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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  May 26, 2018 6:00am-7:00am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with steph mcgovern and chris mason. ireland is on the verge of history after its referendum on abortion. exit polls suggest a landslide win for those who've been campaigning to end the country's near—total ban on terminations. good morning, it's saturday 26th may. also this morning: harvey weinstein is released on $1 million bail after being charged with rape, as his accusers say it's time forjustice to prevail. allez, allez, allez! countdown to kick—off. the excitement builds for liverpool fans in kiev. wherejurgen klopp says winning is in the club's dna as the reds aim to stop real madrid from winning a third successive champions league title.
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elsewhere in sport, one briton‘s despair is another‘s joy — chris froome storms into the lead at the giro d'italia as long—time leader simon yates crumbles with two stages left. and sir richard branson insists his dreams of space travel remain alive. that's quite a suit! we'll hear from him as he tells the bbc he's in training to be an astronaut at the age of 67. and matt has the weather. good morning. sunshine is set to break through the morning mist for many of us this bank holiday weekend but always be on guard for the two thunderstorms. a full 15 minutes. see you then. —— your full forecast in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. exit polls suggest people in ireland have voted strongly in favour of liberalising the country's laws on abortion. reports also indicate an exceptionally high turnout with many people travelling from abroad to cast their vote.
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the official result is expected this afternoon. our ireland correspondent chris page has more. this referendum is a significant and symbolic moment for ireland. this country was once regarded as the most socially conservative in western europe. currently, abortions are only legal if a woman's life is substantially at risk but every year several thousand women go abroad, mainly to britain, to have terminations. voters have been asked if they want to remove the eighth amendment of ireland's constitution which says an unborn child has the same right to life as a pregnant woman. people have died because of the eighth amendment and we cannot have any access to safe abortion ca re have any access to safe abortion care and must be repealed the eighth amendment. people say that they are pro—choice and want to repel the eighth but they have blanket statements, people don't say what it really means, that will give powerful one human to end the life of another human and have think that thatis of another human and have think that that isjust. of another human and have think that that is just. if of another human and have think that that isjust. if the majority votes
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yes, the government plans to bring forward the legislation. abortions would be allowed for any reason until a woman is 12 weeks pregnant, and in some circumstances afterward. last night, the exit polls for the irish times newspaper and the national broadcaster rte suggested almost 70% have voted for a change in the law. 68 to 32. counting is beginning this morning, the results expected to be announced this afternoon. chris page, bbc news, dublin. let's get the latest from chris now. obviously this result is not going to be out until mid—afternoon but given what the exit polls are saying, this could be a landslide victory for the repeal so what happens next, chris? well, nobody can quite remember a campaign that has been conducted as passionately as this one, abortion is a touchstone issue here in ireland and restrictions on abortion are pretty much a legacy of the huge influence
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of the catholic church here over many decades but in recent years that influence has diminished. prior to the polls opening both sides of the campaign were saying they thought that the result would be close but last night, those to exit polls, once the irish times, putting the yes campaign who want to relax the yes campaign who want to relax the laws on 68%, the other four are te putting them on 69%. well, i don't think very many people if any at all have expected that the margin of victory could be that large said if those exit polls are correct, it is certainly find that the speed of social change in this country has been even faster and more dramatic than most people thought and paves the way for the irish government led by the prime minister leo varadkar to pass a law in the irish government which would legalise the termination of pregnancy for any reason until a woman is 12 weeks pregnant and reason until a woman is 12 weeks pregnantand in reason until a woman is 12 weeks pregnant and in some circumstances afterward , pregnant and in some circumstances afterward, for instance, in circumstances where a baby is
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diagnosed with the condition which means it is likely to die in the womb or shortly after birth. this could have implications for northern ireland as well? currently the law in northern ireland is that abortion is only illegal if it is a serious and permanent risks to the health of and permanent risks to the health of a pregnant woman. it is the exit polls are suggesting the eighth amendment here in the irish republic is repealed and the law is liberalised, that means northern ireland will be the only place in britain and ireland that keeps such strict laws on abortion survey has already been calls for that to change, for example the cross community, the party in northern ireland are in favour of changing the law. its leader twittered last night: —— tweeted. there are plenty of people in northern ireland who disagree, the largest political party the democratic union of four favour are not in change of changing the law, they would be resisting change but
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if the eighth remembered is repealed, the result coming as we expect this afternoon, it will fuel and other debate in northern ireland. macca four bit amendment is repealed. we'll be speaking to women on both sides of the debate at 8:10. more than 4,000 liverpool fans are expected to fly to kiev from the city ahead of tonight's champions league final. jurgen klopp's side take on the current holders real madrid after only entering the competition through the play—off rounds. some fans have been forced to change their travel plans after two plane operators cancelled four flights this week, however the atmosphere is building in the ukrainian capital. friends of had flights cancelled, they have managed to get rearranged flights and stuff like that, we are here, we are ready for it and we are coming to win it, mate. emotionally it's been amazing, a great trip, exciting. what is the feeling? it is
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great. are you going to win?l exciting. what is the feeling? it is great. are you going to win? a win, yes. our reporter ian haslam is atjohn lennon airport with some of the liverpool fans getting ready to fly out to kiev. what is the situation like there, ian? nervousness of the fans trying to get there also. being a few problems but thankfully these fans here today are all sorted, the first flight left here at liverpool at around about half past three this morning. as you can see many hundreds of fans in the queue for check—in at the moment, they are all bound for kiev, 4000 fans heading out the ukraine. let's talk to some of them now. hello. it is very early, isn't it? absolutely shattered, i have had no sleep, my nerves are going. that is being a liverpool supporter for you. audio cuts out. do you know what i
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mean? jurgen klopp has to be a legend, do you know what i mean? it has to be. come on. you have been to a european final before?” has to be. come on. you have been to a european final before? i am an old guy but i have seen it all, all of these youngsters haven't seen it, they will do it today. it looks like we have lost ian. impossible not to observe the refreshment of choice. what is it? eighth minute past six in the morning? three quarters of the way down a pint of lager. surely thatis the way down a pint of lager. surely that is the best way to start, and the optimism there. we will go back to him a little later in the programme. the excitement is building as more people had out the kiev. but look at some other stories. president trump has issued an optimistic statement about the prospects of a summit with the north korean leader kim jong—un.
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just a few days after abruptly announcing that the summit was off, mr trump said both sides were now having what he described as "very productive talks". south korea welcomed the prospect of an about—turn, saying it was watching developments carefully. former hollywood film mogul harvey weinstein has been released on $1 million bail after being charged in new york with rape and sexual abuse. mr weinstein also agreed to wear a gps tracker and to surrender his passport after turning himself in to police on friday. he denies non—consensual sex and his lawyer said he would plead not guilty. rose mcgowan was one of the first people to go public with allegations about weinstein. he tied with god the things that the oscars. and to see that constantly and to live in that town, i was there by myself since i was 15, and to see people just lay wreaths at his feet even though they knew, todayis his feet even though they knew, today is a good day. this is a need strike into the heart of abuse of
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power and it shows people worldwide, which was what i was hoping the whole time, that this cannot and will not stand. a government programme aimed at protecting afghan civilians who worked as interpreters for the british army has been called a "dismalfailure" by mps. the defence committee says not a single person potentially at risk from the taliban had been resettled in the uk so far via the intimidation scheme. the ministry of defence said it would take note of the criticism. some tsb customers are still having problems making online payments five weeks after the bank first reported problems. a number of current account customers and some business clients are unable to fully access their accounts online or via the mobile app. the bank has also admitted to the bbc that there has been a rise in fraud incidents. the problems started when the bank switched its it systems. now it one man not short of ambition. —— now to a man not
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short of ambition. sir richard branson has told the bbc he's training to be an astronaut. the virgin boss, who has been working on his own commercial space programme, is hoping to take his first trip in a matter of months. ben ando reports. first, it was planes. then boats. then balloons. and then trains. but a decade and a half ago, sir richard branson set his sights even higher, creating virgin galactic with the aim of offering affordable space tourism, affordable, that is, if you could afford the $250,000 ticket price. now at the age of 67, sir richard has revealed he is training hard, ready to be fired into space. iam going hard, ready to be fired into space. i am going astronaut training, for my fitness training, going through centrifuged and other training so that my body can cope, hopefully cope well with it. how are you getting on? so far, so good, i like
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to keep fit anywhere but to go into space, if you are going to really enjoy your experience, the fitter you can be the better. when he launched virgin galactic sir richard expected to be spaceborne by 2010 by technical problems in the disastrous crash in 2014 in which a test pilot died have caused delay on delay. and the competition is catching up with roberto elon musk and jeff bezos, the founder of amazon, now a p pa re ntly the founder of amazon, now apparently leading a charge to get paying tourist into top orbit. sir richard knows and is privatised space race the countdown is on. ben ando, bbc news. he always has his next adventure. i love his ambition. here is a story for you. tight swimming trunks have been rated as the uk's most hated piece of clothing. i'm not surprised about that, to be honest. you are not a fan? no. i
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mean, tom daley clearly pulls it off their butt... —— off there, but... most commonly known as speedos — of course, other brands of trunks are available — more than two thirds of britons surveyed said they couldn't stand them. that includes three quarters of all women. as we were saying. our most famous speedo wearer is probably tom daley, who you can see here. he is in the water. some of the other clothes people don't like, according to this yougov survey — leather trousers, crocs, and jackets with elbow patches. i'm trying to think if i have any of these. i think i have a rare clean sweep of none of those. excellent. any thoughts on that, let us know. there are probably people about to go on holiday, they have packed their case and they are going on, no! i need new trunks! but go to the papers and start with a front page
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of the times. —— let's go to the papers and start with a front page of the times. talking about boots and the cost of buying treatment from them to cancer patients and the presenter on gardeners world also appearing there, talking about her treatment for breast cancer. she announced it live on air which was amazing. the guardian has a story we are following, harvey weinstein charged, the story has spread all over the world, they say he used his position, money and power to lure young women into situations where he was able to violate them sexually, thatis was able to violate them sexually, that is at the new yorkjudge was told yesterday and the pick to there and also the story of course, huge as well in ireland, exit polls in irish abortion vote went into historic win. the papers are calling down on the royal wedding coverage because the fund only has 24 gossip pages today. it also features baby
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news including coronation street star alex bain who is going to become a dad at the age ofjust 16. become a dad at the age ofjust16. one more quick story, the front page of the mirror. a lady who found a £21 million lottery tick it could afford to get in her handbag had no idea she had won, then went through her bag, found the ticket and there we are. doesn't bear thinking about! you can't have missed the fact that it's bbc music's biggest weekend, with some of the industry's biggest names due to perform. we'll be speaking to some of them throughout the course of the programme but first let's have a look at what fans can expect. do you know what, i don't normally dance like that but i couldn't help myself, really excite them, excited. not sure about the humming but light the moves —— really excited.
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not sure about the humming but light the moves -- really excited. not sure about the weather, the football, lots of sport. look at the grey cloud. a bank holiday weekend so something spoiling it for one or two but if you have plans for the outdoors, most of the time it will be fine, quite a warm weekend wherever you are. maybe one exception, the eastern coast, morning mist and low cloud, the risk of thunderstorms, not eve ryo ne the risk of thunderstorms, not everyone will see one, if you do, it will be a small part of the weekend. lots of cloud this morning, misty and murky in places with hill fog around. already a few showers in southern parts of england, developing more widely in southern england, the midlands, wales, this morning, some heavy ones and maybe thunder in the afternoon but skies brightening in eastern areas as we go through the afternoon. the further north you are the morning mist and low cloud will break up,
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sunny spells and mist and fog patches towards eastern coasts where temperatures will be lower close to the north sea today with a keen easterly wind, but inland, further west in scotland, 25, 26 and 27 in london and the low 20s in south wales. if you're off to the bbc music's biggest weekend at swansea today, be prepared, a few heavy showers and storms. the first batch will clear by the end of the afternoon but we could see more severe storms this evening moving in from france to southern catches of england, south wales, they could have lightning, gusty winds and the risk of flash flooding and they will drift to eastern wales and the midlands overnight. elsewhere, it's missing from the chart, misty and murky in many areas of the country and while we will drop temperatures into single figures with clear skies in the north, further south, quite a muqqy in the north, further south, quite a muggy night, not below 16 or 17. tomorrow, more cloud in the chart,
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lots of mist and low cloud, that will break up to sunny spells for many but more heavy and thundery downpours in southern counties, drifting off to the midlands, wales, maybe northern england later and we couldn't rule out one late into the evening in northern ireland. temperatures, with the sunny spells, widely into the mid—20s for quite a few of you. as we go through into monday, the main risk of showers linked with this front will drift further north, southern scotland, northern ireland, northern england and north wales with the main chance of heavy and thundery showers. northern scotland staying dry, sunny and warm and a bit more sunshine and drier in southern parts of england and wales on monday, where again we could see temperatures around 26 or 28. yes, be prepared for a few showers, have a backup plan if you're spending time outdoors, but lots of the time it will be the and pretty warm in the sunshine. good to hear, see you in a bit! we'll be back with the headlines at 6:30am. time now for the film review with jane hill and mark kermode.
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hello and welcome to the film review on bbc news. to take us through this week's cinema releases is mark kermode. so mark, what do we have this week? very interesting week, we have the breadwinner which is an animation. solo: a star wars story, another one. and mckellen: playing the part. and the breadwinner, based or taken from a book? yes, by deborah ellis. this is from the studio that gave us song of the sea and secret of curls. this is adapted from deborah ellis‘ book.
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taliban—era, turn of the century, a young girl is selling bread with her father. he has lost a leg in the war with the taliban. clearly, they are struggling materially, but he teaches her the power of history, and most importantly, the power of stories. let's have a look at the clip. clip: our people have always told stories, from our very beginning... a fractured land and the claws of the hindu kush mountains, scorched by the fiery eyes of the northern deserts. black rubble earth against ice peaks, our land was the petrified skeleton of a monster. the land of the noble and honourable, we were a pathway to everywhere, carrying goods from east to west. we studied the stars and began to see order amidst the chaos. we were scientists,
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philosophers and storytellers. questions sought answers, and then more questions. we began to see our place in the universe. on the one hand you have that sort of animation with the circling and cut—outs, then you have the more realistic backgrounds of the streets of kabul. they are almost photorealistic backgrounds with these simply drawn but very expressive faces. what happens is the father is arrested by the taliban, and the mother and sister are unable to get food, because you can't go out without a male chaperone. yes, yes. our young heroine cuts her hair, puts on her dead brother's clothes and goes out disguised as a boy. she discovers that as a boy you can go wherever you want. a whole new world. she is also on a mission, not only to do provide for her family, but also to get her father from jail. ijust i just thought this was wonderful. it deals with very dark subject matter.
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this is what i was thinking. the situation is very bleak for women in afghanistan. absolutely what it is about. it is very much a feminist story, but a universal story, but it is told through the eyes of the central child, an 11—year—old girl, and because we see it through her eyes, we can see terrible things, and yet her bravery, courage, humour and laughter sees us through. i think the way that the animation is done, in different styles, with the very realistic portrait of the streets and markets, juxtaposed against the cutout cycling of the story within the story, in which there is a story about a young boy having to go up against a dreadful elephant king which kind of mirrors our heroine's journey, and those two fits together. the mix of eastern and western influences. i have seen it three times, and every time, i saw something i missed. i genuinely think it is universal. it is 12a certificate.
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it is telling a very difficult and very important story. you will love it. i can't wait. i wonder if the animation makes it more bearable, something that is difficult. is that true? absolutely. animation can sometimes talk about subjects that live—action movies couldn't deal with because of the transformative power of the animation. we are living through a golden age of animation. you have things like coco. we are in a wonderful time for animation. this is at the forefront. it is wonderful. it is called the breadwinner, you will have to seek it out, because many screens are showing another movie this week, but do seek it out because it is wonderful. are other cinemas perhaps showing another star wars? there is another one. the other one was only six months ago. this is another one of the stand—alone spin offs. solo: a star wars story.
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it is the back story of han solo and his first meeting with chewbacca. his growing love affair with the millenium falcon. it had a very troubled production. it was originally directed by the guys who made the lego movie. very long into the production they left. they were told to go and they brought in ron howard. that seems, wow, that's a really big deal! it is surprisingly coherent. it does have a coherent tone. the tone is basically flimsy and fun, and alden ehrenreich is very, very good. we see him as the character we know and love as harrison ford. it has the throwback but rogers stuff the original star wars movie had. they also have the force and the religion and the samurai stuff. this doesn't, itjust seems it much more like something... landa calrissian is good fun. it does seem like, i'm not entirely sure i needed this.
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did i really want another one of these? it's a bit baggy in the middle. it's fine, but hardly essential. it was a very sort of... i didn't feel there was a huge amount of jeopardy. it's not rogue one, which is a war movie. we are going to get to the point of any gap of the star wars story, they will make another movie to explain it. if someone goes through a door, oh, what happened when they went through that door? now there's three movies to fill in the gap. moving on, ian mckellen, if you're watching this on friday, happy birthday, ian mckellen, and there is a whole film to celebrate? you were saying before it is a documentary. him looking back at his life, college, theatre, sexuality, becoming a political activist for lgbt causes, and then going back to schools and taking his vast knowledge to schools. he talked about how for a long time theatre was the central of his life, then of course how
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he moves into movies. didn't hejust, didn't he just, yes! and they filmed our progress up the ridge. i think only once because we'd have left our footprints in the snow, therefore couldn't do it twice. as we're going along, and i'm going snow up to my knees, with a perilous drop on one side, and a bit of a peak at the other, i could be on everest. it's about as far away from green screen as you can get. we were there. constantly, we were there. and you can ask any of the actors. there were other locations i remember other locations in the hobbit where we were lifted up by helicopter, with a fantastic
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view over some lake or other, surrounded by mountains. you could listen to his voice all day, couldn't you ? couldn't you ? this is directed by the same guy who made chicken. there were clips, some great archives. he has also done dramatisations in which mckellen‘s word and lip—synched by actors recreating key moments. like the moment he auditioned to get a place in college. those dramatisations works surprisingly well. really, surprisingly well. scott chambers who was so brilliant in chicken features as well. i thought the whole thing was like a lovely leather armchair. you could just sit there and let these stories wash over you. what's great is how engaged he is, how passionate he is. and the sweep of the career, theatre actress to some, a film actor to others, and that's what is so glorious. here he is withjudi dench. he says it is very difficult to play with her, because the audiences just love her.
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if you're playing with her they are not interested, theyjust lovejudi dench! which is absolutely true. this is playing later on on sunday, and opens properly on friday, previews of it on sunday. but it is a real pleasure to watch. your best out won an award at cannes for best debut? jeune femme, young woman. brilliant central performance. you will have to seek it out, but really, really good. interestingly enough, all the heads of department on the film were all female, riv" ' everything. saying that? it is a film by steven spielberg, a historical film about the battle between the freedom press and a corrupt president. i don't know why, but it seemed terribly contemporary. i love it when you say
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what you think, mark. the owes to is enjoyable, a very enjoyable film to watch on dvd. it is a great film, don't let me be too rude about it. good to see you as ever and a reminder that you can find all the film news and reviews from across the bbc, on the website. all our previous programmes on the iplayer as well. that is it for this week, it's a really, really interesting week. thanks for being with us. see you next time. happy cinema—going. hello, this is breakfast with steph mcgovern and chris mason. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. exit polls suggest people in ireland have voted strongly in favour of liberalising the country's laws on abortion. reports also indicate an exceptionally high turnout with many people travelling from abroad to cast their vote. the official result is expected this afternoon.
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president trump has issued an optimistic statement about the prospects of a summit with the north korean leader kim jong—un. just a few days after abruptly announcing that the summit was off, mr trump said both sides were now having what he described as "very productive talks". south korea welcomed the prospect of an about—turn, saying it was watching developments carefully. former hollywood film mogul harvey weinstein has been released on $1 million bail after being charged in new york with rape and sexual abuse. mr weinstein also agreed to wear a gps tracker and to surrender his passport after turning himself in to police on friday. he denies non—consensual sex and his lawyer said he would plead not guilty. rose mcgowan was one of the first people to go public with allegations about weinstein. a government programme aimed at protecting afghan civilians
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who worked as interpreters for the british army has been called a "dismalfailure" by mps. the defence committee says not a single person potentially at risk from the taliban had been resettled in the uk so far via the intimidation scheme. the ministry of defence said it would take note of the criticism. some tsb customers are still having problems making online payments five weeks after the bank first reported problems. a number of current account customers and some business clients are unable to fully access their accounts online or via the mobile app. the bank has also admitted to the bbc that there has been a rise in fraud incidents. the problems started when the bank switched its it systems. sir richard branson has told the bbc he's training to be an astronaut. the virgin boss, who has been working on his own commercial space programme, is hoping to take his first trip in a matter of months. iam going
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i am going from my astronaut training, going for my fitness training, going for my fitness training, going for my fitness training, going through centrifuged and other training so that nobody can cope, hopefully cope well with that, when i go into space. how are you getting on? so far, so good. i like to keep fit anyway so if you we re like to keep fit anyway so if you were going into space, to really enjoy your experience, the fitter you are, the better. you can hear more from sir richard branson on you and yours on bbc radio 4 on monday at 12:15pm. tight swimming trunks have been rated as the uk's most hated piece of clothing. shock, horror! most commonly known as speedos, of course — other brands of trunks are available — more than two thirds of britons surveyed said they couldn't stand them. that includes three quarters of all women. we think our most famous speedo wearer is probably tom daley. i mean, he pulls them off, to be fair. i hope not!
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some of the other clothes people don't like according to this yougov survey — leather trousers, crocs and jackets with elbow patches. it makes you think of geography teachers, doesn't it? geography teachers? you were a lot of different outfits in your various sporting things that you do. speedos? sometimes for practical reasons. this was training with the synchronised swimming team. i was wearing a top to protect my modesty. i got wearing a top to protect my modesty. igota wearing a top to protect my modesty. i got a lot of stick for this one. it was necessary, they are not the skimpiest. you can get away with those. rowing you have to wear them and also in france when you go to swimming pools were told to web speedos, you cannot wear the big, baggy shorts. what is that about? that was a throwaway remark. that
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would put me off doubling to france, i think. dear me. obviously such a big weekend, isn't it? so many finals, in rugby union and football but let's start with champions league. jurgen klopp's third final, will it be third time lucky because he has lost the previous two? so, a journey that began in mid august in hoffenheim could end in glory tonight in kiev, which is where we find our sports reporter hugh woozencroft. it's going to be a long day for the fans there in the sunshine with kick—off there not until 9:45 tonight. it looks pretty hot, almost the weather for speedos but they will have the pace themselves, won't they? yes, absolutely, they are. in fa ct, they? yes, absolutely, they are. in fact, on what looks like a sunny morning, it is sunny but it is cool, temperatures later will not be as
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high as they have been over the previous two days. we are in maidan square, the centre of town, and the liverpool fans that we saw last night as we went to bed with singing and enjoying themselves in the middle of town haven't quite crept out of bed yet that maybe they are saving their energy for a big hopefully in efforts. but the herculean. later on it will be a huge effort from jurgen klopp and his team, you mentioned cup final records for him but he had weighed in the champions league final before backin in the champions league final before back in 2013 when he was the boss of borussia dortmund. it ended in defeat them that he is hoping for redemption later on. he was talking about the experience to the media yesterday. after the game, i knew that i want to, i have this opportunity again to go but now i am here because my boys gave me that chance again. i'm really happy being here but this group of players. they
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fought so unbelievably hard to this. i really think they deserve it, to be here. i'm really proud of them already. now, let's play football. so much to look forward to. we will have all the buildup across brea kfast have all the buildup across breakfast in the coming hours. thank you, hugh. if you want to follow the match tonight, bbc radio 5live have you covered. kelly cates has all the build—up from 5pm, and then at 7:45, it is real madrid versus liverpool, commentated by alan green and john murray. to wembley, where there's another big match as aston villa play fulham in the championship play—off final a match that could be worth 280 million pounds to the winner. the villa boss steve bruce says days like today make the job worthwhile. in these times when it is a difficultjob and a lonelyjob and even this morning having breakfast
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on my own, as soon as i even this morning having breakfast on my own, as soon as i get near the staff, off they go and do i smell? is that the way it is? certainly, certainly, you look back at the big occasions and hopefully it is another big occasion, it is a big occasion if you win. the reward for keeping southampton in the premier league is a new 3—year contract for mark hughes. the former stoke boss signed a short—term deal on the south coast in march with the club in real danger of relegation, but a revival in their last five games meant they pulled off a great escape, despite losing their last match of the season. a brit has the chance to make cycling history this weekend, but it's not the one that we expected. simon yates had led for 13 stages of the giro d'italia but he fell way down the field in a remarkable stage yesterday as chris froome stormed into the lead. he's got a 40—second lead now going into the penultimate stage today as he tries to become the first british man to win the giro. pakistan remain in complete control of the first test against england after the second day at lord's.
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they ended the day on 8/350, a lead of 166, with four of their batsmen making half—centuries. england, who were bowled out forjust 184 on the opening day, rallied late on and took three wickets but the visitors remain big favourites to win the first test of the summer. there are two huge club rugby finals taking place today. scarlets head to dublin with the aim of stopping european champions leinster in the pro 14 at 6 o'clock. before that at 3:00, the two outstanding teams in english club rugby meet in the premiership final at twickenham as exeter and saracens go head—to—head. exeter are the current champions in a third final in as many years, with saracens attempting to lift the title they won against the chiefs two years ago. rory mcilroy is in fine form at the pga championship at wentworth. he leads after the second round on 12—under par, three shots ahead of his nearest rival. he produced a 7—under par round of 65. can't say the same for thomas pieters of belgium, who couldn't hide his frustration
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after two dropped shots through his opening three holes. new clubs, please! the world's biggest skateboard competition comes to the uk for the first time this weekend. london's copper box arena is hosting the first leg of the street league skateboarding world tour. i've been down to the queen elizabeth olympic park to see what's in store. the greatest skateboarding broker on earth has finally arrived in the uk and this is what the crowds packed into the copper box arena can expect this weekend, the skateboarding basketin this weekend, the skateboarding basket in the glory of becoming an olympic sport. a team of 40 flown in from the usa are spending three days getting the copper box arena
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transformed into this world cup skateboarding venue and with the sport making its debut at the olympics in two years in tokyo it seems fitting for the first time it comes to the uk, it is being held in a former olympic venue. one of the stars of the show will be the first woman to win the world title, who has come a long way since she started skateboarding on the streets of brazil aged nine. in the olympic stadium it is amazing, dinner, you get the little feeling of the olympics, you know? the will be in two years olympics, you know? the will be in two yea rs it olympics, you know? the will be in two years it is good to have these little feeling. this really is the most important event that we have in skateboarding right now. what a love about the skateboarders the freedom. every contest feels like the first contest because they get really nervous. but as nervous as i was getting back on the board for the first time in quite a while. even when learning from one of britain's best. i have the pads, the helmet,
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you may not need them but i do. the board at our feet. take a push. have a little skateboard. that's it. end knees? hello? with the rise in street skateboarding is down to ex—essendon to you. as long as it is safe and you have a flat bit of ground and they kill, you can do it anywhere. it gives you the ultimate freedom. but before a hill. it isn't going in the straight line, street skateboarding is all about the tricks and i was shown at the iconic south bank said venue. it is street style skating is on a street style course with handrails and ledges and things. that kind of thing. the first trick you need is to do an olley. you need one because then you can macro curves or do a kick flips you need the ollie. the board sticks to your feet! how does the board
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stay with your feet and minds of is left behind? ethically when you try to do and ollie you were jumping left behind? ethically when you try to do and ollie you werejumping up and pressing the back which was the back up and with your front foot you slide it it pulls the back up. my favourite trick is probably the switch hit. they feel good. it can ta ke yea rs switch hit. they feel good. it can take years to master the tricks. please, do not try this at home about guidance and full protective gear. but thanks to its new olympics status there will be nine street league events around the world this year, or chance than ever before to show the world how far this sport has come. do you know they have glue on their feet. it does look as though... they have a magical power to keep the skateboard stuck to their feet as they do flips. this is a taste of what we will see in the olympics when it makes its debut. you can see live coverage of the street league's opening event of the season, from the copper box this weekend on the bbc red, red button and bbc sport online.
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it's the women's final at 7:30pm this evening, and tomorrow, the men's final. against that is the big thing now, it is no longerjust a thing that kids like doing in the street, it is a genuine sporting contest and aspirations for people to chase after. inspiring many tojust aspirations for people to chase after. inspiring many to just have a go. they used to be two events in the world ‘s two and now there are nine. so there is a lot of interest now. bank holiday weekend, loads going on, but everyone wants to know about the weather. some good news, steph, lots of dry weather this weekend and warmth in the sunshine once you've got it. mist and low cloud to get rid of first and the risk of thunderstorms, particularly in england and wales through the bank holiday weekend, but for many, even if you do get them, only a small portion of the weekend, so hopefully enough dry weather to get out and enjoy it. today, already a few showers
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developing across england and wales at the moment, they will turn heavier through the morning, particularly late morning onwards in south—west england and southern wales. further north, a few isolated showers can't be ruled out, most will be dry and for much of northern england, scotland and northern ireland, misty low cloud breaking up, sunny spells and a bright afternoon for central and eastern parts of england. when the sunshine is out it will feel warm. breeze coming of down the eastern coasts but inland, widely into the 20s, 20 in western scotland and up to 27 in the south—east of england. 20 in swa nsea for the south—east of england. 20 in swansea for the bbc music's biggest weekend in swansea, a few heavy and thundery showers in the afternoon, clearing for a time, but into the night, more developing in northern france and pushing northwards. with those you could see frequent lightning, hail and also the risk of flash flooding in some spots and they will drift into other parts of wales and the midlands into the
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second half of the night. further north, staying dry, mist and low cloud returning, a breeze blowing in will stop temperatures dropping too much, single figures in eastern scotla nd much, single figures in eastern scotland and north—east england but muqqy scotland and north—east england but muggy in the south. sticking in the teens. on sunday, starting with a few showers around, maybe some thunder, but they will develop more in southern counties through the day, especially in the south—west and wales, but one or two elsewhere and wales, but one or two elsewhere and with those some torrential downpours possible. some into northern england later but in much of england, scotland and northern ireland, a good day, morning cloud breaking up, sunny spells and warm with the sun. a similar story on sunday but the focus of the showers goes further north in and around where this weather front is located, northern ireland, southern scotland and northern england the main focus for occasional wet weather on monday with rumbles of thunder possible. maybe also in wales but brighter in
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england and wales on bank holiday monday, warm and humid in the sunshine, scotland the best place to be the whole weekend where it should be the whole weekend where it should be dry with sunny spells throughout. more through the morning. thank you very much. doesn't look too bad. a bit of this and a bit of that. very bank holiday looking at the screen, that screams bank holiday weekend, bit of sun, a bit of rain, take the brolly! be prepared is the key. that's the motto, isn't it? we'll be back with the news headlines at 7am. first, though, it's time for click. as our world becomes more augmented by technology, the lines between fiction and reality are blurring. very soon, we may be able
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to entertain ourselves in these new realities simply by using our thoughts. i'm here at the university of nottingham, where i mightjust see the greatest film that's ever been made, because it's being made by me, using my brain waves. this must be it. this tiny adapted caravan is where i will watch the movie my mind would most like to see. so we're just going to fit you with this eeg headset. clips on and then there's a sensor on your forehead as well. so this eeg headset‘s monitoring my brain activity? yeah, it picks up eeg data, the really tiny electrical signals sent off by the firing of your neurons. so the signal is good. we will press play. enjoy. i rememberyou had become all these different people. there are three simultaneous narratives that my brain can dip in and out of to make up a unique film, with over 101 trillion possible combinations per viewing. is that my brain activity now? this is your data, yes,
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you can see your alpha waves, your gamma waves, your beta waves there. they are just sending out a string of numbers. the more focused my brain is, the longer the scenes are, and the more the narrative holds together. if i lose focus, the computer cuts the scenes more rapidly. so it's a pretty surreal experience watching a film that you're creating as you're going along. the whole concept behind this project as a whole was it was inspired by what was happening with these social media bubbles that are still about, but during, like, 2016 we saw gamergate, with brexit, with the american election, and how, like, a small group of people could influence larger groups. the moment is designed to be watched twice in a row by groups of around five, where two people take turns watching the movie with the headset on. people then observe the different ways the narrative changes. so, how did you find the film?
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ah, really interesting. did it make you think about your relationship with technology? for me, yeah, and also, like, a little bit about, you know, like, society, about, like, people not thinking about what they are doing. i always prefer having an artist picking a message for me and then it does whatever it does to me, rather than me making my own message. it feels like i would be living in my own bubble. i would like the artist to pick the film for me. i don't want to live inside my bubble any more than i already do. it's a bit scary, isn't it? it is a bit scary, yeah. it's a bit scary. what my endgame really is, just to ask people to consider critically the technology that we use and why it is being used in that way. the moment has its world premiere at sheffield doc/fest onjune 7. after that, the caravan will hit the road across the uk. ah, the royal wedding, a once—in—a—lifetime opportunity
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to see history unfold, drink pimms and spot the stars. so many faces to see. so many stories to know. but we can't all have access to thousands of pages of scintillating who's who information like me. oh, look, it's william guy vestey, the eldest son of samuel and cecilia vestey. he's married to violet henderson with whom he has, yes, one daughter. fascinating! and fortunately, this royal wedding, you don't need any of these to stay in the know. this is who's who. it's a website for phones and desktops that uses artificial intelligence to automatically recognise all of those royal wedding guests. from the famous to the more obscure, each guest's face is tagged with their name and some background info.
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plus, the tool lets you skip around to watch your favourite guests arrive. built by data company greymeta and broadcast by sky news, it's the first time they have used facial recognition for a live broadcast. who's who, our royal wedding project, was an opportunity to use machine learning and artificial intelligence to find a different way of telling a story. we knew that with celebrities, viewers would be able to identify them without the software. we also knew there were large numbers of members of the royal family, particularly the extended royal family, who, while public and therefore we would be able to identify them, wouldn't necessarily be obvious to our viewing public. what we were able to do therefore was identify them as they arrived at the ceremony, as well as some of the better—known celebrities, to give a richer experience. behind the scenes, who's who use's amazon's cloud—based rekognition system. throw photos or video at rekognition, and deep learning algorithms are put to work to try and figure out what exactly is going on. that's easy enough for us humans but for computers, understanding what's happening in videos and images is no simple task. this is what amazon rekognition looks like behind the scenes.
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i have just uploaded a clip from last week's click and in a few minutes, it has given me this list of people, objects and activities that it thinks it's found in that video. things like this bloke cycling, the faces of these bystanders, and click host and celebrity urban mayer? the facial recognition today isn't perfect. even though, you know, we trained a model based on, you know, anticipated guests, you know, we were getting the 70—80% accuracy. it was moderated by the researchers who had curated all the training material for the a! service in the first place, yeah, so they were very familiar with the names, the people, the faces. this week sees the start of gdpr, the eu's new, stricter data legislation, which may mean that tools like these might no longer be legal. we were looking at public people in a public environment where they are expecting to be recognised, which gives us implied consent.
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in a post—gdpr world you need exposing consent, which means that if we wanted to run this thing in the future we would have to contact people and say this is what we are doing in a particular environment. we would consider that if we go forward with this project, but we might decide to do alternative things with this type of technology. just this week, amazon found itself in hot water after it was found that they had been marketing recognition systems to law enforcement agencies in america. so as tech like this because more accurate and widely used, one day we could all be as recognisable as the royal family. inevitably, kids today are growing up surrounded by technology, and there are pros and cons to that. but the issue is that grown—ups are still learning how to handle it. i can see you eager beavers are ready to start the game. so here at the techtopia festival at wimbledon's polka theatre, they're hoping to help, with creative ways to get
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the kids thinking. the objects represent different websites. the digiplay workshop here is about teaching kids to safely navigate online. it also encourages them to think about what they are going to share and how they are likely to be perceived as a result. after all, this lot are already pretty active web users. life without the internet, it would be the worst. i would just die straightaway. if there is no internet. what if there were no mobile phones? squeals phew, but they do have a few concerns. one of the worst things is on your homepage and not knowing your password. what we were really aiming to do was to raise awareness about how the online world is governed by algorithms and the types of data people share online, and the information that goes online. and what i did was a series of projects with 13—17—year—olds,
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and they are already pretty savvy. they have grown up online so they know what they are doing. um, but they're not sure how everything works. now, today, working with the younger ones, sort of 8—and—9—year—olds, it is really fascinating to see they have the same knowledge about this stuff and they are aware and their parents have already kind of brought them up to stay safe but not necessarily know what is going on in the background. but after today, they seem brimming with knowledge. use the internet safely and don't go on websites that you don't know about. make sure to keep all your personal stuff safe on the internet so nobody steals them. if you get upset on the internet, always tell your parents. maybe not surprising when they are part of a generation that can end up surrounded by screens from day one. even if they start off as the forbidden fruit, it's not long before parents are weighing up the benefits versus the concerns. but two—year—old emily here is part of a study they could change the way we perceive screen time.
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researchers are three years into their quest to find out what the long—term consequences are likely to be. here, it's all about keeping focus on the apple while attention is being called upon elsewhere. the kids' reactions are being recorded, and they will be combined with markers in their day—to—day lives. parents have a lot of assumptions and maybe fears about how these screens may be influencing their child's behaviour. but a lot of the science behind that is actually based on tv, which is a very different experience to these interactive mobile devices that can be used in different ways. so we wanted to make sure that we were doing studies about these new devices. and that means there is not much science out there right now. a lot of the concerns parents have are not been backed up by scientific evidence. we have found that within the children who are using the touchscreen devices, that the earlier that they actually use a device interactively, the earlier that they reach real world motor milestones. so, for instance, if you are playing with a kid, one of the milestones you can look at is if they can
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stack blocks together. and we found that the kids that actively use a touchscreen earlier are reaching that real—world milestone earlier. but, importantly, we have not seen any signs of delays in language development or in whole body movement development, so walking and crawling, which some parents might have been concerned about. meanwhile, the kids are clearly enjoying the workshops, proving, if nothing else, they still know how to have fun, when there's no phone or tablet to hand. that's it for the shortcut of the programme this week. the full—length version is up on iplayerfor you to watch right now. and here's the thing, if you are at the hi festival this
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weekend, so are we. we are doing a live programme which you can see next week. in the meantime, get in touch with us through our social media. thank you for watching, see you soon. micro hello. this is breakfast with steph mcgovern and chris mason. ireland is on the verge of history after its referendum on abortion. exit polls suggest a landslide win for those who've been campaigning to end the country's near—total ban on terminations. good morning. it's saturday 26th may. also this morning... harvey weinstein is released on a million dollar bail after being charged with rape as his accusers say it's time
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