. it feels like a patch put on. there is constant pressure for my money he went there. it is the dilemma ofan
7:04 am
my money he went there. it is the dilemma of an ageing population and more of us on average living to an old age with complex conditions, but an old dilemma politically about who on earth pays for it, for how long and, where does the money come from? there have been through discussions in government between the health secretary, chancellor and prime minister about how it should be done, with no resolution yet. there was an acceptance in this report that it was an acceptance in this report thatitis was an acceptance in this report that it is likely to come from tax but then it's a question of which taxes, on you and for how long. the government is yet to resolve this. it will be a huge challenge for this and subsequent governments, not something that can be easily resolved. a complaint about the commons speakerjohn bercow has been referred to the metropolitan police. mr bercow, who is facing calls to stand down, was reported to the commons' standards watchdog this week over the claims he called the leader of the commons, andrea leadsom, "a stupid woman". he has also been accused of bullying two former private secretaries — claims he denies. more prisoners could be released to work on a temporary licence as part of a new government
7:05 am
plan to cut re—offending. the ministry ofjustice hopes it will help inmates find and keep jobs after they leave prison. jon ironmonger reports. this busy workshop is inside hindley prison and the men making house panels are all serving jail sentences. keanan 0'neil got three years for smuggling drugs, but now he's got a job and says he wants to keep it. had a babyjust before i came to jail, and my girlfriend, so i want to sort my life out and not end up back in here like everyone else. it's probably changed my life, jail, really. probably more determined to get a job when i get out than i was before because i know what it's like to come here now. hmp hindley has built workspaces and enticed local employers to help inmates get their lives back on track. it's a model the government hopes can help to curb reoffending. under a new strategy announced today, there'll be a consultation on getting more prisoners
7:06 am
into workplaces on temporary licences. businesses will be lobbied to employ ex—offenders and could be given tax incentives. and governors will be given more control over education programmes. reoffending is a huge problem — nearly half of all adult prisoners commit another crime within 12 months of being released, costing the taxpayer around £15 billion a year and keeping more pressure on a prison system that is already overcrowded. prisons are beset with problems from drug use to rising violence, and the prison officers' association said ministers needed to get the basics right first. the russian embassy has asked the uk for permission to speak with yulia skripal — who was poisoned in a nerve agent attack along with her father sergei — in salisbury earlier this year. an embassy spokesperson said russia wanted to check that yulia is not being held in the uk against her will. the request comes after she gave
7:07 am
an interview to the reuters news agency about her experience and recovery. translation: we are so lucky to have both survived this attempted assassination. i don't want to describe the details but the clinical treatment was invasive, painful and depressing. 0ur recovery has been slow and extremely painful. improving northern rail's performance is now the department of tra nsport‘s number one "performance priority, according to chris grayling. the transport secretary's comments come amidst widespread criticism of the company over cancellations, delays and the implementation of a new timetable earlier this week. the company has apologised to passengers but said many of the problems had been caused by delays in electrification work being carried out by network rail. what we have seen in the last few days hasn't been good enough. no one should underestimate the logistical
7:08 am
challenge of introducing a timetable change. this woman a big expansion of services across the country. i know that many passengers had those rubberjourneys. it know that many passengers had those rubber journeys. it is know that many passengers had those rubberjourneys. it is not good enough. i'm sorry this was the case. everyone in my department right now is working hard to get this problem sorted out. at least two people have been killed and 18 injured after a truck crashed into a passenger train in northern italy. it happened at a level crossing near the city of turin. it's believed the train driver is amongst the dead. the most seriously injured have been airlifted to hospital. police are questioning a 19—year—old man on suspicion of preparing acts of terrorism. he was arrested last night in bishop's stortford in hertfordshire — where a property has been searched by officers. scotland yard said their enquiries were linked to two further arrests in london last week. jeremy corbyn says the labour party won't support any brexit deal that includes a return to the hard border between northern ireland and the irish republic. mr corbyn will make his first trip to belfast as labour leader later today. he's expected to argue that a new,
7:09 am
comprehensive customs union between the uk and eu would prevent communities being divided. a full—sized replica of a red arrows jet took up position in downing street yesterday to celebrate the centenary of the royal air force. theresa may hosted a reception for personnel and trainees from the air force, army, and navy, as well as veterans the jet‘s arrival prompted some surprise, the prime minister's chief of staff said on twitter that it was "a helluva job by the pilot to land there". of course it wasn't landed there! it definitely wasn't. it looks fabulous, especially the colours. former offenders looking to start a new life after prison face a myriad of barriers to living a normal life — one of the most significant being the difficulty they face in finding a job. according to the ministry ofjustice, just 17%
7:10 am
of ex—prisoners are in work a year after being released. to try to counter this, today the government launches a new scheme to boost prisoners' skills, and increase their chances of finding a job on release. lj flanders qualified as a personal trainer during his 16—month sentence and now returns to prison to help train inmates. hejoins us now. thank you he joins us now. thank you for joining us. tell us about your story and how you ended up turning things round. i was 21, and how you ended up turning things round. iwas 21, i ended and how you ended up turning things round. i was 21, i ended up in pentonville prison. i try to do everything positive, but education was the way forward, get a qualification that will make me more employable before i get released. get a job, that is what you year, a lot. so... what was it like when you came out, trying to find work? you had got a qualification as a personal trainer. you go and hand in
7:11 am
all of the sheets and tick the box, i made sure that i went to my local gym and ask for a one—to—one with the manager at virgin active. i said that i had got qualified in prison and had recently been released. i felt like i probably wouldn't have got the first interview. had you tried other places and jobs and found you had got a bad reaction?” felt i was lucky. the manager said i would like to give you a second chance. it was my firstjob interview but i made sure, when got bad job, but other people don't have it that easy. we know the statistics are grim in relation to ex—prisoners getting jobs and also reoffending. how crucial is to find work as that pathway, to have that time at changing your life around ? pathway, to have that time at changing your life around? you have a crucial few weeks,
7:12 am
changing your life around? you have a crucialfew weeks, trying changing your life around? you have a crucial few weeks, trying to find accommodation, job, trying to get your life back on track. it is a lot of people not able to get a job. and we have all got to pay the bills. so it isa we have all got to pay the bills. so it is a real tough time. i think employers are coming round to the fa ct employers are coming round to the fact that people can come out of prison and really do well with that second chance. when you're in prison and you did your qualification, what we re and you did your qualification, what were other inmates doing, different things? some people had jobs in the win, some went into education, some didn't do anything. the prison now is trying to push education and governors have more autonomy about what sort of education is relevant to be well getting jobs after prison. so the governors have got nowhere say so prison. so the governors have got nowhere say so now prison. so the governors have got nowhere say so now about what were doing. there is a stigma, with employers, they feel like, in a way, it would be something to be proud of, employing ex—offenders, as opposed to something that you either
7:13 am
don't do at all something you hide away from. people like timpson's, they say that they look to employ a 7% of ex—offenders. that gives a good outlook for other employers to say, if they have done it, they have tried it and succeeded, definitely, i think everyone should, as well. when you first went to prison, did you straightaway start thinking, how ami you straightaway start thinking, how am i going to get myself out of the situation i got myself into? people will be thinking, you're in prison, and maybe people don't have a great deal of sympathy, they don't think, why should we go out of our way now, because he's caused a problem? did you have it in your mind straightaway that you would do something yourself? you've got to go and do it yourself. nothing is given to you on a plate. i made sure, if i did my education, for me to get a job after leaving prison. the prison
7:14 am
invested in my qualification so i took a lot of value away from that, they have invested in me so i want to try and give back and do everything in my power, not to go back to prison. do you think this idea work experience would be a good thing? yes, getting out with job and work experience before release, getting yourself back into normal life. thank you for coming in to talk about it. we appreciated. —— we appreciate it. matt's in cambridge with the weather this morning. how was the weather looking for the bank holiday weekend ?” how was the weather looking for the bank holiday weekend? i am at st john's college in cambridge, founded in 1511, one of the largest colleges in cambridge. behind me, the bridge of sighs, said to be queen victoria was my favourite spot in the city.
7:15 am
we are talking exams today with tom, jane and naga. there is a common thought that the bridge is named after the sighs of students walking in further exams. if we take a look at the forecast today, cambridge has missed out on some of the thundery showers happening across southern england this morning. they are edging their way towards wales. there will be some heavy downpours to ta ke there will be some heavy downpours to take us through the morning and into the afternoon. to them off, mostly starting on a drying out. lots of sunshine for the north and west. low cloud drifting in the north sea. to the east of scotland, drifting through the central belt towards the glasgow area. that will break up in the west. cool across western parts of scotland, but it will bring up quite quickly now that the sun is up. the same across
7:16 am
northern ireland with broken cloud and lots of sunshine to come. wales, east anglia, the midlands and southern england seeing a fairly great start. a bit of a breeze blowing and across parts of the midlands and central and southern england towards wales, some heavy downpours at the moment. there could be the odd rumble of thunder later in the day as temperatures rise. those will drift further westwards. that means in the south—east and east anglia things will brighten up. we will see some sunshine for a time and as the sun comes out temperatures will get a boost into the low 20s. whether cloud stays in place in the midlands, the south—west and wales, but north—west england, the best of scotland and northern ireland, temperatures whiley the 20s. the highlands of transport today at 24 degrees. in the east, cloud will linger and on the east, cloud will linger and on the coast it will feel rather cool. after a dry spell in the south, we have got were heavy showers, some
7:17 am
rumbles of thunder pushing in, across lincolnshire and parts of yorkshire and the midlands and the south—east by morning. a mild night, 12-14dc, south—east by morning. a mild night, 12—14dc, cooler in the north—west under this clear skies. tomorrow, a bit of a thunder and rain sandwich, i suppose you could call it. east anglia, the midlands and wales, and parts of northern ireland through yorkshire and lincolnshire and towards greater manchester and merseyside we did see some heavy rain and thunder at times. to the north of that, some sunshine at times and where we have the sunshine temperatures into the 20s. 0r, well you have got the rain. some thundery showers around into the bank holiday weekend across southern areas, the south—west and wales, but for many, a bank holiday weekend that are set to be another drive on. lots of sunshine to come forward north—west england, north—west scotland, and indeed northern ireland. that is how
7:18 am
it is looking. back to steph and charlie. if you've been watching breakfast over the last few months, you'll know we set naga, jayne and tim the challenge ofjoining the thousands of students around the country sitting their maths gcse exams. it's at 9am this morning. they're waiting nervously outside the exam hall in uxbridge this morning, where we can join them now. good morning. we feel sick! i thought the exam was at 9:30am. we are back to school this morning. did you hear that matt said the bridge of sighs is about students doing exams? preparations, what have you
7:19 am
been doing? i was doing some revision of 0dis, doing chores around the house. i have no long—term and moaned and neighbours' loan. but then i thought i had to get on with it. whether it has been enough, fingers crossed. jane? i can't figure out how something i failed after five years in education... but you did pass. i felt my 0—level, then i got a cse. i don't know howl felt my 0—level, then i got a cse. i don't know how i thought but i would don't know how i thought but i would do it after working full time having three children and winging it in three children and winging it in three months. that perhaps was unrealistic. but here we are. that has been the frustrations of all of us. we all have other things to do. it has kind of been about revision and putting time aside from our normal lives. it is only one subject, and most young people have lots of other subjects to worry about. we have got it easy to a
7:20 am
certain extent. we have been very lucky. we have two experts with us. doctor anna carlton is the mindset expert from bbc bite—size. some of us have been complaining, whining a little bit that it feels harder this year. is that fair? it is a much harderexam. year. is that fair? it is a much harder exam. the recruiting problems and problem—solving to it, whereas now there is a lot more on problem—solving and wider problems where you have to understand exactly what the problem is asking you and work through multistep problems as opposed to simple, routine kind of problems. it has been so hard to concentrate this morning. with my mind crammed full of worry, as jane and tim are, what should people be thinking ahead of the exams?
7:21 am
everyone is sitting this first paper. the idea is to keep that noise and chatter that is making you worried as far away as possible. the thoughts about i haven't done enough work, i'm not good enough, i knew that it would be a disaster, before you walk in the room, that kind of thinking gets you in a panic and takes your focus away, and leaves you not doing as well. bite size is a good way to learn. with that gcse, maths, i struggled so hard. my dad made me go through the papers and explained it, so that i understood it and! explained it, so that i understood it and i went from failing to getting an a, and that is one of my life was my greatest achievements, because it was so hard. and if you show your working that you have brought about the answers. in the examiner might be a five mark
7:22 am
question, you might not be able to answer the whole thing but by showing some of you working you will definitely gain some marks. that is across the entire paper. some questions towards the end of the paper you questions towards the end of the paperyou might questions towards the end of the paper you might think i have uncovered these topics, but if you look at them, read through the questions, and try to gain some marks, you will definitely pick that up. i did a-level maths as well. i think that there are a—level questions in this gcse. one of the things the exam board has done is put lots of crumpet down from the a level down to gcse to make them more difficult and as a result, students are finding it very hard, and features as well. they are finding it difficult to teach these skills to students. at uxbridge, we have tried to train pupils from year seven, building in problem—solving right in from year seven so that when they get the 11th, when they set the gcse, it is not i have never done this before, it is i am used to these type of problems because i've done them for the last five years.
7:23 am
how should we be thinking right now? we have got about an hour and a half. if you haven't eaten, eat something. if you're hungry, hearing your stomach rumble, it is not a good plan. have something to eat. just know that however much you have done, it is done. you know more than you think you know, because everybody does. visualise yourself doing it well. it sounds strange, but if you see yourself going in and sitting down calmly, being able to answer the question is when you go into the room, it is your second time. then maintain that focus and keep that chatter out of your head. make the voices in your head start, thatis make the voices in your head start, that is the answer. thank you very much. this is the room that we will be doing the examiner. we will not be doing the examiner. we will not be distracting the other students sitting at the exam this morning. so, we have had some tips about how
7:24 am
to keep calm. the number-1 mistake i have made in my limited revision sessions is not reading the question properly. so that the things i should of got right at been getting wrong, because i have been careless, and crashing through. showing the working out is important, to show the examiner how your thinking. so some good tips, keeping calm and visualising. just to stay on top of things. if you get the chance to go back over your paper, as well... stef and charlie will be so jealous of us! that you wish that you were sitting with ours, planning away?” genuinely could not think of anything worse than doing my maths gcse again! we are so proud of you and the young people sitting there maths gcse as well. it is a big day.
7:25 am
have you got the stuff? yes, yes... this is mine. can ijust say, you know that we have brought the wrong revision book?! oh, well. it is the chaos before the calm. it will be fine. we will talk to you later on, nearer at the moment. they are very brave. anyone taking their maths gcse today, good luck. yes, definitely. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sara 0rchard. black people in london are four times more likely to have force used against them by the met police
7:26 am
than white people, new figures suggest. 0fficers used force against black people 23,000 times last year — the first full year that they had to record each time that force was used. these figures are very alarming. if the met really is using this level of disproportionate force against black people, that is not a recipe for good police community relations. the metropolitan police has been approached for comment. a 19—year—old man has been arrested in hertfordshire on suspicion of preparing acts of terrorism. met police say the arrest took place in bishop's stortford last night. an address in the town is being searched. scotland yard says it's linked to the arrest of an 18—year—old in north london on friday. an exhibition which captures the lives of the first generation of caribbeans to have settled in london goes on display from today. the photos were taken by award—winning photographer jim grover for the collection called
7:27 am
windrush: portrait of a generation. they'll be on display at london's south bank until the 10th ofjune. the elizabeth line has taken another significant step towards completion with its 200—metre—long trains being tested on the tracks beneath east london. it's due to open in central london this december. let's have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tubes there are severe delays on the picadilly line and a part suspension on the london 0verground. 0n the trains, south eastern have a bus replacement service between sheerness and sittingbourne due to cable theft. 0n the roads there is northbound traffic on the blackwall tunnel. southern approach is slow from the woolwich road flyover. 0n the m25, there are anticlockwise queues from j29 towards j28 following a three—vehicle collision. let's have a check on the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. you may well have been woken up by thunderstorms last night. it's pretty wet under foot this morning and there are some
7:28 am
rather large puddles around, too, through the morning rush hour. now, there will be further heavy showers on and off through the course of the day, a rumble or two of thunder. lots of dry weather around, as well, and bright spells for many later on this afternoon, especially towards the north. now, important not to take this too literally, really. just understand there will be further showers on and off through the day. something a bit brighter emerging through the late morning into the afternoon, particularly for northern areas. the further south and east you are, the cloudier it's likely to be, but showers expected just about anywhere, really. through the afternoon, temperatures in the best of the brightness will still get up into the low 20s in celsius. it is going to feel rather humid. now, there's more showers expected through this evening's rush—hour. some of them again heavy, thundery. further downpours overnight, too, so a rather wet start to the day tomorrow for many of us and really quite cloudy, but it will be a mild start, too — between 12 and 14 celsius. now, it should brighten up tomorrow afternoon, we'll get some good spells of sunshine and temperatures will rise over the bank holiday weekend — 26 to 28 celsius with possibly i'm back with the latest
7:29 am
from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now, though, it's back to charlie and steph. hello, this is breakfast with steph mcgovern and charlie stayt. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. taxes may have to rise to historically high levels over the next 15 years in order to properly fund the nhs, according to a major report by two leading think tanks. the institute for fiscal studies and the health foundation say the average household tax bill may need to rise by £1,500 just to maintain current standards of health and social care. they also warn that pressure on the system will increase because of a growing and ageing population. we are at a tipping point now. the ageing of our population and the rising burden of long—term health conditions means that we can't go on with the historically low funding we've had for the last eight years. we need to return to a level of
7:30 am
funding commensurate with the first 60 years of our nhs, and we need to make sure that we have the skilled workforce that we need to deliver that care. a complaint about the commons speakerjohn bercow has been referred to the metropolitan police. mr bercow, who is facing calls to stand down, was reported to the commons' standards watchdog this week over the claims he called the leader of the commons, andrea leadsom, a stupid woman. he has also been accused of bullying two former private secretaries — claims he denies. more prisoners could be granted temporary release to work, under a new government strategy to cut re—offending. thejustice secretary has announced plans to match employers with inmates, and encourage businesses to take on ex—offenders. no extra funding has been allocated to pay for the changes, leading the the prison 0fficers' association to claim that the announcement "lacked detail". north korea is once again
7:31 am
threatening to reconsider taking part in a summit with president trump next month. in a sharply worded statement, a close aide to kim jong—un said mike pence was a political dummy. it said north korea was ready for a nuclear showdown if talks fail. 0ur asia correspondent rupert wingfield—hayes is in the south korean capital seoul. more serious words but how seriously should we take this? well, i think north korea still really wants to go ahead with this summit. they've been wanting a face—to—face meeting with the us president for decades and they are very close to getting it but they want to establish their position, then negotiating position, beforehand. 0ne position, then negotiating position, beforehand. one of the things they don't want is to be treated like some poor backward country, for example like libya, which is what the us administration has referred to over the last week or so. and so
7:32 am
they are saying stop talking about libya, we are a nuclear power, we need to be taken seriously, treated as an equal going into this summit. those of conditions on which we will meet face—to—face. i think it still will go ahead, my best guess is it will, but this is the jockeying beforehand. we have a group of foreignjournalist beforehand. we have a group of foreign journalist today who have arrived to cover the dismantling of the country's nuclear test site. what will that involve? this is something kim jong—un on what will that involve? this is something kimjong—un on promised during his summit with the south korean president last month as a sort of symbolic gesture, a first symbolic gesture to the south and to america to dismantle these tunnels dug deep under a mountain finery remote corner of north korea and they are used to do underground nuclear test of the last decade and they said they will blow these up and put them permanently out of action. a group of international journalists is in north korea, they
7:33 am
are travelling to that site, they may have arrived but there is no mobile foehn coverage as it is so far into the mountains. we don't know exactly what's going on but this could happen later today or tomorrow, but we won't know until they get out and get back to a place where they can pick up a telephone. gosh, it's going to be interesting to see that footage. thank you very much. at least two people have been killed and 18 injured after a truck crashed into a passenger train in northern italy. it happened at a level crossing near the city of turin. it's believed the train driver is amongst the dead. the most seriously injured have been airlifted to hospital. improving northern rail's performance is now the departments of tra nsport‘s number one performance priority, according to chris grayling. the transport secretary's comments come amidst widespread criticism of the company over cancellations, delays and the implementation of a new timetable earlier this week. the company has apologised to passengers but said many of the problems had been caused by delays in electrification work being carried out by network rail.
7:34 am
hundreds of schools across england have not been inspected for more than ten years, according to a study by the national audit office. it follows a decision by the government in 2012 that schools previously rated as 0utstanding don't require routine inspections. the report also found a drop of 52% in government spending on inspections since the year 2000. 0fsted said it "gets the balance right" in allocating dwindling resources by focusing on poor—performing schools. and the californian surfboard has undergone a makeover. have a look at this. this is foil—boarding. a wing under the water helps it rise up in the air as it gains speed. and because there's less drag it can travel much faster — even on the smallest of waves.
7:35 am
i don't think it makes it any easier to surf. the chances of falling in a pretty high, especially if i was on it. that they are, having enjoyed their day on the server. in sailing they have that technology where the boat sits above the water. matt will be here with the weather live from cambridge. hoping for some better weather and better results for england cricketers. the summer season gets under way later. it wasn't a good season for them, what it? that 1—0 defeat to new zealand, the ashes series. we want to mention that. we're hoping this newly invigorated younger squad, more discipline on the team, says younger squad, more discipline on the team, sastoe root. it's about the team, sastoe root. it's about the young people. england take on pakistan at lord's in the first of two tests. somerset spinner dom bess will make his debut. bess is just 20 and, you might remember this, he received his surprise call—up while out shopping for a sofa. captainjoe root says bess
7:36 am
is ready for test cricket. he's really clear about what he wants to do in the game and how he's going to approach this week. and that's all you can really ask of someone making their debut. it's really exciting for me, as captain. all you want to do is get given your cap and get out there, so he has approached this week really well and hopefully he can have a good start to a good, long career. simon yates is four days away from making history at the giro d'italia as he tries to become the first briton to win the race. he finished in the main bunch on a wet stage 17, to keep his 56—second lead intact. today will be tough — the first of three mountainous stages that will decide who finishes on top of that podium in rome. unai emery can "drive the next chapter" at arsenal after being introduced as the club's first new manager in 22 years, according to the club's chief executive. emery had his first look around
7:37 am
the emirates stadium since being chosen to succeed arsene wenger. the spaniard said he can't wait to get going. i am very excited for this opportunity. a big club, a great city, a grand stadium and also, a great player. there's no british team involved but there is a star british player in this evening's women's champions league final. lucy bronze, named this week as the bbc women's footballer of the year, scored for lyon in the semi—finals. they're the defending champions and they face wolfsburg at five o'clock — you can watch it on the red button or bbc sport website. now, some of you might remember the impressive stylings of enzo vieira — the eight—year—old son of real madrid's marcelo — in what's been dubbed the bin challenge.
7:38 am
this was on social media everywhere last week. enzo went viral online last week after his dad posted this video on instagram. the idea being that you head the ball — in this instance, with every madrid player — without letting it fall or catching it... before popping it in the bin at the end. cue celebrations. it's impressive. well, now he's thrown down the gauntlet to his dad. here he is with enzo's real madrid youth team taking on the same bin challenge. here he is. all the way around. and it's a case of "like father like son". cue wild celebrations in spain. it's brilliant of the kids to be able to do that. it's really difficult. there's a few of them going around when you watch it, heading the ball for a then, but it's still impressive. i love the
7:39 am
celebration. you would think it's the champions league final. go for it! notjust getting the ball in the bin but do you reckon we could give itago bin but do you reckon we could give it a go here? now, normally what happens here is if we get involved in anything like football, frisbee, it always goes horribly wrong. yeah. something gets damage, we get in trouble, health and safety get involved... he doesn't want to ruin his hair. he wasn't subtle about that at all. thanks very much, holly. the mother of a disabled 11—year—old boy is suing a theme park forfailing to provide an appropriate disabled toilet for her son. rachel george claims flambards theme park in cornwall failed to make reasonable adjustments for her son adam because it did not provide a specialised changing places toilet. our legal correspondent clive coleman reports. three, two, one, go! adam george was born with a genetic condition that weakens his muscles, affect his voice, and makes him a full—time wheelchair user. he also has autism —
7:40 am
but it hasn't held him back. i need the toilet. mum, i really need the toilet again! in order to use the toilet, adam needs a hoist, a changing table and more space than you'd find in a standard disabled toilet. adam loves going to flambards theme park, but it doesn't have a toilet with changing facilities suitable for his needs. so when the family visit they need to hire a mobiloo, which can cost hundreds of pounds. adam's mother rachel is part of changing places, a group aiming to increase access for an estimated 250,000 disabled people in the uk who need this kind of equipment and space to use the toilet safely. i think a place like flambards — a theme park, where they expect people to arrive in the morning, stay all day, eat, drink, stay late in the evening, remain for the fireworks show — i think i personally would expect it reasonable that i could use
7:41 am
the toilet when i go there, so why shouldn't adam? why shouldn't all disabled people be able to have their toileting needs met with dignity and safety? this is a fixed changing place. it's big, with a powerful hoist, but it's fit for adam. under the equality act, all service providers are under a duty to make reasonable adjustments for those with disabilities. so, question — is requiring a business to provide something on this scale reasonable? flambards says it isn't, and is defending the legal action brought by rachel george. inclusivity obviously is important for us to make sure everyone has access to our park and the rides. we have to bear in mind that there is an overall cost to putting in a full—on changing places unit and we've been quoted for the building as well as the equipment in excess of £40,000. that would have an effect
7:42 am
onjobs, possibly. what we have done as a sort of interim stage is put in a mobile hoist and a changing bed. adam just want to spend days out with his friends, but that depends in part on what the law decides is reasonable for others to provide in making sure he can use the toilet. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning. taxes will need to rise by £2,000 per household per year by 2033 to fund the nhs, according to a major new report into the health service's future. thousands of prisoners could be released to work on a temporary license — under a government strategy to cut re—offending. being rather lucky with the weather
7:43 am
at the past few days and matt will have the full forecast in the moment. let's cast our eyes over london, a hazy morning in london. to a degree, that is replicated across the rest of the country. matt is in cambridge. what a beautiful backdrop. is that slightly hazy start to the day similar where you are? it's a bit great here. the hayes in london is overnight rain. thunder storms in london overnight. we've seen some damage to trees in the area and those thunderstorms have rumbled off a bit into parts of the midlands and southern england. a bit great here but a beautiful sight. we are talking exam stress this morning and where better to have the calming influence than here at stjohn's college in cambridge. behind me the famous bridge of sighs built in 1831 across the river cam between the third court and the new
7:44 am
court at stjohn's cambridge. as i said, it's great to start with. things will brighten up, a bit of sunshine later in the date and if we look at the forecast across the country, where you have the sunshine today, another beautiful late spring morning in store, pleasantly warm in the sunshine but we have grey skies in eastern areas and the risk of thunderstorms across the south. let's focus on scotland, northern ireland and northern england first. low cloud drifting in from the north sea overnight from the central belt of scotla nd sea overnight from the central belt of scotland to the glasgow area, that will break up readily over the coming hours but will remain great north sea coasts. plenty of sunshine in the west of scotland, northern ireland, north—west england, which will warm things up after a chilly start. still great to pass off north—eastern england but at least your dry here. dry across east anglia at the moment with outbreaks working their way to the east coast. through the south midlands, wales, parts of southern england, particularly to the south west and central and southern england, this is where there are outbreaks of rain. heavy bursts and as we go through the morning there could be a
7:45 am
rumble of thunder with those, too. does mean after a disturbed nights to the south east corner with those thunderstorms, we have sunshine developing to the south east corner and that will warm things up. the links more humid at the moment as we bring in airfrom the near continent. heavy showers and thunderstorms across wales, south west midlands, by the time we get to the afternoon. some of the best of the afternoon. some of the best of the weather will be across north—west england, northern ireland, northern scotland. part of the highlands 24 degrees with lighter winds and we'll see further south. into tonight, showers and thunderstorms, wales and south—west. bickley out of the way and we bring in work towards east anglia, part of lincolnshire and the south—east later on. it keeps temperatures up, fairly mild night across the south with temperatures ten to 14 degrees. low cloud becomes more dominant to north—east england is to scotland but with clear skies to the far north and west, clear night. the sunshine will be back warming things up sunshine will be back warming things up across the west of scotland, northern ireland tomorrow. more clap
7:46 am
for northern england and across the far south and southern parts of the england into wales, the midlands, east anglia, here we'll see a band of heavy - thundery rain g and of heavy and thundery rain come and go all day long. want to be a great day. a bit cooler than we see go all day long. want to be a great day. a bit cooler than we se but i i genuinely didn't know that but i feel better for knowing it now. store that away, it will be useful in some situations. it's been a tough year so far for the restaurant industry with several big high street names announcing branch closures and now it appears the takeaway sector could be facing similar pressures. sean can tell us more. have you have a great guest to chat with. format dragon of the dense so i'll be given a tough time. we'll have a chat about the restaurant sector. we will get into a few of those stats. it's been a tough year. we have high rents, staff costs, we've had a series of headlines, the likes of jamie's, byron over the last year or so making various
7:47 am
announcements about restructuring, closing some stores. 0ur appetite for is growing although they have some of the same pressures on rents and the like. 4000 take aways have p°pped and the like. 4000 take aways have normed up and the like. 4000 take aways have popped up in the last three years. 4000 more takeaways. more than a quarter of all food outlet in the uk now our takeaway is according to recent research. if you are trying out the minute to make a trade of flooding your food somehow, what should you do? this is why sarah willingham is here. you used to be one of the team running p zec express and you went on to expand bombay bicycle club. plenty you will have learnt in dragons' den. what is going on? why are there more ta keaways going on? why are there more takeaways and it seems like fewer chains on the high—street? takeaways and it seems like fewer chains on the high—street7m takeaways and it seems like fewer chains on the high-street? it is interesting. segways are up by 34% over the last five or six years. that's extreme. in the days of p pisa express but we used to say we we re pisa express but we used to say we were the x devine —— we were the
7:48 am
alternative to waitrose. we can choose anything at any time. it is encouraging that growth. 0ne choose anything at any time. it is encouraging that growth. one of the things that is a real challenge for the industry is we don't have the information available. we don't use...| information available. we don't use... i don't want the word data, but we don't use be a formation available. when you are running a really small business you get up in the morning and all you care about and are worried about is, i've got to feed people tonight. you feed them and repeat. you feed and repeat. that goes on and you are a one—man band. repeat. that goes on and you are a one-man band. that's a very different approach to going out for dinner. that almost seems like a com pletely dinner. that almost seems like a completely different market. you're not thinking, all, i'll have a nice ta keaway not thinking, all, i'll have a nice takeaway instead of going to the likes of pizza express.” takeaway instead of going to the likes of pizza express. i think the takeaway industry has become the alternative. i don't think it's cannibalised the restaurant industry because we are seeing growth in small restaurants and small
7:49 am
businesses. where we are seeing the impact is in the large chains. that's the business model as opposed to the consumer trend. of course what has happened with the likes of justeatis what has happened with the likes of justeat is you now have access to 30,000 small restaurants that are now doing takeaway because it is available and those consumers are demanding it in a way they never did before. has that been a good thing. you are working withjusteat, helping small businesses and that relationship has been controversial over the years. for consumers, relationship has been controversial overthe years. for consumers, is relationship has been controversial over the years. for consumers, is it a good thing that the likes of justeat make it so much easier to eat food that is maybe not as healthy as the food we are cooking at home? it's not good just whether consumers but also for the businesses. in my day i had to walk around and dropped leaflets through doors and had to make sure my leaflet was bigger and brighter than everyone else's, that's why everyone ordered from e. now consumers have
7:50 am
choice but we have that choice. if i wa nt choice but we have that choice. if i want to order a superfood salad or a pokeball, i can do that. is that what this growth is or is it the shots we see around the uk? the food we see remains italian but the growth of health food is bigger than ever and we growth of health food is bigger than everand we are growth of health food is bigger than ever and we are seeing consumers become more and more educated in health food and the food is the biggest growth area of the last 12 months. if you think about that, we are making wise decisions and i think for the businesses it's brilliant that those consumers are now available to them. they have to hand over a decent chunk of that margins to justeat, hand over a decent chunk of that margins tojusteat, the likes of justeat to get access to those customers. yes, and you have to market a business. when i was
7:51 am
marketing the bombay bicycle club, i had to walk around the street and pay for big menus and drop them through the door, that's a cost to my business. now the fact that these businesses exist opens up so many more consumers so businesses exist opens up so many more consumers so if you work with an online delivery business, they will give you between 60 and £100,000 worth of sales in a year. that significance, that's a lot more thanl that significance, that's a lot more than i would spend on my menus, my menu delivery, for example. what we wa nt menu delivery, for example. what we want to do is help these smaller businesses understand how the larger chains operate, understand that business model that i kind of imposed onto a small indian restaurant, and it worked. ithen sold it. you were on dragons' den for a while. how does that play out after you left? do you still get text and calls from people who are not making money asking for your
7:52 am
help? i get lows of e-mails, but i love it. that's why i wanted to do the programme so i could work with smaller businesses, which is why i'm excited about doing this, getting back into my industry and working with the one—man band and his family, who has just with the one—man band and his family, who hasjust got one little re sta u ra nt family, who hasjust got one little restaurant and doesn't know how to grow it. it was brilliant and i'm back where i belong so it's all good. sarah, thank you very much. lows going on in the restaurant business. i want to ask another thing. we are doing this story about data protection and i don't know if you're getting these e—mails and texts about... should you respond? business seed seem confused about what their responsibilities are. business seed seem confused about what their responsibilities arem you read the information coming through in each of those e—mails, depending on whether you've opted in or not it is quite specific. i've had a wonderfully cathartic week, as i'm sure others have, just had no
7:53 am
idea how many businesses i had signed up to. no idea. it's been a very cleansing process for consumers, but businesses have to stay on top of it because we are going to lose a lot of opportunity to be able to market to people but ifi to be able to market to people but if i didn't know i was on their mailing list on the first place, it wasn't working. yes, that's interesting. thank you. it's really interesting. so many people have had these e—mails and like sarah is saying, so many companies, you don't know you are on a mailing list for. we've been chatting to a few people to see what they are doing when they get the texts and e—mails. not responded — ifeel like that was kind of spam, so i've not really done it. i've been getting loads from, like, fried chicken shops and gambling things and all kinds of stuff but ijust tend to ignore them. the major ones i've done, i've clicked accept, but the majority, i'm just overloaded with it. my phone's going off every couple of minutes. they're inconsistent. half of them want you to e—mail back if you want to stay subscribed, half of them want to e—mail back if you don't want
7:54 am
to stay subscribed. i didn't really fully understand it. ijust assumed it was the same as before or a bit better from the point of view of privacy. it's a good way to clear off the junk mail from the inbox. if you're sitting around having brea kfast if you're sitting around having breakfast at home and everyone is rushing around trying to get to the foehn, thinking it's gone off, apologies. thank you for those thoughts. there's a lot of confusion. the basic premise of the story is that tomorrow, these eu data protection laws come in and admit to help our data protection but it means companies have to ask you now to opt in to be on their mailing list and things. there has been some brilliant gags doing the rounds. 0ne here from sharon. my mum is leaving it awfully close to the deadline to ask if i want to opt in to receive her e—mails, calls and texts. dave says, kids haven't responded to my request so i don't think i'm legally
7:55 am
allowed to tell them when dinner is on the table. i get the impression a lot of people arejust i get the impression a lot of people are just pretty i get the impression a lot of people arejust pretty much i get the impression a lot of people are just pretty much ignoring i get the impression a lot of people arejust pretty much ignoring it and what difference will it make? we have an expert who we will ask these questions later on to get a clearer picture on that. you can email us at bbcbrea kfast@bbc. co. uk time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sara 0rchard. black people in london are four times more likely to have force used against them by the met police than white people, new figures suggest. 0fficers used force against black people 23,000 times last year — the first full year that they had to record each time that force was used. these figures are very alarming. if the met really is using this level of disproportionate force against black people, that is not a recipe for good police community relations. the metropolitan police has been
7:56 am
approached for comment. a 19—year—old man has been arrested in hertfordshire on suspicion of preparing acts of terrorism. met police say the arrest took place in bishop's stortford last night. an address in the town is being searched. scotland yard says it's linked to the arrest of an 18—year—old in north london on friday. in the week that's being hailed as dementia action week — london has pledged to become the world's first "dementia— friendly capital city". the mayor, sadiq khan, signed the pledge — along with other businesses and services including tfl, british gas and cb! — all of which are promising to do more to make the lives of those living with the condition easier. an exhibition which captures the lives of the first generation of caribbeans to have settled in london goes on display from today. the photos were taken by award—winning photographer jim grover for the collection called windrush: portrait of a generation. they'll be on display at london's south bank until the 10th ofjune. let's have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tubes there are minor delays on the picadilly line
7:57 am
and a part suspension on the london 0verground. 0n the trains, south eastern have a bus replacement service between sheerness and sittingbourne due to cable theft. 0n the roads there is northbound traffic 0n the m25, there are anticlockwise queues from junction 29 towardsjunction 28 following a three—vehicle collision. let's have a check on the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. you may well have been woken up by thunderstorms last night. it's pretty wet under foot this morning and there are some rather large puddles around, too, through the morning rush hour. now, there will be further heavy showers on and off through the course of the day, a rumble or two of thunder. lots of dry weather around, as well, and bright spells for many later on this afternoon, especially towards the north. now, important not to take this too literally, really. just understand there will be further showers on and off through the day. something a bit brighter emerging through the late morning into the afternoon, particularly for northern areas. the further south and east you are, the cloudier it's likely to be, but showers expected just about anywhere, really. through the afternoon,
7:58 am
temperatures in the best of the brightness will still get up into the low 20s in celsius. it is going to feel rather humid. now, there's more showers expected through this evening's rush—hour. some of them again heavy, thundery. further downpours overnight, too, so a rather wet start to the day tomorrow for many of us and really quite cloudy, but it will be a mild start, too — between 12 and 14 celsius. now, it should brighten up tomorrow afternoon, we'll get some good spells of sunshine and temperatures will rise over the bank holiday weekend — 26 to 28 celsius with possibly some isolated thunderstorms. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to charlie and steph. hello. this is breakfast, with steph mcgovern and charlie stayt. increase taxes to prevent nhs misery. a major report warns services won't improve unless every household pays an extra £2000 a year to keep the health service afloat. good morning.
7:59 am
it's thursday 24th may. also this morning: jobs for prisoners. more inmates could be temporarily released to do work experience in a bid to cut re—offending. engage in talks or risk a nuclear stand—off. north korea threatens to pull out of a planned summit with the us. good morning. we've had results this morning from b&q and talktalk and i've got a money—saving tip about sun cream. i'll be back with all that in a moment. in sport, it's the first day of england's cricketing summer and they have a new spinner. dom bess will make his england debut in the opening test against pakistan. good morning. breakfast is back to school today, along with thousands of others in england and wales. we
8:00 am
are setting our maths gcse exam. why? we wanted to know what it was like to re—engage with maths as adults. how have things changed over the years? it is a fascinating journey. we wanted to get under the skin of the subject and all the issues around it. everybody taking it today, we are right behind you. good luck. we are cramming and we will see you later. and matt is out and about for us this morning with the weather. good morning. they may have been studying for their maths gcse and i have been studying the weather charts and there is good news for most of you for the bank holiday weekend. warmth and sunshine and a few thunderstorms. that is what we have in the southern half of england and wales but most of you will have and wales but most of you will have a dry day and it will be warm in the sunshine. all the details in 15 minutes. thank you. good morning. first, our main story. taxes are going to have to rise to maintain the current level of care offered by the nhs, according to a major new report into the future of the health service.
8:01 am
the institute for fiscal studies and health foundation warn that every household may need to contribute between £1200 and £2000 in extra tax by 2033, as people live longer and the number of patients with long—term health conditions rises. 0ur health editor hugh pym reports. the prime minister has promised a long—term funding plan for the nhs. it's expected within weeks. but there's high—level wrangling across whitehall over how much more money will be required. today, two leading think tanks working with the nhs confederation have come up with proposals. their report says significant funding increases will be needed because of demographic factors, and that will probably mean higher taxes. the number of people aged over 85 will go up by 1.3 million over 15 years, almost as much as the increase in the entire population under 65. average uk health spending increases between 2014 and 2016 were 2.3% per year, but the report says 3.3% per year
8:02 am
will be needed over the next 15 years just to sustain current levels of care. even slight improvements will need increases of 4% a year. if paid for by higher taxes, that could add £2000 to household bills in 15 years' time. the real challenge here is that health and social care spending is easily the biggest thing that government does, and over time we've spent more on it. looking forward we've got more older people, increased costs, we're going to need to spend more over the next 10—15 years. you increase the biggest bit of government spending, that's very costly and, in the long run, that must mean higher taxes to pay for it, because it's very hard to see what else you could cut. the nhs confederation said it was time for honesty and a wider public debate to try to avoid a decade of misery for the old, the sick and the vulnerable. hugh pym, bbc news. let's get more on this from our political correspondent chris mason, who's in westminster.
8:03 am
good morning. it is so clear that the nhs needs more money, but where it comes from is controversial, isn't it? it is. good morning. there are so many isn't it? it is. good morning. there are so many times that we have conversations on breakfast about the nhs and it sounds like it has been patched up like pudsey bear, but you look at the numbers, and more money has been going in, but the numbers are always fast because it is such a big structure, such a big servers. and then there is this big overarching challenge. this newish problem, that we are living on average longer with complex and expensive conditions. but it creates this very old political dilemma. who pays? the government is wrestling with this. there have been fraught conversations going on privately within government between the health secretary, the chancellor and the prime minister. there is a promise to have a long—term funding settlement, so they're not all of these headlines around short—term
8:04 am
fixes, but there is not yet a solution. —— we have all of these headlines. this problem will not be solved overnight. it will be for this government and future governments to wrestle with. so who pays and for how long? what kind of taxes, for instance, could go up? some say we could back taxes on those who own the most and others make the argument that they are the most mobile and they can move elsewhere. and then avoid those taxes. but if we spread the burden across everyone, it pushes everyone's tax bills up. not an easy one for the government to solve. we are promised some answers relatively soon. are promised some answers relatively soon. thank you very much. i know you will keep us up to date. chris mason in westminster. more prisoners could be released to work on a temporary licence as part of a new government plan to cut re—offending. the ministry ofjustice hopes it will help inmates find and keep jobs after they leave prison.
8:05 am
jon ironmonger reports. this busy workshop is inside hindley prison and the men making house panels are all serving jail sentences. keanan 0'neil got three years for smuggling drugs, but now he's got a job and says he wants to keep it. had a babyjust before i came to jail, and my girlfriend, so i want to sort my life out and not end up back in here like everyone else. it's probably changed my life, jail, really. probably more determined to get a job when i get out than i was before because i know what it's like to come here now. hmp hindley has built work spaces and enticed local employers to help inmates get their lives back on track. it's a model the government hopes can help to curb reoffending. under a new strategy announced today, there'll be a consultation on getting more prisoners into workplaces on temporary licences. businesses will be lobbied to employ ex—offenders and could be given tax incentives. and governors will be given more control over education programmes.
8:06 am
reoffending is a huge problem. nearly half of all adult prisoners commit another crime within 12 months of being released, costing the taxpayer around £15 billion a year and keeping more pressure on a prison system that is already overcrowded. prisons are beset with problems from drug use to rising violence, and the prison officers' association said ministers needed to get the basics right first. jon ironmonger, bbc news. north korea is once again threatening to reconsider taking part in a summit with president trump next month. in a sharply worded statement, a close aide to kimjong un called us vice—president mike pence a political dummy and said north korea is ready for a nuclear showdown if talks fail. 0ur asia correspondent rupert wingfield—hayes is in the south korean capital seoul. good morning to you. i suppose in a
8:07 am
way none of this will matter if the talks do go ahead. but looking at some of those statements right now, it is not exactly calm waters. no, charlie, it isn't. some pretty choice words used in this statement, particularly about the vice president, mike pence. they called him ignorant. they said his remarks we re him ignorant. they said his remarks were ignorant and stupid remarks gushing from his mouth and they called him a political dummy. i think this is north korea engaging in their normal brickman ship. they are very in their normal brickman ship. they are very good at this and they have are very good at this and they have a long history of it. they are establishing their negotiating position before going to singapore next month and the message they are sending to the us government is essentially don't think that we are the same as these other regimes that you have forced to denuclearises for, in particular libya. they hate the mention of the word libya, which president trump and some of his top
8:08 am
officials have said repeatedly over the last week. they want to impose a deal in the style of libya, and we know how that ended for colonel gaddafi, stabbed to death in a ditch. north korea say we are nuclear power, and you have got to treat seriously as equals before we go into this summit. and let'sjust going into the eyewitness accounts, as it is hoped, the destruction of the nuclear test site. journalists will be able to see something, we are told. what is happening? the short answer is that we don't know. u nfortu nately i short answer is that we don't know. unfortunately i am not one of the journalists chosen to go up there. they arrived in north korea yesterday. we know that they got on a train from a city on the east coast of north korea heading up to this place deep in the mountains, far in the north of north korea, where there is no mobile phone coverage. we understand they were not allowed to take satellite phones
8:09 am
with them. they disappeared into a telecommunications black hole. but we think today or tomorrow they will observe the destruction of these tunnels underneath the mountain there that were used north korea's six underground nuclear tests, the last and the largest of which was last and the largest of which was last september. north korea has said it will shut down this place permanently as a stepping stone towards the singapore summit. we know that it has happened. for the moment, thank you. —— we will have to wait for them to emerge from the mountains before we know whether it has happened. the russian embassy has asked the uk for permission to speak with yulia skripal, who was poisoned in a nerve agent attack along with her father sergei in salisbury earlier this year. an embassy spokesperson said russia wanted to check that yulia is not being held in the uk against her will. the request comes after she gave an interview to the reuters news agency about her experience and recovery. translation: we are so lucky to have both survived this attempted assassination.
8:10 am
i don't want to describe the details but the clinical treatment was invasive, painful and depressing. 0ur recovery has been slow and extremely painful. jeremy corbyn says the labour party won't support any brexit deal that includes a return to the hard border between northern ireland and the irish republic. mr corbyn will make his first trip to belfast as labour leader later today. he's expected to argue that a new, comprehensive customs union between the uk and eu would prevent communities being divided. improving northern rail's performance is now the department of tra nsport‘s number one performance priority, according to chris grayling. the transport secretary's comments come amidst widespread criticism of the company over cancellations, delays and the implementation of a new timetable earlier this week. the company has apologised to passengers but said many of the problems had been caused by delays in electrification work being carried out by network rail. a full—sized replica of a red arrows
8:11 am
jet took up position in downing street yesterday to celebrate the centenary of the royal air force. it must have been a nightmare to park that! theresa may hosted a reception for personnel and trainees from the air force, army, and navy, as well as veterans and civil servants from the ministry of defence. the jet‘s arrival prompted some surprise. the prime minister's chief of staff said on twitter that it was "a helluva job by the pilot to land there". that is a great image. it is 12 minutes past eight. we will have the sport and weather for you later. celebrations will take place later this summer to mark 70 years of the nhs. but two influential think tanks are already investigating how it will look on its 85th anniversary. in the next 15 years the number of people in the uk over the age of 85 is set to increase by more
8:12 am
than a million, with economists warning that taxes will have to rise significantly to maintain the health service we've come to expect. joining us now is niall dickson, the chief executive of the nhs confederation, and in our london newsroom is former junior doctor adam kay, who now writes about the nhs. thank you both forjoining us. let me start with you. on these numbers, the figures out this morning, saying it would take household taxes to rise by £1500 just to maintain a level of nhs service we have now and to improve that it would be £2000 for every household, which is a lot of money. how is this being worked out? the first thing to say is that this is a wake—up call for all of us about what we will face over the next 15 years or so. watch this report doesn't simply ask us to go back to the level of funding that we had for the first 60 years over that time, roughly 4% additional spending
8:13 am
on top of inflation each year going forward. the numbers seem big because we are talking about, by 2033, the assumption is that we will be better off by that time and people will have more to be able to contribute. the underlying question isa contribute. the underlying question is a really serious one. it is a big and tough choice for us all. if we wa nt to and tough choice for us all. if we want to maintain and make the service even better than it is now, we are going to have to pay for it. and there is no way of getting round that. in the past we have tended to cut defence and other bits of public spending. according to the report, they seem to have gone as far as we can take them. as a society, we are probably going to have to spend more. but we need to have a wider debate about it, and we need a longer term funding settlement. at the moment, we tend to bail it out year by year and we have been urging the government to think about a longer term settlement. i am really pleased that the health secretary and the prime minister have said they would go for a longer term settlement. now we need a wider
8:14 am
debate involving the public, not involving the doctors and nurses and managers and people who run the service, about what we can do for the money that will be invested. that is just one way, if you put it all into a particular form that is just one way, if you put it all into a particularform of that is just one way, if you put it all into a particular form of tax and so forth, there are also other ways it can be done, that is the 2033 figure. the honest question is if we want money over the next five yea rs we a re if we want money over the next five years we are going to have to look at additional taxation or if the government wants to borrow more, there are big questions over that. my there are big questions over that. my question is in the absence of additionalfunding coming my question is in the absence of additional funding coming from elsewhere what does the nhs service look like, who is going to bear the brunt of what it cannot do? we are going to enter a period of managed
8:15 am
decline frankly. the danger is we are no longer able to treat people as quickly as we are, more people don't get access notjust as quickly as we are, more people don't get access not just to as quickly as we are, more people don't get access notjust to help that social care, and at the moment there are hundreds of thousands of elderly people who do not qualify for state social care and who cannot afford to get the care that they need. increasingly i think we will have a system if we don't invest, hospitals get even hotter than they are now and that is a terrible problem already, we get community services which are not built up to be able to prevent people from going into hospital in the first place. the key groups i think that will suffer will be a lot of those over 85's. almost a double in the number of people over 85 over the next 15-20 of people over 85 over the next 15—20 years. those people will suffer, we will not have services in place particularly to stop them going in and out of hospital as we are seeing at the moment. let's bring in adam k, formerjunior
8:16 am
doctor who now writes about the nhs, give us the reality of what it is like when you are a doctor working under the limited funds we have had? the nhs has never been totally flush but in the last decade or so an already tight system has been stretched to breaking point. 40,000 nurses short, 10,000 doctors. it is good we are now having the grown—up conversation which says they either need to put more money into the nhs or expect less from it, hopefully we can find the money. d10 taxation is a good idea? it has to come from somewhere. it's not my department. we can spend £1 billion to brave the dup, £2 billion on new killer submarines, we can find the money, we are a rich country. there are two
8:17 am
conversations, one you are doing to your calculations about what the realities are about what treatments can be offered for what price, the next question is the politics of this. who is going to be the political party that presents to the nation you had to pay more tax if you wanted like this? that's the reality isn't it? it is one thing coming up with the numbers, it's another thing to actually make it happen? you are right and the reason we commissioned this report was to provide some objective evidence to help the politicians have that conversation. i think a lot of people including those within government recognise the difficulty which lies ahead and the fact we have had a really difficult period over the last ten years. if we go on like this we will see more and more exa m ples like this we will see more and more examples where individuals are not getting the care and support that they need. we all have to have this
8:18 am
conversation and to make the point, some would say it is the nhs and its unaffordable as if it's something to do with the nhs, it's the same composition in other countries. in countries like germany. we are simply asking that the amount we pay, the amount of wealth we want to pay, the amount of wealth we want to pay by 2033, the germans are already there. other countries are spending, not all, but many of the countries we like to compare ourselves with our spending more than we are and all we are saying is we need to do the catch up. add, it is not scientific by any means, a lot of people getting in touch on this team and if there was a theme it is why should we have to pay more taxes? people like the idea, and if you tell them you want a great nhs they say yes but when it comes to paying more tax for it could get a bit more complicated. it does, if you asked people about putting a penny are two
8:19 am
on tax they would say they were interested but politicians are short termist, they do not want to risk averse seat at the next electoral cycle. there needs to be a cross—party decision maybe, it is difficult but remember the nhs is not buildings, it's the million and a half people who work there and they are the people who are struggling at the moment and the other ones who need the money. we will leave it there, thank you very much. thank you for all your comments as well. it's almost the bank holiday, do you think we will get sunshine? according to matt earlier he said we will, that is the view outside the studio this morning, looks quite calm and peaceful, not a lot of sunshine, none, basically. is that the end of your router report?
8:20 am
do you want to fill in the blanks matt? i think she did a greatjob, over to you! there are a few breaks in sa lfo rd , you! there are a few breaks in salford, and there will be a few more developing across parts of north—west, this morning of course it's exam season, naga munchetty and others sitting their gcse‘s but here at cambridge we are in final step today, we are eight stjohn's couege today, we are eight stjohn's college on the top is the symbol of the eagle which is the symbol of st john's here in cambridge and it's the first of the university buildings to be built this side of the river camp and i think there will be a few nervous people passing by and be in the hours ahead to head to theirfinal exams. by and be in the hours ahead to head to their final exams. but as i said it is cloudier and it will break up, so it is cloudier and it will break up, so let's look at the forecast, predominantly grey across many parts
8:21 am
of england and wales and eastern scotland. low cloud filtering through central parts of scotland as well but a lot of that will break up. some of you disturb through the nights are by some nasty thunderstorms in southern england, they have eased but wet weather at they have eased but wet weather at the minute, stretching from south—east england to the south midlands towards parts of wales and that will continue to the rest of this morning ‘s rush hour. dry weather to get your thirsty under way, sunshine to the west of scotland, the west earn part of central scotland. northern ireland sunny spells, breaking through in north—west england and here in east anglia we will start to see late—breaking about times during the morning as well. still got rain at the moment stretching through south midlands towards wales, only isolated showers and the south west at the moment, could see one or two more developing, and why things turn drier and brighter compared with what we saw during the night we might see showers pushing and later
8:22 am
on into the afternoon. where you get the sunshine it will feel quite warm, temperature flooding in the south—east corner to 22—23, some of the warmer conditions will be across the warmer conditions will be across the highlands of scotland. into tonight we will continue with clear skies in the far north—west of the country, here it will be a chilly night but rain returns the parts of england. across the south east, east anglia, lincolnshire and yorkshire, stretching across the midlands, so it could be heavy and thundery. keeping temperatures up across england and wales, 10—14d, fresher where you have got clearer skies. tomorrow it's a bit of a thundery sam whinged, sunshine to southern counties, sunshine across north—west england, in between across parts of northern england, the midlands also through wales and east anglia we
8:23 am
will see a range come and go all day long. nasty thunderstorms, where you have got the sunshine temperatures into the 20s, lots of sunshine for many of you. more updates tomorrow. that was a much betterjob than me. i have been told he has weaved in the business news with the weather? it's all going so smoothly after the handy hand to matt. the beast from the east has claimed another victim after greggs and debenhams — this time b&q blamed it for sales falling by nearly 10% in the three months to the end of april. the owner of b&q also owns the trade catalogue screwfix, which actually saw increase, but not by as much as they'd hoped. talktalk has seen its profits
8:24 am
fall as it goes through a change in how it runs its business, but after a tough year heading into 2017, it has started to gain more customers again in 2018. last year you might remember it was fined again after its big customer data breach. the consumer group which? has warned that some water—resistant sunscreen products don't work anywhere near as well once they've been worn in the sea. the group hasn't named the two products it tested — and the industry disagrees with the claims. the reports also flags up that some budget creams for less than £3 can be better than more familiar nine quid bottles. i have realised you have started taking over my life, you are doing the business news from me and now you are doing what we used to
8:25 am
we are going to talk also a little later on, if your phone is overwhelmed at the moment with texts and e—mails, people asking about data protection, should you reply, should you ignore them, does it make any difference? we will try to answer those questions later on. ten to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning. many of us still enjoy warm sunshine over the next few days
8:26 am
but today we will introduce something else into the forecast and thatis something else into the forecast and that is done through rain. this affecting many southern part of the uk this morning, and further north, more sunshine. but those thundery downpours in the south all coming in with this little weather system which has pushed its way out france, over the channel, and will mainly affect the southern areas into the afternoon. they will break up a little bit. still the risk of torrential downpours for a time. further north, quite a bit of cloud which will burn back to the north sea coast. just like it did yesterday. like much of northern and western scotland, sunny afternoon to come. right on the coast of eastern scotla nd come. right on the coast of eastern scotland and england, misty and murky with low cloud. showers in parts of wales and into southern areas of england and the odd rumble of thunder but brighter skies developing in the east midlands and towards east anglia later this afternoon. feeling warm and humid in southern parts despite the cloud and
8:27 am
rain. temperatures 18 to 23 and further north temperatures in the high teens and low 20s. through tonight, we will continue with thundery rain. if anything it will become more widespread. frequent lightning perhaps as it moves further north. more low cloud, mist and murk around the north sea coastal areas. throughout friday, this area of rain, with thunderstorms, will move north, and it will come into northern england, perhaps towards dumfries and galloway. some of that for the midlands and wales as well but for southern england on friday, brighter spells developing into the afternoon. sunshine further north as the cloud retreats back to the coast once again. temperatures in the high teens to low 20s. going into the weekend, tempered his rise even further but always the risk of some thunderstorms. —— temperatures rise even further. this is business live from bbc news with ben thompson and sally bundock. trade tensions accelerate, as the united states says it's
8:28 am
investigating foreign car imports. live from london, that's our top story on thursday 24th may. first it was steel and aluminium, now donald trump has suggested foreign cars could be the next target for possible us tariffs. he's started a national security investigation into vehicle imports. also in the programme: it's a $200 billion relationship. german chancellor merkel talks business with president xi jinping amid growing trade tensions with the us.
8:29 am

82 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on