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tv   BBC News  BBC News  May 27, 2018 2:00pm-2:31pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines at 2.00pm. senior politicians call for northern ireland's strict abortion laws to be relaxed as voters in the irish republic overwhelmingly back change in a referendum. north korea's kim jong—un‘s says a summit with us president donald trump in singapore should go ahead. spectacular overnight storms across southern britain — around 15,000 lightning strikes injust four hours. the government is considering whether to expand england's network of national parks and areas of outstanding natural beauty. coming up in the next hour: a painful night for liverpool fans. two game—changing mistakes from their goalkeeper help real madrid to win the champions league final in kiev. # i'm in love with the shape of you.
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# more big acts perform on day two of radio 1's biggest weekend in swansea. and in half an hour here on bbc news, the week in parliament takes a look at the latest developments in brexit negotiations. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. there have been calls for reform of northern ireland's strict anti—abortion laws following the referendum in the irish republic, which overwhelmingly backed change there. sinn fein said a way now "had to be found" to "deliver rights" to women in the north. however the democratic unionist party said northern ireland "should not be bullied into accepting abortion on demand". 0ur ireland correspondent chris page reports. in dublin today, people are considering the outcome of what was a defining vote on a touchstone social issue. for many years, the catholic church's strong opposition to abortion was reflected
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in the law. churchgoers this morning were disappointed. i couldn't vote for that. i'm disappointed, i have a no badge, the majority spoke and you have to agree with the wish of the people so it's back to the government to see what they do now with it. but the referendum resulted in a landslide. abortion has been illegal in the irish republic unless a woman's life was substantially in danger. 66% of the voters supported the case for change. ministers are now set to bring forward legislation which will allow terminations for any reason until a woman is 12 weeks pregnant and in some ci rcu msta nces afterwards. but the huge shift here has raised questions about the situation in northern ireland where abortions are are only permitted if there is a serious or permanent risk to the woman's health. sinn fein there should be more access to terminations north of the border. this has been a national debate, people the length and breadth of the island have been talking
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about how we need to support women. our policy is the same from northern ireland to the bottom of ireland, we want to see the same policy. we need to show care and compassion towards women. the largest party in northern ireland, the democratic unionist party, are opposed to any change in the law. the devolved government collapsed almost a year ago. a number of mps from several parties think that westminster should pass new legislation for northern ireland, but government sources are stressing the priority is to restore devolution so local politicians can decide on the matter. campaigners in belfast who want to keep the current law say they will resist any attempt to alter it. the demand for abortion as a choice depends on the dehumanisation of unborn children. we have existing recognition for unborn children in law and that is the way it should be. we made history! the abortion referendum was a highly significant and symbolic moment for the irish republic but it will have an impact on politics across the whole island and in london.
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president trump says discussions about his possible meeting with the north korean leader, kim jong—un, in just over two weeks, are going "very well". earlier this week mr trump pulled out of the summit, blaming pyongyang's hostility. the president's comments followed yesterdays surprise meeting between mr kim and the south korean leader moonjae—in. laura bicker reports from south korea. embracing for a second time, the two korean leaders look much more like new friends instead of decades—old enemies. the meeting was called by kim jong—un who seems eager to salvage his summit with president trump. translation: kim jong-un reaffirms his strong will for denuclearising the korean peninsula. that's what the white house wants to hear. they had even created a special summit coin, but officially the meeting is off.
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or is it? so we're looking at june 12th in singapore. that hasn't changed... ..and it's moving along pretty well. at the border, tourists from the south come to catch a glimpse of a land they have never known. it often feels like the razor wire and landmines don't exist. and when their leaders meet so easily at such short notice, it makes them feel that one day that might be possible. each one of these ribbons tied to the barbed wire fence represents a hope for peace and if you were looking for signs that this time might be different they've got it. kim jong—un is showing he is willing to engage on a level that his father and his grandfather never were. but fundamentally, one problem remains — is he willing to give away his nuclear weapons? but people here are eager for the us and north korea to at least try, as this is the closest they've come
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to peace in decades. laura bicker, bbc news, padu. with me isjim hoare — he's a former diplomat who set up the british embassy in north korea and had postings in seoul, pyongyang and beijing. thank you very much forjoining us. how much preparation normally goes into organising a summit like this. there are occasional rapid summits, but generally you spend quite a long time preparing for an event takes those. you brief your principle, in this case, the president of the united states and mr kimjong—un, and you then have meetings, you arrange the agenda, your range all sorts of things, entertainment, arrival ceremonies, everything like that, just so that when it happens, doesn't matter what is going on behind the scenes, but the whole thing goes smoothly and straightforwardly. that takes time.
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how publicly would normally do that? not a lot. normally, the things i was involved in, there was a lot of discussions behind the scenes. the world has changed. there is much more press attention and media attention generally, and things leak out, but still, you do a lot of the work quietly in case things go wrong, and then everybody can back away without loss of face, or in case you meet a major problem and you have too spent election time totti out. as an onlooker, how unusual happy abrasion spent the summit? i think the holdings in to very quickly. mr kim apparently issued an invitation to the south koreans, there to arrange the north—south summit. they told the president of the united states and he said go public, and he himself went public. so, you have got no
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agenda, except what the united states once, you don't know what the other side is looking for, how they will handle it, and you then have got to deal with all that in the glare of publicity, and that makes it much more difficult, i think. why does any of that matter, then? as long as they get the table and started walkes it matters, i think, because there isn't an agreed agenda as of yet. united states has said they want a complete end to the north korean nuclear programme. the north korean nuclear programme. the north koreans rather bridled that, is ashley when it was linked to what might happen if they didn't do it. cash especially when it was linked to what might happen if they didn't do it, pointing to libya. that isn't a happy precedent, so, they began to make very loud noises, but on the other hand, mrtrump make very loud noises, but on the other hand, mr trump feels he wants this meeting, and she thinks he can handle kim jong—un, and
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this meeting, and she thinks he can handle kimjong—un, and the danger is, i think, handle kimjong—un, and the danger is, ithink, that handle kimjong—un, and the danger is, i think, that mr trump will from past evidence, not be terribly well briefed. he doesn't seem to read a lot of things. 0n briefed. he doesn't seem to read a lot of things. on all accounts of mr kim are that he will know his stuff, he will have read the documents, he will know what the issues are, and that will me that he's —— mean that he is ina that will me that he's —— mean that he is in a strong position. how likely is it that is summit in singapore, for the club ofjune will ta ke singapore, for the club ofjune will take his? then you are asking. i suspect now that mr trump has sort of come round to the idea of holding it after all, it might well take place. whether it will solve the problems, whether it well reach an agreement that each side can be happy with, i'm still rather doubtful. but you never know, things can sometimes happen. the chemistry can sometimes happen. the chemistry
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can sometimes happen. the chemistry can sometimes work. they might get on, it might be all smooth and peaceful, but it might not. it could go either way. jim hoare, good to meet you. thank you very much for coming in. flights at stansted airport have been seriously disrupted following thunderstorms last night. a lightning strike disabled the aircraft fuelling system leading to cancelled flights. the storms and torrential rain swept across the southern britain overnight with spectacular displays of lightning. around 15,000 strikes were recorded. the met office has issued a yellow warning for heavy rain and flooding across wales and most of england today. thousands of disappointed liverpool fans are returning home after last night's champions league final defeat to real madrid. but their disappointment will be as nothing to the anguish and dejection felt by liverpool's goalkeeper loris karius whose errors handed the spanish side two of their three goals. from kiev, david 0rnstein reports.
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real madrid, champions of europe for a 13th time, liverpool heartbroken. the reds arrived with dreams of another famous triumph, but soon suffered the cruellest of blows, mohamed salah, their inspirational season hauled to the ground and. inconsolable. the key threat removed, real could rally, and were gifted the lead, and inexplicable error by lloris karius, punished by karim benzema. liverpool's blushes were temporarily spared when sadio mane levelled the tie, however, real are a great side for a reason, and gareth bale showed wide. 0n as a substitute, the welshman defied gravity to make a seemingly impossible a reality. a moment worthy of winning any match, and bale soon sealed the trophy, another horror show from karius, and real would reign once again.
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so liverpool's unforgettable journey comes to an an agonising end. the supporters here and at home will be distraught, losing to real madrid is no disgrace, but the circumstances will leave a bitter taste, and a whole summer to ponder how different it could have been. david 0rnstein, bbc news, kiev. england could get more national parks as part of a review of the country's landscape. the environment secretary, michael gove, said the review would also look at whether to increase the number of areas of outstanding natural beauty. ben ando reports. the cpre are now fighting for great tracts of land to be used for national parks. between the wars, the battle raged for britain's open spaces and the right to roam. there were mass trespasses, arrests and propaganda films like this. but it wasn't until 1951 that the post—war government legislated to create britain's first national park, here in the peak district, a place where ordinary people
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could enjoy the extraordinary beauty of nature and that would be protected from overzealous developers. over the intervening years, others have been added. the lake district, dartmoor, snowdonia in wales and the cairngorms in scotland. now, there are 15 national parks. 70 years on, the environment secretary michael gove says it is time for a fresh look at the system. writing in the sunday telegraph, mr gove says a growing population and decline in some habitats could not be ignored and he is ordering a review, which he says has the aim of strengthening protection in the face of present—day challenges. challenges like new housing estates encroaching on the outer edges of national parks and britain's 3a designated areas of outstanding natural beauty. the government has previously talked about a 25 year environment plan and a green brexit. mr gove knows it may be hard to balance demand for new homes with the desire to protect britain's open spaces, whether green and pleasant or wild and rugged. ben ando, bbc news. let's speak to our correspondent
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katy austin who's at butterley reservoir in the peak district — one of the 10 national parks currently in england. katie, it looks glorious there today. it absolutely is, and it is an beautiful weekends like this that you can really see what makes national parks and there is so special. just here, we happy reservoir, as he said, and yes, the peak district is actually the first national partners has ever created, backin national partners has ever created, back in 1951. there are ten of them now ina back in 1951. there are ten of them now in a bid alone, along —— in england alone. these are great places for walking, cycling, exploring, what has restructured its begins in some of the people around here, isjust begins in some of the people around here, is just how many different kinds of people they attract. all you need is a car to get here, really, and then you are off. you can walk for free, taking the
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glorious views. we spoke to some people about the idea of these parks, the review of the protection that these parks have, how valuable they are, and we asked people what they are, and we asked people what they thought about the idea of whether getting new designated national parks is a good idea? very valuable, and they have to be maintained, as well. while they are not as used as these to be, you don't see that many people around, they should be much better used, and certainly should be well kept.|j think it is reported that you have got space like this with good footpath and good access, that people on days that this can go for walks. it would be a really good idea to increase the number of national parks. construction is giving you a sense of claustrophobic, and it is so important that you go out and get into the countryside, with most things that make you feel pressured.
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somewhere where people to go for, some way were “— somewhere where people to go for, some way were “ somewhere different. i some way were “ somewhere different. lam some way were “ somewhere different. i am from huddersfield, but we come on a regular basis, now, so. you heard some people talking about some concerns that things like the population growth increasing the demand for housing could have some impact on areas of outstanding natural beauty, and some people may be at getting out into the countryside as much as they want, and it is concerned like that have prompted the environment secretary, michael gove, to launch the review. it will also look at whether the national park system is working to people who live there, and whether it is working for the economy. that review will be led by a writer, julian glover, who will also have a panel of experts on everything from sort of farming to tourism, advising him, as well. we are expecting that review to report sometime next year. we don't know that he went, but we can expect them to know whether the
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recommendation for more national parks like this one here will be made. thank you very much. the headlines on bbc news: politicians are calling for northern ireland's strict abortion laws to be liberalised, after voters in the irish republic overwhelmingly backed changes in their referendum. donald trump has indicated that preparations for a summit next month with the leader of north korea, kimjong—un, are going ahead as originally planned. storms and torrential rain swept across the southern britain overnight, with spectacular displays of lightning. around 15,000 strikes were recorded. two young people have died afterfalling ill at a dance music festival in hampshire. an 18—year—old woman and a 20—year—old man died in separate incidents at the mutiny festival in portsmouth. 0rganisers have cancelled today's event which was to be headlined by craig david and sean paul after warning of a "dangerous high strength or bad
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batch substance on site". joining us now is our reporter steve humphrey from portsmouth. yes, festival goers today have been telling us of their shock and sadness at this tragedy. the festival was supposed to go on for a couple of days, but it was cancelled as soon as couple of days, but it was cancelled as soon as the extent of what had happened became known. today, as he said there is supposed to be a whole line—up of people playing on the main stage behind me. interestingly, the main camp that is just a couple of miles away. police were first alerted yesterday evening when an 18—year—old woman fell ill, and spent 20 minutes later a 20 odd man collapsed. they were both taken to hospital, just a short distance away. sadly, both of them died. two other festivalgoers also in hospital. 0ne other festivalgoers also in hospital. one of them is in a critical condition. if you moments ago, ian baird from the festival
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made this statement. with tremendous sadness that we can confirm that two of our festival family died in hospital overnight. an 18—year—old woman and a 20 man we re an 18—year—old woman and a 20 man were taken to hospital when sadly died. we do know that the police are supporting the next of kin, and we are continuing to work closely with the police and other relevant authorities. we took the decision, supported by the police, to cancel today's festival, to safeguard the welfare of all the others and out of respect to the two young people who lost their lives. this is deeply upsetting and we again want to send all of our thoughts to the families. hampshire police they are not treating the death as suspicious, but they are investigating. let's return now to those calls for reform northern ireland has
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the strictest abortion laws in the uk, and following the referendum result in the republic of ireland there are calls for the laws in the north to be relaxed. joining me now in belfast is grainne teggart — from amnesty international in northern ireland. thank you very much the joining us. how has the result in the republic of ireland been viewed in northern ireland today? welcome our busy, yesterday's result any referendum was a momentous the women's rights, but it is vital that no woman on the island of ireland has left behind. all eyes are now on the uk government. they need to decide if they are going to remain complicit in the harm and suffering of women living under these restrictive abortion laws, or if the politicians in the republic of ireland, they are going to stand with an sad other women in northern ireland and
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urgently legislates a much—needed and long overdue reform. be dup has 0rigi said that northern allott must not be forced into doing something just because of what has happened in the south. this is a devolved issue, how can you ask westminster to intervene? well, the dup are wrong. they are out of step with their own electorate, on that. amnesty polls and other opinion polls have the illusion that the majority of people in northern ireland favour reform, which includes the decriminalisation of abortion. health and justice are indeed devolved matters, but we haven't had a devolved government for16 haven't had a devolved government for 16 months, and even if we do have a devolved government, that will not relieve the uk government who are ultimately responsible to ensure that in's right to abortion is upheld, here. devolution is not now, nor has it ever been, justification for the denial of
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women's rights, and in northern ireland are now in the absurd position where soon they may board trains, to the republic of ireland to access abortion services, or plain silly rest of the uk, but still cannot access free, safe abortion in northern ireland. it is unacceptable, and the uk government must bring an end to the denial of our equality. there are criminal penalties that can be imposed in northern ireland for abortion, but in truth, how often are those laws really used? well, the abortion or in northern ireland carries the harshest criminal penalties in europe. that should have been a wake—up call to europe. that should have been a wa ke—up call to westminster long ago, but prosecutions are not in theory, they are in reality. amnesty is involved in a case that will go to hearing in september of this year, and that is the case of a mother who is being prosecuted for buying abortion pill is far higher 15—year—old daughter. now, compare
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that with scotland and wales for example where women can now access abortion pills, taking one at home, thatis abortion pills, taking one at home, that is obviously in stark contrast for northern ireland, where women are being hauled through the court. so, the uk government cannot turn a blind eye to the very grave situation that there is the women in northern ireland. we welcome the fa ct northern ireland. we welcome the fact that penny mordaunt, the health and qualities minister and other members of the conservative party are coming forward and beating out the need for change, for women in northern ireland. —— speaking out for the need for change. that is not it with their control. they have the power to bring about the change that is needed, and we would urge them to do so. thank you very much field and today. thank you. music lovers across the uk have been treated to a second day of headline acts as part of the bbc‘s biggest weekend which by its close will see more than 100 artists perform in england, scotland, wales and northern ireland over four days. saturday saw stars including ed sheeran, franz ferdinand and noel gallagher take to the stage.
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# i'm in love with the shape of you # we push and pull like a magnet, too # although my heart is thrown into # # i say, don't you know # you say # i say, take me out # one i love # i ain't found nothing like this # like this # i ain't found nothing like this # i ain't found nothing like this
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# every time you hurt me, the less that i cry # and every time you leave me, the quicker these you walk out, i still love you # we don't stand a chance, it's sad but it's true # i'm way too good at goodbyes # i'm way too good at goodbyes # the way that you just leave me cry.# let's cross to our entertainment correspondent, lizo mzimba who is at singleton park in swansea. joined by three of the thousands of people who are here. what made you wa nt to people who are here. what made you want to come down today? it is a doorstep? it is on my doorstep, and it is lovely to see the city, there's able to get tickets. see all these wonderful artists. how are you enjoying it? the sun is out. people are enjoying it, it's brilliant.
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0livia, who are you looking forward to seeing the most today? taylor swift. y taylor, what's all a good about her? she loves to sing and dance. do think you'll be at islay? how long have you been looking forward to this? tie since my mum let me know she had the tickets. what was your reaction when she said you're coming to see this.|j what was your reaction when she said you're coming to see this. i was so excited, and she told me all the rides, and stuff. of the abbey wonderful time, and rory, who is escorting 0livier here today, how are you enjoying it? it is a lovely day. most can enjoyjason day ruler. and the weather is holding. did you expect this? a very nice day. that is fantastic. 0livia, rory, thank you so much forjoining us. we have
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got people like jason derulo coming up. we will have taylor swift and then florence and the machine. letsjoin lets join thomas letsjoin thomas for lets join thomas for the weather forecast. much, then the light show we saw last night. towards the northern bees, we have got thunderstorms, there. lizo is lucky. many of us it is the case of sunshine, but the thunderstorm risk will continue for the next few days, andi will continue for the next few days, and i can see clearly the map here is green. stalls will be popping off locally as we go through the course of the afternoon. a very warm 25 in the south, warm enough in scotland,
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as well. now, tonight, still a few storms rambling. it is difficult to see them, because they are not quite small. some of them could bring quite a few downpours, but the main message a lot of dry weather across the country, and also turning quite misty and murky, there. because central and eastern areas, that low—grade cloud, that. that sun is out, tomorrow morning, that should burn it back towards the coastline. quite cool on the coast, but by the inland around 26 degrees. tomorrow, across southern areas, inland around 26 degrees. tomorrow, across southern areas, we inland around 26 degrees. tomorrow, across southern areas, we should seize and vicious storms developing web again. —— we could see some vicious storms developing once again. this is bbc news, our latest headlines. politicians are calling for northern ireland's strict abortion laws to be liberalised, after voters in the irish republic overwhelmingly backed changes in their referendum. donald trump has indicated that preparations for a summit next month with the leader of north korea kimjong—un are going ahead as originally planned.
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storms and torrential rain swept across southern britain overnight, with spectacular displays of lightning. around 15,000 strikes were recorded. the environment secretary michael gove has ordered a review of national parks in england, which could result in the creation of a new wave of protected areas. now on bbc news, the week in parliament. hello, and welcome to the week in parliament, where after more tough talk on brexit a conservative mp cuts to the chase. how are the european union negotiations going?
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