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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  May 30, 2018 6:00am-8:31am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and mega munchetty. a government crackdown on the bosses of rogue cold call firms but it comes two years later than planned. they will be held personally liable and could be fined up to half a million pounds. good morning, it's wednesday, 30th may. also this morning... the search for a british toddler who went missing in germany 37 years ago ends with no clues to her disappearance. one of america's biggest tv show is cancelled after its star roseanne barr is accused of sending a racist tweet. good morning. is there a national shortage of bricks? prices are rising and some builders say they
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are waiting six months for deliveries. what does it mean for the construction industry? i am with this brick—maker here to find out. good morning. in sport, serena williams says she feels like a superhero as she wins her first grand slam match since becoming a mother. dinosaurs and duets. you may see that stranger, across a crowded room... and somehow we all know... i talk to hollywood superstar jeff goldblum in a rather unconventional interview. wait until you see it! and carol has the weather. voice of an angel, charlie. showers moving east and west getting into scotla nd moving east and west getting into scotland and wales later in the day. until then, scotland and northern ireland have the brightest conditions with the current cloud pushing back to the coastline.
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details in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. the government has announced that bosses of companies which make nuisance calls could be personally fined up to half—a—million pounds. a consultation on changes to the law starts today. in october 2016, the government made a similar pledge but the necessary legislation wasn't passed. andy moore explains. there is no doubt you since phone calls and texts are a major headache for many of us and the government is keen to camperdown. individual companies can already be fined up to half £1 million but they often declare themselves bankrupt to avoid paying the penalty. targeting the individuals behind those companies would close that loophole. in announcing a consultation that will end in august, the digital minister mm—hm said nuisance calls were a blight on society. exactly the same phrase was used by her predecessor when he said in 2016 that the law
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would be changed in the spring of 2017. it wasn't and now the government is having a second go at the problem. orfind out more —— in just over half an hour, we'll be speaking to the digital minister, margotjames, about the reasons for this two year delay. the response by the authorities to the grenfell tower fire was badly flawed, according to a new report. the paper, commissioned by the charity muslim aid, criticises the leadership of kensington and chelsea council and said volunteers have been left on the front line to cope. the council says it is committed to learning the lessons but will not comment further until after the public inquiry. organisations that never responded to emergencies of this nature before were having to step up. so they found themselves in a situation they are not prepared for, that they hadn't really planned for, they were local service provision organisations. mosques, centres, churches, it going about providing for the local constituencies. they didn't recognise they'd have to respond at this level. a bus has crashed into dozens
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of cars which were stuck in traffic in dartford in kent injuring 17 people. 25 vehicles were damaged in the incident yesterday evening. passengers and drivers suffered minor injuries. a man has been arrested on suspicion of careless driving. a top north korean official is due to land in new york later today as part of the preparations for a summit between leader kim jong—un and us president donald trump. former intelligence chief, kim yong—chol, will be the highest level north korean official to visit to america in almost two decades. our asia correspondent, rupert wingfield—hayes, is in seoul. it feels like we speak much every day at the moment in anticipation of what might happen to do with the meeting. this feels like a significant moment. this is definitely a significant step forward. kim yong—chol is a very senior official, described as the
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right—hand man to kim jong senior official, described as the right—hand man to kimjong un. we understand he has left beijing, or at least we think he left beijing on at least we think he left beijing on a flight to new york a short time ago and he will arrive in new york about midday on wednesday local time and he will meet with the secretary of state. the important thing about kim yong—chol is not only that he is a seniorfigure, former intelligence chief, but he can speak for kim jong un in these face—to—face negotiations. this is really going to be the crucial meeting, what they can hammer out between them in terms of what north korea is prepared to give up in order to get a summit with president trump. they are expected to meet may be on wednesday, maybe thursday, and that i think will determine whether the singapore summit is then re—announced by president trump. singapore summit is then re-announced by president trump. for the moment, thank you. a prominent russian journalist has been shot dead outside his home in the ukrainian capital of kiev. arkady babchenko was an outspoken critic of president vladimir putin. the investigative reporter claimed
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he had to leave russia after receiving death threats. one of america's most popular tv shows has been cancelled after its star roseanne barr was accused of racism. she had aplogised after sending out a tweet comparing a former aide of president obama to an ape. the tv network abc called her actions repugnant and cancelled the series. this report from our correspondent james cook in los angeles contains flash photography. can i have some money? i don't know. mum, can i have some money? i don't know. could i have some money? roseanne barr fronted a tv sensation. housekeeping! the hugely popular sitcom from the 80s and 90s which made a triumphant return this year. that didn't go through. i heard a beep. millions tuned in to see a sympathetic portrayal of white working class trump supporting america. it all came crashing down
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in a vitriolic twitter tirade. roseanne barr's nastiest slur was aimed at an african—american political opponent. referring to valeriejarrett. i think we have to turn it into a teaching moment. i'm fine. i'm worried about all the people out there who don't have a circle of friends and followers who come right to their defence. ms barr also attacked hillary clinton and her daughter, chelsea. and she falsely called the billionaire investor george soros, who was a jewish child who survived the occupation of hungary, a nazi. that tweet was shared by president trump's son donald jr. ms barr issued a partial apology but it wasn't enough for abc, which called her comments "abhorrent, repugnant and inconsistent with our values." roseanne's downfall was clearly her own doing but it's likely to strengthen stereotypes in a divided america with each side accusing the other
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of intolerance and hatred. time now is 6:08am. let's find out what's going on in the sport. we will possibly talk about the possibly greatest sportswomen of all time. we're talking a lot about what she's wearing and there is a reason for that. there is the picture of her there, playing in a back catsuit which makes her feel her there, playing in a back catsuit which makes herfeel powerful, she says, and like a superhero. what do you think? iimagine her you think? i imagine her opponents are already thinking she is both of those, doesn't matter what she's wearing! what about all the rules about... you can do it in the french open and she's got a valid reason for the catsuit which i will explain in a moment. serena williams has won her first grand slam match since becoming a mother. the former world number one is unseeded at roland garros
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we will get those pictures for you as soon as we can. serena said she felt like a ‘warrior princess' in the catsuit she wore on court. wearing the catsuit, like a compression thing, for her legs, for health reasons, is important to her. we've got the picture there. health reasons, is important to her. we've got the picture therem health reasons, is important to her. we've got the picture there. it is a cool catsuit. she won herfirst grand slam much... since becoming a mother and she has had significant health problems so we wish her the best. kyle edmund also breezed into the second round. the british number one had no problems seeing off the rising teenage star alex de minaur. fellow brit cameron norrie is in second round action later when he takes on lucas pouille. the fa have backed raheem sterling over his controversial gun tattoo. the england forward has been criticised by anti—gun campaigners, but he says it has a "deeper meaning". the fa says "we all support sterling
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and acknowledge the honest and heartfelt account he gave". and frank lampard is edging closer to his first job in management. he's being heavily linked with the derby countyjob, and some newspapers this morning suggest that his appointment could be confirmed this week. ican i can see him as a manager. there is a direct link between the sport, the tennis particularly and oui’ sport, the tennis particularly and our next guest, sir richard branson because he is, as people are aware, he is in training to be an astronaut. part of his training regime is tennis. it is part of this space race, so how else would you train to be an astronaut? by playing tennis, of course! lets talk to sir richard branson whojoins course! lets talk to sir richard branson who joins us from california. how is the tennis fitting in with your training as an
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astronaut? i love to do fun things to get fit. and tennis is my sport. kite surfing i love, surfing, waking. although we "a few gems, i personally... i prefer to get out and be active. we do centrifuge training which replicates the flight ina training which replicates the flight in a centrifuge. it will put your body through the g—forces it is going to endure through space. how are you enjoying the training? what is the timescale now for what happens next with your mission?” happens next with your mission?|j love happens next with your mission?” love the training. we have been 13 yea rs love the training. we have been 13 years building these spaceships. today, we today very successful second part test flight. it went
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just on the verge of two times the speed of sound. straight up to 115,000 speed of sound. straight up to 115, 000 feet. speed of sound. straight up to 115,000 feet. and we will have a couple of more flights before the spaceship goes up into space. and then we will do quite a few flights into space with our astronauts. and then i will go up and then very soon after members of the public will go up. we are tantalisingly close now. it is going extremely well, the programme. i've been with our 800 wonderful engineers, and they are working day and night to build and not just the one working day and night to build and notjust the one spaceship but a number of other spaceships as well. 0k, number of other spaceships as well. ok, you've used the term tantalisingly close, it is all going very well. have you got a date? can we pin you down to a date for this flight we pin you down to a date for this flight for passengers which you will be part of? i will... i think that
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virgin galactic will be... first to actually have astronauts up in the spaceship into space. that i hope will happen within the next 2—3 months. as far as myself is concerned, i would months. as far as myself is concerned, iwould hope months. as far as myself is concerned, i would hope that i am up by the end of the year. and then we will start putting people up, and we are 100% sure we have got the craft that have been tested and tested. so my guess would be in the early part of next year. of course, you mention safety. there was the awful, fatal crash of enterprise in 2014. you can't underestimate the importance of this. to be part of this space race to get this next phase in
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momentum, can you reassure the public? it is a race... a safety race. a race with ourselves, and safety is number one priority. that is why this has taken 13 hard years to get here. why we've had 800 engineers working on it. why we are testing rockets time and time again, why we are testing the spaceship. why we've got brave astronauts, who are effectively the test pilots testing these craft to see what can go wrong, if anything, that we can't pick up on earth on the way into space. and once they've put it through its paces time and time again only then will i feel co mforta ble again only then will i feel comfortable having anybody apart from a self go up into space. then i think it'll be the start of a really
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exciting new era of space exploration, where, in the years to come, i think quite a few people watching this programme will become astronauts. a lot of young people watching this programme will be able to afford to become astronauts because when ourselves and jeff bezos and elon musk, when we built the spaceships, that will get prices down and that will enable people who would love to be astronauts. at least 50% of people watching this programme would love to be astronauts and that will enable them. how much contact you have with elon musk and jeff bezos as you go through this race to space? we are friends. i have no elon since he was a struggling entrepreneur. he brought his first car to my house to help let me try it out. and i have
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known jeff for a number of years help let me try it out. and i have knownjeff for a number of years as well. we are all doing things slightly differently. there is the market for hundreds of spaceships and we can only build a few each. and i think a lot of people would love to maybe tryjeff bezos‘s spaceship, try virgin galactic‘s spaceship, try virgin galactic‘s spaceship, it'll be a different experience, if they can afford it... this is the thing, it is £250,000 a ticket now, you said the prices will come down. realistically in three or four yea rs' come down. realistically in three or four years' time, what kind of ticket prices are you looking at? isn't going to be affordable for the non—amongst us? —— is it going to be affordable? it may not be able to come down that rapidly because it is 13 years, it has cost over $1
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billion to get this far and it is still going to cost us more to get thejob finished. so still going to cost us more to get the job finished. so we need to get our investment back and once we have it back, then we can start bringing prices down. i'm afraid we are talking longer than three or four yea rs before we talking longer than three or four years before we can get prices down to make a real difference to a lot of people. in the 19205, airline travel across the atlantic wa5 of people. in the 19205, airline travel across the atlantic was about £250,000. and it came down. now there are thousands of people, hundreds of thousands of people, flying on virgin atlantic and to share ways and being able to afford to do so. —— and ritter share way5. i think that will happen in years to come. congratulations on the 5ucce55ful te5t flights a nd come. congratulations on the 5ucce55ful te5t flights and could good luck with your training. fascinating, isn't it?
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the main stories this morning... bosses of companies which bombard people with nuisance calls could be fined up to half a million pounds under government plans to make them personally liable. military police investigating the disappearance of a british toddler in germany in 1981, are due to confirm that an excavation of a riverbank where she went missing has not uncovered any new information. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. i'm seeing the picture, are you still talking storms? that's right. good morning, we had a lot of thunderstorms acro55 part5 that's right. good morning, we had a lot of thunderstorms acro55 parts of england and wales yesterday. today we have some showery rain at the moment moving north but it is producing some thunderstorms and it'll continue to move northwards through the day, eventually later on getting into northern ireland, 5outhern getting into northern ireland, southern and eastern parts of
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scotland. until then, you've got the be5t scotland. until then, you've got the best of the weather. you can see in the satellite picture the amount of cloud acro55 the satellite picture the amount of cloud across the british isles, this stretches back into yesterday, this i5 stretches back into yesterday, this is what produced all the thundery downpours we had and this is what is moving slowly north—west wa5 downpours we had and this is what is moving slowly north—west was through the day, courtesy of this weather front. not much of a breeze so the showers are slow—moving and if you catch one you could have it for a while, rather like yesterday, and it could be heavy and thundery. we have a bit of low cloud, mi5t fog which will continue to push back towards the north sea coastline and for much of scotla nd the north sea coastline and for much of scotland and northern ireland, you once again have the driest and 5unnie5t conditions. it'll be a humid day and a5 5unnie5t conditions. it'll be a humid day and as these showers and thunderstorms moved north—west words, behind it, there will be a lot of cloud left acro55 words, behind it, there will be a lot of cloud left across southern england, 5outh—we5t, pa rt5 lot of cloud left across southern england, 5outh—we5t, parts of wales, remaining overcast but later it'll brighten up in the south—east. temperatures, up to 24—25, but it'll
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feel quite 5ticky. through this evening and overnight, tho5e showers continue to push northwards getting through northern england, 5outhern and northern ireland. through the night, they will become confined to the north—west of scotland and northern ireland, and behind it we will see a lot of cloud coming in from the north sea with scattered showers acro55 from the north sea with scattered 5hower5 acro55 parts from the north sea with scattered showers acro55 parts of from the north sea with scattered showers acro55 pa rt5 of wales from the north sea with scattered showers acro55 parts of wales and south—west england. another warm and sticky night in a particularly humid further south. tomorrow morning we start off with the showers in north—west scotland and northern ireland. still a fair bit of cloud around pushing back towards the north sea coastline but there will also be some 5un5hine. you can't fail but notice what is coming in from the south—east. we will see more thunderstorms from the near continent. there will be a lot of shower5, some of those heavy, and thundery with torrential downpours. could lead to disruption a5 thundery with torrential downpours. could lead to disruption as well. they are hit and miss, though.
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showers are difficult, it is difficult to say where they will be but this is what we are thinking and if you get caught under one, you'll know all about it. by friday, they will have moved up towards northern ireland, behind, cloud with brighter skies poking through but it is further showers developing and those showers continuing acro55 north—west england and into scotland so it is a really me55y picture over the next few days. then high pressure starts to build in, things start to settle down into the weekend so, compared to all the wild weather we have had in the south, things brighten up, we see more sunshine, and although there will be more cloud particularly so for scotland and northern ireland, there will still bea northern ireland, there will still be a lot of dry weather around but it will fuel humid. the weather is all over the shop at the moment. it feels could lead to pinpoint
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anything. that is the trouble with showers. there is a lot of energy in the atmosphere which is why it is going boom and we are getting all these thunderstorms. showers are difficult to pinpoint where they will be. let's take a look at today's paper5. phone calls are on the front pages. this is about the crackdown. we all know that these phone calls coming in... especially when you think you've signed up to that... exactly. we will talk about the crackdown in a few minutes' time with the government 5poke5per5on a few minutes' time with the government 5pokesper5on responsible. on the daily telegraph, taxman ignores 4 million phone calls. new figures show hmrc i5 conceding the problem is twice as bad as previously di5closed. one in ten callers fails to get through. the picture of serena williams. sally,
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you were talking about the superwoman you were talking about the 5uperwoman outfit. you were talking about the superwoman outfit. she looks fantastic but more importantly 5he 5ay5 fantastic but more importantly 5he says she feels fantastic. coming back since having her daughter last year, she says she feels like a superhero so that is all over the papers today. a couple of other little football stories i'd like to 5how little football stories i'd like to show you. if you're going to russia, and you are here, this is what you can expect to see if you're lucky enough to get a ticket. can you see how tall that standards? you're going to need a head for heights. it is the most easterly of all the stadiums to be used. is it steep the bank? it is temporary, they are calling it the meccano venue. not one for me. quickly in the times, don't know if you saw this, the beanie oh signing for liverpool. the tra nsfer beanie oh signing for liverpool. the transfer happened very quickly. spectre the press quickly, this is him signing his contract... or is it? someone very clever took a
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picture focused in on it. it isn't his contract, it is just a page of the liverpool website. isn't that great? i wonder what he has agreed to that! the devil is always in the detail. the daily mirror, this is one ofjohn warboys fictive and is, saying she will never stop fighting to keep him injail. in the saying she will never stop fighting to keep him in jail. in the times, this is a woman, aged 27, who had refused a job in order to care for her mother. both of them died in grenfell. moments have been described, a man was listening to them as they died. her brother saying i can't breathe, i can't
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breathe. the testimony from the inquiry has been compelling every day. on an entirely different note, carol was talking about the weather, there is always a day where we have flying ants. you can't say exactly when it is going to be but it is coming up soon. the flying and thing is going to be worse than normal this year. you remember when it was wimbledon? and all the players swallowed them? wimbledon? and all the players swallowed them ? it wimbledon? and all the players swallowed them? it was awful. you know what i find creepy? it is when they all are scuttling because their wings drop. it's just nature, isn't it? they probably taste all right, actually. iimagine probably taste all right, actually. i imagine they are quite nutritious. almost 200,000 new homes were built in england 2017, but as demand grows — there's a shortage of bricks. ben is at a brick factory for us. good morning and welcome... we are trying to work out whether we've
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managed to stop the machine working with all our kit but welcome to the factory. there is a national shortage of brick. there is a concern among some builders at having to wait six months to get their supplies delivered to them and that of course is having a knock—on effect for the construction industry so we are here in dudley. this is what a brick starts life as, this is the clay dug out of a quarry around the clay dug out of a quarry around the corner from here and this is how it turns out when it's been through the entire process, the benefits of being tall, this is a finnish brick, fired in the kiln, one of 25,000 they make every single day. so, we are looking at what these guys can do to get more bricks made and delivered to the builders and we will talk about what it means to the construction a little later by but before that we will get the news, travel and weather where you are watching this morning. good morning from bbc london news, i'm charlotte franks.
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some river users are claiming a so called "slum city" has sprung up on the thames opposite hampton court palace. it's claimed about 20 boats are moored off privately owned land, which means they don't have to pay mooring fees. now some fear it could spoil the views and be an eyesore to forthcoming visitors to the flower show. it's untidy and it looks an absolute mess. this will attract hundreds and thousands of people to come and visit here. the last thing they want to be doing is looking across the river and seeing what looks like slum village. this is a beautiful, beautiful palace and then this is the view from outside the palace. transport around the capital is returning to normal this morning after another day of travel disruption for thousands yesterday, caused by the wet weather. passsengers at gatwick, heathrow, london city and luton faced cancellations and long delays for a third day in a row. rail passengers were told to avoid kings cross st pancras altogether
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due to the adverse weather conditions and because of a trespasser on the line. network rail says passengers who commute through essex are set to benefit from its multi—million pound upgrade of overhead wiring between southend victoria and london liverpool street. officials say work is due to start onjune the 4th and end on october the 10th. services after 9:30pm on mondays, tuesday and wednesdays are likely to be disrupted while engineering work is carried out. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tube this morning. on the trains southeastern buses are replacing services between sheerness and sittingbourne. onto the roads and the a13 is building westbound heading out of dagenham into barking. northbound traffic on the blackwall tunnel southern approach is slow from the woolwich road flyover. and in worcester park, central road is blocked at park terrace due to flooding under the railway bridge,
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near the station. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. it's another rather cloudy, misty and murky affair this morning, with still one or two heavy, thundery showers. some left after yesterday's torrential downpours. up in the home counties especially. elsewhere, it's looking dry first thing this morning. mostly cloudy, however. now these are the showers i was talking about. they will drift away north and west. still the risk of a shower later but the cloud gradually thinning and hopefully breaking this afternoon so the chance of a bit of sunshine before it sets. temperatures getting up to 22 celsius. overnight tonight, we'll see clear spells at least at first, but then i'm afraid the cloud will develop again. low cloud, mist and murk around, a mild and muggy night too. the minimum between 13 and 15 celsius. now, as we head through thursday, some heavy, perhaps torrential, thundery downpours anticipated. the wind is light so they will be slow—moving. that could lead to perhaps some flash flooding. for friday, a dry affair, still the risk of some showers
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as we head into the weekend, but lots of dry weather around. some sunny spells and temperatures staying in the low 205. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to charlie and naga. bye for now. hello this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. we'll bring you the headlines in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning... could fining the bosses of companies who make nuisance calls reduce the disruption homeowners face? we'll speak to the government minister proposing new changes. the number of swifts arriving back in the uk has fallen dramatically this year — we'll find out how bad weather in africa has changed their migration route. over to your new daily diet. you are
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kidding me? help! as obesity in the uk reaches record highs, can a crash diet of soups and shakes help to shift the kilos? we'll meet one woman who had to take drastic action. good morning, here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. bosses of companies which bombard consumers with cold—calls could be personally liable for fines of £500,000 following a consultation which launches today. in october 2016, the government made a similar pledge but the necessary legislation wasn't passed. consumers received 3.9 billion nuisance phone calls and texts last year. at the moment, only the companies themselves are liable for fines if they break the law. the response by the authorities to the grenfell tower fire was badly flawed according to a new report. the paper, commissioned by the charity muslim aid, criticises the leadership of kensington and chelsea council and said volunteers have been left on the front line to cope. the council says it is committed to learning the lessons
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but will not comment further until after the public enquiry. organisations that never responded to emergencies of this nature before were having to step up. so they found themselves in a situation they are not prepared for, that they hadn't really planned for. they were local service provision organisations, mosques, centres, churches, going about providing for the local constituencies. they didn't recognise they would have to respond at this level. military police investigating the disappearance of a british toddler in germany more than 30 years ago, will confirm later that their search has yielded no fresh information. two—year—old katrice lee was on a shopping trip with her mother in the town of paderborn when she went missing. let's get more from our reporter megan paterson in germany. this is part of the search seen.
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more than 100 military personnel have been involved in military searches on this piece of land to find evidence which could help in the disappearance of katrice lee. the two went missing on the day of her second birthday back in november 19 81. she was at a military supermarket with her mum and sister and then she disappeared. this area was chosen for searching because a man seen at a supermarket with a child matching katrice's description was reported. but no new evidence was reported. but no new evidence was found at the search. a press conference is happening later and we expect to get more information from that. the news is not a surprise to katrice lee's family because they believed the child was abducted and taken to live a different life with anotherfamily taken to live a different life with
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another family elsewhere. a distressing experience in this long—running tragedy. in 2012 the royal military police did apologise for mistakes made in the initial investigation. today the family hope they will get an indication of what happens next in this investigation which has gone on almost 37 years. thank you. a bus has crashed into dozens of cars, which were stuck in traffic in dartford in kent, injuring 17 people. 25 vehicles were damaged in the incident yesterday evening — passengers and drivers suffered minor injuries. a man has been arrested on suspicion of careless driving. caroline lucas is to step down as co—leader of the green party. ms lucas, the green's only mp, has been in charge alongside jonathan bartley since 2016. under the party's rules leaders serve two year terms. she says she wants to focus more on her constituency in brighton the american tv network abc has cancelled its most popular sitcom, roseanne, after its star tweeted offensive remarks.
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roseanne barr compared a former aide to president obama, valeriejarrett, to an ape. the head of the network said the comments were abhorrent, repugnant and inconsistent with its values. time now it's 6:35am and we will get the weather with carol later but first let's talk to sally and talk about how brilliant serena williams is as part of her comeback. do you ever feel when you come to wait you need to put on a suit of armour, your game face? it is important how your game face? it is important how you feel about what you are wearing, it can make you feel strong, decisive and comfortable. serena williams has it nailed. serena williams won her first grand slam match since becoming a mother. she's unseeded at the french open after her time away from the game, but beat krystina pliskova in straight sets in the first round.
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she wore a specially designed catsuit on court which she says helps her cope with bloodclots, but also made herfeel like a superhero. like i said, i feel like a warrior in it, like a warrior princess, kind of queen. i'm always living in a fantasy world so it's kind of like, i've always wanted to be a superhero and it's kind of my way of playing a superhero. i feel like a superhero when i'm wearing it. it is obviously doing the trick. she came across a big serving opponents, and she did completely do the business? she was absolutely fine. the british number one kyle edmund is also through to the secondf round. he says he used his frustration at liverpool's champions league defeat to help him beat australia's alex de minaur in straight sets. fellow brit, cameron norrie, is in
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seconrd round action later today. reigning champion rafa nadal is also through, beating the italian simone bolelli. nadal came safely through in straight sets in a rain interrupted match, taking the third set tie—break 11—9 to win in straight sets. the fa have backed raheem sterling over his controversial gun tattoo. the england forward has been criticised by anti—gun campaigners, but he says it relates to his dad who died when he was young. the fa says "we all support sterling and acknowledge the honest and heartfelt account he gave". lots of dicussion in the papers this morning and on social media over the last 24 hours about sterling's treatment. let's hearfrom a man who knows him well, the former queens park rangers captain nedem onuoha. hejust doesn't suit certain people's eye. maybe it's his background, maybe it's the fact that people don't want to accept that someone is from where he is in london, or where he was in jamaica or something. people don't relate to him, so they don't feel the same way. maybe raheem sterling doesn't represent what the majority of the country looks like, feels like and wants to be like.
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maybe that's why the media wants to sell that image of him being a bad guy to the masses, because that's how they perceive him anyway and that's how they want to perceive him. which i think is a massive problem. ashley young says the england players have talked about what to do if they're subjected to racism during the world cup in russia. it's a big problem in russian football, and the russian football union was recently fined £22,000 for racist chants by fans in a friendly against france. hopefully fifa and uefa will, if anything is to come about, they will be able to deal with it. whether it is going to happen when we are on the pitch, i am not sure how you react to it. i am sure we will talk about it and we have talked about it in the squad about what to do and what not to do. a couple of results to bring
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you from international friendlies. northern ireland were held to a goalless draw in panama — who are in england's world cup group of course. whilst an inexperienced scotland side lost 2—0 to peru in lima. they conceeded the goals either side of half time, with goalkeeperjordan archer making a couple of mistakes on his debut. frank lampard is edging closer to his firstjob in management. the former chelsea and england midfielder is being heavily linked with the derby countyjob, and some newspapers this morning suggest that his appointment could be confirmed this week. and liverpool's mo salah is in spain to have treatment on his dislocated shoulder. and his injury wasn't the only thing bothering him as he arrived in valencia. here he is being bothered by a particularly some words please? do you think ramos injured you intentionally in the final? god loves a try. he is
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still going. i don't think mo salah is going to say very much. but there we go. where is the taxi rank? if that reporter didn't do that, can you imagine what his boss would say. here we are, these pictures have gone around the world. mo salah was very nice. he was very polite, just the sensible thing and didn't say anything at all. sally, thank you very much, we will see you on. more now on our top story... the bosses of companies which make nuisance "cold calls" could be personally liable for fines of up to half—a—million pounds. a consultation on the proposals begins today. joining us now is the digital minister, margot james. this is one of those issues that winds people buying could ruin lives
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for a period of time, what are you going to do to stop it? we have already done a few things because it is already against the law unless a company has concerned. it is against the law for them to make unsolicited text messages and phone calls. the trouble is, a lot of companies are now dodging the finds that the information commissioner are levying on them. putting their companies into liquidation and there is nothing more under the current law that can be done against the individuals. they tend to just start up individuals. they tend to just start up again in another company name. what we are consulting on from today isa what we are consulting on from today is a proposal to make directors personally liable if they run companies that get caught making these unsolicited phone calls. that is the main change we are proposing to make now, on top of quite a lot of means of law strengthening we have seen over recent years. your
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phrase was, it is already well against the law. but unfortunately, experience of this is unchanging. whatever is in place at the moment, whatever arrangements are in place, they are not working? that is why we are proposing this change. the volume of calls reported to the information commissioner is coming down, but, it is excessive. the fact it has been falling in the last couple of years does not mean to say we have got on top of the problem, which is why we are consulting about this problem now. as i understand it, only half of the finds that we issued were collected. is that right? almost, 54% have been collected. why are you not collecting the finds? because these
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unscrupulous people are, in many cases, putting their companies into liquidation and therefore, they escape not having to pay the fine. what we are doing is we are proposing to strengthen the law to make them personally liable so even if they put their company into liquidation, they will be liable for fines of up to half a million for the breaches. we suspect the reason only 54% of the amount of money find over the last six or seven years, is connected to the fact that so many people put their companies into liquidation when they caught. what is awkward about this, possibly for you personally, 2016, the government made exactly the same announcement. when i say exactly the same announcement, it was literally the same announcement. the wording in 2016, each director can be fined up to five if they are in breach of the
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regulations. nuisance callers are a blight on society. those are literally the words this time round. that was two years ago and nothing happened. in that time, how many millions of people will have been bothered by this but your government couldn't be bothered to do anything about? i am very sorry to the delay, but it was partly due to the fact we knew we would have two strengthen the whole area of data protection and we had to get the law through to strengthen data protection across—the—board, which strengthen data protection across—the—boa rd, which does strengthen data protection across—the—board, which does give additional powers in this area of nuisance calls as well. basically, the key power the data protection act now gives is that data that has beenin act now gives is that data that has been in properly acquired, you are committing a further offence if you continue to use that data, use it to make nuisance calls. can i cut to the chase, given this delay for
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which you have apologised, when will something actually be done as opposed to you presenting it? the difference is, i think as well, over the last couple of years, this time we are issuing a formal consultation, which is the first deputy before introducing this legislation. have you got a date? i would hope to have done it by the end of the summer and it is secondary legislation so we don't need to find a huge time slot in the distance. my ambition is to get it in by the end of the year at the very earliest, early next year. margotjames, very earliest, early next year. margot james, thank you very earliest, early next year. margotjames, thank you for your time. it is very tricky this morning to pick out where all the action is in the weather. we have seen these amazing looking storms, but it is showers now that will be bothering us? yes, but they will be punditry,
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slow—moving. what has been alluded to is some heavy, showery outbreaks of rain. it is across lincolnshire and northamptonshire and it will be moving north—west through the course of the day. if you like your action dryer, sunnier and warm, northern ireland and scotland are the places to be. this won't arrive for you until later in the day. you can see the amount of cloud across southern areas and that is what has produced the thundery downpours through yesterday and the overnight period and infact yesterday and the overnight period and in fact this morning. it is courtesy of this weather front which is moving north. if you look ahead of it, hardly a breath of wind and a lot of clear blue sky to be had as we go through the day across northern ireland and scotland. the band of cloud pushing back to the
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north sea coastline. often a good start across north—west england. north—east england seeing all the cloud, but look at the rash of showers through south—west england, in through wales, the home counties, the midlands, heading towards the wash, lincolnshire and then moving north—west lives, getting into northern england later on in the day. again we will see it get scotla nd day. again we will see it get scotland and northern ireland. scotla nd scotland and northern ireland. scotland and northern ireland. scotland and northern ireland have topped the warmest day so far. today it is not as likely. behind those showers it will remain cloudy for much of england and also wales and overcast. it is later in the south—east we will start to see things brightening up. but it will feel humid. overnight and this evening, it showers continue across the isle of man, getting into northern ireland, southern and
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eastern scotland and they will be pushing north—west woods. behind, a lot of cloud. some breaks in the cloud and a lot of showers. the humid night. the weatherfrom continuing to move away leaving drier and brighter conditions, but by then, the next crop of thundery downpours coming across southern england and moving north into wales, the midlands and continuing the journey north as we go to the rest of the day. these could prove to be problematic so it is something we are keeping a very close eye on. yes, umbrellas up and then down. up and then down. welcome to the midlands where we
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talk about these things. some builders in the country reporting delays are getting deliveries and back could have a knock—on effect for the wider industry, particularly when it comes to house—building because we are told we need to do more. we are thousands by thousands of bricks, there is no shortage? we have a couple of million bricks. there is a seasonality to these things. as an industry we manage these things well, we make more pricks than we sell in the winter and then we run the stocks down in the summer. over the business cycle when the surge is in demand, we run the stocks down to supply the demand thatis the stocks down to supply the demand that is out there. you have been making bricks on this site since the early 1800 ‘s. making bricks on this site since the early 1800 's. we are a family business and we have been operating on this site since 1805. you must have seemed the peaks and troughs,
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so how does this compare? when we have looked at it in aggregate there hasn't been any particular shortage over all. if you have a particular brick you need for your development, i would encourage developers to talk to manufacturers as as soon as possible to make sure they understand what the times are so they can be supplied when they need them. alex, it is good to talk to. kate is a property expert and chris isa kate is a property expert and chris is a local builder. good morning. it is a local builder. good morning. it is smaller builders that are most affected by the shortage, what is it like for you, are you seeing shortage and prices going up? there is definitely a shortage, but we need to be more organised with ordering. it is more difficult for the smaller builders doing extensions and one of properties. but if you pre—order, yes there is a shortage butjust but if you pre—order, yes there is a shortage but just plan but if you pre—order, yes there is a shortage butjust plan ahead. what does it mean day to day if there is
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a shortage, does it take longer to build the house? it does, it takes longer to get started and it affects your cash flow. you cannot get the house finish and you cannot get your money. kate, we are constantly told asa money. kate, we are constantly told as a country we need to build more houses, that is the only way to solve the property crisis, so this isn't going to help? it isn't, but this is manufacturing at the end of the day, and thousands of elements go into it so you will come across problems in any development. these things are always going to be here. there was a fence crisis a few years ago so there was a fence crisis a few years ago so we there was a fence crisis a few years ago so we have to get better as an industry at solving the problem. but it is quite hard, 25% of detached homes are built by the self build industry. you go in for your planning and you don't order bricks before you get planning, just in case and then you have got to wait 12 to 16 weeks before they turn up
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on site. there is a delay factor but like chris says, it is about planning as much as you can. that is the state of play as far as these things are concerned, but thousands of them here on the site in the midlands. but these will be sold up and down the country. but as you heard, it is about planning, learn what you need when you are building a house and make sure you put your order in soon enough. one thing! one thing i love about you, charlie... where is this going? when we get to interview stars of films, you always get something odd. the reason we are doing this, jeff goldblum, who is briefly in the new jurassic park movie, he wasn't the original. when people walk in the room for these interviews, you never know what mood they are in, what they want to talk about. we were there in theory to talk about
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dinosaurs and jurassic park. it didn't start that way. whitejeans? you have a pair of white jeans, don't you? all right, well, i do, so there we go. now, dandy, dandy? that does say to me, i didn't think i was being dandified either. that says to me, hm, ruffled up to some kind of, somebody who's spent too much time thinking about his looks and all fixed up, you know? maybe i am a dandy. and how about your jazz shoe, you look like you're ready for some sort of, you know, class in west side story choreography. and you'd love that because you love the jazz? i enjoy singing. i think singing is our birthright. music is. and i don't think you have to qualify by a test of quality. what do you think about that? if i said to you right now to just give us a little something, would that be a comfortable thing? i always like to sing, do you know any jazz standards? some enchanted evening.
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# some enchanted evening. # you may meet a stranger. # you may see that stranger, charlie... # across a crowded room. # and somehow you'll know, you'll know even then. # that all through your life you will see him again #. etc, etc. do you know, that's the first time i've ever started an interview like this with a song. it's a very magical moment, i'll neverforget this. these creatures were here before us. and if we're not careful, they're going to be here after. you know me. and here we go again with dinosaurs and da—da, da—da, da—da. and my character shows up and i have a thing to say or two about ethics and science and facts and misuse by means of greed
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exploitation and militarisation. there are people messing with dinosaurs with evil intent? that's right. shame on them. i guess they're self concerned. don't they have this idea that the world should work for everyone? well, my character does. run! there is plenty of running away in the film. you know, see the dinosaur, ultimately, no matter what technology you have, run away. yeah, you've gotta get out of there. there's still that, is that the theme, is that the instruction in a dinosaur type situation, you having been in the original, you've done your fair share of running away from dinosaurs? my character had an encounter, yes, and some, as we know are benign, but some are not and shouldn't really be in the same... well, we're never intended
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to be on the same planet, at the same time. do you think you could just re—enact for us, there's always a scene in the movie when the actor first sees a really big dinosaur and they kind of start from the ground and they do the kind of... you know... i like what you just did. i don't remember doing that, but i'll do it for you now. go on. 0k. this is me seeing a di... did you like some of that? yeah, we were all drawn in, i was thinking, it's big! acting, acting. i love to act. acting. real dinosaur masterclass. how to look at a dinosaur, jeff goldblum style.
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time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm charlotte franks. some river users are claiming a so called "slum city" has sprung up on the thames opposite hampton court palace. it's claimed about 20 boats are moored off privately owned land, which means they don't have to pay mooring fees. now, some fear it could spoil the views and be an eyesore to forthcoming visitors to the flower show. it's untidy and it looks an absolute mess. this will attract hundreds and thousands of people to come and visit here. the last thing they want to be doing is looking across the river and seeing what looks like slum village. this is a beautiful, beautiful palace and then this is the view from outside the palace. transport around the capital is returning to normal this morning after another day of travel disruption for thousands yesterday, caused by the wet weather. passsengers at gatwick, heathrow, london city and luton faced cancellations and long delays for a third day in a row. rail passengers were told to avoid
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kings cross st pancras altogether due to the adverse weather conditions and because of a trespasser on the line. network rail says passengers who commute through essex are set to benefit from its multi—million pound upgrade of overhead wiring between southend victoria and london liverpool street. officials say work is due to start onjune the 4th and end on october the 10th. services after 9:30pm on mondays, tuesday and wednesdays are likely to be disrupted while engineering work is carried out. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there are minor delays on the picadilly line between hammersmith and all heathrow terminals and uxbridge due to a signal failure in the acton town area. on the trains southeastern buses are replacing services between sheerness and sittingbourne. onto the roads, northbound traffic is slow on the blackwall tunnel southern approach from the woolwich road flyover. and on the m1, the northbound entry
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slip at j2 for the a41 and a1 at fiveways is blocked following a collision, let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. it's another rather cloudy, misty and murky affair this morning, with still one or two heavy, thundery showers. some left after yesterday's torrential downpours. up in the home counties especially. elsewhere, it's looking dry first thing this morning. mostly cloudy, however. now these are the showers i was talking about. they will drift away north and west. still the risk of a shower later but the cloud gradually thinning and hopefully breaking this afternoon so the chance of a bit of sunshine before it sets. temperatures getting up to 22 celsius. overnight tonight, we'll see clear spells at least at first, but then i'm afraid the cloud will develop again. low cloud, mist and murk around, a mild and muggy night too. the minimum between 13 and 15 celsius. now, as we head through thursday, some heavy, perhaps torrential, thundery downpours anticipated. the wind is light so they will be slow—moving. that could lead to perhaps some flash flooding. for friday, a dry affair, still the risk of some showers as we head into the weekend, but lots of dry weather around.
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some sunny spells and temperatures staying in the low 205. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to charlie and naga. bye for now. hello this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. a government crackdown on the bosses of rogue cold—call firms but it comes two years later than planned. they will be held personally liable and could be fined up to half a million pounds. good morning, it's wednesday, 30th may. also this morning... the search for a british toddler who went missing in germany 36 years ago ends with no clues to her disappearance. one of america's biggest tv show is cancelled after its star
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roseanne barr is accused of sending a racist tweet. good morning. is there a national shortage of bricks? prices are rising and some builders say they are waiting up to six months for delivery. what impact could it have on the construction industry? at this brick—maker in the midlands today find out. good morning. in sport, serena williams says she feels like a superhero as she wins her first grand slam match since becoming a mother. good morning. twitchers across the uk are reporting a huge drop in the number of migrating swifts migrating back to the uk so we will tell you later on what you can do, you can build your own swift box, place it up build your own swift box, place it up in the eaves and try and lend a hand. and carol has the weather. good morning. at the moment, a band
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of showery rain is moving north and west, some of that heavy and sundry, eventually getting into scotland and northern ireland later in the day. before it does, you are looking at some warm sunshine but today it is going to feel more humid. more details in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. the government has announced that bosses of companies which make nuisance calls could be personally fined up to half—a—million pounds. a consultation on changes to the law starts today. in october 2016, the government made a similar pledge but the necessary legislation wasn't passed. andy moore explains. there is no doubt nuisance phone calls and texts are a major headache for many of us and the government is keen to clamp down. individual companies can already be fined up to half a million pounds but they often declare themselves bankrupt to avoid paying the penalty. targeting the individuals behind those companies would close that loophole. in announcing a consultation that will end in august, makes consumers were bombarded with
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three points 9 billion use phone calls and text last year. 17 million in fines have been issued since 2010 but only about half that sum, 54%, has been collected. this isn't the first time the government has issued a planned to fine individuals. exactly the same phrase was used by her predecessor when he said in 2016 that the law would be changed in the spring of 2017. that didn't happen. this time we are issuing a formal consultation between introducing the legislation. i'd hope to have it, the consultation, done by later this summerand consultation, done by later this summer and i'd hope to be introducing its secondary legislation, so we don't need to find a huge time slot off in the distance. my ambition is to get it in before the end of the year. the government hopes it'll have better luck second time around. military police investigating
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the disappearance of a british toddler in germany 36 years ago, will confirm later that a month long excavation of a river bank where she went missing has yielded no fresh information. two—year—old katrice lee was on a shopping trip with her mother in the town of paderborn. she has never been found. let's get more from our reporter megan paterson in germany. what's been happening there? good morning. we are the sides the river alme in paderborn and for the last four weeks or so this river bank has been the site of a forensic search with more than 100 military personnel involved in those investigations looking for evidence which could help in the disappearance of katrice lee who went missing in 1989, the day of her second birthday. she went to the military supermarket with her mum and sister and then she disappeared.
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the investigations here not turning up the investigations here not turning up any new evidence which gives any indication of what happened to katrice. this site was chosen because it is believed a man seen at the supermarket with a child who looked like her was later seen at the bridge over the river. nothing has been found here, there will be a police conference later today to tell us a bit more about that but the news not coming as a great surprise to —year—old's family who have believe the toddler was abducted and taken to live with anotherfamily, abducted and taken to live with another family, given a abducted and taken to live with anotherfamily, given a new life elsewhere. the police have taken some criticism over this investigation. there were flaws in the early investigation. since 2012, the early investigation. since 2012, the search for katrice, more evidence has been launched, and hopefully they will give us some idea of what they will do next in this investigation. thank you. an independent report has accused kensington and chelsea council of being slow and lacking direction in the weeks following the grenfell tower disaster. the research, commissioned by muslim aid, suggests
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that the authorities relied on voluntary organisations to help those in need, and says the disaster should be a wake—up call about how to deal with future emergencies. ben ando reports. in the chaotic aftermath of the blaze at grenfell tower, everyone wa nted blaze at grenfell tower, everyone wanted to give. clothes, food, supplies, and hundreds of local people stepping forward with something just as precious, their time. according to a report commissioned by muslim aid working with local charity groups, the response from the authorities, primarily kensington and chelsea borough council, was weak and lacked direction or coordination. then, says the report, left local volu nteers says the report, left local volunteers often with no experience of local work trying their best to cope but often overwhelmed. there was complete chaos. i've been to many disasters around the world as an aid worker and i really didn't expect to find this level of chaos
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and chaotic response in west london. i think what we need to reflect on is that the local service actors are the ones that are part and parcel of that provision and that response. the ones that are part and parcel of that provision and that responsem response, the council said... the council said it couldn't comment further until the main public inquiry concluded but the charities say the lesson of this report is clear. in the aftermath of a disaster, the community itself should be put at the centre of the first response, not considered as an afterthought. a bus has crashed into dozens of cars, which were stuck in traffic in dartford in kent, injuring 17 people. 25 vehicles were damaged in the incident yesterday evening. passengers and drivers suffered minor injuries. a man has been arrested on suspicion of careless driving. a prominent russian journalist has been shot dead outside his home in the ukrainian capital of kiev. arkady babchenko was an outspoken critic of president vladimir putin. the investigative reporter claimed
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he had to leave russia after receiving death threats. caroline lucas is to step down as co—leader of the green party. ms lucas, the green's only mp, has been in charge alongside jonathan bartley since 2016. under the party's rules leaders serve two year terms. she says she wants to focus more on her constituency in brighton. one of america's most popular tv shows has been cancelled after its star roseanne barr was accused of racism. the actress posted a tweet likening a former aide to barack obama to an ape. roseanne apologised, but tv network abc called her actions repugnant and cancelled the series. this report from our correspondent james cook in los angeles contains flash photography can i have some money? i don't know. mum, can i have some money? i don't know. could i have some money? roseanne barr fronted a tv sensation. housekeeping!
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the hugely popular sitcom from the 805 and 905 which made a triumphant return this year. that didn't go through. i heard a beep. millions tuned in to see a sympathetic portrayal of white working class trump supporting america. it all came crashing down in a vitriolic twitter tirade. roseanne barr's nastiest slur was aimed at an african—american political opponent. referring to valeriejarrett. i think we have to turn it into a teaching moment. i'm fine. i'm worried about all the people out there who don't have a circle of friends and followers who come right to their defence. ms barr also attacked hillary clinton and her daughter, chelsea. and she falsely called the billionaire investor george soros, who was a jewish child who survived the occupation of hungary, a nazi. that tweet was shared by president trump's son donald jr. ms barr issued a partial apology
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but it wasn't enough for abc, which called her comments "abhorrent, repugnant "and inconsistent with our values." roseanne's downfall was clearly her own doing but it's likely to strengthen stereotypes in a divided america with each side accusing the other of intolerance and hatred. the time now is 7:10am. carol waugh have the weather in a few minutes and sally will keep us up—to—date with the sport. as the world waits to hear whether june's summit between kim jong—un and donald trump will go ahead, the bbc has been finding out what those who live inside north korea think. over many months the victoria derbyshire programme has worked with a covert network to put questions to ordinary people living inside the world's most repressive state, as michael cowan reports. this man is a father
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who works in the military. this woman is a market trader who lives with her husband and two daughters. they told us about the power of the state and the country's notorious labour camps. sometimes the state security department get people by calling them spies. they make up stories for their own performance. they make people say that they were planning to go to china, and, then, report them. here there are a lot of government captures. people arrested and taken away. people cannot survive in the prison camps. they unconditionally beat you, they starve you while you do extreme labour. once you go there, you are no longer a citizen. i think this terror is what keeps society going. recently, they say we should be living in peace with america, for everyone to have a better life. our next guest, jihyun park, also grew up in north korea
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but now lives in the uk. she decided to flee north korea when her brother was beaten almost to death for leaving the army. welcome to the programme. you have seen that report before. do those stories sound familiar to you? you had a fascinating and very difficult journey coming out of north korea. yes, iam journey coming out of north korea. yes, i am a witness and also a survivor so i totally understand what is going on inside north korea. what happened to your brother? he was beaten very severely and so that sparked in new a decision to leave north korea. what happened?m sparked in new a decision to leave north korea. what happened? it was in the 19905. 3 million people died of starvation inside north korea but this is not only people, it is also military. so my brother was in the
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army. so, they run out of the business area. he went home. after military came to my house and they catch my brother. once they beat him, then! catch my brother. once they beat him, then i saw him, he is not the same person because all body is swollen and bloody and his teeth are gone. he escaped again because he already knew he was sent to prison so maybe he would be executed. i left north korea. you fled to china? yes, i abandoned left north korea. you fled to china?
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yes, iabandoned my left north korea. you fled to china? yes, i abandoned my father and left north korea. you fled to china? yes, iabandoned my father and me and my younger brother escaped north korea and we went to china. but in china, there was human trafficking. my china, there was human trafficking. my younger brother was sent back to north korea. now it is almost 17 yea rs north korea. now it is almost 17 years but he has disappeared. given what you have been through at the hands of north korean state, and what you are seeing now, the possibility of this summit, i wonder... some people are portraying this as a moment in history and possibly something really significant about bringing north korea back towards the rest of the world. given your experience, what do you see? i am very worried about this summit. because i arrived in the uk ten years now. so i knew i
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learnt many histories all over the world. the former prime minister chamberlain in the 305, he met hitler, they made peace agreement. and many journalists followed hitler, they made peace agreement. and manyjournalists followed this prime minister and they say that this world is now peace. so, your comparing this meeting to chamberlain meeting hitler? yes, because hitler started world war ii and he kills many people. so do you feel kimjong and he kills many people. so do you feel kim jong un will be given power? through this meeting with president trump? because they only show the media but kim jong president trump? because they only show the media but kimjong un is now he is wearing different mask and showing to us. his realface is dictator and murderer because now in north korea there is still concentration camps and 120,000
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people live in concentration camps and a million people live in labour camps. so, if this summit takes place, and even if, and this is a big if, there is some commitment to do with nuclear disarmament from north korea, what you're saying is for people live in north korea, nothing changes. nothing changes because north korea is only one power and one ideological countries so if if they don't change this ideology, inside nothing changes because kimjong ideology, inside nothing changes because kim jong un and the family a lwa ys because kim jong un and the family always controls the family ideology. this ideology is still 70 years now, continued the same ideology. we talk about the nuclear weapons but this is only... kim jong about the nuclear weapons but this is only... kimjong un on isjust
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only talking about his survival. i am really angry because donald trump mentions that, guaranteed his assistance. but why? my people are still under the dark country and they are tortured and they are without human rights. why aren't people concerned about our people? why do they always think about the politics? how, then, given how you describe that, and people understand what you're saying, how could that be addressed by the west? what could donald trump to different the rather than talking to him about denuclearisation? how could he try to affect what is happening to people that? we continue to talk about the nuclear weapons issues. plus the human rights issues. you usually see united nations, you see
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it as usually see united nations, you see itasa usually see united nations, you see it as a human right report. it is just a report, there is no after work. because it is trump who met the north korean refugees in white house, and he heard terrible stories. so he mentioned human rights. we together asked the north korean government. we continue to push the government side, and the people side. thank you so much, it's been lovely hearing a perspective so thank you very much. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. those pesky storms and showers are around, aren't they? they are and they will be with us for the next couple of days but not everywhere. scotland and northern ireland have seen a lot of dry come sunny and warm weather. it has been the warmest day of the year so far for both and yesterday was no exception. in scotland, we reached a
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7.5, northern ireland reached 25.3 yesterday. today will not be quite as full but for you be likely dry, sunny and still warm. other end the country, we have had some thundery downpours and today is no exception. we have them at the moment and they are moving northwards and westwards. you can see on the satellite picture the extent of cloud cover we've had in the last 12 hours, producing the heavy, thundery downpours and still is as it continues to move north and west. it's this weather fronts that is taking the showery outbreaks of rain, some of which are heavily on pantry, but as you can tell from the lack of isobars, there isn't much of a breeze. it is quite cloudy this morning as well across central and eastern scotland. that will push back as it has done to the north sea coastline. but of sunshine from northern ireland, right start from north—west england away from the east where we have the cloud. then
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we have although showers, currently thundery across northamptonshire and lincolnshire. you can see the progress they make moving through south—west england, wales, midlands into northern england and later into southern and eastern scotland. ahead of them we hang on to the sunshine with temperatures up to the mid—205 quite easily today and in parts of northern ireland probably about 23. behind this line, we are looking at another humid day, as we are around the showers as well and a lot of cloud. it will remain grey and overcast, not brightening up until later. along the north sea coastline, feeling cool. through the evening and overnight, eventually those showers. push across the rest of northern england, much of scotland, heading towards the north—west and they also get into northern ireland. behind them, a lot of cloud, a little bit of clearance in the sky but not much. these showers flirting with the south—west
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and it'll be another sticky night. tomorrow we see the weather front eventually push away from the north—western northern ireland, and there will be more cloud for scotla nd there will be more cloud for scotland and northern ireland, more than you've been used to this week. at the same time, england and wales, more thunderstorms coming up from the near continent, some of those will be downpours and slow—moving so they could lead to some disruption but i'll keep you posted on we know you will! new research seen by bbc breakfast suggests that survivors of domestic violence are facing intimidation when their cases are heard in the family court. many have to come face—to—face with their abusive ex—partner. the charity women's aid says the process can be a major source of fearfor some women. the government says it is consulting on a bill which will tackle the issue. graham satchell reports. isabel's relationship with her husband started to go wrong after the birth of her daughter, olivia. she says he became jealous, angry, abusive. we've changed both names and re—voiced their words
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to protect their identities. he started getting very, very angry. he'd give me a tiny bit of money a month for everything. so, in the end, i ended up selling most of my things on ebay and eating cereal so the children had something to eat. i realised he couldn't hurt me any more. i was pretty much a shell. iwas... there was nothing left in me, really, so he started on the children. they were really terrified of him. he would start getting more angry and, like, violent and stuff, and ijust remember, like, crying in the corner because i was so afraid after him shouting at me for ten minutes. you were afraid of him? terrified, yeah. after years of abuse, isabel finally left a husband. the police investigated but said it was her word against his and there was no prosecution. the case ended up at the family court where, eventually, a judge decided isabel's husband should have contact with the children. he came to pick her up
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and she refused to go. she said, "i don't want to see you today." and he physically picked her up from the front door with her kicking and screaming and put her in the car, slammed the door shut and drove off with her. so, it was traumatic for her. it was traumatic for me. i didn't want to see my dad at all. the last thing i wanted to do was see my dad. so, ijust wanted to have a voice in this whole thing which, obviously, didn't happen. you don't feel as though you were listened to? no. her brother said i hatejudges, i hate the courts, why are they forcing us to see daddy when he's being so horrible to us? why can't they see this? why don't they believe us? new rules were introduced to the family court last year to ensure the safety of children involved in domestic abuse but in a study of 72 cases, the charity women's aid found that 24% of domestic abuse survivors said they'd been cross—examined by their ex—partner in court and 61% said there were no special measures in place, like separate waiting rooms or screens to protect them. isabel says the family
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court is not doing enough and things need to change. i think it takes a lot for domestic abuse survivors to come forward and say this is what's happening to me, and they really need to be believed. i'm really hoping the court will protect you and your children, and i don't think that's happening at all at the moment. olivia no longer sees herfather. the most recent court order said she was now old enough to make her own decisions. the government says it's forjudges to determine what's best for the child in each case and it is reforming the law to protect victims and bring more offenders to justice. campaigners say too often children's safety is put at risk because survivors of abuse are not believed. later on in the programme, we'll be speaking to sian hawkins from women's aid about the research. there's a shortage of bricks in some
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parts of the country with some builders waiting six months for supplies. ben is at a brick factory in the west midlands. it isn't surprising not enough building is being done but this could be part of the problem? you are right, there is no shortage of bricks in this factory because they've been building and making bricks on this side since 1805 and this is what they make, particularly popular in the midlands, you might recognise this, they make 25,000 of these every day, about 7 million a year. but there is potentially a shortage up and down the country, especially for smaller builders. the big house—builders get the orders in early but for the smaller ones they
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are struggling to get their hands on something like this in some cases having to wait six months just to get them. that of course has the knock—on effect for all sorts of things but not least building all those houses we are told we need to build in this country to deal with the shortage of supply and soaring house prices. a little later, i'm going to speak to a property expert and speak to the guy who runs the spice but also a local builder about how they make sure they've got enough supplies to keep them going and make sure the houses we need get built. we will talk to them in about half an hour but before that let's get the news, travel and weather where you are watching breakfast this morning. good morning from bbc london news, i'm charlotte franks. some river users are claiming a so called "slum city" has sprung up on the thames opposite hampton court palace. it's claimed about 20 boats are moored off privately owned land, which means they don't have to pay mooring fees. now some fear it could spoil
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the views and be an eyesore to forthcoming visitors to the flower show. it's untidy and it looks an absolute mess. this will attract hundreds and thousands of people to come and visit here. the last thing they want to be doing is looking across the river and seeing what looks like slum village. this is a beautiful, beautiful palace and then this is the view from outside the palace. transport around the capital is returning to normal this morning after another day of travel disruption for thousands yesterday, caused by the wet weather. passsengers at gatwick, heathrow, london city and luton faced cancellations and long delays for a third day in a row. rail passengers were told to avoid kings cross st pancras altogether due to the adverse weather conditions and because of a trespasser on the line. network rail says passengers who commute through essex are set to benefit from its multi—million pound upgrade of overhead wiring between southend victoria and london liverpool street. officials say work is due to start onjune the 4th
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and end on october the 10th. services after 9:30pm on mondays, tuesday and wednesdays are likely to be disrupted while engineering work is carried out. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there are minor delays on the picadilly line between hammersmith and all heathrow terminals and uxbridge due to a signal failure in the acton town area. on the trains southeastern buses are replacing services between sheerness and sittingbourne. onto the roads northbound traffic is slow on the blackwall tunnel southern approach from the woolwich road flyover. and in belvedere, bronze age way is blocked under the lower road bridge due to flooding, with northbound queues to erith station. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. it's another rather cloudy, misty and murky affair this morning, with still one or two heavy, thundery showers. some left after yesterday's torrential downpours. up in the home counties especially. elsewhere, it's looking dry first thing this morning.
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mostly cloudy, however. now these are the showers i was talking about. they will drift away north and west. still the risk of a shower later but the cloud gradually thinning and hopefully breaking this afternoon so the chance of a bit of sunshine before it sets. temperatures getting up to 22 celsius. overnight tonight, we'll see clear spells at least at first, but then i'm afraid the cloud will develop again. low cloud, mist and murk around, a mild and muggy night too. the minimum between 13 and 15 celsius. now, as we head through thursday, some heavy, perhaps torrential, thundery downpours anticipated. the wind is light so they will be slow—moving. that could lead to perhaps some flash flooding. for friday, a dry affair, still the risk of some showers as we head into the weekend, but lots of dry weather around. some sunny spells and temperatures staying in the low 205. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to charlie and naga. bye for now. hello this is breakfast with
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charlie stayt and naga munchetty. bosses of companies which bombard consumers with cold—calls could be personally liable for fines of half a million pounds following a consultation which launches today. the government made a similar pledge two years ago but the necessary legislation wasn't passed . earlier on breakfast, the digital minister, margot james apologised for the delay. there is no doubt nuisance phone calls and texts are a major headache for many of us and the government is keen to clamp down. individual companies can already be fined up to half a million pounds but they often declare themselves bankrupt to avoid paying the penalty. targeting the individuals behind those companies would close that loophole. the information office has issued
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fines, but only 54% has been collected. this isn't the first time the government has introduced a plan to fine individuals. in 2016, the government announced a change in the law in 2017. but that didn't happen. this time we are issuing a formal consultation. i would this time we are issuing a formal consultation. iwould hope this time we are issuing a formal consultation. i would hope to have the consultation done by later this summer. i would the consultation done by later this summer. iwould hope the consultation done by later this summer. i would hope to be introducing... it is second very legislation so we don't need to find a huge time slot off in the distance. my ambition is to get it in by the end of the year. the
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government is hoping it will have better luck second time around. the response by the authorities to the grenfell tower fire was badly flawed according to a new report. the paper, commissioned by the charity muslim aid, criticises the leadership of kensington and chelsea council and said volunteers have been left on the front line to cope. the council says it is committed to learning the lessons but will not comment further until after the public enquiry. police investigating the disappearance of a british toddler in germany 36 years ago, will confirm later that an excavation near the spot she went missing, has yielded no fresh information. two—year—old katrice lee was on a shopping trip with her mother, near a british army base in the town of paderborn. she has never been found. the royal military police have spent the past five weeks digging at a riverbank in the town but say nothing has been found. a bus has crashed into dozens of cars, which were stuck in traffic in dartford in kent, injuring 17 people. 25 vehicles were damaged in the incident yesterday evening — passengers and drivers suffered minor injuries. a man has been arrested on suspicion of careless driving.
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the american tv network abc has cancelled its most popular sitcom, roseanne, after its star tweeted offensive remarks. roseanne barr compared a former aide to president obama to an ape. the head of the network said the comments were abhorrent, repugnant and inconsistent with its values. in the last half an hour, roseanne has been back on twitter to apologise. she asked her fans not to defend her. adding losing her show is nothing compared to being labelled a racist. she also hit out at those who criticised her for being outspoken on the matter, saying she'll handle it the way i want and that she's tired of being attacked. some of the tweets this morning from roseanne barr after she had her show axed by the network, abc.
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it is time to talk super heroes? absolutely, the days we talked about what women wear to the workplace is over, unless you are serena williams. look at her playing at the french open yesterday playing in a black catsuit saying she feels like a superhero, a warrior princess. i take the point you are making, but the thing about serena williams, she isa the thing about serena williams, she is a superhero with or without the outfit, because of what she has achieved and the comeback, which is so important. with all those achievements, she can wear whatever she likes. serena williams has won her first grand slam match since becoming a mum. she's unseeded at the french open after her time away from the game but beat krystina pliskova in straight sets in the first round. she wore a specially designed catsuit on court which she says helps her cope with bloodclots, but also made herfeel like a superhero.
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like i said, i feel like a warrior in it, like a warrior princess, kind of queen. i'm always living in a fantasy world so it's kind of like, i've always wanted to be a superhero and it's kind of my way of playing a superhero. i feel like a superhero when i'm wearing it. so serena said that catsuit made herfeel like a "superhero" she became a mum less than nine months ago and later tweeted, "catsuit anyone? for all the mums out there who had a tough recovery from pregnancy — here you go. if i can do it, so can you. love you all!" but we don't all look like you, in our catsuits! but it is a wonderful message. the british number one kyle edmund is also through to the secondf round. he says he used his frustration at liverpool's champions league defeat to help him beat australia's alex de
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minaur in straight sets. fellow brit cameron norrie is in seconrd round action later today. reigning champion rafa nadal is also through, beating the italian simone bolelli. nadal came safely through in straight sets in a rain interrupted match, taking the third set tie—break 11—9. the fa have backed raheem sterling over his controversial gun tattoo. the england forward has been criticised by anti—gun campaigners, but he says it relates to his dad who died when he was young. the fa says, "we all support sterling and acknowledge the honest and heartfelt account he gave". lots of dicussion in the papers this morning and on social media over the last 24 hours about sterling's treatment. let's hearfrom a man who knows him well, the former queens park rangers captain nedem onuoha. hejust doesn't suit certain people's eye. maybe it's his background, maybe it's the fact that people don't want to accept that someone from where he is in london, or where he was in jamaica or something.
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maybe they don't relate to him, so they don't feel the same way. maybe raheem sterling doesn't represent what the majority of the country looks like, feels like and wants to be like. maybe that's why the media wants to sell that image of him being a bad guy to the masses, because that's how they perceive him anyway and that's how they want to perceive him. which i think is a massive problem. ashley young says the england players have talked about what to do if they're subjected to racism during the world cup. it's a big problem in russian football, and the russian football union was recently fined £22,000 for racist chants by fans in a friendly against france. hopefully fifa and uefa will, if anything is to come about, they will be able to deal with it. whether it is going to happen when we are on the pitch, i am not sure how you react to it. i am sure we will talk about it and we have talked about it in the squad in what to do and what not to do.
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northern ireland were held to a goalless draw in panama, who are in england's world cup group of course. whilst an inexperienced scotland side lost 2—0 to peru in lima. they conceeded the goals either side of half time, with goalkeeperjordan archer making a couple of mistakes on his debut. frank lampard is edging closer to his first job in management. the former chelsea and england midfielder is being heavily linked with the derby countyjob, and some newspapers this morning suggest that his appointment could be confirmed this week. marco silva is expected to become the everton boss this week. the former watford manager is the club's number one target to replace sam allardyce who was sacked at the end of the season. and liverpool's mo salah is in spain to have treatment on his dislocated shoulder. and his injury wasn't the only thing bothering him as he arrived in valencia. here he is being bothered by a particularly perisistant reporter. some words please? will you be
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picked to play with morocco. did you think hamas in jejune picked to play with morocco. did you think hamas injejune intentionally. do you think he will run out of questions. still going. i can only imagine what he is asking him. what is your favourite cheese? what is your best t—shirt. did he ask what his favourite cheese was? no, it was a joke! pirro are playing scotland andi a joke! pirro are playing scotland and i am trying to get myself into the world cup thing. i am starting to and! the world cup thing. i am starting to and i always like to have a team iam to and i always like to have a team i am interested in and did know anything about. they haven't been in the world cup for 28 years. is that your team? the world cup for 28 years. is that yourteam? i
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the world cup for 28 years. is that your team? i am not saying the world cup for 28 years. is that yourteam? iam not saying i am not supporting england, whatever, but it will be nice to have a team who will be really excited. i have already decided who my non—england team is. egypt. for any particular reason to mark mo salah. you can get enthusiast dick a team, it is per room for me. who is your second team? room for me. who is your second team ? if that room for me. who is your second team? if that we need to find you a first team. england. roseanne is one of the biggest shows on american tv, commanding audiences of almost 20 million people. yesterday, the sitcom was cancelled after the programme's star posted an offensive tweet. roseanne barr compared one of president obama's former aides, valeriejarrett, to an ape. let's speak to los angeles based showbiz reporter gayl murphy thank you very much for your time this morning. what do you make of this? like everybody else, it is a
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crazy thing. i do want to let you know we do have a bit of breaking news. roseanne barr, who said she had actually deleted her twitter feed, did notand had actually deleted her twitter feed, did not and she tweeted about two hours ago. she said guys, i did something unforgivable so do not defend me. it was 2am and i was ambient treating, it was memorial day and i went too far. i don't want to be defended, it was indefensible and please don't do family. she is absolutely right. yes, but how do you think now, too little too late, the show has been cancelled? you think now, too little too late, the show has been cancelled7m you think now, too little too late, the show has been cancelled? it is done. abc owns disney and they both acted so swiftly on this, it almost makes me feel, almost as if they
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knew it was coming. abc hired nasty and abc got nasty. why do you say nasty? that is roseanne, she is nasty, and nasty, mean lady. my question was, what were they thinking? they only have to look at her twitter feed, she is thinking? they only have to look at her twitterfeed, she is cranky thinking? they only have to look at her twitter feed, she is cranky and she is a trial and she has been that way for years. then knew her comments were racist and anti—semitic and they were targeted. she has been doing this for years. it is almost as if they kind of knew this was happen —— would happen and they were ready. they rose to be a —— occasion quickly. i have to ask myself, did they think no one would notice? regardless of how much money they could lose by cancelling the show, which for a disney is a drop
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in the pocket, but if they didn't cancel roseanne fass, there isn't enough money in the world they could buy back what her tweets would say about them. you have made some pretty powerful accusations about her character. i want to ask one more thing, the tweets she has put out recently, you mentioned one, but she did say she has asked her fans not to defend her, adding using her show is nothing compared to being labelled a racist. she has also said for those who have criticised her for those who have criticised her for being outspoken on the matter, she will handle it the way she wants to and she is tired of being attacks. she is a provocative or. she is a troll. i spoke with roseanne at the tv critics press conference in january. roseanne at the tv critics press conference injanuary. she was so nasty and mean to the press from the stage, i had never seen that before.
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she was cranky. i remember thinking, maybe she is just acting the part, maybe she is just acting the part, maybe she is just acting the part, maybe she isn't like this at all, it is roseanne for goodness' sake. i spoke to some of my colleagues and i said, she is kind of unpleasant, don't you think? they say, that is who she is. i read my colleagues' columns and blogs and news reporting, in the process of putting this together and they all say the same thing. i cannot say it on broadcast television. thank you very much for talking to us. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. good morning both. good morning to you. there are thunderstorms in the forecast and we have some across lincolnshire, northamptonshire and into the midlands generally, as a
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line of rain moves northwards. it is breaking up but if you are in scotla nd breaking up but if you are in scotland and northern ireland, you are infora scotland and northern ireland, you are in for a belter with lots of sunshine. the cloud currently across scotla nd sunshine. the cloud currently across scotland pushes back towards the east coast. this is the culprit producing the rain. it is extending to south—west england, the part of wales, into the midland and then into wales. we start with this cloud in scotland and pushes back to the north sea coastline where it will be cool but for the rest of scotland and northern ireland, are lot of sunshine. the north—east is seeing more cloud and then you will see the showers as this weather front continues its journey, showers as this weather front continues itsjourney, moving north and west. like yesterday, not much ofa and west. like yesterday, not much of a breeze to move though showers along. if you catch one it could be prolonged, heavy and punditry. behind it, there will be a lot of cloud left in its wake, grey and
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overcast day for much of england and wales. later it will brighten up in the south—east. top temperatures today are likely to be in scotland, where we could hit again, somewhere in the mid—205. this evening and overnight, the weather front continues to move across northern england, southern scotland, eastern scotla nd england, southern scotland, eastern scotland and heading towards the north—west. it gets in behind northern ireland. a lot of cloud but some breaks. wherever you are, it is going to be another muggy night. tomorrow we have the remnants of the front of another scotland and all we re front of another scotland and all were ‘— front of another scotland and all were —— north—west ireland clearing. sunshine across england and wales, but not for long because we are early in the day going to import more heavy, thundery, slow—moving downpours across england and wales. like the last few days, they are hit and miss. there is a lot of energy
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in the atmosphere and that is what is producing them. you might be lucky and miss them but your friend down the road could have them for a long time. as we head into friday, the system pushes in across northern ireland, north—west england and also scotland. behind it there will be a few showers but generally speaking it will be drier in the south. some brightness coming through, but where ever you are, still feeling humid. last year, the government set a target to build 300,000 new homes to deal with the housing shortage. now, the cost of bricks is increasing, ben is looking at some of the reasons why at a factory in dudley. what interesting place, it is the kind of thing you don't think about, the cost of bricks, but you are in the cost of bricks, but you are in the place where they make them? yes, i have learned so much this morning about the supply and demand bricks,
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but how they make them. what you are seeing is the end of the process and all the bricks have come out of the oven and they have been fired and they are ready to go to building sites up and down the country. but you are right, prizes are going up because there is a shortage. alex, we are at the end of the process, how soon will these be out on a building site? these guys are packing up 25,000 bricks a day and they will be available three to five days, a new order came on. you are ina days, a new order came on. you are in a position where you have enough supply and meet the demand you have got, particularly big house—builders, they plan ahead. but smaller builders are struggling? the issue is, if you are looking for a particular brick and you need it tomorrow, you should have planned ahead. we have a huge range of bricks in this country and we don't have everything available in stock. from our yard you can have a product
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available immediately if it is a standard product. it would take you probably 12 weeks to get up a spoke product made, which requires the time from extruding the brit, drying it and firing it and then to get it into the yard to make it available. i have learned, there is lots to it. what impact is it having on the rest of the construction sector? i have kate, a housing inspector and chris, a local builder. the big builders have their orders in early, what difference does it make for you if there is a shortage? we have had the shortage where we have a site with nine to five units with another developer and we agreed the price of the bricks, but now they have said, they have gone out of production with one type of brick and then the price has gone up on the other. we will have to go back to the planning
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department in north east lincolnshire. luckily they are very good and we should turn it around in a couple of weeks. but others, it takes months before you can get started. some planners stipulate what kind bridge you have to use in your development? yes, we have to stick with the one type and what tiles are used. we have to go back to the council to approve the new bricks. what difference does this make up and down the country because we are constantly told we are not building enough houses. there are thousands of components that go into building a house. anybody in manufacturing knows he will be short of something, particularly when it takes five years to build out a scheme. you need to get the change and where it is possible quickly is one of the ways of tackling it. is ita one of the ways of tackling it. is it a problem with supply or is it
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that some people haven't been organised enough to get their orders in early? sometimes you can get your orders in early but if you are a householder and you need to wait two months for your planning to come through, you will not place an order until it is in. it might only be a few months, but there are thousands of different bricks. if you want something special, but they make every now and again, it could be, let you buy a car or have others spoke kitching, it could be three to six months. really good to see you, thank you very much. who knew something we take for granted when it comes to getting houses up and builds and meeting the demand, could be so located. this place, they make 25,000 a day, 7 million a year and they are hoping it goes some way to address the shortage. thank you very much, we will be back with you later on. from bricks, to birds. for many their arrival heralds the start of summer, in fact poet ted hughes said
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the return of the swift to british skies was proof that "the world's still working". but something's not right this year. the number of swifts migrating to the uk from africa has fallen dramatically. john maguire is in bristol for us this morning to try to find out why. john, you are in a back garden and it isa john, you are in a back garden and it is a stunning location. glorious. isn't it, i will pass on your compliments to jane and mark in a moment because it is a wonderful garden, very wildlife friendly. mark is renowned for his swift boxes. he has 25, 17 with cameras. what is going on, why have we seen such a uk wide drop in the number of migrating slits. richard bland, from the british trust of ornithology, do we know what is happening? in some ways yes, and some ways no, it is not a
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very good answer. it is impossible to survey in any effective way, but the evidence is, there has been a decline perhaps 40% over the past 20, 25 years. we decline perhaps 40% over the past 20,25 years. we are decline perhaps 40% over the past 20, 25 years. we are not sure about the causes of it. if global warming is happening, they should be doing better. but it may be we are altering the insect population with lots of poisonous fumes in the air. they are very much urban birds, so what affect towns, will affect them. also very weather dependent. they live about 16 years, so they can put up live about 16 years, so they can put up witha live about 16 years, so they can put up with a lot of problems. all they have got to do is produce two young in the course of their lives and the population is stable. it may be things look worse than they are, it would be nice to think that. let's hope so. i want to show people at
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home one of mark's cameras. this is the central bird box above our heads. tell us what we are seeing, this is a live shot. yes, that is a female, the mail is about to go out and she is sat on a couple of eggs. she will spend most of the day scratching about, she will do a bit of nest—building, drag a feather in it and stick together with saliva. herjob is to look the eggs. in about 20 days, they should hatch. let's see if we can help the swift population. we will look at these boxes. i will give you the microphone, talk us through this. this is a design anyone can build? basically it is a simple box design with exterior plywood. easy to make, all the dimensional 's are on my website. i painted black because the
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swift likes a darker colour inside. i gave them a ready—made nest, couple of little feathers. they spend most of their time just flying until they come back and then that gives them a bit of confidence to crawl back. that is what anybody can do, put one of those on your house. they go up in the eaves? yes, easy. they go up in the eaves? yes, easy. they fly to africa and back and they don't spend a lot of time on the ground. if you find one that is tired and exhausted? if you find one in distress, present it up. don't throw it, just present it up, if it is fitting enough it will fly away. if it doesn't fly, you need to take it toa if it doesn't fly, you need to take it to a rescue centre. don't ever throw it because it willjust flop back down again. just offer it up and if it has recovered enough, it willjust take off from your hand.
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thank you both very much indeed. never let it be said we are not joined up on bbc breakfast. talking about bricks and then this is a swift brick. what they are saying, if house developers put wannabes in, it would replace a brick and then it becomes an instant swift box and also for other species as well and it might be a ready—made habitat. if there is a brick shortage, you have got one in the house.” there is a brick shortage, you have got one in the house. i reckon that would replace two bricks. good thinking. more from the beautiful back garden later on. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm charlotte franks. some river users are claiming a so called "slum city" has sprung up on the thames opposite hampton court palace. it's claimed about 20 boats are moored off privately owned land,
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which means they don't have to pay mooring fees. now, some fear it could spoil the views and be an eyesore to forthcoming visitors to the flower show. it's untidy and it looks an absolute mess. this will attract hundreds and thousands of people to come and visit here. the last thing they want to be doing is looking across the river and seeing what looks like slum village. this is a beautiful, beautiful palace and then this is the view from outside the palace. transport around the capital is returning to normal this morning after another day of travel disruption for thousands yesterday, caused by the wet weather. passsengers at gatwick, heathrow, london city and luton faced cancellations and long delays for a third day in a row. rail passengers were told to avoid kings cross st pancras altogether due to the adverse weather conditions, and because of a trespasser on the line. network rail says passengers who commute through essex are set to benefit from its multi—million pound upgrade of overhead wiring
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between southend victoria and london liverpool street. officials say work is due to start onjune the 4th and end on october the 10th. services after 9:30pm on mondays, tuesday and wednesdays are likely to be disrupted while engineering work is carried out. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there are minor delays on the picadilly line between hammersmith and all heathrow terminals and uxbridge due to a signal failure in the acton town area. on the trains southeastern buses are replacing services between sheerness and sittingbourne. onto the roads, heading through borehamwood, southbound, traffic on the a1 is slow towards the barnet lane at stirling corner. and in belvedere, bronze age way is blocked under the lower road bridge due to flooding, with northbound queues to erith station. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. it's another rather cloudy, misty and murky affair this morning, with still one or two heavy, thundery showers.
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some left after yesterday's torrential downpours. up in the home counties especially. elsewhere, it's looking dry first thing this morning. mostly cloudy, however. now these are the showers i was talking about. they will drift away north and west. still the risk of a shower later but the cloud gradually thinning and hopefully breaking this afternoon so the chance of a bit of sunshine before it sets. temperatures getting up to 22 celsius. overnight tonight, we'll see clear spells at least at first, but then i'm afraid the cloud will develop again. low cloud, mist and murk around, a mild and muggy night too. the minimum between 13 and 15 celsius. now, as we head through thursday, some heavy, perhaps torrential, thundery downpours anticipated. the wind is light so they will be slow—moving. that could lead to perhaps some flash flooding. for friday, a dry affair, still the risk of some showers as we head into the weekend, but lots of dry weather around. some sunny spells and temperatures staying in the low 205. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back
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to charlie and naga. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. a government crackdown on the bosses of rogue cold—call firms, but it comes two years later than planned. they will be held personally liable and could be fined up to £500,000. good morning, it's wednesday 30th may. also this morning: the search for a british toddler who went missing in germany 36 years ago ends with no clues to her disappearance. one of america's biggest tv shows is cancelled after its star, roseanne barr, is accused of sending a racist tweet. is there a national shortage of
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bricks? some builders say they are having to wait six months for new deliveries, so what does it mean for our construction industry? i am in the midlands this morning to find out. good morning. in sport, serena williams says she feels like a superhero as she wins her first grand slam match since becoming a mother. dinsoaurs and duets. # you may see her across a crowded room... # i talk to hollywood superstar jeff goldblum in a rather unconventional interview. i think the weather is unconventional too! good morning, fairly cloudy start for many this morning, cloud pushing back towards the north sea coastline, for scotland and northern ireland, another sunny and warm day.
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england and wales, the cloud producing showery outbreaks of thundery rain, moving northwestwards, but even as it does so, behind it we will be left with leaden skies. more details in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. the government has announced that bosses of companies which make nuisance calls could be personally fined up to £500,000. the government made a similar pledge two years ago, but the necessary legislation wasn't passed. earlier on breakfast, the digital minister, margot james, apologised for the delay. andy moore explains. there is no doubt nuisance phone calls and texts are a major headache for many of us, and the government is keen to clamp down. individual companies can already be fined up to £500,000, but they often declare themselves bankrupt to avoid paying the penalty. targeting the individuals behind those companies would close that loophole. the regulator, ofcom, estimates consumers were bombarded with 3.9 billion nuisance phone calls and text last year. the information commissioner's
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office has issued £17 million in fines since 2010, but only about half that sum, 54%, has been collected. this isn't the first time the government has issued a plan to fine individuals. in 2016, the government said there would be a change in law in 2017, but it didn't happen. i'm very sorry for the delay, in part due to the fa ct for the delay, in part due to the fact that we knew we were going to have to strengthen the whole area of data protection, and we had to get the law through to strengthen data protection across—the—board, which does give additional powers in this area of nuisance calls as well. the government was hoping it will have better luck second time around.
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the response by the authorities to the grenfell tower fire was badly flawed, according to a new report. the paper, commissioned by the charity muslim aid, criticises the leadership of kensington and chelsea council and said volunteers have been left on the front line to cope. the council says it is committed to learning the lessons but will not comment further until after the public enquiry. organisations that never responded to emergencies of this nature before were having to step up. so they found themselves in a situation they were not prepared for, that they hadn't really planned for. the they were local service provision organisations — mosques, centres, churches — going about providing for the local constituencies. they didn't recognise they would have to respond at this level. later this morning, the grenfell commemoration hearings will hear more testimony from those who lost friends and family in the fire. yesterday, ahmed elgwahry talked about losing his mother and sister in the blaze. my
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my mum and sister were poisoned by the smoke, they were burned, they we re the smoke, they were burned, they were cremated. i had to listen to them suffer, and i had to listen to them suffer, and i had to listen to them die. i had to watch grenfell tower burn for a couple of days, but particularly the top floors. a bus has crashed into dozens of cars which were stuck in traffic in dartford in kent, injuring 17 people. 25 vehicles were damaged in the incident yesterday evening. passengers and drivers suffered minor injuries. a man has been arrested on suspicion of careless driving. italy's prime minister designate, carlo cottarelli, is due to meet the country's president later today, amid reports that snap elections may be called for the second time this year. the prospect of fresh elections and the possibility of eurosceptic parties strengthening their position has raised concerns about the eurozone's stability. our europe correspondent adam fleming joins us from strasbourg. in terms of italy, how is that
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affecting developments for the future of the eu now? well, what eu bosses are mostly concerned about at the moment is how they are coming across to ordinary voters across europe, and! across to ordinary voters across europe, and i would give you a really good example of that. yesterday, germany's europe commissioner, in charge of the budget, did an interview with german television where he appeared to suggest that voters in italy would be taught a lesson by the financial markets about what happens if you... for certain political parties. that intimate telling off from his bosses, and he made a grovelling apology last night. —— that earned him. even though it turned out he had been misquoted, that is how twitchy the big bosses are about how they are appearing to voters in italy. they are worried about a whole load of other things — does the turmoil in italy affect the rest of the eurozone? it has been doing pretty well for the last couple of yea rs. pretty well for the last couple of years. does it affect, for example, a big summit of eu leaders planned for next month, when they wanted to
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tackle issues like migration and the eu budget, will they be able to do it without a functioning italian government? and of course, it is yet another example of where voters have been asked, what do think about the eu, and they have come back and said, hmm, not a eu, and they have come back and said, hmm, nota lot, really. eu, and they have come back and said, hmm, not a lot, really. just a brief one, what is happening behind you in that screen? oh, right now we are going to have a speech from the prime minister of luxembourg, a household name, who will be talking about the future of europe, the latest in a long line of eu leaders who have been coming to the european parliament in strasbourg every month to lay out their vision. he will do a speech, and then there will be about two hours of members of the european parliament, north, south, east and west, far right, far left, greens and liberals, all coming up with different versions of what they think the future of europe should be, thereby proving the point of why it is so hard for leaders to grapple with these issues and please people like voters in italy. great to talk
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to, adam, thanks macro very much. a prominent russian journalist has been shot dead outside his home in the ukrainian capital of kiev. arkady babchenko was an outspoken critic of president vladimir putin. the investigative reporter claimed he had to leave russia after receiving death threats. caroline lucas is to step down as co—leader of the green party. ms lucas, the green's only mp, has been in charge alongside jonathan bartley since 2016. under the pa rty‘s rules, leaders serve two—year terms. she says she wants to focus more on her constituency in brighton. one of america's most popular tv shows has been cancelled after its star, roseanne barr, was accused of racism. the actress posted a tweet likening a former aide to barack obama to an ape. roseanne apologised, but tv network abc called her actions repugnant and cancelled the series. this report from our correspondent james cook in los angeles contains flash photography. mom, can i have some money? i don't know. mom, can i have some money? can i have some money?
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roseanne barr fronted a tv sensation. a hugely popular sitcom from the 19805 and '905 which made a triumphant return this year. that did not go through. millions tuned in to see a sympathetic portrayal of working—class trump supporters in america. it came crashing down in a vitriolic twitter tirade. ms barr's nastiest slur was aimed at an african—american political opponent. she was referring to valerie jarrett. i think we have to turn it into a teaching moment. iam fine. i worry about the people out there who do not have a circle of friends and followers who come to their defence. ms barr also attacked hillary clinton and her daughter chelsea, and she falsely called the billionaire investor george soros, who as a jewish child survived the occupation of hungary, a nazi. that tweet was shared
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by donald trump junior. roseanne barr issued a partial apology, but it was not enough for the abc. roseanne's downfall was clearly her own doing, but it is likely to strengthen stereotypes in a divided america with each side accusing the other of intolerance and hatred. in the last half an hour, roseanne has been back on twitter to apologise. she asked her fans not to defend her, adding losing her show is nothing compared to being labelled a racist. she also hit out at those who criticised her for being outspoken on the matter, saying she'll handle it the way she want and that she's tired of being attacked. those are the main stories this
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morning. all the weather and sport coming upfor morning. all the weather and sport coming up for you a little bit later on. katrice lee was just two years old when she disappeared in 1981 near a british army base in the german town of paderborn. she's never been found. for the past month, the royal military police have been excavating a riverbank near where she went missing, but today they're expected to confirm the search has yielded no fresh information. katrice's father, richard lee, is in paderborn this morning and joins us now. richard, a very good morning to you, thank you for your time this morning. iam not thank you for your time this morning. i am not sure what contact you have had with the military police who have been doing the investigations, can you bring us up to date on what they have told you? you are starting to break up, but are you assuming you have asked the question about what contact i have
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had with the royal military police, andi had with the royal military police, and i can confirm that the royal military police and the mod put a statement out, and that statement i find heartbreaking, because i know for a fact that it is not the truth, it is not accurate, and i thought i was working hand in glove with the royal military police, i was coming here for a press conference with the royal military police at 10:30am, to explain where we go from here. so my first question would be, why have you put a statement out that is inaccurate? my second and the main question will be, where does the investigation go from here? the location you are in, we know there has been considerable excavation work going on. tell us a little bit about what was done to get to the point where we are now at. well, basically, keeping it quite simple, the dots werejoined basically, keeping it quite simple, the dots were joined by the royal
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military police with the and e—fit a green saloon car, and very statement is true then to this location. the car was mentioned in statements by various people, and they assumed, going by previous cases, that there was a possibility, the darker side of the case, that katrice was murdered and buried in this location. now i am pleased to say my belief has been confirmed, and where we are at now is the one and only frontrunner is that my daughter was abducted in 1981, and we made that statement then, we are in 2018, lo and behold, we are now at a turning point. you mentioned at the beginning in accuracy is, you think, in terms of what police are presenting. explain that a little bit more for us, would you?” presenting. explain that a little bit more for us, would you? i am not prepared to explain that, and the reason i'm not is because i thought
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that i was working hand in glove with the royal military police. it is an issue that i have taken up last night, and there will be a statement and a release of information by the royal military police, and i am not prepared to break my promise to them that i would remain in confidence.” understand, richard, icompletely understand, richard, icompletely understand that. can you tell us a little bit about how this has been for you personally? you are standing ina for you personally? you are standing in a location, i can only imagine it cannot be easy for you, literally, to be there in these circumstances, even after all this time. well, actually, you can't imagine what it is like unless you are stood in my shoes. but what i can say is that my family, for at the last four and a half weeks, have been living on eggshells. my daughter natasha, she has struggled to maintain her dignity, and katrice's mother sharon
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has also struggled as well. i am a soldier, ideally in facts, but the fa ct before soldier, ideally in facts, but the fact before me, but the proof before me, and! fact before me, but the proof before me, and i will believe you. my belief never drained, and i have said from day one that she was abducted, she is not here, and this has now been proven to be the case. we await to hear what will be said to the media but notwithstanding that, where do you go from here? for you and your family, what will happen next? i can tell you that i have done investigation of my own. i have done investigation of my own. i have a gun and i have loaded it with bullets and i will be firing those questioned at a press conference and i think it only fair i do it in front of the royal military police and not in front of a camera so they hear it second hand. i have stuck to my belief that we are working hand in hand but my faith has now been shattered because of the statement
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that were put out by the mod and royal military police which is wholly inaccurate. richard thank you very much for taking time with us this morning. we are expecting a press co nfe re nce this morning. we are expecting a press conference and more information from germany and we will bring you those details later in the morning on bbc news. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. there are still showers around that are going to catch us out. certainly and some are heavy and thundery in parts of lincolnshire and nottinghamshire and the midlands generally and all me think north—westwards through the day. in scotla nd north—westwards through the day. in scotland and northern ireland we have some blue skies but in central and eastern scotland there is a lot of cloud. the that will push back towards the north sea coast. generally along that cost wherever you are it will feel cool. this front is producing the showery
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outbreaks, and it is a weakening feature, no longer dynamic producing a band of heavy rain. in scotland we have central and eastern areas with this cloud pushing towards the north sea and in the west we have some sunshine as we have in northern ireland and currently in north—west england. you can see these showers. across lincolnshire and the midlands, some are heavy and also thundery and through the day that whole band will move north—westwards into wales and northern england and eventually southern scotland and later eastern scotland and much later eastern scotland and much later in the northern ireland. for scotla nd later in the northern ireland. for scotland and northern ireland once again you have the lion's share of the sunshine and warmth. up to 26 in scotland, 23 in northern ireland. for england and wales, in the thunderstorms the temperature will come down but will feel quite humid and behind there will be a lot of
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cloud and it will be overcast but later it will brighten up in far south—east. this evening and overnight we still had the weather front producing those showers across the rest of northern england and into southern and eastern scotland, drifting to the north—west and getting into northern ireland. behind them, for england and wales there will be a lot of cloud, some brea ks there will be a lot of cloud, some breaks but wherever you are it is going to be a muggy night. we start tomorrow with the remnants of the fund clearing from the north—west scotla nd fund clearing from the north—west scotland and northern ireland and will be more cloud and you have been used to sit this week but for england and wales some sunshine however from early the day we will be watching more thunderstorms coming in from the continent and moving northwards and westwards. these could be torrential and slow—moving so if you catch one you could have it for a while and it will be thundery. it could lead to some problems so keep in touch with the weather forecast. it will be another muggy day as well. by
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friday, those will push off towards northern ireland and western scotland. further showers developing in much of the rest of scotland going through the day but for england and wales in the south where we have had those thunderstorms this week come a bit of a breather with high—pressure building and things are starting to settle down. heading into saturday's in southern areas we will see some sunshine, still humid but further north we have more cloud and the chance of the odd shower. it is changing as we head towards the weekend. thank you. space tourism. it isa it is a fascinating idea, the idea that ordinary people albeit extremely wealthy, might be able to go to space. sir richard branson has moved another step forward in his mission to send tourists into space, after a second successful test flight of his spaceship.
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i spoke to sir richard earlier and asked him how the flight went. we've been 13 years building these spaceships. today we did a very successful second power test flight. it wentjust on the verge of two times the speed of sound, straight up to 115,000 feet. and we will have a couple more flights before the spaceship is actually in space. and then we will do quite a few flights into space with our astronauts and then i'll go up and then, very soon after, members of the public will go up. so we are tantalisingly close now. it's going extremely well, the programme. ok, you've used the term tantalisingly close. it's all going very well. have you got a date? can we pin you down to a date for this flight for passengers, which you will be part of?
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i will... i think that virgin galactic will be the first to actually have astronauts up in the spaceship into space and that i hope will happen within the next two to three months. as far as myself is concerned, i would hope i'm up by the end of the year. and then we will start putting people up when we are 100% sure we have got the craft tested and tested and tested and so my guess would be in the early part of next year. of course you've mentioned safety. there was the awful crash, the fatal crash of enterprise in 2014. i mean, you can't underestimatejust the importance of this to assure the public but to be part of this space race, to get this next phase in momentum. it is a race, it is a safety race. a race with ourselves and safety is obviously
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the number one priority. and that's why this has taken 13 hard years to get here, why we've got 800 engineers working on it, why we're testing rockets time and time again, why we're testing the spaceship. and once they put it through its paces time and time again, only then will i feel comfortable having anybody apart from myself go up into space. but then i think it will be the start of a really exciting new era of space exploration because when ourselves and jeff bezos and elon, we collectively have fleets of spaceships, that's going to one day get the price down and enable a lot of people who would just love to be astronauts — and i think at least 50% of the people watching this
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programme would love to be an astronaut — it will enable them one day to become one. it's £250,000 a ticket now. you said the prices are going to come down. realistically, say three orfour years' time, what kind of ticket price are we looking at? is it going to be affordable for the non—billionaires amongst us? it may not be able to come down that rapidly because in 13 years it's cost over $1 billion to get this far and it's still going to cost us quite a lot more to get the job finished. so we need to get our investment back. once we've got our investment back, then we can start bringing prices down. richard branson talking to us earlier. very excited about his trip. looking at that, if we looked
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at 20 or 30 years ahead, he is equating it to a £500 trip to new york which would be a fascinating prospect. i was trying to think the link between sir richard branson and this next trail is mavericks because he isa this next trail is mavericks because he is a maverick businessman and we like people who do things their own way. jeff goldblum is in the new jurassic park film. i had a chat with him and it kind of went in a jeff goldblum direction! if i said you now come a little something. do you now come a little something. do you know any jazz standards? # some enchanted evening. # you may meet a stranger. # you may see that stranger, charlie... # across a crowded room. # and somehow you'll know, you'll know even then. # that all through your life you will see him again #. etc, etc.
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if you're wondering, he does talk about dinosaurs! i was enjoying your singing! yesterday he made an announcement he is bringing out his first album because he is a very accomplished musician and by pure coincidence yesterday he announced the album. dinosaurs and songs and lots more with lured a bit later. i don't know how we go from jeff goldblum to bricks. ben is at a factory in dudley. who knew that bricks could be so exciting? who knew and we have come inside to look at the production process. this big brown thing is known as a slug and that is the raw brick clay compact together, but in this machine it will come down here
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and it is cut into 15 different bricks automatically. they make about 25,000 every single day, about 7 million a year. but apparently there is a shortage with some builders reporting they cannot get enough bricks and having to wait about six months to get their hands on them and the price they are paint going up. the bricks they make here are the strongest in the country —— they are paying are going up. i want to show you this one which is just clay and because it has not been fired, they tell me, and it could be embarrassing, i should fired, they tell me, and it could be embarrassing, ishould be fired, they tell me, and it could be embarrassing, i should be able to break it. let me have a go. that is what happens before it gets fired in the kiln. it isjust what happens before it gets fired in the kiln. it is just pure clay dug out of the ground. we will tell you what that shortage could mean for some builders and developers later but before that we can get the news and travel and weather where you are
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this morning. there is some great weather around today, and that will be across northern parts of the country — belfast and glasgow. lots of sunshine. but overall the message is that for the next few days, still a chance of storms. we have had storms through the morning, particularly around parts of east anglia, some downpours around again, the risk of downpours around again, the risk of downpours remains through the course of the day today. this is what it looks like around midday, some downpours across parts of northern england, wales, the midlands, parts of medicine. but the north—west of the country, this is where the best of the weather is, so in belfast and glasgow, temperatures well into the 205, beautiful in the western isles,
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but across much of the country it is going to stay fairly cloudy. later in the day, it looks like the sun should be out across western areas and the midlands as well. a lot of cloud tonight, showers in the north, a muggy night, temperatures in london around 15 degrees. in edinburgh, no lower than 14. that ta kes edinburgh, no lower than 14. that takes us into thursday, another speu takes us into thursday, another spell of wet weather heading towards southern areas, downpours with thunder and lightning, gusty winds as well. downpours will be slow—moving, so they will last for a long time, wherever they occur. further north, however, better weather, temperatures into the low 205. those storms, you can see the blogs coming out of the continent, still with us on friday, and also developing across europe, notjust us. northern germany, holland, storms here, whereas across the uk it looks like the downpours will be placed a little bit further north
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for a change, so southern areas getting some dry weather. that is it from me, bye—bye. this is business live from bbc news with jamie robertson and samantha simmonds. italy goes to the markets to raise billions of dollars today. its borrowing costs surge as global investors fret over the country's deepening political crisis. live from london, that's our top story on wednesday 30th may. investors in asia continue the global sell—off and seek safe havens, as fears over italy pushes the euro to a ten month low against the dollar. also in the programme, china warns it's ready to fight back after the us calls off the truce, saying it's going ahead with $50 billion worth of tariffs against the world's second biggest economy.
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