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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  May 30, 2018 9:00am-11:01am BST

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hello, it's wednesday, it's nine o'clock, i'm victoria derbyshire, welcome to the programme. as preparations for the us—north korea summit are back on, we bring you rare and fresh insight into the lives of everyday people living in north korea. it's brutal, repressive and despite the threat of imprisonment or even execution for speaking out, one describes leader kim jong—un asa vampire sucking up the money of his people. mostly, people criticise kim jong—un for being a businessman. people say that kim jong—un makes the same as us that kim jong—un makes the same as us but takes away our money a lot. he uses his head to suck up money like a he uses his head to suck up money likea vampire. another north korean citizen told us about the notorious labour camps. we'll have more on what life's like living in north korea in quarter of an hour. our second exclusive story today — the new calais? since thejungle was torn down
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a year and a half ago, the migrants have moved on, and we've found out where — a tiny port in northern france several hundred miles away, where lorry drivers have told this programme that migrants, armed with knives, are regularly trying to get into their trucks. a report commissioned by one of the voluntary groups that led the aid effort after the grenfell fire has concluded that the response of the local authorities was slow and lacked direction. we will be talking to the head of muslim aid about what needs to change. welcome to the programme, we're live until 11 this morning. also in the programme, we will be talking about nuisance calls. iam sure i am sure you have had one, perhaps more than one. uk consumers received a whopping 3.9 billion
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nuisance calls and texts last year. and now the government launching a much delayed crackdown which will make the bosses of the worst offending firms personally liable for how their companies behave. will it be enough? bosses could be fined up to £5,000, it is being suggested today. will it stop them? letters know your worst nuisance calls. —— £500,000. our top story today — an independent report has accused kensington and chelsea council of being slow and lacking direction in the weeks following the grenfell tower disaster. the research, commissioned by muslim aid, suggests that the authorities relied on voluntary organisations to help those in need, and says the disaster should be a wake—up call about how to deal with future emergencies. ben ando reports. in the chaotic aftermath of the blaze at grenfell tower, everyone wanted to give. clothes, food, supplies, and hundreds of local people stepping forward with something
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just as precious — their time. according to a report commissioned by muslim aid working with local charity groups, the response from the authorities, primarily kensington and chelsea borough council, was weak and lacked direction or coordination. then, says the report, left local volu nteers, often with no experience of local work, trying their best to cope but often overwhelmed. there was complete chaos. i've been to many disasters around the world as an aid worker, and i really didn't expect to find this level of chaos and chaotic response in west london. i think what we need to reflect on is that the local—service actors are the ones that are part and parcel of that provision and that response. in response, the council said... the council said it couldn't comment further until the main public
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inquiry concluded, but the charities say the lesson of this report is clear. in the aftermath of a disaster, the community itself should be put at the centre of the first response, not considered as an afterthought. joanna gosling is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the rest of the day's news. the government has announced that bosses of companies which make nuisance calls could be personally fined up to £500,000. a consultation on changes to the law starts today. in october 2016, the government made a similar pledge but the necessary legislation wasn't passed. andy moore explains. the regulator, 0fcom, estimates consumers were bombarded
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with 3.9 billion nuisance phone calls and texts last year. the information commissioner's office has issued £17.8 million in fines since 2010, but only about half that sum, 5a%, has been collected. this isn't the first time the government has announced a plan to fine individuals. back in 2016, the government said there would be a change in law in 2017, but that didn't happen. i'm very sorry for the delay, but it was in part due to the fact that we then knew we were going to have to strengthen the whole area of data protection, and we had to get the law through to strengthen data protection across the board, which does give additional powers in this area of nuisance calls as well. the government is hoping it will have better luck second time around.
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andy moore, bbc news. caroline lucas is to step down as co—leader of the green party. ms lucas, the green's only mp, has been in charge alongside jonathan bartley since 2016. under the pa rty‘s rules, leaders serve two—year terms. she says she wants to focus more on her constituency in brighton. an exclusive investigation by this programme has shed light on the views of ordinary people in north korea, with one woman saying citizens criticise leader kim jong—un for operating like a businessman and taking their money. the bbc used a covert network of dissidents to put questions to people inside the secretive state over a number of months. it comes as a top north korean official is due to meet us secretary of state mike pompeo, suggesting the summit between president trump and kimjong—un could be back on. as speculation continues about the possibility of a summit meeting between president trump and kimjong—un, the debate about north korea's record on human
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rights has been largely sidelined. a prominent russian journalist has been shot dead outside his home in the ukrainian capital of kiev. arkady babchenko was an outspoken critic of president vladimir putin. the investigative reporter claimed he had to leave russia after receiving death threats. russia's foreign ministry has denied ukrainian accusations that it was behind the killing. police investigating the disappearance of a british toddler in germany 36 years ago will confirm later that an excavation near the spot she went missing has yielded no fresh information. two—year—old katrice lee was on a shopping trip with her mother near a british army base in the town of paderborn. she has never been found. the royal military police have spent the past five weeks digging at a river bank in the town but say nothing has been found. the american actress roseanne barr has apologised to her colleagues who've lost theirjobs after her popular tv show was cancelled following a racist comment she posted on twitter. she'd compared a former adviser of president 0bama to an ape. the network abc called
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her actions repugnant. this report from our correspondent james cook in los angeles contains flash photography. mom, can i have some money? i don't know. mom, canli have some money? i don't know, can“ have some money? roseanne barr fronted a tv sensation. housekeeping! a hugely popular sitcom from the 19805 and ‘90s, which made a triumphant return this year. "beep!" that didn't go through. i heard a beep. millions tuned in to see a sympathetic portrayal of white, working—class, trump—supporting america. it came crashing down in a vitriolic twitter tirade. roseanne barr's nastiest slur was aimed at an african—american political opponent. she was referring to valerie jarrett. i think we have to turn it into a teaching moment. i am fine. i worry about the people out there who do not have a circle of friends and followers who come
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to their defence. ms barr also attacked hillary clinton and her daughter chelsea, and she falsely called the billionaire investor george soros, who as a jewish child who survived the occupation of hungary, a nazi. that tweet was shared by president trump's son, donaldjr. ms barr issued a partial apology, but it wasn't enough for the abc, who called her commments. .. roseanne‘s downfall was clearly her own doing, but it's likely to strengthen stereotypes in a divided america with each side accusing the other of intolerance and hatred. the digital minister, margot james, has told the bbc that consumers should not use viagogo when trying to obtain hard—to—get event tickets. ms james said viagogo is "the worst" of the secondary ticketing sellers. it comes as the advertising standards agency said viagogo has
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missed a deadline to change the way it shows its ticket prices and fees. the scottish government is banning single—use coffee cups in restaurants and cafes in its main buildings to cut plastic pollution. the measure is coming into force on monday. drinks will be served in reusable ceramic mugs for those sitting in, and staff are being encouraged to bring their own cups to take out. that's a summary of the latest bbc news, more at 9:30. if you are getting in touch, you are very welcome. you can if you are getting in touch, you are very welcome. you can message us on facebook and whatsapp. later in the programme, we will be talking about a story we have covered before, secondary ticketing, a massive issue, and the advertising standards authority have said viagogo is breaking advertising rules by failing to make the total cost of your ticket clear. it talks about
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drug pricing not being good for the consumer. well, now the digital minister that customers should not use viagogo at all. we will have all the details on that for you and your experiences of secondary ticketing prices is very welcome. let's get some sport with will perry, and serena williams has been making headlines on court for more reasons that one? i don't know what you made of this, but what they returned to grand slam tennis for serena williams, the first grand slam since giving birth to her daughter, her outfit getting a bit of attention, but it was a really tough first—round draw for serena, kristyna pliskova in the first round at roland garros, she saw her off pretty comfortably —— 7-6, 6-4. saw her off pretty comfortably —— 7—6, 6—4. you can see the relief on herface at 7—6, 6—4. you can see the relief on her face at match point, 7—6, 6—4. you can see the relief on herface at match point, her team
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clapping her, but the advert has got at action, it is a catsuit which he designed quite a while ago, and it reminds her of the characters from the black panther film, reminds her of the characters from the black pantherfilm, and reminds her of the characters from the black panther film, and she tweeted this straight after the result. 0na on a serious note, she says it has helped cope with the issue of blood cards, which she revealed in february almost cost her her life, but interesting outfit, interesting to see what she will wake against ashleigh barty in the next round, victoria. lots of reaction to raheem sterling's tattoo, that continues to come in. that is everywhere, all of social media and the papers this morning, raheem sterling has had the backing of the football association for some of the criticism over the tattoo. it is an m—16 assault rifle which he said is a reminderfor him to never touch a gun after his
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father was shot dead when he was a baby injamaica. a spokesperson said we all support sterling and i've not be heartfelt account that we —— and acknowledge the heartfelt account he gave. but he is a role model, should he be leading by example, does it send the right message? particularly ata time send the right message? particularly at a time when there is so much gun crime going on in london. nedum 0nuoha is a former manchester city defender and qpr captain, he is friends with raheem sterling, and sterling has come in from a lot of criticism from his open at! and his own players, from lots of other fans of other clubs. —— from his own fans. he doesn't suit certain people's idea, maybe it is his background, they don't accept that someone from where he is in london, or where he was injamaica, they don't relate to him, they don't feel
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the same way. maybe it isjust that raheem sterling does not represent what the majority of the country looks like, feels like and wants to be like, maybe that is why the media cells that image of him being a bad guy to the masses, because that is how they want to busy them, which i think is a problem. that was nedum 0nuoha. it is unfinished, who knows, there could be read macro circle with a cross, but it has had a lot of attention. most people know that mo salah is in a race to be fit for the world cup, he has arrived for treatment in spain, something else was hustling him. they were, the positive news for liverpool fans and egypt fans is that he has not broken or dislocated his shoulder. he arrived in valencia yesterday, and one spanishjournalist, arrived in valencia yesterday, and one spanish journalist, the only guide there, had a prime spot, have a look at this, he is grilling salah as he arrives in spain. some words, please? clearly not
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wanting to answer these questions, meeting a member of the medical staff as he went for an assessment on the shoulder, he kept going, the only one around him, here he is again. it is possible to play real madrid next year? he was not giving up! he was back again and kept marching with him and clearly salah had enough of him that he was moving freely and pulling his bag and he seems to be moving freely. this guy kept on going, he had about 50 questions but he did not answer any. he is fighting to be fit for their first world cup game for egypt since 1990 as they take on uruguay on the 15th ofjune. thank you. the us—north korea summit looks like it's back on, as the us secretary of state and a top north korean general meet in new york today.
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what about everyday people living in korth korea? talking to them is almost impossible. anyone going into the country is constantly watched and their movements restricted. communications with the outside world are blocked — owning a phone which calls abroad is illegal and there is no access to the internet. but, working over many months with a covert network, this programme has been able to put questions to two citizens living inside the world's most repressive state. speaking to us could bring severe punishment — imprisonment or even execution. so we have taken steps to conceal their identities, like not using their real voices, to ensure their continuing anonymity. what the two people — a woman who works as a market trader and a man from the military — tell us paints a stark picture of life under kim jong—un, with people who speak out about the brutal regime disappearing, rounded up by the notorious security forces and sent to labour camps, or worse. they reveal what the people of north korea really think
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about their young leader, an extraordinary softening of attitudes towards the west and the rumours swirling about possible talks between kim jong—un and us president donald trump. 0ur report michael cowan has this exclusive film. north korea is the world's most repressive regime. the brutal kim dynasty, which has been in control for over half a century, has presided over some of the world's worst human rights abuses. talking to the ordinary people of north korea is virtually impossible. information coming out of the country is strictly controlled by the regime. anybody going in is heavily policed. citizens can't move freely inside the country, or leave it. working with a covert network over many months, we have put questions to two ordinary citizens living
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inside north korea. if the authorities found out they had spoken to us, they would face imprisonment in one of the regime's notorious labour camps, or death. for that reason, we have concealed their identities and have taken steps to ensure their continued anonymity. eating and living is difficult. people say that kim jong—un is the same as us. but he takes away our money. some people do complain about their everyday lives. some get caught by the state security department for saying the wrong things. people cannot survive in the prison camps. once you go there, you are no longer a citizen. i think this terror is what keeps society going. chul—ho is a father
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who works in the military. sun—hui is a market trader who lives with her husband and two daughters. these aren't their real names. like many market sellers, she trades notjust in goods, but also in black foreign currency, chinese yen and dollars. we asked them about their daily life. i wake up at dawn, around 5.30, because i need to cook rice. afterwards, i call the dollar black market and find out the exchange rate. i eat breakfast with the family, then i organise the goods to sell at the market and head there. i usually lunch at the market. nongma noodles, potato noodles. after i eat lunch, i check the market rates to see what the popular items are.
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i then come home and check the inventory, then i prepare dinner. when the business is good, we eat rice three times a day. when it isn't so good, we have to mix corn in with the rice. we mostly buy from the market. sometimes we buy in bulk from nearby farmers. sometimes at night i watch korean drama or foreign films. i usually sleep at about ten o'clock. our people are nice. we have a saying, that neighbours are better than cousins. if something happens to our neighbours, we visit each other. but eating and living is difficult. there are no such things as weekends. there is not much to watch on tv,
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and no time to stay at home. if i have spare time, i go woodcutting. despite being closed off from much of the outside world, and crippled by economic sanctions, there are thriving markets with goods brought in both legally and illegally via china. foreign media, like films and tv shows, are popular, something the regime fights hard to prevent as it undermines their anti—western propaganda. the smugglers may meet everyday if there is a business, or maybe just once a week, or month. korean things are the most popular, of course. but the crackdown on them is strong. i've heard the cost of bribes
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if you are caught is huge, but people still want to watch them. it is easy to understand. people are curious about how south koreans live. but they can't watch it every day. you watch it once in a blue moon. i have heard in some places if you have money, you can pay to have a chinese tv station installed for about 600 chinese yen. that's equivalent to around £70 — a fortune to north koreans whose average annual income is estimated to be less than £1000. the state security department are known as the bowibu to north koreans. they are the iron fist of the regime. they are known for demanding outrageous bribes for small infractions, as well as policing everyday citizens for signs of dissent. dissent in north korea includes things like criticising the regime, trying to defect or making contact
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with anybody outside the country. these crimes can result in detention in a hard labour camp known as the gulags, or, in extreme cases, public execution. punishment isn't restricted to the accused. in north korea, three generations of their family can be sentenced as retribution for one person's actions. sometimes, people get caught by the state security department, the bowibu, for saying the wrong things. people do suddenly disappear. but it hasn't happened here recently. sometimes the state security department get people by calling them spies for their own results. they make up stories for their own performance. they make people say they were planning to go to china and then report them.
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many people do go to china officially, but they are sent there and told not to be influenced by capitalism. i myself don't know what happens in the camps, because the bowibu deal with them. we can't talk about them much. when a neighbour disappears, we just say he went to low town, meaning south korea. defection doesn't happen here much. i heard it happens a lot in the border areas. here, there are a lot of government captures, people arrested and taken away. the people shouldn't commit crime. people cannot survive in the prison camps. they unconditionally beat you. they starve you, while doing extreme labour. once you go there, you are no longer a citizen.
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i think this terror is what keeps society going. kim jong—un became the leader of north korea in the wake of his father's death in 2011. he is the third ruler in the dictatorship. it's a cult of personality, with the leaders portrayed as godlike figures. the youngest kim stands accused of leading a regimejust as brutal as his father and grandfather. he allegedly ordered the murders of his uncle and half brother, whilst allowing the unfettered powers of the security services to continue. hearing any kind of public criticism of kimjong—un in north korea is exceptionally rare. in fact, it's illegal to publicly criticise him or any of his family. mostly, people criticise kim jong—un
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for being a businessman. people say that kim jong—un acts the same as us, but takes away our money a lot. that the little man uses his head to suck out money like a vampire. but the number of people who assess him positively is increasing. in the 1990s, north korea experienced a famine that left over 1 million people dead when the state couldn't fund its ration system. in response, black markets emerged across the country. today, they serve as a lifeline to the population with the regime reluctantly allowing this capitalist trade to grow. according to the un, 40% of the population is undernourished. and, without these markets, they'd starve. he leaves the markets alone and doesn't crack down much, no matter what we do. many people want things
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to continue the way it is. and, internally, there appears to be a softening in rhetoric towards the west. i've heard at the market that the president of the us is coming. people don't know much about the meeting, but everyone dislikes america and says the reason for us living in poverty is because america split us and sealed us off. but things are changing a little recently. they say we should get along with the south. recently, they say we should be living in peace with america for everyone to have a better life. i'm not sure what foreigners think about north korea. there is only north koreans here. i myself hope to live well, without envy, until we die. without being sick. with parents being healthy and my children living well. voices from north korea giving
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new and rare insight into their daily lives. in an hour's time we'll get reaction to what we've heard from those who study the secretive state for a living and be getting their assessment of the prospect of a summit between donald trump and kim jong—un. still to come, is this the new calais? these pictures have been exclusively given to this programme by uk lorry drivers who've been telling us that up to 200 migrants, armed with knives, have now moved from calais a new french port and are trying to get into their trucks to try to sneak into the uk. we'll bring you the details. and do you struggle to get a doctor's appointment? a new report has found that more than a million people in the uk have been forced to look for a new gp over the past five years.
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we will be finding out what is behind the closures. time for the latest news. the response by the authorities to the grenfell tower fire was badly flawed according to a new report. the paper, commissioned by the charity muslim aid, criticises the leadership of kensington and chelsea council and said volunteers have been left on the front line to cope. the council says it is committed to learning the lessons but will not comment further until after the public enquiry. bosses of companies which bombard consumers with cold calls could be personally liable for fines of £500,000 following a consultation which launches today. in october 2016, the government made a similar pledge but the necessary legislation wasn't passed. consumers received 3.9 billion nuisance phone calls and texts last year. at the moment, only the companies themselves are liable for fines if they break the law. caroline lucas is to step down as co—leader of the green party. ms lucas, the greens' only mp, has been in charge alongside
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jonathan bartley since 2016. under the pa rty‘s rules, leaders serve two—year terms. she says she wants to focus more on her constituency in brighton. the american actress roseanne barr has apologised to her colleagues who've lost their jobs after her popular tv show was cancelled following a racist comment she posted on twitter. she'd compared a former aide to president 0bama to an ape. the head of the network said the comments were abhorrent, repugnant and inconsistent with its values. the digital minister, margot james, has told the bbc that consumers should not use viagogo when trying to obtain hard—to—get event tickets. ms james said viagogo is "the worst" of the secondary ticketing sellers. it comes as the advertising standards agency said viagogo has missed a deadline to change the way it shows its ticket prices and fees. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. here's some sport now with will. here are the sport headlines for you, victoria.
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serena williams says she felt like a warrior princess in the catsuit she wore, beating krystina pliskova in straight sets at the french open. it was her first grand slam since returning from having a baby. she faces australian ashleigh barty in the second round tomorrow. the fa have supported raheem sterling after the england forward revealed his new gun tattoo. sterling said it's in memory of his dad, who was shot and killed when he was young. the fa say, "we all support sterling and acknowledge the honest and heartfelt account he gave." frank lampard is edging closer to his firstjob in management. the former chelsea and england midfielder is being heavily linked with the derby countyjob, and some newspapers suggest that his appointment could be confirmed this week. and it was a disappointing night for scotland. they travelled all the way to lima to take on peru but lost 2—0. northern ireland drew 0—0 with panama, who are in england's world cup group. that's all the sport for now, more for you at ten. next month will mark a year since the devastating
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fire at grenfell tower which killed 71 people. now a report, commissioned by one of the groups that led the aid effort after the fire, has concluded that the response of the local authorities was slow and lacked direction. we'll talk to the man behind the report in a moment. when we broadcast our programme from north kensington for the fourth time in two weeks after the fire, residents were desparate for answers. this was the moment the then housing minister, alok sharma, joined our programme and talked to those affected by the fire. can i just first say, look, i understand why people are really angry. i do understand that. please, if i may have... no, no, no, excuse me! if i may say, for one minute... we are angry! sir, can ijust, for one minute, just say... i went to the harrow club last week together with my colleague nick hurd. i met people who have been affected by this. you know, the bravery that people are showing in coming forward, and the dignity... stop, please! they're asking you to stop
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with the platitudes, please. a new report today commissioned by muslim aid found that voluntary organisations stepped in to help those in need, although it acknowledges that charities also came up short. kensington and chelsea council said it was committed to learning lessons. let's talk to jehangir malik, the chief executive of muslim aid. you have delivered aid in the aftermath of earthquakes, floods and droughts — what was your experience of west london? you talk about a chaotic picture in this report, which i have read this morning. is it understandable, though? it is an unprecedented disaster, i drove past it this morning on the way into the studio, a stark reminder of what happened almost a year ago, reminder of what happened almost a yearago, and it was reminder of what happened almost a year ago, and it was a disaster that caught everyone by surprise, including the local authorities and the emergency response mechanisms. the report highlights the phenomenal
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role played by local organisations, the churches, the mosques, the centres, alongside great volunteers that emerged out of all walks of life who played a heroic act. and so that morning, we were there with the volunteers, as chaotic, uncoordinated and crazy as it appeared, there was a sense of community spirit that stepped into the void that was left behind. how was the voluntary sector able to organise in a more effective way than officials from the local authority, who were there on the ground on the very morning, because i spoke to them? well, the local centres, community centres, mosques and the local organisations are deeply rooted within that area and have been working with local communities for a very, very long time. so it is about trust? because
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they are not experts in organisation. not at all, not set up to be disaster response agencies. i have worked in disaster response for 25 years, and that is our bread and butter, but i didn't expect to find his chaos in emergency response within the local area. so the local organisations stepped up to the mark, and as ill—prepared and ill—equipped as they work, they did a sterling job, along with all the amazing voluntary support that came in that morning. which disasters around the world have you helped that? for myself, the tsunami in indonesia, the somalian famine, pakistan earthquake, floods, disaster responses. i have been an aid workerfor 25 years, disaster responses. i have been an aid worker for 25 years, i've disaster responses. i have been an aid workerfor 25 years, i've been all over the world. and how would you compare the organisation and relief effort with those disasters with the response to this fire in the capital city of one of the most
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developed nations on earth? i've got to say, i was deeply shocked that the level of chaos that in student right after the fire, and it is something i didn't expect to find in west london. is it partly because, this is what some residents feel, because they are deprived compare it to some parts of this country, and they are cared about less? is there any truth in that? i think the local authorities and the emergency response mechanisms need reviewing, andi response mechanisms need reviewing, and i think they don't take into consideration, i think this is why the reporters called mind the gap, the reporters called mind the gap, the gap between local civil society organisations and the local authorities. that mechanism is to be improved to ensure that the vulnerable people are not left to their own devices in the eventuality
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ofan their own devices in the eventuality of an attack. we have got terror attacks that have happened right throughout 2017, we have got climate change, we have got the potential of much more disasters. maybe, hopefully, god forbid, nothing of this nature, on this scale, but we have got to take lessons, to ensure we put that into a mechanism that will enable us to better respond. you barely mentioned the government's response. the grenfell inquiry is what will address the government's response. the primary purpose of muslim aid is to highlight the valiant efforts, however chaotic they were, that need improving of the voluntary service, and to ensure that the voluntary service needs coordination with the local authorities and a response mechanism into the government so that, in the first few hours of any attack, the fate centres and community centres dotted all across our country, they could be better mobilised, better utilised, if they
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we re mobilised, better utilised, if they were ina mobilised, better utilised, if they were in a better preparedness mechanism. you say in the report that housing remains a major unresolved problem. absolutely. some people are still in hotels almost one year on, how much does that contribute to a sense of injustice felt by residents? i mean, you know, whenever i have gone back to grenfell, justice is the number one priority, and our hearts and prayers go out to all those who have lost their lives, and those who are in need of a permanent solution. i think what we call upon here is every victim, every buried family member, the local community that has been affected, these scars will be deep and will go on for a very long time. as we speak, as we are looking at the one—year on tragedy, we must seek to learn lessons so that the eventuality of anything happening
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again, we're better prepared. since the so—called jungle camp in calais was flattened and the migrants who lived there were moved on, on this programme we've heard claims that hundreds of them are still dispersed across northern france. so where are they going? well, this is caen. the port's actually in a small town called 0uistreham. lorry drivers have now exclusively told this programme that up to 200 migrants, armed with knives, are regularly hanging around the roads near the port, hiding in ditches, trying to get into lorries to make it to the uk. in fact the situation is so bad in what's being called "the new calais," that some companies are refusing to let their drivers use the route. let's talk now to rod mckenzie from the road haulage association.
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sherralin ballard is a long—distance lorry driver who's had problems with migrants trying to get onto her truck in 0uistreham, which is the port near caen. and i'm alsojoined by vicki campbell from haulage company breakwells, who are so worried about the situation in caen, they refuse to use the route for their drivers. i would like to start with you if i may, tell our audience what you have been experiencing as a driver. good morning. well, going into caen, there is a ditch on the right—hand side next to the hypermarket. they arejust sitting, side next to the hypermarket. they are just sitting, waiting for you to go past. there is a roundabout way you have to slow down, if you don't, they run out in front of you, and they run out in front of you, and they are trying to get into the back of the trailers, open your doors, and from experience you know that they all have knives. they all have knives, because once they get into
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the trailers, they have to get out, and even if they open the doors to get in, to get out they generally cut themselves out of the side curtains. they also get in other trailers, and obviously most uk hauliers are aware of the problem, they do seal their vehicles, do their checks. but i have personally been offered £2000 to bring people into the uk. now, when you offer somebody from a very poor country, like romania, lithuania, any of those, £2000 is a lot of money, they will put them in the trailers. they get off when they are on the ferry, and then they get into any trailers. they climb over the roof, i have personally had experience of that. how intimidating is it? well, it is, because these people run out in front of you. what is your option? do you slow down? you know you will get into trouble. 0r
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do you slow down? you know you will get into trouble. or do you keep going and hope that they move out of the way? who is responsible for these people? these are not poor people, they all have shoes, they all have mobile phones, they all have an education. they throw things at you, they throw stones, they throw marbles, that is one that my colleague had thrown at him, a brand—new vehicle, cost him £150,000, and he had marbles thrown at his vehicle, which then cost him about £2000 forjay risbridger to fix the problems it had caused. about £2000 forjay risbridger to fix the problems it had causedm this area the new calais, as far as you are concerned ? this area the new calais, as far as you are concerned? absolutely, if you are concerned? absolutely, if you go into caen, around the ring road into 0uistreham, from the ring road into 0uistreham, from the ring road onwards, you can see them walking around, exactly as in calais. there is a small fish market that you need to drive around, and that you need to drive around, and that fish market and that area is a parking area for cars, and sometimes
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you go around there, and there are 100-200 you go around there, and there are 100—200 people there. the gendarmes are trying to control it, this is a very small holiday town, and the gendarmes, at the same time, are overwhelmed. thank you very much. nicky campbell is from a haulage firm, you have decided not to have any of your vehicle is going through caen, why? we don't send them because of the risk now involved with damage to the vehicles and for the drivers' safety as well. what do mean by driver safety? as the lady said, they are all carrying weapons now, doing lots of damage to our vehicles and the goods on board, and we feel it is only a matter of time before our drivers are at risk with their safety as well. do you think it is the new calais? it is, yes, it seems to be, now that they have
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closed that down, they have gone to other ports with caen, we have experienced lots of issues in bilbao and santander in northern spain as well. oh, right, so notjust france? rod mckenzie, what to make of this situation? it is very worrying and getting worse. it is the summer that this happens, and there is a lot of evidence as was so vividly described, of a real and present threat to the lives of drivers doing their job, threat to the lives of drivers doing theirjob, trying to get goods to theirjob, trying to get goods to the uk. so whose responsibility is it, then, to make this a safer place? it has got to be the french authorities, because it is their land. to some extent, some security measures have been improved around the port, there is more fencing, but as was said, the difficulty is when as was said, the difficulty is when a lorry stops or is full to stop by makeshift roadblocks, and that that
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point the migrant gangs, very well organised, try to get on board lorries, and they do that often with either threats of violence towards drivers or, indeed, threats of rape towards female drivers. has that actually happened ? towards female drivers. has that actually happened? you have evidence of that? the real threat to drivers of that? the real threat to drivers of both sexes is massive in caen and it is deteriorating. you have described them as migrant gangs, you'd say they are armed, do you have any sympathy for the desperation to get to britain to start a new life? i understand why mike windt have arrived in france and spain, trying to get to the uk —— migrants have arrived. the uk is seen as an attractive place but my
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job, ourjob at the road haulage association is to look after the interests of drivers. they have a human rights as well and they're right should be a safe journey to and from their places of work. the british government has an arrangement with the french government that effectively our border is in northern france when it comes to vehicles and trucks on the ferries and the tunnel, do you have a message to them? the message must be that the police are doing their best, as we have heard, but they are heavily outnumbered. as they go off shift or reduce numbers because they think they're built with a problem, you have a new build—up of migrants and probably only the french military have the manpower to be able to efficiently tackle this over able to efficiently tackle this over a sustained period. i understand you have actually considered closing your business because of the threat to your trucks and drivers? not closing the whole business, just the
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spanish delivery side of it. because we're back to look to see if it is worth our while and with the risk involved with the drivers and the damages we receive all the time, if it is worthwhile to continue or not. and at the moment it is worthwhile? the ferry company have built a new wall in bilbao which is quite high and seems to be keeping migrants out of the port but because of that they move further away. the situation in bilbao seems to be managed better and he's not too bad at the moment. sherralin, what would you suggest is the solution? the solution is with the solution? the solution is with the french. you have to remember that these people are not illegal in france and spain. 0ur border, because we're not in the schengen agreement, it is the place they can be stopped. it needs to be dealt
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with at source. i heard a report recently of a female gynaecologist coming from somewhere like syria or iran and paying £2500 to get to the uk illegally. people say that these are educated people and we need gynaecologists, but they also need them in syria, in their home countries. these are the educated people that should be rebuilding these countries and it is down to these countries and it is down to the governments and the people who are in charge of welfare in their own countries to get these people safe. i know it is a war zone and i can understand any person taking their children from a war zone, the same as they did in the world wars, but that the same time, my sister is in australia, my sister—in—law came from the philippines, but they both emigrated legally. it needs to be dealt with at source before it gets here. thank you very much. sherralin
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isa here. thank you very much. sherralin is a long—distance driver and we also heard from vicky campbell from brea kwells and rod also heard from vicky campbell from breakwells and rod mckenzie from the road haulage association. coming up... we talk about roseanne barr whose show has been cancelled after a racist tweet she said. over the last five years, more than a million people in the uk have been forced to look for a new gp due to closures of doctors' surgeries — that's according to the gp magazine pulse. we can now speak to helen stokes—lampard, chair of the royal college of general practitioners and chris read, who's campaigning to save a local gp walk—in centre in accrington, where two other surgeries have closed in recent months. good morning to both of you. helen, why are so many gp surgeries closing? we have a mixture of closures and mergers. some are closing because they cannot get the
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doctors and they don't have the resource and cannot get nurses and the other staff that it takes to run a surgery safely in the modern nhs but many are also emerging. they are getting together to provide better services for patients and scale up they feel they can provide a greater range of services. the figures are shocking and every surgery that shut isa shocking and every surgery that shut is a tragedy for the patient and for the doctors and nurses there but beyond that, many are merging to do new and exciting things. with a bit more new and exciting things. with a bit m o re co ntext new and exciting things. with a bit more context it is not as bad as it first looks? not as bad as it looks but there are many surgeries closing and every one is a disaster and we have to support those practices going through this closure and tension and threat of closure to help them because there is no benefit in practice is closing as an emergency measure, nobody wins. what has been going on with the surgeries in yourarea? has been going on with the surgeries in your area? we have lost two gp surgeries in the area in the last three months. the accrington walk—in
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ce ntre three months. the accrington walk—in centre is also a gp centre which is used to taking in over 44,000 people a year through the doors. they have also closed the out of hours service in clitheroe just a few miles down the road and there isjust the pressure on gps which is unsustainable and terrible. there is no reason for them to close this valuable walk—in service because it is leaving people with nowhere to go and we know at least 32% will end up going to a&e. and we know at least 32% will end up going to me. on that very point, i had a statement from the east frankish hospitals nhs trust it says, "we like to ensure people that all of our services remain u naffected all of our services remain unaffected by the decision to withdraw the walk—in centre. that service is a primary gp service for patients with minor ailments and we therefore do not anticipate the closure will have a significant impact on a&e." explain why t44
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people —— y 44,000 people went through the doors. it is because people could not get appointments at the time. theyjust do not have the capacity for out of hours appointment only surgeries. sorry to interrupt, chris, but helen says that are not enough nurses or members of staff to run a surgery, it will have too close? at accrington they will make them redundant. i was going to say, redundancy in the current nhs seems unbelievable because we are desperately short of doctors and nurses. also, we want to help patients. if people think they need to see somebody, it is all very well saying that attendance was not appropriate or necessary, the patients do not know that until they have a chance to at least speak to someone, a health care professional who can understand what is going on
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and disentangle their problems and shorts and b button go to a&e ought walk—in centres do not need to be there but we can't expect people to telepathically know that. they need the right resources, whether that is online, through apps, telephone to direct them to the best place, the people who think they need cup need help and we had to direct them for the viewer benefited personally from the viewer benefited personally from the walk—in centre, tell us how. i suffered a brain haemorrhage at the time. i went into the walk in the time. i went into the walk in the centre, but i had a and within an houror so the centre, but i had a and within an hourorsol the centre, but i had a and within an hour or so i was in north—western being operated for a brain haemorrhage. wow. that isjust walking in. it is a disgrace. they cannotjustify this walking in. it is a disgrace. they cannot justify this closure, despite what they say, they cannot justify it. thank you very much for coming on the programme. a statement from nhs england said "more than 3000 gp
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practices have received extra support banks to £827 million investment over the past three years and there are plans to help hundreds more. nhs england is beginning to reverse is direct underinvestment with an extra 2.4 billion going into gp practices every year by 2021." we will have the news and sport and weather coming up. it's not always easy being a female dj but it's especially hard in the male—dominated music scene in russia. ahead of the world cup, the bbc has been to the city of st petersburg, a centre for underground art and music, to meet two young djs, yulia and ira, who are trying to bring more visibility to russian women behind the decks. how is your russian? mine is not up to scratch! i apologise, obviously we meant to bring you the subtitled version of that and we completely failed so i do apologise! the news
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and sport is up but before he is the weather. good morning. for the next few days we will carry on with some unsettled weather, warm sunshine but there is the risk of more thunderstorms. we have that combination today with this line of rain moving northwards and west with producing quite a few thunderstorms this morning, particularly in lincolnshire, northamptonshire and nottinghamshire. courtesy of this fund which will continue to move northwards, if you look at the isobars, that is hardly any wind so if you are caught under one of those storms, you could have it for a while. they will move northwards and westward through the day and ahead of them in northern ireland they have sunshine from the word go and will hold onto it. in scotland, some cloud in central and eastern areas this morning which pushes towards the north sea coast and it will then brighten up. in north—west england, after a bright start, you have the
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cloud and show was coming through the afternoon. a lot of cloud left in the wake of the system apart from in the wake of the system apart from in the south—east where it will brighten up later. we are looking at a top temperature in northern ireland in the sunshine of about 23, in the west of scotland more likely around 26 and 22 in london. always cooler on the north sea coast. again todayit cooler on the north sea coast. again today it will feel quite humid. this evening and overnight, what is left about whether fund will continue to drift northwards and westward, taking some showers into northern ireland and some into southern and eastern scotland pushing towards the north—west but it is also a weakening feature. quite a lot of cloud again tonight as there has been over the last few nights. 0ne or two breaks and it will be another humid night, particularly as we push further south. 0n humid night, particularly as we push further south. on thursday, the re m na nts of further south. on thursday, the remnants of any overnight showers
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will move away from scotland and northern ireland and it will be quite a cloudy day with some bright spells developing but in sharp contrast to the south where we have more thunderstorms coming in from the continent. it is hard to predict exactly where these storms will occur. that is what we think at the moment. they will be slow—moving and heavy and we think part of hampshire could see them for example, gostyuzhev and into wales, but they could occur almost anywhere —— gloucestershire. they could be disrupted so if you are travelling, keep an eye on the weather forecast. 0nce keep an eye on the weather forecast. once again, it will feel quite humid. by friday we will have the showery outbreaks in parts of northern ireland and into north—west england and further showers developing in scotland. quite cloudy but some brighter breaks in the south. we have had the thunderstorms of late in southern areas but this is an improvement, drier and brighter conditions but still
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feeling quite humid. into the weekend, high—pressure starting to build, again looking at a fair bit of sunshine in the south, still some cloud in the north with one or two showers. hello, it's wednesday, it's ten o'clock, i'm victoria derbyshire. as preparations for the us—north korea summit are back on. we bring you rare and fresh insight into the lives of everyday people living in north korea — it's brutal, it's repressive, and despite the threat of imprisonment or even execution for speaking out, one describes leader kim jong—un as a vampire sucking up the money of his people. mostly, people criticise kim jong—un for being a businessman. people say that kim jong—un makes the same as us but takes away our money a lot. the little man uses his head to suck up money like a vampire. reaction to come in the next half—hour.
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a report by one of the voluntary groups that led the aid effort after the grenfell fire says that the local authorities‘ response was slow and lacked direction. 0rganisations that never responded to emergencies of this nature before were having to step up. so they found themselves in a situation that they are not prepared for, that they hadn't really planned for. as secondary—ticket website viagogo misses a deadline to make its prices more transparent, a government minister tells consumers not to use it. that was going to be clip of margot james, the digitial minister, telling you not to use viagogo, we will have that in the next half hour. nowjoanna with the news. the response by the authorities to the grenfell tower fire was badly flawed, according to a new report. the paper, commissioned by the charity muslim aid,
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criticises the leadership of kensington and chelsea council and said volunteers have been left on the front line to cope. the council says it is committed to learning the lessons but will not comment further until after the public inquiry. it was a disaster that caught everybody by surprise including the local authorities and the emergency response mechanism. the report stands to highlight the phenomenal role played by the local organisations, the churches and mosques and centres alongside the great volunteers that emerged out of all walks of life into this space and played a heroic act. that morning we were there with the volunteers, as chaotic, uncoordinated and crazy as it appeared, there was a sense of community spirit that stepped into the void that was left behind. authorities in belgium have confirmed that the attacker who killed three people in liege yesterday had killed a fourth person the night before.
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the suspect, named by belgian media as benjamin herman, shot two policewomen dead, before turning the weapon on a student teacher sitting in a parked car. the attacker, who is believed to have been radicalised in prison, was shot dead by police. bosses of companies which bombard consumers with cold calls could be personally liable for fines of £500,000 following a consultation which launches today. in october 2016, the government made a similar pledge, but the necessary legislation wasn't passed. consumers received 3.9 billion nuisance phone calls and texts last year. at the moment, only the companies themselves are liable for fines if they break the law. caroline lucas is to step down as co—leader of the green party. ms lucas, the greens' only mp, has been in charge alongside jonathan bartley since 2016. under the pa rty‘s rules, leaders serve two—year terms. she says she wants to focus more on her constituency in brighton. an exclusive investigation by this programme has shed light
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on the views of ordinary people in north korea, with one woman saying citizens criticise leader kim jong—un for operating like a businessman and taking their money. the bbc used a covert network of dissidents to put questions to people inside the secretive state over a number of months. it comes as a top north korean official is due to meet us secretary of state mike pompeo, suggesting the summit between president trump and kimjong—un could be back on. the american actress roseanne barr has apologised to her colleagues who've lost their jobs, after her popular tv show was cancelled following a racist comment she posted on twitter. she'd compared a former aide to president 0bama to an ape. the head of the network said the comments were abhorrent, repugnant and inconsistent with its values. the digital minister, margot james, has told the bbc that consumers should not use viagogo when trying to obtain hard—to—get event tickets. ms james said viagogo is "the worst" of the secondary ticketing sellers. it comes as the advertising
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standards agency said viagogo has missed a deadline to change the way it shows its ticket prices and fees. this view on whatsapp says, my husband bought wwe tickets for him and my two sons a few months ago from viagogo, but it wasn't until the tickets came that he realised we had been charged much more than face value. no warnings about the extra charges, it is disgusting that they do this to people, i'm going to try to get our money back somehow. and this, two years ago i booked tickets for a concert in glasgow, i was horrified to see that our 90 quid tickets cost, in the end, over 300 quid. iwas tickets cost, in the end, over 300 quid. i was furious — tickets cost, in the end, over 300 quid. iwas furious — in tickets cost, in the end, over 300 quid. i was furious — in my ignorance, i spend way over the odds. we will talk more about that in the next hour. and the
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government's plans to crack down on nuisance calls by making the bosses of these companies liable for what they do. apparently they could be fined, the actual bosses could be fined, the actual bosses could be fined up to £500,000. if you have an experience of a nuisance call or two, let me know. good morning. day four of the french open has just got under way britain's cameron norrie is amongst those in second round action, but it's serena williams who's still dominating the headlines at roland garros. she's unseeded in paris after her time away from the game having given birth, but she beat krystina pliskova in straight sets in the first round. she wore a specially designed catsuit on court which she says helps her cope with bloodclots, but also made herfeel like a superhero. like i said, i feel like a warrior in it, like a warrior princess kind a queen from wakanda maybe. i'm always living in a fantasy world is it's kind of like, i've always i've always wanted to be
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a superhero, and it's kind of my way of being a superhero. i feel like a superhero when i wear it. british number one kyle edmund is also through to the second round. he says he used his frustration at liverpool's champions league defeat to help him beat australia's alex de minaur in straight sets. the fa has backed raheem sterling over his controversial gun tattoo. the england forward has been criticised by anti—gun campaigners. but he says it relates to his dad, who died when he was young. the fa says, "we all support sterling and acknowledge the honest and heartfelt account he gave." northern ireland were held overnight to a goalless draw in panama, who are in england's world cup group. and an inexperienced scotland side lost 2—0 to peru in lima. alex mcleish's side conceeded the goals either side of half time, with goalkeeperjordan archer making a couple of mistakes on his debut. paul hurst is the new manager of championship side ipswich town. he's signed a three—year contract after leaving shrewsbury who he led to this year's league one play—off final.
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hurst succeeds mick mccarthy who left portman road at the end of the season. paralympic champion ellie simmonds says she came close to quitting swimming after losing her love for the sport in the build—up to the rio games. instead of retiring, the five—time paralympic champion took a break after winning gold and bronze in brazil and went travelling. her time off included camping under the stars in the australian outback, an emotional trip to the water cube in beijing, plus visits to thailand, america, mexico, south africa and vietnam. she's now hoping to regain a place on the british para—swimming team for august's european championships in dublin. ijust i just hated swimming, ijust hated swimming, i hated everything about it. but then my year off, i think it really gave me a perspective of what these board is for me, and it's my life, something thatis for me, and it's my life, something that is not just for me, and it's my life, something that is notjust my life, it is a hobby, and the opportunity that it gives me, so huge, so i decided to
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just get back in august and give it one more shot. that's all the sport for now. i'm back with the headlines for you at 10:30. good morning, it is nine minutes past ten. while the us and north korea continue making plans for an historic joint summit, back home in north korea we bring you a reminder that for everyday citizens — life is still repressive, dangerous and frightening. speaking to people inside the country is almost impossible with all visitors heavily policed and communication with the outside world block. but working with a covert network, this programme has been able to put questions to two citizens living inside the world's most repressive state. speaking to us could bring severe punishment — imprisonment or even execution. so we have taken steps to conceal their identities, like not using their real voices, and to ensure their continuing anonymity. what the two people, a woman who works as a market trader and a man from the military, tell us paints a stark picture of life under kim jong—un, with people who speak out
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about the brutal regime disappearing — rounded up by the notorious security forces and sent to labour camps, or worse. they reveal what the people of north korea really think about their young leader, and shed light on an extraordinary softening of attitudes towards the west and the rumours swirling about possible talks between kim jong—un and us president donald trump. well, earlier in the programme, we saw mike cowan's exclusive film featuring voices from inside the totalitarian state of north korea, here's a reminder. chul—ho is a father and works in the military. sun—hui is a market trader who lives with her husband and two daughters. if the authorities found out they'd spoken to us, they would face imprisonment in one of the regime's notorious labour camps — or death. for that reason, we are concealing their identities and have taken steps to ensure their continued anonymity. we asked them about daily life. i wake up at dawn, around 5:30, because i need to cook rice. i eat breakfast with the family, then i organise the goods to sell at the market and head there. when the business is good, we eat rice three times a day. when it isn't so good, we have to mix corn in with the rice.
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eating and living is difficult. there are no such things as weekends. there is not much to watch on tv, and no time to stay at home. if i have spare time, i go woodcutting. the state security department are known as the bowibu to north koreans. they serve as the iron fist of the regime. sometimes the state security department get people by calling them spies. they make up stories for their own performance. they make people say they were planning to go to china and then report them. here, there are a lot of government captures, people arrested and taken away. people cannot survive in the prison camps. they unconditionally beat you. they starve you, while doing extreme labour.
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once you go there, you are no longer a citizen. i think this terror is what keeps society going. kim jong—un succeeded his father in 2011. many thought he would usher in modernity. he didn't. the cult of personality surrounding the kim dynasty continued, as did a total repression of freedom of speech. it is illegal to criticise the regime and carries severe punishment. people say that kim jong—un acts the same as us, but takes away our money a lot. that the little man uses his head to suck out money like a vampire. the number of people who assess him positively is increasing. there are signs of change from the authorities, around a distinctly capitalist activity. the country's numerous official and unofficial markets are a lifeline to the population and have been allowed to not
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just continue, but grow. he leaves the markets alone and doesn't crack down much, no matter what we do. many people want things to continue the way it is. and, internally, there appears to be a softening in rhetoric towards the west. i've heard at the market that the president of the us is coming. people don't know much about the meeting, but everyone dislikes america and says the reason for us living in poverty is because america split us and sealed us off. but things are changing a little recently. they say we should get along with the south. they say we should be living in peace with america for everyone to have a better life. i'm not sure what foreigners think about north korea. there is only north koreans here. i myself hope to live well, without envy, until we die. we can speak now
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to dr virginie grzelczyk, lecturer in politics and international relations, aston university. colin alexander, a lecturer in political communications at nottingham trent university specialising in north korea. and from seoul — arnold fang from amnesty international. thanks for talking to us. first of all, colin alexander, how rare is it to get this sort of insight into what everyday north koreans think? yeah, very much so. most of the information that we get of this calibre tends to come from defectors, north koreans who have left the regime, you know, they may well have left the regime in a
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number of ways, but certainly to receive this information from two people who continue to live in north korea, continue to participate in north korean society, that is certainly something that the bbc journalist to have done this should be commended for. what about your own reaction? i think this represents what we know in terms of research, the recent changes in the north korean society, especially this engagement with black—market activities, and the type of relationship that north koreans have with the outside, especially china, and the fact that goods are going back and forth. sol and the fact that goods are going back and forth. so i think it is very good, very good report to hear, especially from people who are still inside. is it
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isita is it a reminder that despite kim jong—un shaking hands with the leader of south korea, these preparations for this summit, he is definitely not cuddly kim, he is still a brutal dictator who steals money from his own people?” still a brutal dictator who steals money from his own people? i think a lot of the human rights violations that have been happening continue today and i think, in terms of stealing money, we are not sure but i understand that very often security department officials are allowed to take bribes from people and the government is turning a blind eye to that. it is not necessarily receiving money from these officials, it is more because these officials, it is more because the government fails to pay a decent salary to it civil servants that is allowing this to happen. we heard that the gulags are very much still
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in existence, people still disappear, all they can afford to eat is rice three times a day and thatis eat is rice three times a day and that is when things are good. and kim leaves the illegal market alone because it suits him. definitely, the government continues to deny the existence of these political prison camps but amnesty international and other north korea watchers have been able to confirm their existence through satellite images and we have the testimonies of people who have been living in them. even though they may not be very recent, we know they may not be very recent, we know the situation has been bad and they have been subject to forced labour, like starvation is sometimes used as a measure to control people there. what do you take from what these two citizens have been able to take us, colin? following on from the point made by the amnesty international gentleman, what we see here, some
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perspective on this i think is required, if you have an animal and you in cage it ought to investigate it, you take on responsibility for it. in north korea, the kim regime refuses to allow people to travel either within the country or outside of the borders. the regime notionally takes responsibility for theircare and notionally takes responsibility for their care and what you see with these markets now is that essentially these people, the kim regime is saying, we cannot provide enough for these people and so these markets and that notion of free trade as to fill that void. i thought it was interesting also that the male interviewee you had, what he said at the end of the longer piece you played earlier was that
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essentially what north koreans want is to be able to love their family and provide for them. that is a very poignant message, behind all this rhetoric of nuclear reservation, denuclearisation, is tens of millions of people who have just the same concerns millions of people who have just the same concerns as we all do. can i ask you about this meeting which is happening in the states today between this top north korean general and the us secretary of state ? general and the us secretary of state? would you agree it seems as though it is full steam ahead for this summit between donald trump and kim jong—un this summit between donald trump and kimjong—un injune? you pulled a face as though you could not be that confident! i think we will know when it happens, when we see the pictures that the meeting is happening on june 12. we have seen a lot of back
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and forth and a lot of confusion on every part. south korea was quite blindsided by the united states pulling out of the meeting, especially when president moon had just visited the united states, and what we see, i'm not the busy it is a rapprochement between the north and south but both careers are talking together and more easily than in the past —— both koreas. we have seen a recent meeting on friday between the leaders and that is important for korean society. ultimately we of course have the talk about nuclear weapons but as colin mentioned, this is about people. we tend to often just focus on the leadership and not on what it really means for those people to live there and potentially have a change in the system. some people might want and some people might be
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very confused about it. it was interesting in the report to hear the fact that at the market they we re the fact that at the market they were talking about the meeting, this american president coming. what we have heard from president trump over the past few days was a monetary offer to north korea. north korea could be a very rich and successful country. for a country that has spent 17 years developing rhetoric against capitalism and basically talking about south korea is being a puppet of american capitalism that i'm not sure we can have a u—turn —— 70 years. we will have to have another type of incentive for north korea to engage. arnold, you were nodding in agreement, that we obsess about the nuclear weapons side of things but for people there it is about potentially a whole new way of
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life and a system. can you imagine that? i think the most important thing for us is to seek change on the ground. —— see change. it has been a long time that north korea has been closed to the rest of the world and the rhetoric of the need to maintain national security has also ripped the people of a lot of the freedoms they are entitled to like travelling to other countries and even the freedom to access information from the outside world. the government basically restrict them from contacting the outside world because they say it could be a threat to national security. i think with this situation changing, possibly warming relations between tap! north and south korea, i hope the government could also relax a little bit and allow people to enjoy
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their freedom is —— little bit and allow people to enjoy theirfreedom is —— between north korea and south korea. especially in regard to getting in contact with the outside world. one final thought, colin alexander, do you think that a deal on denuclearisation, on getting rid of the nuclear weapons or some of them, as do happen before a summit between trump and kim can happen? it's a good question. i think certainly we are aware there is is essential amount of back channel diplomacy occurring at the moment and whether it is trump's twitter account or some of the more outlandish statements coming from pyongyang, we have to remember there is a significant about back channel diplomacy coming either directly between washington and pyongyang or through proxies and third parties. and essentially when trump and kim
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meet, if indeed they do, a lot of this should already be not quite agreed but certainly there should be some pretty good benchmarks already made for the when they meet, perhaps what we will see is a bit more of the pageantry of diplomacy rather than the real nitty—gritty and substance of it. thank you so much for your expertise and time, all of you, we appreciate it. still to come... bosses of companies that bombard people with cold calls could be personally liable for fines £500,000 but do these proposals go far enough? "abhorrent, repugnant and inconsistent with our values"
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that was the verdict of america's abc television network on a racist tweet from comedian roseanne barr. it acted swiftly to cancel her show after she likened an african—american former president 0bama aide to an ape. roseanne barr's nastiest slur was aimed at an african—american political opponent. she tweeted "muslim brotherhood and planet of the apes had a baby equals v.j.." this was a reference to the former adviser to president 0bama, valeriejarrett. i think we have to turn it into a teaching moment. i'm fine. i'm worried about all the people out there who don't have a circle of friends and followers who come right to their defence. miss barr also attacked hillary clinton and her daughter chelsea. and she falsely called the billionaire investor george soros — who as a jewish child survived the occupation of hungary — a nazi. that tweet was shared by president trump's son, donald junior. since then roseanne barr has apologised. the la showbiz reporter gayl murphy told me events unfolded.
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when abc came to roseanne and they said they wanted to reboot the show, it had been off the air for 21 yea rs, it had been off the air for 21 years, the only thing she was adamant was that her character be a hard—core trump supporter like she is in real life. one of the things about roseanne barr is that she is known as a troll on twitter. she was at it on tuesday morning, targeting at it on tuesday morning, targeting a woman called valeriejarrett, saying that she was a product of the muslim brotherhood and the movie planet of the apes. and valerie used to work for... barack 0bama, she was a senior white house adviser to him. she is
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african—american, born in iran to american parents. this whole thing created a complete firestorm on social media to the point where she apologised but she had already sparked this whole thing. comedian won the sykes, consulting for the producers, quit. and a statement came out from the president of abc entertainment, another african—american woman named channing dungy, she called the comment abhorrent and above it and inconsistent with the abc valleys and they cancelled the show. and the ceo of days now —— disney said this was the only thing to do and they cancelled the show with all evidence of the show scrubbed from the website. at which point did roseanne
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barr apologise? when did that happen? she apologised when the firestorm started. she had so much pushback from so many celebrities it was ridiculous. and then, about two hours ago, her twitter feed was supposed to have been disconnected. about two hours ago she tweeted. this is what it said... what does that mean, sleeping pills? indeed, yes, sleeping pills. that is what ambien treating means. —— tweeting.
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-- tweeting. how surprised are you and others that abc took such swift action to cancel the show, roseanne, which they had only brought back earlier this year and was a hit with viewers with 25 million people watching? what is the reaction to the fact it is off air again? it is interesting when we talk about the swiftness of abc. going into this, they hired nasty and what they got was nasty. what were they thinking? all they had to do is look at her twitter feed. roseanne is all they had to do is look at her twitterfeed. roseanne is known, you didn't even have to know she was roseanne, if you saw her twitter feed, you would say, this is a nasty, cranky troll. because previous tweets have been anti—semitic, they have offended some of the survivors of the parkland school shooting, all recent history. and very targeted. and the
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speed to which they put it down, it was almost as if they knew it would happen and they were ready. they rose to the occasion. i am telling you, they will still get some blowback, abc, it will blow over but there will be blowback and we have to wait for the dust to settle on this force up they knew who she was when they signed the check. did they think nobody would notice?” when they signed the check. did they think nobody would notice? i suppose one irony is that roseanne am the show, was brought back to represent those decent, ha rd—working show, was brought back to represent those decent, hard—working trump supporters. as you said, she is a trump supporter in real life. she is not done them good. you know, we get to the average american is. —— americans. a lot of people saw themselves in that which they did not seek in other programmes and i get that but i feel like she betrayed them. a lot of shows show
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people that have a life that is different from your life but not all of them jump down your throat and on your back. does it tell us something more about race relations in america that they are changing perhaps for the better? no, it says they are real. 0ne the better? no, it says they are real. one of the things about social media is we are not used to seeing and hearing all this stuff so much all the time. the only thing that has changed is the mailman. and what now for roseanne barr? i don't think she can overcome through this, she is 65 years old, she is not going to change. donald trump is 72, he is not going to change. she doesn't have enough life left to go into rehab and come back and change. i just... left to go into rehab and come back and change. ijust... look, this woman was given a gift by the media gods on high, putting hundreds of
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people to work, having fantastic production crew, really great people, and she screwed it up. there you have it! coming up in the last half—hour of the programme, nuisance calls, have you been bombarded with cold calls? the boss of the company doing the cold calling could have to pay a fine of up to £500,000. and a row has broken out over what to do with hundreds of millions of pounds in a fund designed to help the government to pay off the national debt. time for the latest news, here's joanna gosling. the response by the authorities to the grenfell tower fire was badly flawed, according to a new report. the paper, commissioned by the charity muslim aid, criticises the leadership of kensington and chelsea council and said volunteers have been left on the front line to cope. the council says it is committed to learning the lessons but will not comment further until after the public inquiry. authorities in belgium have confirmed that the attacker
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who killed three people in liege yesterday had killed a fourth person the night before. the suspect, named by belgian media as benjamin herman, shot two policewomen dead, before turning the weapon on a student teacher sitting in a parked car. the attacker, who is believed to have been radicalised in prison, was shot dead by police. bosses of companies which bombard consumers with cold calls could be personally liable forfines of £500,000, following a consultation which launches today. in october 2016, the government made a similar pledge, but the necessary legislation wasn't passed. consumers received 3.9 billion nuisance phone calls and texts last year. at the moment, only the companies themselves are liable for fines if they break the law. caroline lucas is to step down as co—leader of the green party. ms lucas, the greens' only mp, has been in charge alongside jonathan bartley since 2016. under the party's rules leaders serve two year terms. she says she wants to focus more on her constituency in brighton.
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the american actress roseanne barr has apologised to her colleagues who've lost theirjobs after her popular tv show was cancelled following a racist comment she posted on twitter. she'd compared a former aide to president 0bama to an ape. the head of the network said the comments were abhorrent, repugnant and inconsistent with its values. the digital minister, margot james, has told the bbc that consumers should not use viagogo when trying to obtain hard—to—get event tickets. ms james said viagogo is "the worst" of the secondary ticketing sellers. it comes as the advertising standards agency said viagogo has missed a deadline to change the way it shows its ticket prices and fees. that's a summary of the latest news. thank you very much, quite a few comments from you about viagogo, linda says at last something seems to be being done about secondary
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ticketing, but it needs to go further. all secondary sites should be banned, because add—on charges of the tip of the iceberg. they all encourage touting, real fans end the tip of the iceberg. they all encourage touting, realfans end up having to pay much more than face value. many top artists are sold out before fa ns value. many top artists are sold out before fans can purchase them, and then within minutes the same ticket to be on secondary site at vastly inflated prices. if all resold tickets had to be at face value with minimal add—on charges for postage, the practice would soon stop. we will be talking more about that in a moment. serena williams says she felt like a warrior princess in the catsuit she wore beating krystina pliskova in straight sets at the french open. it was her first grand slam since returning from having a baby. she faces austraian ashleigh barty in the 2nd round tomorrow the fa have supported raheem sterling after the england forward revealed his new gun tattoo. sterling said it's in memory of his dad, who was shot and killed when he was young. the fa say, "we all support sterling and acknowledge the honest and heartfelt account he gave."
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and it was a disappointing night for scotland. they travelled all the way to lima to take on peru but lost 2—0. northern ireland drew 0—0 with panama, who are in england's world cup group. paul hurst is the new manager of championship side ipswich town. he's signed a three—year contract after leaving shrewsbury, who he led to this year's league one play—off final. that's all the sport for now. a government minister says do not use viagogo, one of the big four secondary ticket resellers. here's digital minister margot james talking to 5 live today. to get a ticket for an event from the primary seller, and you have to go to the primary seller, and you have to gotoa the primary seller, and you have to go to a secondary site, there are four choices — just don't choose viagogo, they are the worst. what are you going to do about them? the best thing is for people to be made aware. . . best thing is for people to be made aware... we can't necessarily... because they are based outside of
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the uk, there are limits to what we can do to single them out. they will have to comply with the law in the end, it isjust have to comply with the law in the end, it is just that the other three big companies have agreed to do so in advance. but we are taking more steps to constrain the activities of secondary ticketing sites, to bring them into line, to make sure that users know exactly what the charges before they click to buy, that is crucial thing. that is happening on the three sites but not on viagogo, and consumers should vote with their feet. 0ur reporter chi chi izundu's here. such a huge issue for our audience, reaction to what margot james has said today? most people are quite happy that a minister has come out and backed calls for viagogo's business to end. she is basically saying vote with your feet, there's not much we can do. viagogo is based
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in switzerland. the competitions and marketing authority last month announced that they were seeking legal against viagogo because they hadn't complied with commitments they made in 2015. they are also investigating with hmrc as well. and the advertising standards authority is looking at a range of options, including getting google and bing to look at paid add content. they are also considering legal action to the trading standards authority and also looking at posting in and around the viagogo online warnings about the practices they do, because they say that viagogo is still telling people that viagogo is still telling people that their tickets are 100% guaranteed, which we know they are not. one example of that is ed sheeran, just last week he cancelled more than 10,000 tickets that fans had bought via viagogo's platform,
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then made people by face value ticket on the door. so they are still not doing the things that they should be doing, and that also includes what they are causing this drip feed method of payment, where you will go on the site, you think a ticket is £97, by the time you have got to the end, there is vat, delivery charges, admin costs, and it will be a couple of hundred. some fa ns it will be a couple of hundred. some fans have told us that when they have tried to cancel tickets at that point, the cancellation has not worked and they still have been charged. and that is one the issues today, viagogo breaking uk advertising rules by failing to make those additional fees clear. this e—mail is from kath... this e-mail is from kath... massive con, scandalous racket, paid over £332 with extras for two tickets for a rolling stones concert at old
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trafford. thought it would be a fabulous experience, on my bucket list, i thought i had bought two tickets at 125 quid each. 0n receipt, shocked to see had been sent tickets with a face value of £59 95. should be shut down immediately and prosecuted for fraudulent practice. clare has been trying to buy tickets for the kids but has managed to help people claw—back over £300,000 in refunds, hi, your reaction to the digitial minister saying don't buy tickets from viagogo? absolutely welcome, i have been saying this now since i began the campaign. and your campaign began why? because i was live... buying tickets to ed sheeran in 2017, -- i live... buying tickets to ed sheeran in 2017, —— i was ripped off. £1400
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was taken from my account without my consent, over £350 of that was fees i knew nothing about. how did it go up i knew nothing about. how did it go up to £1400? how had theyjustified that? they didn't, the prices simply weren't displayed, so i had no idea, and viagogo apologised to me for that, and then i started this campaign, because i knew other people were not as lucky as i was, but still the practice is happening, and one of the most important things to realise is that although it is thousands of pounds being taken from people, the human cost is immense, and just can't be underestimated. would their business model be ok with you if they were honest and transparent about the total cost at the of the process? would that be all right? sure, i am not opposed to the secondary ticketing, and in fact there are some good legitimate re sale there are some good legitimate resale sites, but in this case,
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because it is anonymous, because people don't know. thank you very much. thank you, thank you very much, thank you for coming on the programme. thanks for your messages. i have got more, keep them coming a row has broken out over what to do with hundreds of millions of pounds in a fund designed to help the government to pay off the national debt. the fund was started after the first world war and was paid into by anonymous benefactors. it was contributed to by aristocrats, politicians and even some returning soldiers, and has gone from being worth £500,000 in 1927, to over £400 million now. during the first world war, britain had to borrow money in order to pay for the vast expense of war. british national debt has increased
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to 7.4 billion in 1919. the national fund for the redemption of the national debt was set up by those who felt it was their duty to pay that off. one of those was the conservative prime minister stanley baldwin, who, it's thought, donated 20% of his estate. jeremy wright, the government's attorney general, is now going to the high court to gain access to the money. the only snag, however, is that the current national debt of the uk is £1.7 trillion. people usually put the adjective eye watering in front of that! the £400 million in the fund amounts to just 0.00024% of that. campaigners say it should be spent elsewhere, but what do you think a pot of money
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this size should be spent on? drjohnna montgomerie is from the progressive economy. she will tell you what that is in just a moment. and frank field, labour mp, who is campaigning to stop the government's plans to use the money to pay off a bit of our debt. hello, both of you. right, let's talk about national debt. is it the same as our personal debts, you know, what we hope on our mortgage or credit card? absolutely not, this is precisely why we have a government. first of all, no household has the ability to print the currency by which they issue the debt and pay it back in the same currency. we instead earn money through wages to pay our debts. the second important way that it is not the same is that the uk government
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has been issuing debt for 300 years. issuing? they have been creating national debt gilts to be sold on. backin national debt gilts to be sold on. back in the 1600, when this was invented, the idea of the national debt, it was quite an innovation, and it gave britain a leg up in its imperial conquests. but if you are saying that you can sell it to other people, it is an asset, is it? well, yes, you should think of it as an asset. just last week, when the bank of england or the treasury issued its treasuries, it was hugely oversubscribed. uk gilts are a huge national asset, many people want to hold it. 70% of the debt is held by firms, banks and pension funds. in many ways, to think of it as a liability is to slightly misunderstand the advantage that the uk has, having a government debt that people want to buy. what do you think the motives were
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of those who contributed to this fund? we have to go back to 1919, the devastation of that war, hardly any family unaffected by loss, windows created, women with lovers who would never come back to marry them, a real sense of relief that people had pulled through. and therefore this was a tangible way to pay off the debt of war of those who had survived. as you said in the introduction, stanley baldwin probably contributed a fifth of the whole of his wealth without anybody knowing, other people just sent in cheques or postal orders. they thought it was a really good thing to commemorate and to draw a line of what had happened to those people who died. this particular investment was made because they thought we
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would pay off the national debt and the money was only to be used to pay off the last part. what i think the government is missing, it is rather dreary to go in and get the money and this is mega, as we heard, it will make no difference. why not imaginatively say, those who were trying to pay off the national debt after the war wanted something dramatic. how could we build this fund into something that could be created and be dramatic in the impact on our society? 400 million, the lottery could double that. what about the government, is contributing? what about your programme taking ideas on what would be the one dramatic thing we could do which would, in a sense come close this whole debate about world wari close this whole debate about world war i and the feeling of debt. that isa war i and the feeling of debt. that is a creative idea and thank you for that but would it not be
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disrespectful to the memory of those people who contributed after the first world war in order to pay off the national debt? i take the point it would barely dent the debt but would it not be disrespectful? it would barely dent the debt but would it not be disrespectful7m could be argued but as we have heard, people like to buy national debt and providing it is not excessive i would have thought, as we've heard, it is a rather good thing. but here we have a will, a trust set up which will never, ever be able to be fulfilled. that this would be the last payment to wipe out the national debt. the person who has set that up wanted to make this most dramatic of contributions ever. the government just this most dramatic of contributions ever. the governmentjust going into court and getting permission to hoi polloi this into the national debt is neither here nor there. what about making something creative about making something creative about it? 1.7 trillion, what does
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that mean in to the economic security of the uk? that is the national debt now. to put this into perspective of numbers you can understand them if you had a debt of £1700, it would be like going to court for 40p. that is how small it is. it is very symbolic. ultimately theissueis is. it is very symbolic. ultimately the issue is you do not pay off the national debt, because of the length by which it can be held for, you outgrow it. that is fundamentally the problem we are facing today, that the economy is not growing, 0.1% growth is the most generous figure they came up with in the last quarter and the uk has barely grown above 1% in the past five years, it isa above 1% in the past five years, it is a very stagnant economy. if you wa nt to is a very stagnant economy. if you want to do something about the national debt, you want to invest so you can facilitate growth and you outgrow your debt. and we want to ask questions about to what degree do we want the government to hold
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savings, if it can issue debt that everybody wants. and how would the banks, what sort of collateral with a use if they did not have national debt? and how would you sum it up in yourforum? debt? and how would you sum it up in your forum? we have been formed in order to think about precisely these new and innovative ideas, that we can begin to revive economic thinking to solve the problems facing the uk economy. it's a really good initiative. and we will hold onto your suggestion as well. thank you for coming on. we invited the govenrment to appear but nobody was available. instead, we have this statement from jeremy wright, the attorney general. "almost 90 years ago, an anonymous donor bequeathed money to the nation, and yet we have not been able to put it to good use. we have been working with the treasury, trustees and the charity commission to find a solution consistent with the donor's original objectives of extinguishing the national debt. i am applying to the high court to ask that the fund is released, and if that application is successful, the fund could be used to benefit the nation
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by helping to do what the original donors intended." there you go. isn't it pathetic they did not come on to make the case and excite us, theyjust push out a statement. the prime minister ought to have a cabinet meeting and say, we want to get out at every opportunity to try to explain what we're doing. the idea of turning you down is barmy. i'm used to it! i think they may have more pressing concerns but thank you for your sentiments. england's grammar schools are back on the agenda following a recent government announcement of £55 million for more places for disadvantaged pupils at selective schools. but the odds are still stacked against children who choose to sit the test, with up to four applicants for each place at some schools. a bbc two programme "grammar schools: who will get in?" has been talking to some of the children who've ta ken the 11—plus test, and their parents. let's hear from them. you can see the full version of that programme on the bbc iplayer. that's available now. and the next episode is on bbc two at 9pm on tuesday next week. have you been annoyed by a nuisance
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call? you're in the middle of doing something and the phone goes. you rush to get to it, only to discover that it's a cold caller trying to either sell you something or get information. it's something the government says they want to crack down on and have announced that they want to make bosses of companies that make nuisance calls personally liable for breaking the law. under the proposal, directors could be fined up to £500,000. in principle. at the moment, only companies are liable, and bosses try to avoid paying fines by declaring bankruptcy and re—opening under a different name. joining the is our guest. i interviewed you ten years ago on this. the problem is that nuisance
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calls have been a problem for so long. the regime that covers them now is the same as it was back then. trying to do a last—minute tweaks to make effective, we need to make them radical to stop this altogether. are you saying this plan to make the bossis you saying this plan to make the boss is liable with fines of up to half a million is a tweak? yes. it may help in a few cases that the information commissioner is able to pursue each year. they do about a dozen cases each year, some directed slip away, but in the context of 3.9 billion nuisance calls and texts are made. for all their great effort and i'm happy to applaud the work they do, the information commissioner's of cannot get anywhere near addressing all of those. far more radical steps are needed, the phone companies need to get involved, the
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direct regulators, people like the financial conduct authority. what would be the most radical thing that would be the most radical thing that would sort it? we have to stop and think about the nuisance call is being a data protection issue and more of a business process. they are involved in a business process which now the british public has had enough of. unsolicited direct marketing by telephone, no more. does that mean legislation to make it illegal? in many cases, the regulators are already in place that have that ability. while we remain in the eu there are regulations we have to keep two but who knows? 0ne benefit of leaving could mean we could pass general legislation to stop businesses exploiting the business friendly european environment. if you were a boss who could be fined half £1 million potentially if your company does this you might think twice about continuing with that business model.
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imight continuing with that business model. i might chat with my lawyer to see if there was any serious risk and look at the odds of being caught which are not that great. thank you very much, david hickson from the fed, —— affect ella gunson campaign. they give your company. we are back tomorrow at nine o'clock. —— fair telecoms campaign. not everywhere is it wet and cloudy across the country and a bag some areas have some beautiful weather today —— in fact some areas. in the south the thunderstorm risks should continue over the next few days. this is lunchtime, still showers, possibly some thunder this time in northern england and parts of
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northern england and parts of northern wales but the beautiful weather will remain in western scotla nd weather will remain in western scotland where yesterday it was up to 28 degrees and very warm in northern ireland as well. tonight, a lot of cloud across the country, it will be a muggy night with temperatures in the mid—teens in some of the big cities, notjust in the south, further north as well. tomorrow we are watching for more downpours, possibly thundery, reaching southern and south—eastern areas and we have to be prepared for some nasty conditions tomorrow in the south. this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at 11.
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the local authority response to the grenfell tower fire was "slow and lacked direction" — according to one of the groups that led the aid effort after the disaster. organisations that never responded to emergencies of this nature before we re to emergencies of this nature before were having to step up. so they found themselves in a situation that they're not prepared for. belgian officials say the man who shot dead two policewomen and a student teacher in liege yesterday killed a fourth person the day before. ukraine's prime minister accuses moscow of being the killing of russian journalist and kremlin critic, arkady babchenko british financier and putin critic, bill browder is detained temporarily in spain, on a russian arrest warrant which turned out to be invalid.
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