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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  May 24, 2018 9:00am-11:02am BST

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hello. it's thursday. it's nine o'clock. i'm chloe tilley. welcome to the programme. in the health service. of the number of people aged over 85 over the next ten to 15 years. over the next ten to 15 years. to stop them going in and out of hospital as they are at the moment. could have to pay an extra £1200 a
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year in tax. used to pay for the nhs? do get in touch. online and then blackmailed — is on the increase. are putting themselves at risk. going to share this with all of your friends and family. friends and family. being a scam, someone trying to rip you off. at that point it became serious. an explicit webcam chat. as the star tries to crack down on ticket touts and resale websites.
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hello and welcome to the programme. we're live until 11am this morning. a month in taxes? the nhs fit for purpose. into the health service? to the ed sheeran tour on a resale website? if so, you won't be able to use it. at the proper price. but is that fair? and should it be up to the artists themselves to tackle the problem? do get in touch on all the stories we're talking about this morning. at the standard network rate.
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to maintain current standards of health and social care in the uk. and ageing population. here's our health editor, hugh pym. funding plan for the nhs. it's expected within weeks. money will be required. have come up with proposals. mean higher taxes. by 1. in the entire population under 65. 3% per year, but the report says 3.
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levels of care. even slight improvements will need increases of 4% a year. bills in 15 years‘ time. we've spent more on it. we're going to need to spend more over the next 10—15 years. what else you could cut. the sick and the vulnerable. hugh pym, bbc news.
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correspondent chris mason, who joins us live from westminster. us live from westminster. say we need to bring in substantial tax rises. tax rises. but everyone knows the nhs needs the cash. good morning. that is the essence of the political dilemma here. dilemma here. weekly basis about the nhs being patched up like pudsey bear. patched up like pudsey bear. number of people, it is not a guaranteed route towards popularity. guaranteed route towards popularity. it is the essence of the challenge here. here.
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generation but fun with expensive and complex conditions. and complex conditions. heart of it is an old political dilemma. —— often with expensive conditions. conditions. who pays for it and how much and when? much and when? to get to a long—term settlement but they are not there yet. they are not there yet. 70th anniversary of the nhs, in a couple of months' time. couple of months' time. government, it will be one for subsequent ones as well. subsequent ones as well. of the health service is simply not going to go away. thank you, chris. we will speak to you later for more updates, i am sure. of the rest of the day's news. taking part in a summit with president trump next month.
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of libya before the overthrow of colonel gaddafi. is the time to reach a peace deal. while being secretly recorded. although the real number of victims is thought to be much higher. of preparing acts of terrorism. searched by officers. in london last week. licence as part of a new government plan
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to cut reoffending. after they leave prison. jon ironmonger reports. and the men making house panels are all serving jail sentences. but now he's got a job and says he wants to keep it. in here like everyone else. it's probably changed my life, jail, really. than i was before because i know what it's like to come here now. inmates get their lives back on track. it's a model the government hopes can help to curb reoffending.
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on temporary licences. given tax incentives. and governors will be given more control over education programmes. reoffending is a huge problem. pressure on a prison system that is already overcrowded. the basics right first. jon ironmonger, bbc news. crashed into a passenger train in northern italy. the incident happened at a level crossing near the town of turin. it's believed the train driver is amongst the dead. the most seriously injured have been airlifted to hospital.
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been referred to the police. of misconduct in public office was being assessed. andrea leadsom, a stupid woman. private secretaries, claims he denies. by the national audit office. routine inspections. on inspections since the year 2000. resources by focusing on poor performing schools.
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toilet for her son. provide a specialised changing places toilet. unreasonably expensive. more than a0 years ago is being reintroduced. location in rockingham forest in northamptonshire. for a new english population. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. 30. thank you. throughout the morning on all the stories we are talking about. and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate.
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they've had a lot to work on, haven't they? difficult it has become for teams to play home and away. play home and away. winter's away, how pleased they must be to be back home. be to be back home. it is hard to forget how the ashes went. forget how the ashes went. 4— zero series win, close to a whitewash. whitewash. auckland, one of their worst ever total. total. they have not won any overseas tests after that. overseas tests after that. problems besetting england off the field. field. the ashes because of an issue at a bristol nightclub. bristol nightclub. greeting of cameron bancroft led to headlines and sledging.
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headlines and sledging. team, suspended because of a disciplinary incident as well. disciplinary incident as well. in that context that england are looking to turn over a new leaf. looking to turn over a new leaf. they are playing pakistan at lords this morning. this morning. improve their preparation to start with field and on field. with field and on field. looking for a better intensity to their training session. their training session. years, not only away from home but at home. at home. the preparation hasn't necessarily been the best. necessarily been the best. pints and more practice perhaps for england. england. required and probably going to be adopted. new players. who should we look out for? one very new fresh face. face. youngest spinner in 87 years when he makes his debut this morning. makes his debut this morning. he is just 20 and he plays for somerset. just 20 and he plays for somerset.
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while sofa shopping and arguing with his girlfriend! his girlfriend! solve the spinner problem for england. england. lords but he was 12th man once for somerset. somerset. according tojoe root, he is ready. is ready. what he wants to do in the game and how he will approach this week. how he will approach this week. making their debut, which is really exciting for me as captain. exciting for me as captain. want to do is give him the cap and get out there. get out there. he has approached this really well. this really well. have a good start to what is hopefully a very long career. hopefully a very long career. has been recalled to take his place batting at number seven. batting at number seven. licence to thrill with his big hitting.
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hitting. things to stop it being the same old same old for england. same old for england. have at least been fairly consistent. consistent. it and last time around they could only draw the four match series. only draw the four match series. can follow it across the bbc radio and online. and online. been raining at lords but it will now be sunny. now be sunny. a sign of summer if ever there was one. a british summer! thank you. speak to you the morning. national crime agency. sex acts whilst being secretly recorded by criminal gangs. up from just over 400 to more than 1300. of the real number of victims, most of whom don't come forward. this and joins us now.
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the next ten minutes or so. children in the room you might want to turn the sound off for a while. to turn the sound off for a while. terms of crime, what are people being tricked into doing? being tricked into doing? think are women, actually female gang members, online. gang members, online. acts on webcam whilst being secretly recorded.
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recorded. once they have the video footage they have the victim. footage they have the victim. footage to all those people we talked about. talked about. this has had some pretty serious consequences? pretty serious consequences? this crime is as serious as it gets. crime is as serious as it gets. number of reported cases are up, troubled in just three years. troubled in just three years. investigators say those numbers are just a fraction of the real number. just a fraction of the real number. just for those victims directly impacted but for the family as well. impacted but for the family as well.
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where victims have killed themselves because they were so desperate. because they were so desperate. because there was nowhere for them to turn. they felt there was no way out. out. mainly young men, men in their teens and 20s. and 20s. threatening to what they would say destroy their live, what do you do? destroy their live, what do you do? involve telling them so what do you do? do? aware of five people taking their own lives. own lives. 20s so a bit more mature and able to deal with the consequences. deal with the consequences. pounds and actually told me what happened to him. at flipped and i was watching myself back on like a short loop. because i know this kind of
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thing happens. but ijust never expected it to happen to me. you never do. to all your friends and family. it certainly felt a lot more sinister at that point. where someone isjust trying to rip you off. at that point it became serious. i said i can't pay 600. i don't have 600. able to get that for you. and they said fine, 500. i was like, no, i'm not doing that either. "the most i can give you is 150". and the country, which happened in this case to be the philippines. i sent the 150 but then they did ask for the same... occasion by the same way. that was it, i handed over another 150. trying to get rid of stuff, sell things, that kind of stuff.
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what is the advice to people who maybe get caught up in this? maybe get caught up in this? involved in this as a victim do not panic, do not pay, call the place. panic, do not pay, call the place. thank you so much for that. for avon and somerset police. a local perspective. the national crime agency. jon pearn is a victim of attempted sextortion. a victim of blackmailing by a gang based in the philippines.
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thank you all for talking to us this morning and joining us. morning and joining us. i want to begin if! morning and joining us. if you can outline what happened to you? i befriended someone by mistake. mistake. person and went on skype and that is when it all curtailed off. when it all curtailed off. blackmailed for £500 which i thought was funny because i don't have £500. was funny because i don't have £500. i basically told them where to go, i wasn't interested. wasn't interested. then they got quite upset. quite upset. the details, i said sure them, they will only laugh. will only laugh. so i didn't really do
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anything. do anything. the victims, the ones who have killed themselves. killed themselves. i wish the stories could have got out earlier. stories could have got out earlier. your thoughts on what everyone has to say. to say. i want to bring in ron, tell me what happened to your nephew? me what happened to your nephew? daniel, basically exactly the same as the chap just told you. daniel, basically exactly the same as the chapjust told you. as the chapjust told you. talking to and they did exactly the same. same. e—mail account and tried to extort him for money. him for money. pay them they basically told daniel to go and kill himself. to go and kill himself. were going to send everything to everybody.
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everybody. before us has the right idea, if they do try it, do not pay them. they do try it, do not pay them. just do not pay them, they are not worth it. worth it. anybody about this, did anybody know? nobody had a clue. death was at the start of everything which is happening now. which is happening now. taking note because people are starting to die from it. starting to die from it. in scotland were really good, the police don't so thoroughly good. police don't so thoroughly good. refusing at the moment to cooperate even though they did at first. even though they did at first. have had a change of regime and they are not cooperating any more. are not cooperating any more. help and support from the countries where these are based? where these are based? totally, there is help and support available. there is help and support available.
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assisting and do their own prosecutions. prosecutions. arrests, significant arrests over at there. there. information which we can then pass on to foreign law—enforcement. on to foreign law—enforcement. somerset police saying they have been a victim of sex sextortion? been a victim of sex sextortion? out the true picture to offer you as much support as possible. much support as possible.
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is it mainly men? mainly men? victims were all sorts of reasons, vulnerability, they might feel shy. vulnerability, they might feel shy. so you don't know how they will use it. it. be funny if you send these photographs, so what? photographs, so what? eloquently put by ron, it's a lot harder to have that strength? harder to have that strength? but they don't bother coming forward. it's what they need to do. i have had people contacting me from all over the world. all over the world. about that, people getting in touch about their experience? about that, people getting in touch about their experience ? about that, people getting in touch about their experience? about their experience?
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the time he was in touch with me and i told him to tell them where to go. i told him to tell them where to go. to go to the police and we ended up becoming friends. becoming friends. he appreciated what i had told him. what i had told him. think we have a grasp at all five biggest problem is. biggest problem is. about the embarrassment and shame, what do you think? what do you think? help us and give us that information. information. so we know there are more victims who need to come forward. who need to come forward.
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driving force in what made him take his own life? his own life? want to embarrass the family i suppose. he would not have done that. that. it would have been laughed off, eventually, so what? off, eventually, so what? blackmailers, the way they are putting it across. putting it across. be so bad, they will be disowned but they will not. they will not. rather have them back here than committing suicide. committing suicide. to report less have the majority already handed over cash? already handed over cash? its case by case, it's very different. by case, it's very different.
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people very much have the perspective of go ahead and do it. perspective of go ahead and do it. leveraged and the footage but they don't go on to publish it. don't go on to publish it. moved to the next person and it will all go away. all go away. end to that, they would always ask for more money. for more money. that if somebody does not pay that they actually publish anything? they actually publish anything? as possible to get reassurance and support. support. because it is growing at such a rate or more people are coming forward? or more people are coming forward?
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the police are better equipped to deal with these people now. deal with these people now. to the police that they will be dealt with appropriately. dealt with appropriately. coming forward is a good thing for us. coming forward is a good thing for us. us. how easy is it to shut down these gangs? these gangs? can do everything we can dojust the threat, if not eradicate it. threat, if not eradicate it. you don't have a lot of faith these gangs can be stopped? gangs can be stopped?
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married, i have not done this for me, i have done it for other people. me, i have done it for other people. have you find it embarrassing? not really, it is in my nature! really, it is in my nature! in the situation daniel found himself in, what is your advice? himself in, what is your advice? whatever happens because they will keep coming back for more and more. keep coming back for more and more. they are a coward and bullies who will keep coming back for more. will keep coming back for more. to the police and give the police a chance to try to catch them. chance to try to catch them. i don't think enough work is being done especially abroad. done especially abroad. standing in the way of the extradition have asked for. extradition have asked for. backside and let them go over here and face trial. and face trial. do you want to respond to that? right?
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in the philippines at this moment in time doing work. time doing work. in the reduction of payments going to morocco. it's not an overnight fix. fix. conjunction with jurisdictions and we are making progress. we are making progress. all for your time, i am very grateful. plans to help former inmates into jobs when they leave prison. were bought on re—sale sites. considerably out of pocket. time for the latest news. here's annita.
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according to a major report by two leading think tanks. to maintain current standards of health and social care. they also warn that pressure on the system will increase. taking part in a summit with president trump next month. of libya before the overthrow of colonel gaddafi. is the time to reach a peace deal. while being secretly recorded.
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although the real number of victims is thought to be much higher. crashed into a passenger train in northern italy. the incident happened at a level crossing near the city of turin. it's believed the train driver is amongst the dead. the most seriously injured have been airlifted to hospital. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. here's some sport now with hugh. third spinner in four tests to do so for england. for england. is due to start at 11 o'clock against pakistan this morning. against pakistan this morning. catch manchester city at the top of the premier league. the premier league.
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sixth, 37 points behind the champions last season. champions last season. he has work to do. to do. first british rider to win the prestigious race. prestigious race. seconds after that soggy stage yesterday. yesterday. league, a liverpudlian will try to do the same for lyon today. do the same for lyon today. they play wolfsburg in the final in kiev. play wolfsburg in the final in kiev. much more sport coming up after ten o'clock. former inmates get a job and cut re—offending. inside prisons, staff levels down and complaints about overcrowding. ready for life on the outside. prisoners in cheshire.
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by prisoners across the uk through the clink charity. i was going through a really bad patch in my life. i was an addict. i got involved with a bunch of people and i ended up selling drugs. for conspiracy to supply class a. my mum died and my life spiralled out of control. the pain away from losing her. i ended up coming to prison through taking drugs, committing crime. would you like anything to
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drink? water? still water, sparkling water, anything? are you 0k? once you walk back in them gates, you put your mask on. because it's a different lifestyle in the prison. but when i'm out here the mask comes off and i become myself. i become julia again, the julia what i know. the julie what likes to talk. the julia what likes to laugh. but in there, your mask goes on. i never used to be able to speak to anyone. i was just so shy. and they brought all that out in me. they taught me all different things. working in the kitchen. so i'm going to try and get the diploma for that one as well. they treat you with respect. you give respect, you get respect. so the people what you serve here, they're absolutely fantastic.
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their life, giving something back. perhaps the family that you burgled might feel you've got a soft option. you've got an easy life all of a sudden. i understand that. and i do sympathise. "that person what did this to me is helping their selves. a future for themselves. the people who teach us, they're amazing. they don't treat us like prisoners. they treat us like normal people. and they'll go above and beyond to help you with what you need. you're here to be punished. to society — selling class a drugs. they might think this is a soft option.
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no, because it solves a problem. better my life. to get ex—offenders into work. inspector. enterprise in sheffield. for a number of charities and is now a painter—decorator. thank you for coming in. got out of wandsworth prison at the start of 2017. start of 2017. the country's most overcrowded prisons. prisons. been in a prison a sense of daily life there. life
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there. behind the door for 23 to 23 and a half hours a day. half hours a day. that is a huge strain on any human. strain on any human. the prisons are generally overcrowded. they are noisy. they can be dangerous. they are quite dirty places. are quite dirty places. and the staff are stressed and overworked. staff are stressed and overworked. so that is not an ideal environment to be educating anybody. to be educating anybody. and i'm interested in your experience. interested in your experience. there is some good education in prisons. is some good education in prisons. tell us about your experiences. went into prison in 2006 for a serious assault. serious assault. school i didn't do any qualifications. qualifications. when i went into prison, it was only the second time. prison, it was only the second time.
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and i did as many qualifications as i could. i could. opportunities to do courses and take exams? exams? them are spread out among the prison system. system. is to ask for a transfer to that prison. prison. not a chance in hell of you getting there. there. in because i want to hear about your time inside doncaster prison. time inside doncaster prison. right in thinking that you helped in educating some of the prisoners? yes. i actually met phil in doncaster as well. doncaster as well. drawing prisoners about a week after getting into prison. —— mentoring.
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with the standard learning programme. programme. it was it challenging to want to learn? want to learn? anything to get out of your prison cell. cell. around being in a classroom and being told what to do by teachers. being told what to do by teachers. they have got negative experiences of that. of that. in approach that needs to
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come as well. well. don't engage with mainstream education. education. individually, they do fall by the wayside. wayside. john, would you agree with what michael has said? absolutely. one of the problems has been with the education contract. the education contract. prisons in london, their education is provided by manchester college. is provided by manchester college. it tends to be one size fits all. entirely appropriate, but it doesn't look at the individual. look at the individual. doesn't look at the individual needs of the prisoners. of the prisoners. control, is a good one, that the devil will be in the detail of that.
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devil will be in the detail of that. i wanted to ask michael and nick and phil whether this is a good plan. phil whether this is a good plan. not all shake your heads. principle, yes, but will it work in practice? practice? more prisoners, more violence, how can it work? can it work? i would like to ask michael this question. sorry, john. able to deliver this increase in education? education? to run a regime where you can unlock prisoners and get them to education? prisoners and get them to education? will you be able to do it? in some prisons it will be difficult and in some it will be impossible. and in some it will be impossible. it depends on how it works. budget which is kind of managed ce ntrally. budget which is kind of managed centrally. centrally.
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afternoon, and you are lucky if it is three days a week. is three days a week. good quality education needs to be six hours a day five days a week. six hours a day five days a week. that needs to be eight hours a day five days a week. five days a week. a prison to be safe, well ordered and well staffed. and well staffed. 2000 or 3000 inexperienced staff to replace 5000. replace 5000. there is a fundamental problem there. problem there.
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the use of release on temporary licence. licence. he ran scared and put a block on rotl. forgive me forjumping in. we are running out of time. are running out of time. leaving prison and getting employment. employment. how challenging was that for you, phil? it was very challenging. get a job with violence on your record is next to impossible. record is next to impossible. qualifications i gained in prison that they gave me a job. that they gave me a job.
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criminal record or do you not tell them? i have informed them. i mean the house owners, not the business? the house owners, not the business? you cannot blame them for thinking that? he is a nice chap... but you cannot blame them for thinking? cannot blame them for thinking? is on—site or setting up own business. business. you have got violence or have got a criminal record. criminal record. michael, what challenges did you have? have?
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not want to have do try to hide my past. past. i decided i would start my own business when i was in prison. business when i was in prison. sought support from the prince's trust immediately. trust immediately. crowd funded some money and started my own business. money and started my own business. of fraud, widescale fraud, so different challenges i'm guessing? different challenges i'm guessing? insurance, everything is a challenge. challenge. prison and then getting you a job when you leave prison. when you leave prison.
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challenge is taking care of by companies like that. companies like that. thank you so much for speaking to us. coming up... household will have to pay to maintain and modernise the nhs. we'll be asking if people would be willing to pay. ed sheeran's sold out tour kicks off in manchester this evening. but lots of fans aren't happy. for a ticket. sites won't be valid. and it'll be cancelled. they'll then have an opportunity to buy a new ticket at face value. some losing hundreds of pounds. to our entertainment reporter chi chi izundu.
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programme, is it up to ed sheeran to police this i wonder? police this i wonder? the problem is who polices the internet, nobody. who polices the internet, nobody. play live then i guess it's up to the artist to do something about it. the artist to do something about it. artists in the world we must say is doing something quite drastic. doing something quite drastic. known totes, his management have said. said.
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new ticket at face value of 49 pounds or £80. pounds or £80. obligation for the totes resale sites to give money back? sites to give money back? that is the issue. the issue. ticket might be invalid upon entry of a gig or event. of a gig or event. the other sites have all complied and do warn fans. have all complied and do warn fans. management but he's not the only artist to have done this. artist to have done this. we investigated tickets, look at this.
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and more difficult to get one at a reasonable price. or secondary ticketing websites where fans can resell tickets. as highlighted recently by a committee of mps. saying these are official artist tickets. ticketmaster confirmed to me that artist is in fact robbie williams. here's a ticket you can buy one ticketmaster's website. i'm feeling flush, so let's get some good seats. level one, block 126 sounds good. £95 each. so let's see what it's going for on there. very similar seats one block over from the stage at £160 each.
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this is not a resale ticket. it's being sold for the first time on a secondary site. but confirm they come with no extra perks. in our view unenforceable and illegal. illegal. management seed which is not realised his tickets. realised his tickets. thank you very much for that. let's talk now to live music fan and journalist lauren page. to celebrate her tenth wedding anniversary. are valid after buying ed sheeran tickets
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for her children. christmas present for your children wasn't it? wasn't it? appreciation for everything they do for me. for me. directly and they sold out straightaway. straightaway. i think came up for viagogo for me to purchase tickets. viagogo for me to purchase tickets. i went for it and paid over the odds, a silly amount for it. odds, a silly amount for it. paid, tell us how much, it is i watering. watering. so for four tickets i paid £723 and something p. £723 and something p. lot of time to save up that money, borrow money.
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borrow money. thank you, i appreciate what you've done for me. done for me. bit like a slap in the face because now we don't know if we can go. now we don't know if we can go. they don't want to give me a clear answer. alexandra what is your experience? experience? you sped over £500 on two tickets. two tickets. and they have given me pretty standard responses. standard responses. know where to go from here to be honest. honest. invalid or do you think this is a goodidea? invalid or do you think
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this is a good idea? good idea? money to pay out but unfortunately it's at my expense. it's at my expense. but i appreciate and understand why he is doing it. and understand why he is doing it. third—party sites than what you can get from the website. get from the website. outside selling tickets for quadruple the price. quadruple the price. the only option to go and see someone you like. someone you like. ticket as invalid then sell you a proper one at face value? proper one at face value?
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because we don't gets baby—sitters to be able to look after her. to be able to look after her. told we can get in seems ridiculous to be honest. to be honest. i would just like my money back. money back. will be able to get in, you just have to buy one at face value? have to buy one at face value? that is what i believe as well. is what i believe as well. of people in the same boat as the guest you have got on your show. guest you have got on your show. buy one at face value and be able to get them. get them. be able to get into one of
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the concerts. concerts. the industry and it's clearly not worked. worked. do so, should this not be an industrywide issue? industrywide issue? definitely, i think technology is the problem. think technology is the problem. cards and by different tickets, they can go out and pay over the odds. can go out and pay over the odds. they will pay a ridiculous amount of money. money. desperate to see an artist you are desperate to get a ticket. desperate to get a ticket. which is face—to—face, fan to fan sharing of tickets. sharing of tickets. pictures on tickets and have stronger forms of id. stronger forms of id.
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to bring ide, got to the door and been light straight in. been light straight in. say i've not played through the nose? nose? we need to look at a way to get rid of touts. get rid of touts. tickets and true fans get into gigs and touts don't make a lot of money. and touts don't make a lot of money. hope it's sorted out, thank you for talking to us this morning. talking to us this morning. company said it is legal to resell concert tickets in the uk. concert tickets in the uk. on by the original purchaser in good faith. faith. to cancel tickets on the basis they have been resold are highly unfair. have been resold are highly unfair. in our view illegal and only punish consumers. let's get a weather update.
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across scotland and northern ireland, the far north of england. ireland, the far north of england. moment, beautiful blue skies, cloudy conditions in surrey this morning. conditions in surrey this morning. wales, still the showers going at the moment. the moment. through southern england during this afternoon. afternoon. eastern coast of aberdeenshire during this afternoon. during this afternoon. across scotland are plenty of blue skies and sunshine. skies and sunshine. for northern ireland, risk of catching a shower. catching a shower. northern england, where from the north sea coasts.
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north sea coasts. england and the south—east the risk of further showers. of further showers. heavy side and also with some thunder. thunder. up into the midlands and across wales. wales. could turn quite chilly, further south pictures in double figures. south pictures in double figures. and the mahiedine mekhissi—benabbad 20s. 20s.
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further over the weekend, this coming from the east and south—east. coming from the east and south—east. and that's going to spark off some thunderstorms. thunderstorms. hello. it's thursday. it's 10 o'clock. i'm chloe tilley. of nhs health and social care. in the number of people over 85 in the next 15 to 20 years. the next 15 to 20 years. they will be big sufferers. be big sufferers.
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hospital as we are seeing at the moment. and getting the response of a consultant. to decide whether to change the country's abortion laws. i just feel that women should have the choice for a safe abortion. the choice for a safe abortion. have an abortion is if we are attacked. attacked. take away somebody else's right to life. we'll be speaking to those on both sides of the debate. severely disabled son. good morning.
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with a summary of today's news. rises in the next 15 years to safeguard nhs funding. £1200 a yearjust to guarantee current levels of care. paid for is by tax rises. taking part in a summit with president trump next month. of libya before the overthrow of colonel gaddafi. is the time to reach a peace deal. while being secretly recorded.
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although the real number of victims is thought to be much higher. plans to match employers with inmates to reduce reoffending. inmates to reduce reoffending. prison 0fficer association said the announcement lacked detail. in northern italy. near the city of turin. it's believed the train driver is amongst the dead. the most seriously injured have been airlifted to hospital. increased by 200,000 last year. to an increase in eu
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nationals. and those with romanian nationality. toilet for her son. changing places toilet. unreasonably expensive. british retail sales increased by 1. the biggest rise in 18 months. when britain was in the grip of cold snowy weather. broadly unchanged over the last six months. that's a summary of
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the latest bbc news. 30. and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. about paying more tax to fund the nhs. nhs. £1200 a year if you knew it was going on the nhs? going on the nhs? the money comes from and where the money will go of. money will go of. and another anonymous tax. anonymous tax. why should people pay more tax towards the nhs? more tax towards the nhs? the money taken out of their payments. payments.
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after tax dodging celebrities to pay it. it. we didn't have a free health service. service. the tax is a full price to pay in the long run. pay in the long run. your thoughts are welcome. now some sport. in the opening match of a two test series today. series today. the dolls will be in half an hour. half an hour. dom bess bowling for the first time today. today. spinner to do so in 87 years butjoe root says he is ready. root says he is ready. the game and how he will approach this week. this week. is really exciting for me as captain. captain.
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all you want to do is get given your cap and get out there. given your cap and get out there. has approached this week really well. well. start to what will hopefully be a good and long career. good and long career. journey to kiev for the champion league final against real madrid. league final against real madrid. and poland, before arriving sometime on saturday morning. on saturday morning. hours, hence that stock of supplies being taken on board. being taken on board. evening's women's champions league final. final. defending champions and they face wolfsburg at five o'clock. wolfsburg at five o'clock. watch that on the red button or the bbc sport website this afternoon. bbc sport website this afternoon. season but he has set a higher target as well. target as well.
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manchester city at the top of the premier league. premier league. sixth, 37 points behind the champions last season. champions last season. i am very excited for this opportunity. excited for this opportunity. great club, great city, great stadium, and also a great player. stadium, and also a great player. club to american investors who also own an nfl franchise. own an nfl franchise. minority stake for £10 million from the club's italian majority owner. the club's italian majority owner. could play matches at the 49ers's levi's stadium. levi's stadium. days away from making history at the giro d'italia. giro d'italia. he could be the first briton to win the race.
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briton to win the race. a wet stage 17 yesterday to keep his 56 second lead intact. 56 second lead intact. the sport for now and the headlines will be coming up later. thank you. just to keep the nhs going in its current form. group of economists. to historically high levels to fund the health service. for the nhs this summer, despite concerns within her cabinet. so with budgets tight, would you be happy to pay more? what if you knew it was going to go to the nhs? it is needed. you cut back on things that people need, desperately need sometimes? need, desperately need sometimes? at the end of the day, why not? the end of the day, why not? it is for us.
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for us. you are in a bit of a mess without it, aren't you? without it, aren't you? it would make sense to fund it properly. make sense to fund it properly. just not been put into the right thing. thing. i think they have lots of managers and stuff like that. managers and stuff like that. think it needs to be managed in a different way. and yes, i would pay more. more. their safety nets a bit more before increasing the tax on it. increasing the tax on it. the health service and the medical situation is dire. yes, definitely. more tax for the nhs. from the health foundation. at king's college hospital london. in detail what you have come up with in this report. in this report.
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that it faces over the next 15 yea rs ? that it faces over the next 15 years? years? institution which helps everyone in society, but it is struggling. society, but it is struggling. waiting lists are up to 4 million now. now. half of our hospitals can't balance their books. balance their books. there are real pressures today. pressures today. number of older people rises very markedly. markedly. age with long—term health conditions. and multiple health conditions. conditions. diabetes, heart problems, dementia. problems, dementia. that really piles on the cost to the system.
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piles on the cost to the system. we face a choice, really. face a choice, really. continue to deliver high quality care when we need it? care when we need it? we almost certainly will need to pay a bit more in tax. a bit more in tax. bit more of that wealth needs to go into the nhs. into the nhs. would be prepared to pay more tax to help the health service. help the health service. we have got to plan for this. to plan for this. how should we pay for it? for it? proportionately is living in retirement? retirement? spread those costs more fairly across the whole population? across the whole population? that is the discussion. the discussion.
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lot of money to ask, and that could be really unpopular. be really unpopular. it isn't there to meet their needs properly. properly. we need to look at what the alternative is. the alternative is. able to access might not be available? available? in need of social care can't get the services they need. services they need. debate about what the service we want to have would be. want to have would be. going to pay for it and how to do it fairly?
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fairly? and any government, always be put into the nhs? into the nhs? certainly that is very popular with the public. popular with the public. are more prepared to pay extra for it. it. lean year, we might have to top it up. up. it is earmarked but with the potential for top ups if necessary. potential for top ups if necessary. is 4% enough? would allow us to start to improve services. services. 3%. what figure would you put on it?
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government committed to 4% per year over the long term. over the long term. in the short term we need a bit more than that. term we need a bit more than that. years where it has been squeezed, but in the long term around 4%. but in the long term around 4%. prime minister and the health secretary? secretary? about cross—party consensus to fund this fairly. this fairly. the public really want to see a system that is fair. to see a system that is fair. public about what the options are and what is the fairest way forward.
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worry she would be penalised at the ballot box? ballot box? telling you she is happy to bring in a special tax? telling you she is happy to bring in a specialtax? telling you she is happy to bring in a special tax? a special tax? campaign that there would be a price to pay in the polls. to pay in the polls. opportunity in a hung parliament to build a political consensus. build a political consensus. start of the process, you cannot do it at the end. it at the end.
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actually tried to get those measures through parliament. through parliament. election we see a decline a decline in services. the public want this fixed. fixed. believe that the nhs tax will be brought in? i think it should be. increased and expectations have increased. increased.
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with good radiology support an proper trials around it. proper trials around it. care it unfortunately going to require an increase in funding. require an increase in funding. wonder if you think it should be tax specifically for the nhs? specifically for the nhs? which is being spent is being spent on front line services. on front line services. the majority of people would be prepared to live with it. prepared to live with it. may, get a sense of whether this
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is likely to be welcomed? likely to be welcomed? all the time and most importantly patients and people in the service. patients and people in the service. something which is incredibly important to people. important to people. for 70 years is that we manage it in a very short—term, to mouth. a very short—term, to mouth. periods of feast followed by famine. of feast followed by famine. people recognise that is deeply damaging. damaging. always just focusing on next week or next month. you need to
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more long term. term. the nhs rather than in fluctuating between governments? absolutely. running the nhs for the interest of patients. patients. sufficient funding available to us to continue to do that. to continue to do that. minister wanting to bring in slightly different changes. slightly different changes.
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losing the diagnosed with parkinson's. parkinson's. am in my late 50s, i'm healthy and work full—time. work full—time. tax on my salary if i knew it would benefit me in future. benefit me in future. employment so surely more people are paying national insurance? paying national insurance? acceptable to be extra tax but would it be guaranteed to go to the nhs? it be guaranteed to go to the nhs? it for other things, the money would go into the overall revenue. go into the overall revenue. could change rather down the line and it gets swallowed up? and it gets swallowed up? be confident the nhs will use it well?
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well? are starting to talk about having a dedicated tax. dedicated tax. of transparency and as sarah wollaston said there are challenges. wollaston said there are challenges. what do you do if there is a downturn in the economy? downturn in the economy? that or do you try to top it up from other areas? other areas? accountability to the public to see where the money has gone. where the money has gone. what'll happen to the nhs, the part you work in? you work in? are trying to do more with less money. money.
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this is properly funded and properly run and properly supported. run and properly supported. you both so much for talking to me this morning. for her son's needs. on whether to change abortion laws. life is in danger. to legalise terminations for pregnancies up to 12 weeks. from outside ireland trying to influence the referendum.
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voters that are funded overseas. 0ur reporter deirdre finnerty has been following the story. voting on and what it means so take us back to basics? us back to basics? it's a total constitutional ban on abortion. abortion. so there is a lot of soul—searching going on. going on.
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final few hours of the referendum campaign. campaign. something which is not discussed in ireland at all is it? ireland at all is it? starting to wear badges and discuss it more openly. it more openly. the amount of weapon speaking openly about their experiences. about their experiences. husband they travelled to england to have an abortion. have an abortion. 20s, professional women who have not told anyone. told anyone. they are now talking about their experiences. about their experiences. conversation is happening about abortion. abortion.
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that this campaign has brought about. thank you for dropping by. let's talk to campaigners from both sides of the referendum. she helped set up parents together for yes. against changing abortion law. laoise first of all, why is this so important to you? important to you? enjoy the right to life or it should be taken away from them. be taken away from them.
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of ireland and everyone is talking about it. about it. everyone feels very emotionally invested in it. emotionally invested in it. presumably that is the same for you the other perspective? the other perspective? acknowledgement that the eighth amendment has failed. amendment has failed. administer illegally with the abortion pill here every day. abortion pill here every day. and more onto the streets and into houses and neighbourhoods. houses and neighbourhoods. leafleting, conversations happening in our small corner shops. in our small corner shops. it's widespread and it's moving.
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widespread and it's moving. been such a private issue for so long. long. women in pregnancy particularly crisis pregnancies. crisis pregnancies. mothers and babies and i welcome that conversation. that conversation. perinatal services and have more advanced neonatal care. advanced neonatal care. are, if they want an abortion that will not help them. will not help
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them. where it is considered a free choice. choice. 1967 abortion act, that is twice the population of ireland. population of ireland. the capacity of the emblematic croke park. people are worried about the statistics. statistics. shaking your head, but it is a fear emblematic of what is going on? emblematic of what is going on? populations are in no way compatible. compatible. and irish culture is very different to uk culture. very different to uk culture.
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citizens to divorce for the first time. time. one divorce for every three in the uk. uk. that happens, it isjust they are more dangerous for women. more dangerous for women.
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care for them and we refuse to accept them as part of our society. accept them as part of our society. people in ireland want that any more. ireland because they don't want influence from outside of ireland. influence from outside of ireland. has that restricted your work, being here in the uk and campaigning? no. we are just amateur campaigners. fund raised through pub quizzes and ceilidhs and things like that. ceilidhs and things like that. don't have the big bucks for facebook or youtube adverts. facebook or youtube adverts. didn't provide a rationale for their decision. decision. facebook and google, and that is why they took that decision. they took that decision.
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traditional media in ireland is so biased against us. biased against us. papers in ireland take an editorial stance in favour of the amendment. stance in favour of the amendment. through media, so that illustrates the power of social media. the power of social media. did you have concerns about this strategy to ban the adverts? strategy to ban the adverts? don't have adverts funded from outside ireland. outside ireland. funding that wants to impact on our health care access. health care access. ireland, as it is everywhere else in the world. the world. people, not as influenced by funding from, for example, the us. from, for example, the us. can i just say one point? just say one point?
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amnesty international, they received hundreds of thousands of pounds. hundreds of thousands of pounds. that isn't true. it is. amnesty are in breach of irish electoral law. in breach of irish electoral law. ladies, we have managed to be polite so far. let's not let ourselves down. thank you for speaking to us. of a severely disabled 11—year—old boy. boy. toilet facilities for him and his mother will be suing them. mother will be suing them. change in name for chelsea ladies club. club. they will now be called chelsea football club women. chelsea football club women. now some sport. some sport. is the first days of our cricketing summer. summer.
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the toss has been one by england captainjoe root. england captainjoe root. decided to bat first against pakistan at this green wicket. pakistan at this green wicket. could be an entertaining day for england and pakistan today. england and pakistan today. means we will have to wait longer for dom bess to make his debut. for dom bess to make his debut. four tests to make his england debut. debut. against pakistan at 11 o'clock today. he will play if chris woakes doesn't. doesn't. city at the top of the premier league. league. who finished in sixth last season, 37 points behind the champions. 37 points behind the champions. women's champions league for the first time. first time. the final in kiev at five o'clock this afternoon. this afternoon.
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the first british rider to win the prestigious race. prestigious race. seconds after safely negotiating a soggy stage 17. soggy stage 17. the cricket is available on radio 5 live. available on radio 5 live. tns is up and running. and running. so will the cricket be at 11. that is all the sport for now. thank you. to fighters with so—called islamic state. human rights are being abused. mainly from central asia, russia or turkey. by their husbands. with is to justice.
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jalal talabani, from 2005 to 2007. in on some of these trials. just give us a sense of how these trials play out. trials play out. who are facing trial at a court in baghdad. these trials are short. they last ten to 15 minutes, in my experience, having sat in on them. experience, having sat in on them.
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for allegedly breaching the counterterrorism law. counterterrorism law. and have some of these women been put to death? of these women been put to death? far as far as we know none of the women has been executed. women has been executed. 100, have already been given the death sentence. death sentence. children with them, sitting with them in the prison. them in the prison. old, two years old, if their mothers are indeed executed. is this justice? it is notjustice. these women are really nobody in iraq. women are really nobody in iraq.
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only in iraq, but the countries from where they came. where they came. they don't want to know anything about it. russia, for example. example. russian, they are from the caucuses mainly, but russian citizens. mainly, but russian citizens. and we don't want to hear about them. don't want to hear about them. moroccan origin, she was freed after seven months in jail. moroccan origin, she was freed after seven months injail. seven months injail. know, maybe the french government tried to take her back. tried to take her back. but that was only one woman, so far as i know. only one woman, so far as i know.
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why is it that iraqi women are being treated in this way, and foreigners? treated in this way, and foreigners? iraqi women are also there. iraqi women are also arrested. women are also arrested. we don't know why they are tried separately. know why they are tried separately. liberated mosul and captured those women. women. these women who belong to chechnya and so on.
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and so on. i think there were some from azerbaijan. from azerbaijan. with their children, they took them back. children, they took them back. about freedom of information, but it is very difficult. is very difficult. some information from my contacts, but in vain. but in vain. we don't know actually how many foreign women are there. how many foreign women are there. people that they are having to deal with? with?
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educated countries in the middle east. east. they have an incredible university system. university system. who are very capable of handling cases and handling them properly. cases and handling them properly. that would suggest that line has dropped out. dropped out. statement from the government on this. this. by the state on whose territory is their crimes have been committed. their crimes have been committed. opposes the death penalty in all circumstances. circumstances. screening process in accordance with international humanitarian law. international humanitarian law. clear that international humanitarian law must be respected. humanitarian law must be respected. thank you very much for speaking to us. thank you very much for speaking to us. some breaking news.
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bailey of murdering their french nanny. nanny, sophie leeanay. burning her body, but they denied murder. murder. get her to admitted crimes
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she did not commit. not commit. the footage of her daughter being beaten. beaten. mark walton, a former member of the band boyzone. band boyzone. apartment in the middle of the night and helping drug and abuse them. and helping drug and abuse them. prosecution said these were postures allegations. allegations. no truth to the allegations made about her daughter. about her daughter. from los angeles to the old bailey voluntarily to give evidence. voluntarily to give evidence.
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and he had never even heard of her until after her death. until after her death. attempts to implicate him in the murder. murder. place blame on me was very shocking to me. to me. the pain and misery caused by their actions. actions. impact statements from sophie's pa rents. impact statements from sophie's parents. parents. sat and listened quietly as they gave evidence to the two defendants. gave evidence to the two defendants. what they had to say and it is time for them to give their voice. for them to give their voice.
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head, repeatedly saying i didn't do it. it. sentencing will take place at the old bailey on the 26th ofjune. the old bailey on the 26th ofjune. thank you. sophie long speaking to us live from the old bailey. we'll be speaking to one of their players shortly. facilities which are suitable for his needs. a full—time wheelchair user. is something this programme has been exploring for some time. you may remember anne wafula—strike's story. here's a short
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extract of her film. my name is anne wafula strike. i am a paralympian. i have an mbe. because the accessible toilet was out of order. it was one of the most humiliating experiences of my life. and it turns out this is not just an issue on trains. accessing toilets everywhere. some are being forced to take extreme action. manny has spinal muscular atrophy. while out. to put the tube through into your bladder. to have an operation without any medical need. yeah, yeah, no medical need. i wasn't incontinent. you all...
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because there wasn't the facilities there. manny needed a hoist to go to the toilet. disabilities like her can use. but campaigners say there aren't enough of them. they are called changing places toilets. people need to use them. some parts of the country have none. is still hit and miss. and 30% of shopping centres don't have disabled loos. anne wafula—strike with that report. and our
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legal affair correspondent clive coleman. first of all, what are the legal obligations? obligations? can be that of a non—disabled person. person. issue, what is reasonable in terms of cost? of cost?
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i think rachel disputes but the say it could impactjobs. it could impactjobs. done is reasonable in meeting the needs of disabled people like adam. needs of disabled people like adam. tell us a little bit about adam's needs? needs? a boy, he is 11 and he needs to move, play and experience life. move, play and experience life. is disabled and he does need a hoist to get to the toilet. to get to the toilet.
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i can do that myself and it is very dignified unsafe. dignified unsafe. —— it is very dignified and safe. dignified and safe. places you visit have these facilities? facilities? gloucestershire so adam can have a day out. day out. what the weather might be like or what else might crop up. what else might crop up. facilities for your son because you want him to have those days out. want him to have those days out.
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cost between 40,000 — £60,000 to install a toilet. install a toilet. business point of view that's a huge amount of money. amount of money. that owns them owns more than one theme park. theme park. come in at under 30000 and they can literally put it in place. literally put it in place. heists fitted and get a changing table in, it's not difficult. table in, it's not difficult.
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board and said this needs to be done but we don't have the money. but we don't have the money. week and the changing table is going on next week. and they did that for £9,000. £9,000. thank you very much for talking to us. from a russian military brigade. all 200 and 98 people on board were killed. our correspondentjon donnison is with me now. give us more details on what we found out? found out? dutch, two thirds of the people on the plane were from the netherlands. the plane were from the netherlands. there is also belgium, ukraine and malaysia involved. malaysia involved.
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was supplied directly from the russian military. russian military. eastern ukraine and then the muscle being transported back. being transported back. any response from russia? from russia? not yet, russia has always denied it. always denied it. forces, something the ukrainian forces denied. forces denied. has refused to take part in any sort of un investigation, un tribunal. of un investigation, un
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tribunal. it turned out to be russia, refused to extradite people. to extradite people. thank you for the update. are renaming themselves. from now on they'll be known as chelsea football club women. the women's fa cup and also reached the champions league semi—finals. side as the ‘first‘ team. who's a goalkeeper on the team. thank you so much for coming in.
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i always listen and slightly screwed my face up when it's ladies? my face up when it's ladies? representing all females, to call us ladies. so yes it does matter. chelsea but generally the women's game is being taken more seriously? definitely. has decided to take this important step. step. it's something that we are now spoken about in an equal manner. spoken about in an equal manner. reach, equality, then you have to have the language to represent that. have the language to represent that. even in the last few years, what would you put that down to? would you put that down to? been a long journey of
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women's football. football. have to invest in our teams and take it seriously. it's a big business. it light or else you would have success. success. huge crowds coming to watch which is what toxin football, sadly. which is what toxin football, sadly. unfortunately yes, the numbers speak. speak. for a number of years which are starting to show. starting to show. the beginning of the season you could achieve what you have? could achieve what you have? did believe we could win because we have a great squad. have a great squad. standards, even we play not so well we can still get the points. we can still get the points. a massive achievement for us, to reach that level. reach that level.
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hopefully we can go from here and grow even bigger. go from here and grow even bigger. women's football cross over and push on? on? i think we are on a good path and we need to keep working. and we need to keep working. to someone who wants the women's game. take it on its own rights? exactly. thank you so much for coming in. coming in. messages you send us, have a lovely day, goodbye. bbc news live is next.
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north sea coast, like yesterday it will stay cool and cloudy. will stay cool and cloudy. showers even rumble of thunder across these parts. across these parts. midlands, temperatures up into the high teens and low 20s. high teens and low 20s. shore, showers coming across much of england and wales into friday. england and wales into friday.
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stories developing at 11. of murdering their french au—pair sophie lionnet. bizarre obsession legends potting against them with a pop star. is to be maintained and modernised. over 85 in the next 15—20 years. as we're seeing at the
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moment. suitable toilet facilities for her severely disabled son. nuclear showdown if diplomacy fails. also, the thousands of people being extorted online. into performing intimate acts while being secretly recorded. is being reintroduced at a secret location in in northamptonshire.

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