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tv   BBC News  BBC News  May 28, 2018 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines at 5pm... a man is killed after flash flooding in the west midlands — with some areas getting more than a month's rain injust one hour. the clean—up operation is underway, but weather warnings remain in place for several parts of england. a migrant from mali is to be made a french citizen after scaling a building in paris with his bare hands to rescue a dangling child. i asked him was and he frightened for his own life. he said no, at that moment he wasn't thinking of himself, he was thinking of the child. as soon as he started to climb, he was scared that the child would get tired and let go. the labour partyjoins calls to change abortion laws in northern ireland, following the referendum in the republic. from sparkling sea, to magnificent moorland — the 840 bus route from pickering to whitby in north yorkshire has been voted britain's most scenic. and coming up... the travel show is in thailand, finding out why holiday selfies are putting animals at risk. that's in half an hour
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here on the bbc news channel. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. a man's been killed after storms caused flash flooding across the west midlands — with more than a month's rainfall hitting parts of birmingham yesterday in the space of just an hour. the man — a pensioner in his 80s — died in walsall, after his vehicle became submerged. met office amber weather warnings — for rain and thunderstorms — are in place this afternoon for east anglia, london and the south—east and the south—west. our correspondent caroline davies has the latest from walsall. it seems almost surreal that this
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happened last night. if you follow that road down, you will see the railway bridge. this gate, eyewitnesses say it got stuck in the death underneath the railway bridge. we have seen some photos about how high it got. you can see there are some blossoms stuck about that level of order. the man was stuck there at about two o'clock in the morning. the emergency services were called to help him. he was rescued on a wrap. paramedics had to swim to reach him. he was taken to hospital but u nfortu nately he was taken to hospital but unfortunately he died later on. this seems a very unusual unfortunately he died later on. this seems a very unusual situation. it looked very different yesterday afternoon. wading through floodwater this is selly park in birmingham and across the city residents struggled to get help after sunshine turned to downpours.
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we saw through social media that there was flooding in the selly park area so i left a little bit of time and took a drive back up. the road was closed and eventually i ended up getting a lift home on a kind of raft with the fire service who kindly brought me to my front door. in some areas a month's worth of rain fell in a few hours. west midlands fire brigade attended over 100 weather—related incidents. there were so many calls that at times they were dealt with by the london fire brigade. cars and houses completely flooded out, cars probably up to about four foot right up to the windows and houses completely flooded out. my car was struck by lightning and my screen cracked. i don't think that this is safe. it was not only in birmingham, in northampton roads flooded. welshpool saw the same. while temperatures may be soaring in other parts of the country, here the clean—up is just starting.
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the road is clear and traffic are coming here but there were plenty of abandoned cars were people had got out of their vehicles. we have heard about those met office amber warnings. for some people the clear up warnings. for some people the clear up has started already but for the families of the gentleman who did die and will be coming to terms with this tragic event. a malian migrant hailed as a hero in paris after scaling a building to rescue a small boy, who was dangling from a balcony, is to be made a french citizen. mamoudou gassama has been widely praised for saving the the four—year—old. earlier this morning he met french president emmanuel macron, who honoured him with a medal of courage. from paris, lucy williamson reports. france has nicknamed him spiderman. his real name is mamoudou gassama. when he saw a toddler dangling from a fourth floor balcony, the malian immigrant ran straight past the crowd of onlookers
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and began to climb. in less than a minute he had scaled the outside of the building. a neighbour holding onto the toddler until he arrived. with one leg swung across the balcony, mamoudou swept the child to safety, to cheers from the crowd below. the child's father is now being questioned for apparently leaving him at home alone. this morning mr gassama was invited to meet president macron, who asked whether he had stopped to think before climbing. no, he replied, i wasn't thinking about anything, i just climbed. once i had started god gave me the courage to continue. afterwards when the police arrived, i started trembling. the president awarded mr gassama a bravery medal and certificate and has invited him to apply for french citizenship. mr gassama is now planning tojoin the country's fire service. he previously had documents allowing him to work in italy
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but not to enter france. the video of his dramatic ascent has now been viewed millions of times on social media. before the french authorities even knew he was here, mamoudou gassama was already a nationwide hero. lucy williamson, bbc news, paris. (tx next) a car collided with pedestrians in stockport last night, killing a man and injuring others. police have launched a murder investigation. greater manchester police were called to the salisbury nightclub in the area of brinnington. it's thought a black audi a4 collided with a number of people before fleeing the scene. a man in his 30s died later in hospital. a 15—year—old boy has appeared before magistrates in sheffield charged with murder. it's over the death of 15—year—old sam baker, who was stabbed in the chest in the city on thursday. the teenager accused of his murder is due to appear at crown court tomorrow. pressure to relax northern
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ireland's strict abortion laws is intensifying — with labour adding its voice to calls for change. it comes after friday's historic referendum in the republic of ireland. mps from across the commons say women should have the same rights in all parts of the uk, but downing street insists it's a matterfor northern ireland. the dup, on whom theresa may relies for a majority in parliament, says it will not be bullied into accepting abortion. our correspondent chris page is in belfast, and explains more about the laws in northern ireland. currently a woman can only have an abortion if there is a serious permanent risk to physical or mental health. much more restrictive than the rest of the uk older women can travel from here to have abortions. when you look at the wider political picture in northern ireland, none of
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the five main parties are in favour of extending the law and the rest of the uk to northern ireland. you have a range of political opinions. the dup are very strongly against the law. the second biggest party sinn fein, their current position does not go as far as the irish government, the plan to pass legislation to legalise terminations for any reasons until 12 weeks and then some circumstances afterwards although sinn fein might relaxed position further at their annual conference in a weeks. there is growing pressure on the westminster government to legislate to relax the abortion laws in northern ireland particularly in the absence of a devolved government in stormont which collapsed 16 months ago does not mean necessarily that any change in the law is imminent here. it's been almost seamless. from the debris of a cancelled summit — to piecing it back together. first the rhetoric calmed — now the diplomats are hard at work. a us team has had a second day of talks with north korean officials, in the demilitarized zone.
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the key issue the minimum requirement — from both sides — to get the singapore summit back on. south korea's president met kim jong—un for impromptu talks on saturday — it's being suggested he might attend he might attend any kim — trump summit — if it were to go ahead. our asia correspondent rupert wingfield—hayes has been at the korean border, just two kilometres away from the talks. he explainsjust what these talks mean. but wait railway bridge there is the old railway from seoul to pyongyang. on the other side of the river is the demilitarised zone that divides south korea from north korea. write about two kilometres where we're standing senior officials the united states and the north korea are sitting down to try and draw up and applying an agreement that they can ta ke applying an agreement that they can take from here to singapore next month where president trump and kim jong—un to finalise and sign off on. this is significant that senior
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experienced diplomats are sitting down together to get the nuts and bolts of an agreement together. what would be the chip of that agreement? it appears that the united states is prepared to offer recognition in north korea, security guarantees for kim jong—un north korea, security guarantees for kimjong—un and north korea, security guarantees for kim jong—un and his regime north korea, security guarantees for kimjong—un and his regime and economic assistance to north korea. but in return president trump wants kim jong—un to hand over all of but in return president trump wants kimjong—un to hand over all of his nuclear weapons. it has been very clear in the last week or so that kim jong—un is not clear in the last week or so that kimjong—un is not prepared to do that, not in one go. the crucial question is if singapore is to go ahead what is kimjong—un prepared to bid on the table? that president trump can take from the summit backed the united states and declare victory. joining me now from washington is our washington correspondent gary o'donoghue. are these talks going to happen? that is a good question and no one really knows the answer at this stage. i think there is a pretty good sign that these talks could
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happen in the sense of these discussions that are going on in the demilitarised zone at the moment have gone into a second day. if they had nothing to say to one another and no meeting of minds whatsoever i can see why they would still be talking so that in itself is a positive sign. we also know there are some of these preparatory issues are some of these preparatory issues are also going on in singapore with groups meeting there as well. i think the issue with this is this is a senior level meeting going on at the moment but it is not the most singular. whatever is discussed or agreed to come up with their proposals are put on the table by both sides, this group will have to go back to their respective capitals and see if they are suggesting is palatable both to washington and pyongyang before we can know whether or not the summit can go ahead in two weeks‘ time. or not the summit can go ahead in two weeks' time. i suppose the trouble is no matter who you are, whether a journalist, politician or president you are always second—guessing what north korea is
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up second—guessing what north korea is up to because we know very little. where do you think kim jong—un is coming from? what is the feeling in the white has been handed there? is he coming to these talks with the permission —— position of power in his mind because of the success missile strikes or is he coming to the talks in desperation for the need for food, money and investment? both are true. don't forget this would be the first—ever meeting with the us president in north korea leader, the reality is that in the past north korea has promised a lot and various administrations have gone looking for a deal and it has broken down but some think he has changed. the key thing is technology, nuclear capability, intercontinental ballistic missile tube abilities. those things have changed. that threat is now regarded asa changed. that threat is now regarded as a very serious one changed. that threat is now regarded as a very serious one in washington. they don't think it is bluster. they think the technology is sufficiently dangerous to want to do something real about this now. that is why it
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has been a key foreign policy priority not just for the has been a key foreign policy priority notjust for the trump administration but the obama administration but the obama administration previous to that as well. those things are true. he has a stronger hand but he has a greater need. that is the balance that people will be looking at. to what extent is he prepared to give up this new power in order to reinvigorate his country, solidify himself in power, stop his people starving and create some economic development? the trouble is we are seeing the pictures now of what they claim to be a nuclear testing site being destroyed, north korea are the kings of propaganda, they would have to go much further than that to prove that they are denuclearise but we are hearing from south korea is they have no intention of that so one wonders what president trump would actually come back from with these stocks. there would have to be a much more significant programme of inspection and verification, taking
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a bunch of journalists inspection and verification, taking a bunch ofjournalists to see a couple of explosions doesn't really tell you anything quite frankly and to their credit those journalists said exactly that when they came back from that exercise. it would involve i am sure the international atomic energy agency, regular inspections, and openness, some sort of mechanism for verification. i don't think any of that is out of the question and there is no question the americans would demand all that and probably more but it is likely to be a process. if they do agree to it on both sides. it is a process the north koreans will want something from, notjust economic relief from sanctions but also this bigger questions about the american presence in south korea, the nuclear umbrella, the protection the us operas to south korea and japan and other allies in the area, that is something that is likely to be on the table from the north korean point of view. all fascinating. many
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thank you for now. we will keep you up—to—date with that on the abc website. —— bbc website. the italian president sergio mattarella has asked a former economist for the international monetary fund, carlo cottarelli, to lead an interim government until new elections are held. mr cottarelli has accepted, saying his government would ensure italy's finances are managed prudently. on sunday efforts to form a coalition of populist and far—right parties failed after the president rejected the proposed finance minister, who opposes italy's membership of the euro. the headlines on bbc news... a man is killed after flash flooding in the west midlands — with some areas getting more than a month's rain injust one hour. a migrant from mali is to be made a french citizen after scaling a building in paris with his bare hands to rescue a dangling child. the labour partyjoins calls to change abortion laws in northern ireland, following the referendum in the republic. time for the sport. holly is waiting
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for us. busy holiday for you. as always. coventry have been promoted to league one their first promotion from any division since 1967. thet beat exeter 3—1 in a thrilling finale to the football season at wembley. jordan willis gave the commentary the lead with the academy graduate scoring early in the second half. five minutes later jordan scoring early in the second half. five minutes laterjordan shipley, a deflected effort made it to know before this third to seal promotion for the sky blues as they return to the third division of english at fault. gareth bale may well be leaving champions league winners real madrid this summer but he will not be returning to former club tottenham.
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the welshman said he needed to be playing "every week" after scoring twice in the champions league final against liverpool on saturday. bale left spurs to join the spanish giants for a world record fee in 2013 but there was a buy—back clause in the contract. however, due to the size of his wages and transfer fee it is unrealistic that tottenham would make a bid. it's three weeks today until england open their world cup campaign against tunisia. the players have been training today at st george's park. gareth southgate welcomed back players from manchester united and chelsea after they were given an extra week off because of the fa cup final. they were also joined by chelsea teenager trevor kalobah after the withdrawal of burnley‘s james tarkowski. england play nigeria at wembley in the first of their two warm—up matches on saturday. british number three cameron norrie has won his first ever match at the french open.
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the first set was won in 25 minutes, 6-1. his the first set was won in 25 minutes, 6—1. his his german opponent required treatment. at 2—0 in the second set, he was refers —— forced to retire. remarkably, norrie hadn't even played a competitive match on clay until february of this year. lucas pouille of france is up next for him. novak djokovic made the second round of the french open after bidding a brazilian qualifier. djokovic is seeded 20th. he went to know down at the start but recovered. world number 2 caroline wozniacki is also through to the second round after a straight sets victory over america's danielle collins. it was a closely fought first set with collins, in her french open debut, pushing wozniacki all the way to a tie break. but the dane's experience showed in the end as she took
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the second set 6—1. a first for south africa's rugby team as flanker siya kolisi has been named as the side's first black test captain ahead of the three match series against england next month. the 26—year—old has made 28 caps since his debut in 2013 and has captained his club side stormers since february last year. head coach rassie erasumus says kolisi is hard working and has the respect of his fellow players. ulster and ireland centre jared payne has been forced to retire from rugby after failing to recover sufficiently from a head injury he sustained last year. the 32—year—old won 20 ireland caps and last played for the lions on their tour of his native new zealand last summer. ulster have announced he'll take up a new role as defence coach and will be working with national team coaches during ireland's summer tour of australia. england have dropped mark stoneman for the second test against pakistan which starts
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on friday at headingley, after a run of bad scores. he's the only change england have made, with keatonjennings replacing him. the opener last played for his country last summer before losing his place in the side. but he's scored three centuries for lancashire so far this season. we'll have more for you in sportsday at half past six. more now on the storms that caused flash flooding across the west midlands. a man who rescued a driver trapped in his submerged car hours before a man died on the same stretch of road has been speaking to reporters this afternoon. he explained how he dived in to a six foot deep flood to reach the stranded man. this is what he has been saying. this is what he has been sayinglj was this is what he has been saying.” was on my way home. i avoided the road closure like everyone else does and they went down a side street and
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then i came across the blood and people coming up to the car asking if you can zoom —— came across i got igot up i got up straightaway and went on. just an old man. the man in the car, how i was the water in the car? about two inches of breathing space in the carto about two inches of breathing space in the car to the roof. what did you do? i opened the back door and i thought there was kids in there and i couldn't feel anything. he said thatis i couldn't feel anything. he said that is just i couldn't feel anything. he said that isjust him in i couldn't feel anything. he said that is just him in the front but he couldn't get out. i opened the gore —— door, told him to take a breath and dragged him out. what was his reaction? he was shocked. he didn't say much but he thanked me. it spoke to him this morning. what did he say? was very thankful. i understand
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you are asking him to go for a pint. yes but it all depends when i am free. what was the state of the roads? did you have any concern about how it was being dealt with?” got him out before any emergency services turned up, but i understand it has been stretched so that is understandable with response times. do you think it should have been closed off? it should have been closed off? it should have been closed properly, all the side roads. i don't think we should use cones, i think they should be metal barriers down so you can't get through or move them. but everything is stretched. everyone is hailing you asa stretched. everyone is hailing you as a hero. what do you think of that? it is overwhelming.” as a hero. what do you think of that? it is overwhelming. i didn't know what else to do. no hesitation in your mind. he went underwater. no. i knewi
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in your mind. he went underwater. no. i knew i would be all right because i can swim. it isjust no. i knew i would be all right because i can swim. it is just the man was trapped so i had to get mad. —— get him out. a man has been arrested on suspicion of murdering an 11—year—old girl and a 31—year—old woman. the pair were found seriously injured by police at a property in gloucesterjust before 5am this morning, and declared dead at the scene. the arrested man is 28 years old. police have appealed for witnesses. our correspondent martin jones is at the scene. officers were called here to dexter way in gloucester at around ten to five this morning where they found a 31—year—old woman and 11—year—old girl dead in one of the houses behind me. the 28—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of murder. i spent the morning speaking to residents here, all of them said this is normally a quiet street and many expressed shock particularly because it happened in the small hours of the morning and none of them heard anything. they awoke to police activity outside their homes.
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several of them have expressed their shock and one said he has seen a pool of blood on the pavement outside his flat. we have seen forensics officers going about their work this morning, we have also seen many offices escorting people who live here through the cordon to their homes because a large area remains cordoned off this afternoon. it remains an active investigation although they are appealing for anyone with more information to contact them. police have arrested three people suspected of drug dealing at a dance music festival in portsmouth — where two people died at the weekend. the news comes after 18—year—old georgia jones and 20—year—old tommy cowan were named as those who died after falling ill at the mutiny festival on saturday night. they were among 15 revellers admitted to hospital from the event that night, with organisers issuing a warning over "high strength or bad batch" of drugs. they cancelled the second day of the
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event. the father of one of those who died, tommy cowan, has spoken to the bbc as our correspondent katy austin explained. tommy cowen's father damian went to the scene of the mutiny festival today, in cosham, which is to the north of portsmouth. he went there with other family members to place flowers, and he spoke emotionally about how he had been in hospital with his son as lay dying, how he held his hand in those final moments, and he wanted to warn people who might be considering drugs, not to do it. he didn't want his face to be shown on camera, but you can hear him speaking to bbc‘s reporterjoe campbell. it's no good saying don't do drugs, all i can say is take this onboard, look what's happened, if you want to end up that way, carry on. if you don't, just don't even think about it. well, as we heard, 15 people in total were treated in hospital, after attending the festival.
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we know that a further person as well, in addition to the two we know had died, was in a critical condition, but we know they have now stabilised. hampshire police haven't explicitly linked the two deaths to drugs, however, the mother of georgia did say to people that she wanted them to really use her daughter's death as a wake up call. she said she didn't want anybody to take anything ever. event organisers issued a warning about what they thought might be a high strength or bad batch substance being on site, before the festival's final day was then cancelled. now today police have been investigating what they say was the supply of drugs to the festival. they have arrested three people, all in their early 20s, all from places near portsmouth, in the hampshire area, on suspicion of supplying class a drugs and all three people remain in custody. a fatherfrom north london is to be released from prison in ethiopia after being on death row for four years on suspicion
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of being a terrorist. andy tsege, a prominent critic of ethiopa's ruling party in the 1970s, was given asylum in the uk in 1979 — but later tried for terrorism in his absence. in 2014 he was kidnapped in yemen and taken back to ethiopia. he's now been pardoned after two years of foreign office appeals and a change in the political situation there. he still needs emergency travel documents and the journey to work on the number 840 bus in north yorkshire isn't your ordinary commute. it's just been crowned the ‘most scenic bus ride in britain'. however campaign groups are warning that rural services are in crisis. simon gompertz has hopped on board to find out how to keep the wheels turning. it's a bus driver's dream. the 840 coastliner starts in leeds, takes in york, then heads over the north york moors here and out to whitby on the coast. driving what's been crowned our most
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beautiful bus route and getting paid for it, is adam davies. every day is a joy, every day is a joy on this route. it's just beautiful. people out of the cities into this beautiful land. ticket sales pay for this service, but only partly. whitby, that's lovely. thanks very much. it depends on public money. council subsidy over the winter, also the bus firm being reimbursed for letting on all the trippers with free bus passes. for anybody who hasn't got a car, or anybody who hasn't got a driving licence, it's the only way to get out and about in the area. if you didn't have the bus? well, if we didn't have the bus, we wouldn't go half of the time. this is a trophy service, its scenic, it's popular. it survived. that is not the case of the lot of bus routes. bus funding has been cut by a third over the
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la st has been cut by a third over the last few years and it is argued —— often the most needy services that tend to suffer. in whitby, volunteers have stepped in to provide services up to the places on the moors where people feel abandoned. every moors bus will have one of those. eden blythe is one of them. rebadging local buses and paying with donations. i think that somebody like us will always be needed. and we're happy to do it. but we don't really want to have to keep taking overfailing bus services, because that shouldn't be the case, should it? it's all the more reason then to cherish remaining routes like the 840 on which you can go where you need to, while soaking up the views. simon gompertz, bbc news, in north yorkshire. let's find out what the weather is doing. it has been a lovely day up and down the country away from the
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east coast which was rather cool and grey. there was thunder clouds have been building up in a few places particularly across the south coast into south—west england and wales. they will rumbled on for the next few hours and has allowed. —— fizzle out. grey cloud across eastern coasts spreading further west has the night wears on. western fringes will stay clear and dry. the chance ofa will stay clear and dry. the chance of a few more thundery showers in the south—east. warm and muggy. tuesday starts grave. through the morning the cloud should break up and sunshine appears. missed until cloud will burn back to the cloud. the threat and southern parts of isolated showers and thunderstorms as temperatures reach the mid—20s. warm and humid. stays like that for much of this week with the risk of further dundry downpours. this is bbc news,
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our latest headlines. a man is killed after flash flooding in the west midlands — with some areas getting more than a month's rain injust one hour. i would say there was probably about two inches to the roof. a migrant from mali is to be made a french citizen after scaling a building in paris with his bare hands to rescue a dangling child. the labour partyjoins calls to change abortion laws in northern ireland, following the referendum in the republic. now on bbc news, the travel show. coming up on this week's show:
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i find out how to stop holiday selfies putting animals at risk. poacher hunt them in the forest because they are quite cute. oh, chico's holding my hands, yes, hello chico. we are hunting for icebergs on a budget. plus, we go underground in search of london's hidden rivers. we are so far down there we can actually hear the cirle and district line rumbling through. this week we're talking selfies. taking a photo of your travels to share on social media
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is an essential part of the trip for many people, and some will go to great lengths to get that perfect snap. but now major charities and social media giant instagram are asking tourists to stop and think before you snap a photo of animals, wherever you are in the world. i am heading to the wildlife friends foundation, three hours drive south of thailand's capital bangkok to find out midsibgiogxisegtg the 165 acre complex houses a rescue centre and thailand's first wildlife hospital. there is also a refuge for elephants, so there are plenty of photo opportunities. if i go instagram and search for, says, "elephant selfie", under that hashtag, there are almost 15,000 posts. but if i click on the hashtag, i get a warning that says, "protect wildlife on instagram — animal abuse and the sale of endangered animals or their parts are not allowed on instagram."
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the page asks the poster to be wary when paying for photo opportunities with exotic animals. it is an issue charities are trying to tackle on the ground. how big a problem are these animal selfie pictures? it's huge, it's huge. let me show you a few of the things i have come across in my time working here in thailand. for example, here we have a gibbon being used as a photo prop animal, it is very common to see a baby gibbon or a slow loris being carted around by a guy, and people will pay about 100 or 200 baht to have that one—second selfie, and sadly it's a lifetime for that animal. there's a few more here... what's he riding on? this is a liger, which is a cross between a tiger and a lion. the liger is the biggest wild cat you can have, but this guy is riding it. a lot of these animals are just beaten into submission. this animal here, you can't see unless i zoom, but he is on a very short chain. but they are huge, dangerous animals, they have massive
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canines and huge claws, and if the animal does have a little flinch in its mind to think, oh, i want to attack this person, god forbid what would happen to you. this is a family, we don't know if the animal has diseases or vice—versa, these guys could have a common cold and that is very easy for it to be transmitted between the great apes. infant animals are particularly vulnerable to the photo prop trade. here in the wildlife hospital, babies that have been rescued or abandoned are cared for in the nursery. this vet takes me behind the scenes to meet them. oh, hi, hi little guy! can you tell me a bit about langurs, why are they so popular in the photo prop industry? because when they was born their fur is completely full of orange, and with the pink face, they are so, so cute, they are very popular for people to be taking a photo. they are still cute now!
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how old is vincent now? for now he is six months old. looking after animals like vincent is painstaking work. some have complex needs, like slow loris tien. he was kept as a pet, and vets here say a poor diet and lack of sunlight caused him to develop bone disease. hi! sorry to wake you. so the loris is on the endangered list, isn't it? poachers hunt them in the forest because they are quite cute, they have the big eyes. in the south of thailand, all the tourist places, they are quite popular to bring them to take a photo to the tourist, and pay money for them. oh you poor guy! he wants to climb now. 0k! let's give you some exercise.
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the vet gives tien daily physiotherapy can and get used to the sunlight again. slowly his condition is improving. in the wild these animals would hold on to their mothers throughout infancy, so they instinctively cling on to each other to try and recreate the warmth and security they would normally get from their parents. this is our baby macaque, boonma and pearl, one male and one female. boonma! why does he want that one? don't try and steal pearl's! the owner brought her from the market, this means her mother was killed by a poacher. so sad. they have got each other now. they know they have each other, and that is a good thing for them. look at these sweet baby macaques, pearl and boonma.
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i love how affectionate they are with each other. it is too young to be separated from their mother. removing a young animal from its parents impact their behaviour for life. tom takes me to meet two indonesian orangutans who staff are trying to re—teach wild habits to. maggie was found abandoned near the rescue centre. chico grew up in the photo prop industry and was kept as a pet. he was given to the team here when he became too big to handle. we have carers who bring maggie and chico into the forest every day and we encourage them to climb in the trees, by throwing fruit into the trees, wrapped in vines and stuff like that. we were hoping that he would copy maggie, who is more wild, chico is a little bit more fond of humans, he is coming to say hello now. 0k. hi chico! should i be worried? hi chico!
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just stay calm. oh, chico is holding my hands. hello chico! oh, hi! i think chico likes my shoes. i didn't quite expect that, human interaction, he is almost like a small child. does that hark back to the days when he was used as a photo prop or even a pet? he does have an unnatural attachment to humans. he would have been poached from the wild as a very young infant, he has been with humans most of his life. we are trying to erase that, to a certain extent. but the stark reality of a photo prop animal, it is not all fun and games like we saw then, yes, he was having fun with you, but if he did that to a tourist he would be beaten with a stick. and that's how they can control these animals. so chico could never probably be released back into the wild. i would not like to say never but it would be a long process
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to rehabilitate him to a state where he would be a release candidate. it is great to see chico, and i want to know how to help other animals like him. what people should do when they see things like this is safely try and take video footage or photographs, the location, the animal so we can identify the species, if they have a high level of protection. it then needs to be reported to the relevant authorities and ourselves here at wfft, because we can inform the department of national parks and the authorities to act. and if you are taking a photo with an animal, the advice is to keep a safe distance and assess the condition it is being held in. there are national parks and sanctuaries throughout thailand where people can experience wildlife in a responsible way. here at the foundation, tourists are encouraged to roll up their sleeves, get dirty and help care for the rescued animals. and that is far more rewarding than taking a selfie to share with your friends. it is hard going here, but i think she
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is enjoying it. i might be getting a bath too. if you are planning a trip to thailand, here is our guide of things to think about before you go. may to october is thailand's rainy season. there are obvious downsides to that, but don't forget — it also means smaller crowds and cheaper prices, and the rain only tends to come in short, sharp bursts. also if you choose your destination carefully, it may not affect you at all. on some of the islands like koh samui or koh tao, the downpours generally don't arrive until september. if you have to be in the capital bangkok, there is still indoorfun to be had. we've enjoyed cooking with to, which is a school in one
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of the city's slums, or you could go shopping at one of the night markets, which are largely undercover. this one is rot fai, iun the north of the city. kitsch and fun and as ever, some of the street food there is wonderful. muay thai, or kickboxing is thailand's national sport, and a visit to one of the big arenas is rarely a boring experience. tickets to fights cost around 1000 baht, which isjust over 30 us dollars. if you are feeling brave you can book yourself into one of the camps that will train you up and harden you into a muay thai machine. orfor something more mindful, why not spend some time getting in touch with your inner monk. some monasteries like this one here in the north—east allow tourists to stay in exchange for a small donation and a little bit of elbow grease. you will need to be respectful and follow all the rules, but you might pick up a little spiritual enlightenment along the way. still to come on this week's travel show: we will be finding out why this italian village is so unlucky. and simon is back with his tips
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on italian train travel and the cheapest way to see an iceberg. next up, to the uk where a new exhibition called london mithraeum has opened showcasing a reconstruction of the temple of mithras, built by the romans in the third century alongside the banks of one of the city's rivers. that river, like many, was long ago paved over and forgotten. but one man wants londoners and tourists are know more about the city's hidden rivers. we went to meet him. i have been living in london for about 39 years. but it was not about seven years ago i first discovered these hidden rivers. and ijust wanted to write and illustrate about them, to show them to other people, londoners, tourists. the river fleet starts at hampstead heath and flows down to blackfriars. one of my favourite parts of the river fleet is here on hampstead heath, this is the beginning of the river fleet.
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you can see the water bubbling up just here, and running through. it isn't hidden at this point, it's very exposed in streams and ponds. the history of london is very much bound up with the river fleet as well. the romans used it, it was used for powering mills, but then people started to use it to throw rubbish away, and smithfield market, they were throwing off—cuts of meat and gore and blood into the river. dead animals were thrown into the river, and then it became foul and stinking, and so sadly they had to cover it up. when i was writing the book i had to get inside the sewers to see. we got donned up in overalls, hardhats, waders, a small oxygen supply. the thing that surprised me most was that it was not as smelly as i thought it was going to be. these sewers, they started building them in the 1860s. beautifully engineered. the tiles down there are still in very good condition given their age. in places it is big open caverns with huge metal doors. there are some narrow little corridors that you have to sort of scoot through.
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one interesting thing i found was that we were so far down there we could actually hear the circle and district lines rumbling through. and another part of what makes the river fleet so special is that it has shaped the way that some of the roads have run. the paths would run down the side of the river and road is now follow the same route. there are still traces of the river, if you know where to look. where buildings have in constructive around the stream, not over the stream. there are manhole covers where you can peer down and see the river or the sewer as it now is, below. i would imagine that most of the commuters coming out of king's cross station are totally unaware that there is a river flowing in front of them here, although subterranean, of course. here is an example of the river fleet, as it curves around king's cross. it reflects on the architecture here, the hotel to my left is curved as it follows the line of the river. above me here is the holden viaduct, and it is a great reminder that there is still a river flowing underneath. —— holborn. this viaduct was built by the victorians in the 1860s. the problem was because we are in quite a steep river valley here, paul straughan vehicle standard difficult getting from one side to the other, down the hill, up the hill. —— horse drawn vehicles.
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so they built this viaduct to alleviate the problem. i am standing here by the thames and at this point, blackfriars bridge, is where the river fleet flows into the thames. i think when people walk around london they are not aware of how many hidden rivers there are. i wanted to show people little clues and science in the history of what is just beneath our feet. —— signs. time to our global guru, simon calder, to answer your travel questions. welcome to the slice of the show that tackles your questions about getting the best out of travel. coming up, where should friends from the uk and new zealand converge to celebrate their 40th birthday? the tiles down there are still in very good condition given their age. in places it is big open caverns with huge metal doors. there are some narrow little corridors that you have to sort of scoot through. one interesting thing i found was that we were so far down there we could actually hear the circle and district lines rumbling through. and another part of what makes the river fleet so special is that it has shaped the way that some of the roads have run. the paths would run down the side of the river and roads now follow the same route. there are still traces of the river, if you know where to look. where buildings have in constructive around the stream,
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not over the stream. there are manhole covers where you can peer down and see the river or the sewer as it now is, below. i would imagine that most of the commuters coming out of king's cross station are totally unaware that there is a river flowing in front of them here, although subterranean, of course. here is an example of the river fleet, as it curves around king's cross. it reflects on the architecture here, the hotel to my left is curved as it follows the line of the river. above me here is the holden viaduct, and it is a great reminder that there is still a river flowing underneath. —— holborn. this viaduct was built by the victorians in the 1860s. the problem was because we are in quite a steep river valley here, horse drawn vehicle standard difficult getting from one side to the other, down the hill, up the hill. —— horse drawn vehicles. so they built this viaduct to alleviate the problem. i am standing here by the thames and at this point, blackfriars bridge, is where the river fleet flows into the thames. i think when people walk around london they are not aware of how many hidden rivers there are. i wanted to show people little clues and signs in the history of what is just beneath our feet. time for our global guru, simon calder, to answer your travel questions.
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welcome to the slice of the show that tackles your questions about getting the best out of travel. coming up, where should friends from the uk and new zealand converge to celebrate their 40th birthday? and hunting to icebergs on the cheap. first, all eyes are on russia, where the football world cup takes place in the second half ofjune and the first half ofjuly. fans with a ticket for at least one game can explore the country notjust during the tournament but for two weeks before and afterwards. next, tina eager is off to italy. historic city of bologna, but she wants to make day trips to venice, florence and ravenna. i have seen conflicting advice about conserving tickets on trains and whether it is necessary. should i reserve now, reserve later, orjust buy a ticket on the day of travel? bologna is the railway hub for northern italy and you can reach venice in 90 minutes on a high—speed train. book a super economy ticket in advance on the website and you could pay less than 30 euros there and back.
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turn up on the day and it will cost you more than twice as much. florence is also served by high—speed train in less than half an hour. but i recommend when you come back from florence to bologna, you use the old slow railway line, which winds through spectacular scenery. and ravenna is just a few minutes away, with plenty of trains and, it you turn up and go, it will cost you just 8 euros each way. emma adelson lives in the uk, and a long with another british friend, wants to meet up with a friend from new zealand to celebrate their 40th birthdays in september. the question is, where? we are looking for somewhere between the uk and new zealand with warm weather, a pool, maybe even a beach. it is proving tricky to find somewhere
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that will work for all of us. thailand offers a combination of easy access, good beaches and low costs. the trouble is, in september, the weather will be hot and humid. so my top choice for both low—cost overall and a great experience is greece. in september, you and your british friend will be able to get there and back for next to nothing. so you might want to subsidise your new zealand friend for her much longer, more expensive trip. base your selves in athens for a cultural trait and then head out for an island escape. finally, john ash from exeter in south—west england has a simple question. for a cut—price encounter with a floating mountain of ice, head for canada's iceberg alley. this is a patch of sea extending from the coast of labrador down to stjohn's on the island of newfoundland. you can fly to stjohn's from london in about six hours. at the optimum time to be there is late may, when a flight will cost you around £500 return.
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if you want to know where to go and when, then the travel show is here to help. just email the travel show, and i will do my best to find you an answer. from me, simon calder, the global guru, goodbye for now and i will see you next time. finally this week, we meet the residents of colour bra wrote in southern italy. finally this week, we meet the residents of colour bra wrote in southern italy. the village is said to be so cursed it is unlucky to say its name. that is it for this week. join us next week, when... christer visits amsterdam were 23 million visitors are expected by the end of the decade. to find out how this historic city
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plans to cope the crowd. and in the meantime you canjoin us on our adventures or share your travels with the travel show team on social media. until then, from all of us here in thailand, it is goodbye. hello, there was, it was a great start for many of us today but the clouds brock up nicely and a lot burned back to the east coast where it stayed cool and grey, there was copious amounts of southern in the uk. glorious spells of sunshine across much of scotland once again,
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closer to that east coast, that cloud did hold on as disappointingly cool cloud did hold on as disappointingly cool, braise and grey, further south, start to see big thunderstorms developling, mainly across east and west sussex, parts of the south—west and into wales. these storms are likely to rumble on and then fizzle out and most places should be dry, we will see that low cloud and mist rolling back westwards a cross cloud and mist rolling back westwards across much of the country, apart from western fringes that will stay clear, another warmer night to come, in southern areas where there could be the chance of an odd shower or thunderstorm. so as we head on to tuesday we are still in that very warm air which is across in that very warm air which is a cross m ost in that very warm air which is across most of continental europe in ourair mass, across most of continental europe in our air mass, which is moving up from the south—east, so it will be another warm start today, rather cloudy and grey, like this morning but it should break up to allow for sunshine to develop widely, probably the best in north and western areas. and then like this afternoon we
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could see showers or thunderstorms developing in southern areas as the temperatures reach the mid 20s, of course with high humidity. into wednesday we look at more organised weather front which pushes wednesday we look at more organised weatherfront which pushes in wednesday we look at more organised weather front which pushes in from the east. that could bring showers to the east and maybe across central parts of england and wales we could sigha parts of england and wales we could sigh a more prolonged area of thupedry rain. a bit of uncertainty, probably the best of the sunshine in the north—west, where it will feel warm again, but again warm and humid across the board. that is the weather front that brings the rain to england and wales, on wednesday, moves further northward so we could see thundery showers in scotland and northern ireland, generally speaking, a misty murky humid start to day for thursday but as the sunshine breaks through and the temperatures rise, again we could start to see showers or thunderstorms developing, mainly in southern south—east, as the temperatures reach round 23 or 424 degreers so you get the message, it
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isest to stay warm for this week, there will be sunshine round but the best is in northern and western area, we will have that risk of thundery downpourings and it looks like that risk of thundery downpours will start to move northwards as the week wears oner. bye for now. a motorist in his 80s has died after being caught in flash flooding in the west midlands. torrential rain and storms hit in the region — with a major clear—up operation taking place today. to see my neighbour going through this again, it's awful. everything out on the streets. many of them have only
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just moved back in from the flood two years ago. i don't know how they're going to cope. the extreme weather happened as other parts of the country enjoyed warm and dry bank holiday weather. also tonight. an interim prime ministerfor italy — but he's just a temporary solution to the country's deep political crisis. fresh protests in northern ireland over its restrictive abortion laws — as labour piles new pressure on theresa may to act. and how this man's bravery saved the life of a child — and made him a national hero in france.
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