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tv   BBC News  BBC News  May 26, 2018 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm annita mcveigh. the headlines at five. early results suggest the republic of ireland has voted by a landslide to relax some of the world's most restrictive abortion laws. the prime minister says it's a quiet revolution. it means that ireland is a country that trust women and respect their decisions. and i am in dublin. in what has been a historic referendum and a historic day on the horizon. the leaders of north and south korea hold talks as a us delegation heads to singapore before a possible meeting between president trump and kimjong un. countdown to kick off — as liverpool fans soak up the atmosphere in kiev ahead of tonight's champions league final. jurgen klopp says winning is in liverpool's dna as the reds aim to stop real madrid from winning a third successive title. and four countries.
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four cities. and some of music's biggest stars. bbc music's biggest weekend is in full swing across the uk. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. the irish prime minister, leo varadkar, says his government plans to enact a new abortion law by the end of year, after what appears to be a resounding referendum victory for those campaigning to liberalise such laws. counting is nearly over, but, in the first four let me welcome you to dublin. a sea of people that have gathered to celebrate what has been a historic referendum. there are waiting the
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results inspected to come within the next hour. that would overturn legislation that was put in place of 35 years ago. the same rights tabib on born as it did to the mother. barry with exit polls that there was an overwhelming victory for the yes campaigni an overwhelming victory for the yes campaign i was working to liberalize the abortion laws of this country. just a few moments ago the prime minister has spoken to the bbc. i think what we have seen today, really, is a combination of a quiet revolution that has been taking place in ireland the past ten or 20 years. this has been a great exercise of democracy and the people have spoken. the people have said that we want a modern constitution for a modern country and we trust women and respect them to make the right decisions and the right choices about their own health care. we're still seeing results coming m, we're still seeing results coming in, but it seems as if it's going to
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bea in, but it seems as if it's going to be a greater than two to one majority. the majority of men and women of almost all age groups and social classes. that says to me we aren't not a nation that's divided but united and want to make this change and give the government a mandate that we need now. leo there. this is where the votes have been counted and where the people have gathered to hear that result. how did we get to this point? let's hear more from mike colleague. more emphatically than anyone predicted, ireland has voted for change. exit polls indicated a landslide in favour of repealing the controversial law which has restricted access to abortion for so long.
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absolute shock. we were hoping a few percent, but 68%, 69% last night was just absolutely crazy. people are more accepting, i think, than we thought they were. i think we underestimated the irish people in the way. we are righting a wrong of the last 35 years. before midday, the no campaign conceded defeat. obviously, we are very sad if the exit polls are the results, which certainly looks to be the case. and i think what we will have to do now is just to see where we go from here as a movement, and where we will be going from here is to hold the government to account for what they said. those people had actually made up their minds... the irish government now plans to bring forward legislation to allow abortions up to 12 weeks of pregnancy. something opponents say they will continue to campaign against. even in an issue that is as deeply emotional and personalfor people as this one, that is the right way to do it. and what's more, by the way, you can so passionately believe that the decision
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of the people was wrong, as i happen to do. the official declaration is expected this afternoon, but already the tallies here tell us a great deal. large piles of yes votes and the realisation that i may have changed as a country more than anyone believed. with more than 3 million people registered to vote, it's thought of this referendum sought a higher turnout than the country's same—sex marriage vote in 2015. an intense campaign at an end, and ireland on the brink of a new era. thanks very much to emma vardy for that. you're seeing the crowds that are here. there's one man that so many of them really wanted to see and he got such a warm welcome when he came up to this stage to speak to me. that's simon harris who was the minister for me. that's simon harris who was the ministerfor health me. that's simon harris who was the minister for health leading the
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campaignfor minister for health leading the campaign for yes within his party. but listen to what he had to say. emotional. relieved for myself but all the women in ireland who were depending on us getting this done and depending on the of ireland coming out. a lot of people have told their stories over the last numberof told their stories over the last number of months, stories of how they felt left down they cannot access termination in ireland and those stories can never be untold. they were telling them is personal and intimate stories and then you have the popular vote and i'm so humbled the irish people responded in such large numbers, male and female and rural and urban. one neck and face up to the realities and abortion is a reality for irish women. we have to look out for them in ourown women. we have to look out for them in our own country. there was also no voters here, but how are you going to unite those factions as not having divisive future in ireland over this issue? would have had to
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social referendum is a lot of issues. like marriage equality and people vote yes and people to vote i'io people vote yes and people to vote no but we managed to get out and unify the country. this is no different. i respect people voting ina different different. i respect people voting in a different way but we have to be led by the majority in this country who have voted to tell people like me to get on with ourjob now. one of the most passionate things was between medical professionals and there was made of voted no that do not want any part of it. they believed a conscientious objection is not laid down in the law the way that works for them to really refrain from taking part in any of those procedures. what would you say to the medical professionals that are looking at this in dismay? the overwhelming majority of the medical professionals do support this and eight conscientious objection will
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be invest as is already in our medical guideline. i'm very confident. it will absolutely be possible for people to object. when will legislation be passed that will in fact change the abortion laws and liberalize in this country?” in fact change the abortion laws and liberalize in this country? i will go to government on tuesday to seek permission to draft legislation. if they hope to introduce into our office in parliament. i would hope by the end of this year we will have changed the law in this area. we cannot move ahead with that until this very significant vote today. what you think when you look out at scf people? a lot of people i have met today with tears in their eyes, tears of relief and tears of gratitude that fellow citizens have said if you find yourself in a crisis we want to be able to support you here. they're the faces of the real ireland there's a lot of stereotypes particularly a brought about our country, and when the people of ireland had an opportunity to vote they have said we want to look after when in ireland and don't wa nt look after when in ireland and don't
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want them to go to the airport to go to the uk for termination in delivery within everyday taking an illegal abortion with no supervision. i want to live in a country that is tolerant, inclusive and compassionate. simon harris speaking to me a few minutes ago. you have to hear the roars from the crowd whenever he makes the parents. the prime minister calling this vote in his referendum a silent revolution, but i don't know whether he was counting on the crowds that we have found you today. with me is an irish broadcaster and also from amnesty international. how would you describe this moment as you look out at the people gathered here? the salad people have found their voice here in dublin this evening. it's extraordinary. i know people are hesitant to use the word celebration, but really people are celebrating, i think, celebration, but really people are celebrating, ithink, a relief. a moment in irish history which is really profound. i think talent here
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beside me who has campaigned referendum for so long with many come in many, many women who have been courageous to stand up and tell their stories at a time in ireland when it was very, very difficult for them to do so. there's a stigma, shame, abortion has been a taboo subject in this country for so long. not anymore, it seems, after this copper heads of victory for the yes side and that is what women in particular out there and indeed men, become lists only 70% of men voted yes, that is what they are marking today. this is only than the sixth referendum on abortion in this country. why was this now the time that the tide turned? it was the sixth and the last. i am told to stay. we have removed this issue from our constitution and it never should have been there. ireland is not changing, but the discourse is changing. they discovered and
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reclaimed our capacity to have conversations, to talk to each other about our lives than no longer acce pt about our lives than no longer accept about what we should talk about and think and believe when it comes to issues around sex and sexuality. for a very very long time and that was dominated by dogma. we have thrown it off. we have had conversations about life and how challenging and difficult and joyous and damn tough life can be at times. guess what we discovered, or we found a way to say our huge yes it to his eyelids that wants to wrap people in a bucket of compassion and ca re people in a bucket of compassion and care at a moment of crisis. they use that phrase because that's the phrase that so many women who have told their stories about travelling told their stories about travelling to liverpool hospitals have told about their experience. we want to wrap out about their experience. we want to wrap our own about their experience. we want to wrap our own people and girls in blankets of compassion and care in moments of crisis. whenever the
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crisis might be and that's what the key outcomes of this referendum. if you look at exit poll they did the primary motivation for people to vote yes in the referendum was a woman's right to choose. that's a really profound statement because what they were asked was, and what we asked ireland was at a woman or girl was pregnant and can't be who should decide what happens next? google asked that question and they said she should. we will celebrate that. this is never a referendum about abortion, this is referendum about abortion, this is referendum about whether we are a society that will do more than tolerate women in crisis. that would do more than find some kind of messy irish solution to an irish problem. rather we will be i'iow an irish problem. rather we will be now a society that values and cherishes and respects and is determined to protect the rights of women's and girls that we will celebrate that. the word on your shirt means yes and iris. in the last 30 seconds those no voices, of
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which this probably around 30% without vote, what happens to them now? with a also be brought into the fold? the legislation has to go before parliament now. there's been a numberof before parliament now. there's been a number of politicians who have voted no and campaigned for it, and today they have said they respect the will of the people. the overwhelming majority of irish people who haven't voted yes and they would support the legislation. thank you both very much. more to come. stay with us on bbc. thank you very much. let's take you inside dublin castle. we this room, this is where the official declaration is going to be made and in terms of the referendum results some people starting to filter in there now. looking at the official referendum website. a few
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constituencies that have not yet declared the final result. just three constituencies to declare their results before that final result comes in. the referendum on the 36th amendment of the constitution in 2018. the eighth amendment, repeal the eighth is the slogan you have heard from what seems clear to be the winning side in this referendum. for all the latestjust go to our website. there you'll find analysis and all the latest on the results. including the final declaration expected very soon. south korea has said that its president moonjae—in has met the north korean leader kim jong—un for two hours today. the south korean government's official twitter account posted these images of the pair embracing
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at the panmunjom border crossing. it's the second meeting between the two leaders in the space of four weeks, and signals improving relations between two countries. and a team from the white house is leaving for singapore — as originally planned — for the summit between kim jong—un and president trump — should it take place. our seoul correspondent laura bicker explains what the meeting between south and north korea means. what does all of this mean? and means that present the moon and kim jong—un are not going to wait for the united states to become involved. they will move the process along by themselves. it's a direct hotline between president moon's desk and kimjong—un and hotline between president moon's desk and kim jong—un and they decided not to use it. they unification house. when it comes to president moon he has made it clear this is why he was elected. this is his mission. he wants to move this
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forward and he wants to keep war away from the peninsula. when it comes to kim jong—un dishes away from the peninsula. when it comes to kimjong—un dishes is willing to engage at a level we have never seen willing to engage at a level we have never seen from his father or his grandfather. what does it mean for the singapore summit? we don't know, it's been on—again, off—again. none of us really know what will happen. president chavez said it is looking more hopeful. i think with regards to what those two leaders met and talked about when other talked about the summitand talked about when other talked about the summit and we will wait and hear what president moon has to say. perhaps this means that both north korea and the us are moving towards meeting on the 12th in singapore, but who knows. it's 16 minutes past five the. the headlines on bbc news: first official results suggest a clear majority has voted to relax ireland's abortion laws. reform campaigners, led by the country's prime minister, are celebrating. south korea says its president met the north korean leader kimjong—un for two hours on saturday at the border crossing between the two countries. nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe — a british—iranian woman
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imprisoned in tehran, will face security—related charges in a second case against her according to iranian media. thousands of liverpool fans have been arriving in ukraine's capital kiev ahead of tonight's champions league final against real madrid. the spanish side may be the bookies favourite — but liverpool are convinced they can win. our sports correspondent, david ornstein, is in kiev. the capital of ukraine. tonight, the centre of the sporting world, moments to be treasured for supporters who have waited 11 years to be back on this stage and made it to kiev despite travel and accommodation havoc leaving many stuck at home. i feel sorry for the people who have not been able to get here. we are made up to be here. the atmosphere is incredible. beautiful city. i genuinely see it 3—0 liverpool. the fans are a massive part of this
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club, a massive part of liverpool and they have played a massive part in us getting this far. hopefully our fans can create an atmosphere similar to anfield because it's made a big difference to us. liverpool's journey started in the qualifying rounds on the 15th of august. they are the competition's top scorers and plan to embellish their famous history. i'm really happy being here with this group of players. they've fought so unbelievably hard for this and i really think they deserve it, to be here, and it feels good. i'm really proud of them already and now, let's play football. inside the hotel behind me, liverpool are preparing for the biggest game of their lives. in just a few hours, they will make the shortjourney from here to the olympic stadium and attempt to win club football's most sought—after prize. the pressure is all on madrid. i think it is great being
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the underdog and i think probably that is whatjurgen klopp has been saying to them all week, no one expects us to win and my gut feeling is, i don't know how they are going to do it, but ijust think that liverpool will win the competition. nobody has done that more than real madrid. they are synonymous with the trophy and hope to lift it for a third consecutive year. in liverpool, though, they face a club, team and fan base with an unshakeable belief that this is their time. well our sports correspondent, hugh woozencroft, who is in kiev for this evening's final, told me a short time ago that liverpool supporters are hoping that their manager's claim that winning is in the club's dna will see them lift the champions league trophy tonight. well this certainly hope so, they have been a very good spirits. but the fans that have tickets are to the olympic stadium just behind me for a little bit later on are really hoping and playing... praying that liverpool
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will make it a sixth european cup title, but what a huge challenge ahead of them. real madrid going for their 13th european cup in all, it would be a third straight year that they have won the champions league title. and really they do all have the pedigree going into this match. jurgen klopp even believes that his real madrid counterpart, zidane, may name the same starting 11 that started last year's final. now, liverpool weren't even in the champions league next year, so that it's just an indication of a task that is facing them. jordan henderson, you saw him in david's piece talking to the media. he believes that a european final defeat for liverpool underjurgen klopp back in 2016, when they were beaten the europa league final, may count as a positive. he believes that they will learn from that evening and they will use it as a experience, and that they can get a little slice of redemption in tonight's match. now, if you are a wales fan, gareth bale is a big talking point. he may or may not start tonight match. he has had huge success since going to real madrid, but this season has not been his best, but he has scored five goals in the last five games.
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zidane saying that that may mean he gets a starting berth. we shall see the teams a couple of hours, but certainly we know that when the match does kick off your expecting an exciting first 20 minutes, and if liverpool do get a goal, or a couple in that time, well, that it could be an amazing night for those fans who made journeys from all over the world. mps say a programme to protect afghan civilians who worked as interpreters for the british army has been a dismalfailure. the defence select committee says the so—called intimidation scheme has failed to relocate any interpreters to the uk, even when their lives have been threatened by the taliban. the government says britain is the only nation that has a team in kabul, to try to protect them. the conservative mp tom tugendhat is chair of the foreign affairs select committee, and saw active service in iraq and afghanistan as an army officer. he told us that he's not surprised by the report's conclusions.
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i can't speak for the reason why this worked, but all i can say is that there are some notable failings and especially essential that we include civilians in those who we have not included care for. not quite the same duty of care for our soldiers but very similar. if they have served alongside us in taking can arrest our soldiers have as many of them did and we have a duty to make sure that that service does not put them in danger with herfamilies in danger in the future. i think we should be very active in making sure that those who served alongside us and have ta ken that those who served alongside us and have taken risks and those whose lives are now at risk because of the service they did on set our troops in combat is recognised and given
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protection they require. sometimes in the uk and sometimes elsewhere depending on what they choose. i'm very pleased with had the privilege to serve alongside a very brave man who is now living in the uk with his family. he earned his place in the uk, many many times over. through his assured nura coverage. i'm extremely proud of our country is recognised that had brought him over. there are others and that is what i gave evidence to the committee, because julian what i gave evidence to the committee, becausejulian lewis was absolutely right and it's a matter of great concern, i'm very proud that members of the committee liked johnnie mercer have made their voices clear on this. iranian state media's reporting that the british woman nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe — who's imprisoned in tehran — will face security—related charges in a second case being prepared against her. no date has yet been set for a hearing. mrs zaghari—ratcliffe was detained during a visit to iran in 2016 and is now serving a five—year sentence after being found guilty of spying. nazanin's husband, richard ratcliffe, has been telling me what more he knows.
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yes, so we discovered the same as eve ryo ne yes, so we discovered the same as everyone else from the irani and media today that the president of the revolutionary court give a speech in the second case to be going forward against terror. who would be security—related charges. to go back a week she had met with thejudge who said to go back a week she had met with the judge who said that they had charges of spreading propaganda. it's a very mild form of a security charge. this week, nazanin met with the deputy prosecutor and wrote a letter to his office outlining her choice of lawyer and we have not had it approved. family following the news that he saw in the media have been chasing with the lawyer to see if he has heard anything. just to clarify, you don't know whether this charge relates to this charge of spreading propaganda or whether it's something else? we don't at the
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moment. it's possible that it is just that which would be a relief because it's a smaller scale, and it could be bigger. we will have to wait and see. one was last time you managed to to nazanin?|j wait and see. one was last time you managed to to nazanin? i spoke to her on tuesday after she met with the deputy prosecutor and she was more upbeat and i had a conversation with her, but also there was this application for furlough when you get to go home for a few days. she had been wanted to go home for her daughter on her birthday. our viewers noble river towards the end ofa ship viewers noble river towards the end of a ship or something going to toronto to try to lobby for her release. clearly there was some hope at that stage. things seem to have deteriorated since then, don't they? lots of hope at that stage we definitely were very hopeful it'll
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about christmas just after. we have had a slow deterioration. and, yeah, one of the reasons we have done this is to try to do more campaigning. that's why i'm running the marathon tomorrow to. just with keeping spirits up and keeping them going. what more can the government do at this point to try to escalate its response to her case? the thing that she asked for in the letter when she spoke to the ambassador was that they write a formal letter of protest a nd they write a formal letter of protest and a letter complaining about her treatment. the idea of a second court about her treatment. the idea of a second court case about her treatment. the idea of a second court case what you were imprisoned is nonsense. i was asking him, can you take that for us? as the response to that? we had discussions but i don't think there was a final decision. we're talking
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about a letter from the government of protest. will you be speaking to borisjohnson again on a point? of protest. will you be speaking to boris johnson again on a point? the conversation i had with the ambassador was what do we understand what's going on? will have to wait to see what happens in neuron first. some customers some tsb customers are still having problems making online payments five weeks after the bank first reported problems. the problems started when the bank switched its it systems. a number of current account customers and some business clients are unable to fully access their accounts online or via the mobile app. the bank has also admitted to the bbc that there has been a rise in fraud incidents. it's being billed as bbc music's biggest weekend — with huge name stars to back that up. ed sheeran, taylor swift and sam smith arejust a few of those performing. four uk cities across the four nations will host their own event. let's talk to our entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba, who's in swansea.
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andi and i guess with no glastonbury this year there's a huge appetite for this of event? absolutely. what to swa nsea. this of event? absolutely. what to swansea. a beautiful, sunny afternoon. people were expecting rain with thunder and lightning, but the fact that the weather has held out has made this afternoon even more enjoyable for so many people. the band years and years are behind me on stage performing right now. we saw the likes of ed sheerin who opened up the stage at 12 o'clock andi opened up the stage at 12 o'clock and i we will see people like sam smith, clean bandit and craig david. as you say the fact that this is a fellow to glastonbury and they take a year off to have a rest, it was a great opportunity and the bbc that they could take advantage of it. underline their commitment to live music in its different forms. this four—day festival across four sites infour four—day festival across four sites in four nations is the result of
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that. here in swansea at singleton parkis that. here in swansea at singleton park is hosted by radio one, all of the festivals are being done in conjunction with bbc national radio network. yesterday and today in belfast. in perth and scotland radio 2and belfast. in perth and scotland radio 2 and three and tomorrow and monday in coventry, also radio 2 and three which gives them the chance to actually have people ranging from the likes of these bands like years and years, to ed sheerin copout artists like that to chas artists with classical styles like nigel kennedy. shows the great relationship with bbc feels it needs to have not just relationship with bbc feels it needs to have notjust with artists but with the public. there are so many great ingredients in place to make this a real enjoyable event i got some of the biggest names in music taking part. they have got thousands upon thousands of bands taking part as well. people come along to this
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and have a great time that will really make this kind of thing going to advance. at the end of the day when people are looking back on this they are asking will it have that little bit of magic from one or two of the very biggest artists that elevated to one of the most talked music event 2018? and maybe we will find that out on sunday or monday. in sunny swansea there. whether in a moment. the love actually and four weddings and a funeral actor hugh grant — who has called marriage unromantic in the past —— has married for the first time. the 57 year old has married his swedish girlfriend anna eberstein. they said i do at a simple ceremony at chelsea old town hall in london yesterday afternoon. the couple have three young children together. he also has two other children with a former partner. rita will be here shortly was national news. first here very warm and humid out there. and
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that means one thing. thunderstorms. that everybody will get the thunderstorms this evening, in fact many parts of the country not getting them at all. look on the map here. clear across the midlands and wales, and northern england. scotla nd wales, and northern england. scotland and northern ireland missing storms. initially we're talking the downpours across other parts of the uk, hail and thunder with gusty winds here. this was the most humid air is aware the highest temperatures are below the lower mid 20s. this also means an increasing risk of storms as they go through this evening the biggest weekend there. there's been a cloud and rain and that lightning risk is increasing. this is what it looks like around 8pm. almost from the coast through the isle of wight downs towards cornwall and devon. moving forward into oxfordshire and
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southern parts of wales as well. very difficult to pinpoint exactly what time the storms will strike and whether it is the heaviest. the southwestern portion of the country roughly from london through birmingham across wales and down into southwestern areas. to the north of that is clear and much cooler here. the very warm and humid there. brief lull in the morning in there. brief lull in the morning in the weather and then the storms return. kind of taking the same tract and see moving from the southeast and that general direction and might even end up in belfast little bit later on tomorrow. once again, for the north and east you are the better the weather will be. we will be escaping the storms in new edinburgh and aberdeen. let's have a look at the rest of europe because it's very warm here how we are doing across the continent. lots of storms scattered around from spain through france and into germany as well. somewhat of a heat wave a cross germany as well. somewhat of a heat wave across europe right now. ca ptu res u p wave across europe right now. captures up to 30 degrees in france and not just in
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captures up to 30 degrees in france and notjust in germany as well. very, very warm across the continent. bank holiday monday, the storms will be in slightly different places and not as many of them around so less of a chance of catching a downpour, but the thunderstorm remains and another very warm and muggy day on bank holiday monday. bye—bye. good afternoon. voters in ireland appear to have overwhelmingly rejected their country's strict anti—abortion laws, and backed reform — in a landmark referendum. the final votes are still being counted, but exit polls suggest around two—thirds of voters supported the calls for change, and the no campaign has conceded defeat. ireland's prime minister leo varadkar has called it a "quiet revolution" for his country, and his government plans changes to the law to allow terminations for all women in the first 12 weeks of pregnancy. from dublin, emma vardy reports. singing a transformative moment for ireland.
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more emphatically than anyone had predicted, the country has voted for change. it has been such a long time coming. we have won. it's a massive relief. two is fighting and campaigning and finally we've shown the rest of the country that we got what we wanted and what we fight it for. it is showing a sea change in our society and how we treat women. exit polls indicated a landslide. by midday, pro—life campaigners conceded defeat but resolved to continue their campaign. this result will pave the way, and everything about abortion on demand. we stand by everything we said during the campaign. the opinion on abortion is now so strongly against the messages you are putting forward. i continue to oppose what many women want? we have many women ourselves who have
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gone through abortion ourselves and have been hurt by it, it gives us strength in continuing with this. more than two thirds of voters supported repealing ireland back‘s controversial law which has restricted access to abortion for so long. i think what we are seeing today really is a combination of a quiet revolution that has been taking place in ireland for the last ten or 20 years. this is a great exercise of democracy and the people have spoken. the start of a moral crusade... in the nineteen eighties, ireland voted to enshrine in law protection for the unborn. today's result shows how much attitudes have changed. this referendum, at its heart, was about giving women a choice but it has brought so much more. a renewed sense of pride and optimism in ireland's future. more. a renewed sense of pride and optimism in ireland's futurem more. a renewed sense of pride and optimism in ireland's future. it is a step towards being a more progressive nation, and it is a
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really good move for the young people of ireland to get out, the political and vote. an intense campaign atan political and vote. an intense campaign at an end, and ireland on the brink of a new era. the final declaration is going to be made here very shortly. as you can see though, the celebrations are already well under way. shouts of "we made history" are ringing out behind me and it has been extraordinary to see the issue of abortion, usually such a personal and private matter, becomes the subject of such debate in this campaign. ireland has delivered a decisive result, one that marks a major social and political change for this country. studio: major social and political change forthis country. studio: emma vardy, thank you. the owner of boots has been referred to the competition authorities, over the prices it's charging the nhs for some drugs. an investigation by the times newspaper found walgreens boots alliance is charging more than a thousand pounds for medicines which can be bought for a fraction of the cost. our business correspondent joe lynam is here.
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how is this possible? it is all to do with drugs called "specials". they are made to order short notice drugs. they make up a tiny sliver of the overall budget for the nhs. nonetheless, the figures involved in these charges, on the surface, appeared to be extraordinary. for example, £3200 charged to the nhs for arthritis tablets which could otherwise have been bought £1. £2600 for specialist sleeping pills which could also be procured for £1. walgreens, which owns boots as a distributor as well as the retail company, does not dispute those figures but it does say that it firmly rejects the allegation that it is overcharging the nhs and is happy to talk to the government and
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the competition authority, and of course the government has referred them to the competition authority foran them to the competition authority for an investigation. the government says that taxpayers would take a very dim view over any company overcharging the nhs. july nine, thank you. —— joe lynam, overcharging the nhs. july nine, thank you. ——joe lynam, thank overcharging the nhs. july nine, thank you. —— joe lynam, thank you. police have appealed for information about a missing schoolgirl who left the uk on a eurotunnel train. 13—year—old serena alexander—benson left her home in wimbledon yesterday morning, telling herfather she was going to school. the police believe she probably boarded the train "in the company of an older person". south korea's president moonjae—in has met the north korean leader kim jong—un today — for more talks aimed at resurrecting the planned summit with donald trump. it's the second meeting between the two leaders — in the demilitarised zone that divides the two countries. a white house team is departing for singapore to prepare for the summit — if it takes place onjune12th. mps say a programme to protect afghan civilians who worked as interpreters for the british army has been a "dismalfailure". the defence select committee says the scheme has failed to relocate any interpreters to the uk,
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even when their lives have been threatened by the taliban. richard galpin reports. british troops on the ground fighting the taliban in afghanistan, they were there for more than a decade. their afghan interpreters also risked their lives on the front line. we have hidden their identities because, to this day, they face retaliation from the taliban for working with british forces. but, so far, only a fraction of the 3500 interpreters have been allowed to leave afghanistan, and settle in britain where they are safe. here, the head of the defence committee is shocked and says it is damaging for britain. if the united kingdom gets a reputation for leaving those people who put their lives at risk to help our soldiers
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at the mercy of our enemies when our soldiers are no longer there to look after them, it will be very difficult in future conflicts to find people, local people, prepared to do that. it is now more than three years since the british combat mission in afghanistan ended, with most troops being pulled out. since then, 400 interpreters and locally hired staff have moved to britain. leaving most offend for themselves at home in afghanistan. —— to fend for themselves. yet the ministry of defence insisted that their team in kabul provides them with enough security advice and support to ensure that they are safe. richard galpin, bbc news. now, can liverpool win the biggest prize in european football? with just hours to go, thousands more fans have been arriving in ukraine's capital kiev, for tonight's champions league final against real madrid. our sports correspondent natalie pirks reports. it is almost here... liverpool,
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particularly their fans, have it is almost here... liverpool, particularly theirfans, have been on quite a journey to reach this moment of destination... planes, trains, coaches and cars, it did not matter how they got here as long as they got here. they think, though, it will all be worth it. steven gerard said that if we had a final on the moon, we would find a way of getting there. he's right! to win tonight means everything!” getting there. he's right! to win tonight means everything! i will be crying my eyes out in happiness and if we lose i will cry my eyes out with despair! i'm going to be crying one way or another! they are confident, because this has been an exceptional cup run and a manager who understands this club's dna. the last of their five european trophies was 13 years ago. it's time to make new memories... in cup competitions, sometimes as a player, things happen
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to you and it convinces you that you can win. my gut feeling is, i don't know how they will do it, but ijust think that liverpool will win the competition. but real madrid are the undoubted ball kings of europe, littered with star turns tonight they go for their 13th champions league trophy. their third consecutive unprecedented in this iraq. steve mcmanaman has played for both. —— in this era. iraq. steve mcmanaman has played for both. -- in this era. the fact that real madrid can win it three years ina row real madrid can win it three years in a row amid so much instability, is something else. today saw a special version of the anfield wrap podcast, delivered to devotees in the sunshine. it's a religion.|j wa nt to the sunshine. it's a religion.|j want to see supporters who love each other. they are ready to show their love, the olympic stadium has no
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idea what is about to hit it. you can see just how much this means to the fans. if liverpool can strike that balance between attack and defence, they are very confident they can beat madrid tonight. they have scored more goals than anyone leading up to the final and ultimately, every underdog has its day. studio: natalie pirks, thank you. there's more throughout the evening on the bbc news channel, we are back with the late news at 10.15 — now on bbc1 its time for the news where you are. good evening. iamjohn i am john watson with the latest sports news from the bbc sportscenter. news coming up of another sensational ride from britain's chris froome in cycling's giro d'italia, he's on the brink of clean sweep of three grand tour wins. we start though with the countdown to tonight's european cup final, less than two hours to go as liverpool look to write another historic chapter in the club's history. fans are making their way to the stadium in kiev ahead of kick off, the holders real madrid lie in wait in the final
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which kicks off at 7:45pm. we're expecting the all—important team news in the next hour or so. there's coverage on bbc five live as the underdogs look to topple the champions. for liverpool's managerjurgen klopp he's looking to right the wrongs of defeat in the champions league final with his former club dortmund back in 2013. after the game i knew that i want to, to have this opportunity again. it took a while but now i am here because my boys gave me that chance again. i'm really happy being here with this group of players. they fought so unbelievably hard for this andi fought so unbelievably hard for this and i really think they deserve it, to be here. i'm really proud of them already. and now let's play football. to reach the premier
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league and potentially play against liverpool next season... it's labelled the most lucrative match in football, and it's fulham who have the advantage against aston villa in today's championship play off final with a premier league place also at stake. latest score 1—0, thanks to tom cairney‘s strike early in the first half in a match that could be worth up to £280 million for the winner. villa have been out of the top flight for two seasons. fulham missed out on automatic promotion on the last day of the season. the reward for keeping southampton in the premier league, is a new 3 year contract for mark hughes. the former stoke boss, signed a short term deal on the south coast, in march, with the club, in real danger of relegation but a revival in their last 5 games, meant, they pulled off a great escape, despite losing their last match of the season. chris froome is set to become the first british man to win the giro d'italia after another stunning ride on today's penultimate stage. simon yates had been the man in the lead for most of the historic race,
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but froome's incredible breakaway yesterday saw him seize the lead from the brit, and victory again today means he just needs to safely negotiate the largley processional final stage in rome tomorrow. drew savage reports. this was the moment when chris from new that he all but one it. you will be the first british winner... for now, time to congratulate his team ona now, time to congratulate his team on a job well done. we have seen this so often at the tour de france, secure in the leader'sjerzy protected by his team—mates but it is the first time we have seen it in the italian mountains. the heroics yesterday meant that he had to gain 40 seconds if he wanted to win the peakjersied but 40 seconds if he wanted to win the peak jersied but he 40 seconds if he wanted to win the peakjersied but he bound a man wearing it stuck to his back wheel. he tried to get ahead but spending over a fortnight looking out of the running chris froome was in complete
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control. it 46 seconds advantage and the anti—dumping case has left plenty of questions and if he wins italy, it will be three in a row. and that is something to celebrate. to lords where england's cricketers could face defeat inside three days in the first test with pakistan. in their second innings, they've surrendered wickets cheaply in pursuit of pakistan's lead. dawid malan spectacularly caught by sarfraz off the bowling of mohammad amir. amir struck two balls later to removejonny bairstow and ben stokes picked out a fielder to become the fifth wicket to fall. joe root went for 68 butjoss butler and dom bess have stuck around. and they've helped england past pakistan's first innings total so the tourists will have to bat again. england are 201 for six, a lead of 22. -- 205 -
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—— 205 — six, for a lead of 26. saracens are the premiership champions following victory over exeter in today's final at twickenham. having had the lead for almost the whole match, saracens made sure of the win through this nathan earle try. exeter may have finished eight points ahead of saracens after the 22 game season, but they couldn't get the better of saracens stubborn defence as they clinched their third title in four years. it was bittersweet for red bull ahead of tomorrow's monaco grand prix as daniel riccardo clinched pole, while team mate max verstappen crashed out and will start at the back of the grid. red bull's max verstappen crashed in practice meaning he was unable to take any further part in qualifying and will start from the back of the grid, teammate daniel ricciardo grabbed pole for tomorrow's race after he set yet another track record. britain's lewis hamilton will start from third on the grid. that's all the sport for now. thank you very much. just to keep you updated on the situation in dublin when we are waiting for the
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official declaration of the referendum result, referendum on ireland's abortion laws and all indications are that evil have voted resoundingly to change and that would loosen restrictions on the circumstances in which a woman can be given an abortion. —— that people have voted. the official declaration will be made but we are still waiting for the declarations from three constituencies. you can see on your screen there to the left of your screen there to the left of your screen, the green bar and the pink baror your screen, the green bar and the pink bar or red bar. so the green is yes for repealing the eighth amendment to the irish constitution which relates to abortion. that
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looks as you can see well ahead of the no voters. if you want to check out any further details of course you can go to our website/ news. a short film starring jason isaacs is getting its world premiere in a rather unusual venue. a hairdressers in lincoln. it is written and directed by bonnie wright best known forjenny will easily in the harry potter films. you would expect a movie premiere on london's west and but one short film is getting its world's first screening here, upset the blow dries and trams at the salon, people can watch medusa's ankles. set in a salon and its stars jason isaacs as a hairdresser. wonderful. i am good,
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aren't i. and it is directed by bonnie wright, messed known as ginny weasley in the harry potter films. it is so much that i learned like the attention of detail and all the heads of department and the newbies whether the cinematographer or the editor, they were at the top of their field. the film is being shown here for three days, and the first time it has been screened in public and it brings a hollywood star in to and it brings a hollywood star in to a local hairdresser. it is strange but interesting. i hope people come to watch it and decide to have their hair done. being here brought it alive because you have the blow d rye rs alive because you have the blow dryers at the back... i suppose it makes sense to do it somewhere else
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to get a new audience. to be outside of london, a premier like this i thought was interesting.” of london, a premier like this i thought was interesting. i thought it was very good because it is boring especially when you have colour and. screenings are part of the mansions of the future, a three—year project bringing international artist were to lincoln. i was excited to be a part of it, to be in a public space and discover film that otherwise he would not have known about it, they would not have known about it, they would have their hair cut and ask questions. watching the film is free but you need to book and you could even get a short back and sides while there. australia may be in the grip of winter but one city's bathing in unseasonably warm glow. the vivid light has full, an annual
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celebration of colour, culture and art. and the beach reports. the syd ney art. and the beach reports. the sydney knights gave lit up i've neverforfour —— sydney knights gave lit up i've never for four —— the city knights gave lit up like never before. never for four —— the city knights gave lit up like never beforem never for four —— the city knights gave lit up like never before. it is so well—done that looks like it is a big tv and cannot tell if it is a projection or anything, very fluid. it is the tenth time a light festival has been saved here and this time may be the biggest and brightest yet. i think the lights are blue, the characterisation is phenomenal in lights and using the architecture of the buildings, just perfectly. 90 installations have magically transformed landmarks with visitors urged to enter a world of childish delights. look!, there he is. organisers say the displays draw on local culture and environment.
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the inspiration was a creative act in the cosmic sense and also the individual sense as an artist. beyond that, it became the australian fauna in nature and geology, all the things that make it such a unique place. last year nearly two and a half million people enjoyed the events, bringing $100 million boost to the economy. with the spotlight remaining on sydney for the next three weeks, that could soon be outshone. time to take a look at the weather forecast. here are the details. warm and humid out there and the atmosphere is very volatile which means one thing, thunderstorms. not eve ryo ne means one thing, thunderstorms. not everyone is getting those this evening but many parts of the country are not getting them at all, look on the napier, clear across much of the midlands, wales northern england. —— look on the map here.
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hailand england. —— look on the map here. hail and thunder and gusty winds here, this is where the most humid areas and the highest temperatures areas and the highest temperatures are in the low or mid 20s. this also means an increasing risk of storms as her go through the evening for the biggest weekend there, with the radio1. the biggest weekend there, with the radio 1. initially a lot of clout, a little bit of rain but the thunderstorm and lightning risk is increasing. this is what it looks like around 8pm, so for me, almost the kent coast down to devon and into berkshire, oxfordshire, southern parts as a well of wales. difficult to pinpoint when the storms will strike and where the heaviest of the rain will be but it is the southwestern portion of the country, roughly from london through birmingham and across wales and southwestern areas. it is much clear in the north, and a brief lull in
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the morning for the weather and then the morning for the weather and then the storms are and take the same track and you can see moving from the southeast in that general direction and might even end up in belfast a little later on tomorrow. once again further north and east you are, better the weather will be and will be escaping the storms in new castle, edinburgh and aberdeen. very warm here, and how are we doing across the continent, a lots of storms scattered around through spain and france and germany. a heat wave a cross spain and france and germany. a heat wave across europe right now, temperatures up to 30 degrees in france and not far off 30 in germany as well. bank holiday monday, the storms will probably be in slightly different places and not as many of them around, so less of a chance of catching a downpour. but the thunderstorm remains and again i very warm and muggy day on bank
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holiday monday. goodbye. this is bbc news. i'm annita mcveigh. the headlines at six. early results suggest the republic of ireland has voted by a landslide to relax some of the world's most restrictive abortion laws. the prime minister says it's a quiet revolution. meath ireland is a country that trust women and respect their decisions. this is the scene live in dublin, the official result is expected shortly. the leaders of north and south korea hold talks as a us delegation heads to singapore before a possible meeting between president trump and kimjong un a scheme to protect interpreters who helped british troops in afghanistan is deemed a "dismal failure" by a group of mps countdown to kick off, as liverpool fans soak up the atmosphere in kiev ahead of tonight's champions league final. jurgen klopp says winning
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is in liverpool's dna as the reds
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