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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  May 30, 2018 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at 11. the local authority response to the grenfell tower fire was "slow and lacked direction" — according to one of the groups that led the aid effort after the disaster. organisations that never responded to emergencies of this nature before we re to emergencies of this nature before were having to step up. so they found themselves in a situation that they're not prepared for. belgian officials say the man who shot dead two policewomen and a student teacher in liege yesterday killed a fourth person the day before. ukraine's prime minister accuses moscow of being the killing of russian journalist and kremlin critic, arkady babchenko british financier and putin critic, bill browder is detained temporarily in spain, on a russian arrest warrant which turned out to be invalid. ajoke in bad taste" — roseanne barr apologises for racist tweet about a former obama adviser, but her revived sitcom is cancelled. also in the next hour —
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dealing with the danger from drones. pilots will have to pass online safety tests — or face fines — to tackle the growing number of near—misses with aircraft good morning. welcome to bbc newsroom live. an independent report has accused kensington and chelsea council of being slow and lacking direction in the weeks following the grenfell tower disaster. the research, commissioned by muslim aid, suggests that the authorities relied on voluntary organisations to help those in need, and says the disaster should be a wake—up call about how to deal with future emergencies. ben ando reports. i'm afraid we have a technical issue
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with that report. we will try to fix it to you. the new edition of the london review of book is dedicated to g re nfell london review of book is dedicated to grenfell tower. the editor spent time spoking to epeople involved a and has been spoking to the bbc. albeit there is an inquiry ongoing, i wanted to take an independent writer's stance and the review of books supported me and we had a teach of researchers that looked at everything. much of that understandable dismay and anger that we all started with, it couldn't stand up alongside all the evidence that was suggested... you mean anger at the council? yes, people wanted
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accusation to stand for evidence, that to call out the leader and the deputy leader of the council as being responsible for this somehow didn't at all stand up to the evidence that these were people, you don't work for councils through some sense of obligation, people are away with the fairies if they think they hate the poor. they were accused of that and i discovered the council, despite reports even today, we just heard them in the news, the evidence goes the other way when you look at it. that the council actually responded as well as they could under these tremendously difficult circumstances. but one accusation was about the cost of the refurbishment and the documents that we re refurbishment and the documents that were obtained by the bbc and others that showed that the council had tried to cut the costs of that refurbishment, to replace the original zinc cladding with a more
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economical version. i don't know if you got into that detail. economical version. i don't know if you got into that detaillj economical version. i don't know if you got into that detail. i did and thatis you got into that detail. i did and that is incorrect. you say the council, what you mean is the tenant management organisation. people haven't been making the subtle distinction, they have to make in this case, because you have talking —— you're talk about possible corporate manslaughter charges. that is andrew 0 hagan with his views on what happened in grenfell tower. we can bring you that report from our correspondent ben ando. in the chaotic aftermath of the blaze at grenfell tower, everyone wanted to give. clothes, food, supplies, and hundreds of local people stepping forward with something just as precious — their time. according to a report commissioned by muslim aid working with local charity groups, the response from the authorities, primarily kensington and chelsea borough council, was weak and lacked direction or coordination. that, says the report,
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left local volu nteers, often with no experience of aid work, trying their best to cope but often overwhelmed. there was complete chaos. i've been to many disasters around the world as an aid worker, and i really didn't expect to find this level of chaos and chaotic response in west london. i think what we need to reflect on is that the local—service actors are the ones that are part and parcel of that provision and that response. in response, the council said... the council said it couldn't comment further until the main public inquiry has concluded, but the charities say the lesson of this report is clear — in the aftermath of a disaster, the community itself should be put at the centre of the first response, not considered as an afterthought. and we'll have the very latest from the grenfell inquiry from our correspondent tom burridge
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at 11.30 here on bbc news. the gunman who shot dead two police officers and a civilian in the belgian city of liege had killed someone the night before the attacks. belgium's interior minister said the gunman had murdered a man — a former prisoner — he met while injail. the attacker also took a female cleaner hostage at a school before being killed by police. prosecutors say they're treating the attacks as ‘terrorist murder‘ i'm joined by our europe correspondent damian grammaticas. it has emerged the gunman was on day release from prison. what questions are being asked. there are serious questions being asked, the timeline has been expanded in this event, so it was already known yesterday that this man, he has been named in the
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media as benjamin hermann has been released on a temporary one night released on a temporary one night release from prison on monday. what is emerging is he appeared to have killed one man on monday evening, as you were saying a former colleague of his, a cell mate, an inmate he was in prison with, on monday evening. then on tuesday, in liege he carried out his killing spree before being shot dead himself. the questions around his release are becoming pointed, because people are saying and looking at this and questioning why he was out at all, if he was a danger and the interior minister here has been on belgian radio saying he is questioning his own conscience, because he felt responsible for the fact that this man was on release when he carried out these killings. what are they
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piecing together about the motives here? it is interesting. on the one hand the prosecutors have been giving a press conference saying they're treating it as terrorist murder and attempted terrorist murder. because of the nature of the events, because of the fact he targeted the police officers, because he seemed to have shouted as he did it. he seems to have been in contact he did it. he seems to have been in co nta ct ca n he did it. he seems to have been in contact can radicalised individuals in prison. but they say they are keeping two other minds. because there is a possibility he was in prison on drugs offences, so was he on drug at the time. the fact he carried out the killing on monday evening may have contributed to his state of mind and maybe the interior
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minister suggested this that, he was, this man was feeling hopeless about his prospects if he went back to prison and then carried out the killings. thank you. the foreign secretary borisjohnson says he's "appalled" by the murder of a russian investigative journalist in ukraine. arkady babchenko, a critic of president vladimir putin, was shot dead in ukraine's capital kiev, where he was living in exile. russia's foreign minister, sergei lavrov, has rejected suggestions that moscow was behind the murder. caroline rigby reports. arkady babchenko was one of russia's best known investigative journalists. an outspoken critic of the kremlin, as well as russia's actions in syria and eastern ukraine, the 41—year—old claimed he had suffered a campaign of harassment and feared for his life in his home country. that, he said, led him to move to ukraine last year and it was at his apartment block in the capital kiev, where the 41—year—old was shot and fatally wounded. his wife told police she was in the bathroom when she heard gunfire.
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she found her husband lying in a pool of his own blood. he had been shot in the back and died in an ambulance a short time later. of course it is about finding out who was behind it. and as i have said it is too early to say. we see the russian pattern there. arkady babchenko had hosted a programme on the ukrainian channel atrtv. this is how the station broke the news of his death. and the ukrainian prime minister, volodymyr groysman, described the journalist as a true friend of ukraine, who told the world the truth about russian aggression. an investigation is now under way into arkady babchenko's death. police in kiev say the evidence points to a tar getted murder related to his work as a journalist. russia's foreign minister sergei lavrov has been
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speaking about the shooting and called the ukrainian reaction ‘very sad'. translation: another tragedy happened yesterday in kiev. arkady babchenko was murdered. shot at the entrance of his own home. the ukrainian prime minister is already talking about how it was done by russian secret services. an investigation has not yet begun. but now it probably will. this fashion of conducting international affairs is very sad. we have had further condemnation from the kremlin, condemning the killing of arkady babchenko in the ukraine and calling for a real probe into his murder. let's talk to our correspondent. i know you actually knew arkady babchenko. tell us what your links were. we were both reporters, war
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reporters and conflict reporters, we met in one of places in ukraine during the uprising and we met on several times. we have many friends in common. we were not close friends. but we knew each other. we exchanged messages. the last one was injanuary exchanged messages. the last one was in january when i exchanged messages. the last one was injanuary when i was in prague and he was there too. but he left one day early. i didn't know that. i called him to drink some beer. that is where i knew him. he was a reporter and he was a journalist and as to this, the motives of murder, eve ryo ne as to this, the motives of murder, everyone who knew him, or his friends and colleagues, they all agree that he had no business conflicts. no conflicts in his every day life whatsoever. he was a very, in his common life he was a very nice person and benign person. all
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agreed that no motives other than what he wrote and what he said on air, there could be no motives for this murder. tell us more about what he wrote and said on air. he was, you couldn't call him even opposition activist, because he was kind of a stand alone opposition activist. he didn't join kind of a stand alone opposition activist. he didn'tjoin any political force. in activist. he didn'tjoin any politicalforce. in russia before leaving or after leaving. he was... he was not even a reporter. he was a soldier, former soldier, he went to the first chechen war as a conscript asa the first chechen war as a conscript as a young man and he suffered post—traumatic stress disorder, as he said himself. he went to the second chechen war as a volunteer soldier, as surgeon. after that, he became very much disappointed in the
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state, in the authorities of russia and he became a very fierce critic of them and so he became a journalist. he wrote books, he wrote reports, but everyone said he was never balanced and indifferent reporter, he was very much imbalanced and a very fierce critic of the authorities. but that is basically it. even with the rest of the opposition, there is the serious rift within the russian opposition between those who stay in russia and try to do something within russia in these circumstances and those who immigrated. so arkady babchenko emigrated recently. two years ago. just one year ago. he emgrated because of the threats to his
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security, to threats of criminal persecution and threats of physical violence and he was at the forefront of that rift, because they criticised, they constantly do that, they criticise each other, you escaped, you're in security, say those who are still there in russia, now we can all see they're not. the finger is being pointed at russia, russia is saying we condemn the killing and call for a recommend investigation. — — real investigation. — — real investigation. we have no evidence, so we investigation. we have no evidence, so we can't state it was russia or special services as some of arkady babchenko's colleagues do. we can't state that. we don't have evidence. on the other hand, as i said, there could be no other motive than what he wrote and what he said. also you
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know commenting on those russian statements, especially the statement by the investigative committee of russia, who opened a criminal investigation into the murder and the statement of the foreign ministry, who voiced their concern over killings of russian journalists in kiev and arkady babchenko is not the first, the first was two years ago. you know, friends and collea g u es ago. you know, friends and colleagues of arkady babchenko called this statement... utter hypocrisy to say the least. thank you very much. bill browder, the prominent critic of russian president vladimir putin, has been arrested under a russian warrant in spain, according to his twitter account the anti—corruption campaigner wrote on wednesday morning: in the last hour foreign
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secretary borisjohnson has tweeted that he has spoken to mr browder and is glad that he has bben released. mrjohnson also said that russia should concentrate on finding the killers of mr browder‘s former lawyer, sergei magnitsky, who died in a russian prison in 2009 the headlines bbc newsroom live: a report says the local authority in g re nfell tower was slow a report says the local authority in grenfell tower was slow and lacked direction. a man who killed two people in liege was on release from prison. and the ukraine has accused russia of being behind the killing of the russian journalist arkady babchenko. day four of the french open is under way. serena williams
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said she felt like a superhero as she won herfirst said she felt like a superhero as she won her first grand slam said she felt like a superhero as she won herfirst grand slam match since becoming a mother. scotland lost 2—0 in peru. northern ireland drew 0—0 with panama. and eilie simmonds said she almost quit swimming after losing her love for the sport. he went travelling after the sport. he went travelling after the olympics in rio and is now targeting success in the european championships in august. i have more at 11.30. one of america's most popular tv shows has been cancelled after its star roseanne barr was accused of racism. the actress posted a tweet likening a former aide to barack obama to an ape. roseanne apologised, but tv network abc called her actions repugnant and cancelled the series. this report from our correspondent james cook in los angeles contains flash photography mum, can i have some money?
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i don't know. mum, can i have some money? i don't know, can i have some money? roseanne barr fronted a tv sensation. housekeeping! a hugely popular sitcom from the 1980s and ‘90s, which made a triumphant return this year. "beep!" that didn't go through. i heard a beep. millions tuned in to see a sympathetic portrayal of white, working—class, trump—supporting america. it came crashing down in a vitriolic twitter tirade. roseanne barr's nastiest slur was aimed at an african—american political opponent. she was referring to valerie jarrett. i think we have to turn it into a teaching moment. iam fine. i worry about the people out there who do not have a circle of friends and followers who come to their defence. ms barr also attacked hillary clinton and her daughter chelsea, and she falsely called the billionaire investor george soros, who as a jewish child
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who survived the occupation of hungary, a nazi. that tweet was shared by president trump's son, donald trump jr. ms barr issued a partial apology, but it wasn't enough for the abc, who called her commments. .. roseanne's downfall was clearly her own doing, but it's likely to strengthen stereotypes in a divided america with each side accusing the other of intolerance and hatred. italy is at risk of a major financial crisis, with implications for the rest of the european union, in the wake of the political crisis in rome. the governor of italy's central bank described the situation as ‘very serious‘ — following the failure to form a new government and a resulting slump in global stock markets. investors are said to be worried that another election could strengthen the euro—sceptic parties and destabilise
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the eurozone. our correspondentjames reynolds is in rome. james, bring us up—to—date with the latest. that is almost an impossible thing to do, because by the time i finish this sentence things will have changed. as things stand, italy has a prime minister designate who isa has a prime minister designate who is a pro—euro—economist who has not been sworn in. the reports is he has not been sworn in, because he is seeing if there is a chance of bringing back a populist government that was vetoed on sunday, because of the possibility of having a euro sceptic finance minister. so he is trying to see if he can avoid early elections. if they can't find a way through, we were talking yesterday about elections being months away.
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is it going to have much sooner than that? yesterday, we started thinking elections might happen in september. yesterday evening, elections had moved to 29thjuly. today the latest theory is they will try and keep elections away. it is almost impossible to know which one to predict. but there is one party, one of the populists, the league party, a hard—right party, which is rising in the polls. and it shows very little interest in the moment in trying to form a coalition with the current numbers. its best bet maybe to wait for current numbers. its best bet maybe to waitforan current numbers. its best bet maybe to wait for an early election and rise up. for that reason, it may be difficult to put together a government investigating the league now. and that is the party that wa nts to ta ke now. and that is the party that wants to take italy out of the eurozone? a very simple question, the right question, but it is a difficult question to apps. they
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have said many things in the past. it wasn‘t in their manifesto or in their potential government contract with another party, but league members have talked of their frustration with the euro and a lot of italians have been worried about that party because of that. thank you. let‘s look at some of today‘s other developing stories: a bus has crashed into dozens of cars, which were stuck in traffic in dartford in kent, injuring 17 people. 25 vehicles were damaged in the incident yesterday evening — passengers and drivers suffered minor injuries. a man has been arrested on suspicion of careless driving . police investigating the disappearance of a british toddler in germany 36 years ago, will confirm later that an excavation near the spot she went missing, has yielded no fresh information. two—year—old katrice lee was on a shopping trip with her mother, near a british army base in the town of paderborn. she has never been found.
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the royal military police have spent the past five weeks digging at a riverbank in the town but say nothing has been found. caroline lucas is to step down as co—leader of the green party. ms lucas, the green‘s only mp, has been in charge alongside jonathan bartley since 2016. under the party‘s rules leaders serve two year terms. she says she wants to focus more on her constituency in brighton. for a full summary of the news you can go to our website at bbc.co.uk/news. the government has announced that bosses of companies which make nuisance calls could be personally fined up to half—a—million pounds. a consultation on changes to the law starts today. in october 2016, the government made a similar pledge but the necessary legislation wasn‘t passed. andy moore explains. phone ringing. there is no doubt nuisance phone calls and texts are a major headache for many of us, and the government is keen to clamp down.
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individual companies can already be fined up to £500,000, but they often declare themselves bankrupt to avoid paying the penalty. targeting the individuals behind those companies would close that loophole. the regulator, ofcom, estimates consumers were bombarded with 3.9 billion nuisance phone calls and text last year. the information commissioner‘s office has issued £17 million in fines since 2010, but only about half that sum, 5a%, has been collected. this isn‘t the first time the government has issued a plan to fine individuals. in 2016, the government said there would be a change in law in 2017, but it didn‘t happen. i‘m very sorry for the delay, in part due to the fact that we knew we were going to have to strengthen the whole area of data protection, and we had to get the law through to strengthen data protection across—the—board, which does give additional powers in this area of nuisance calls as well.
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the government is hoping it will have better luck second time around. it is harder than it has been in living memory for a wrongly convicted person to overturn their conviction. that‘s according to a former court of appealjudge, speaking in a new bbc panorama programme investigating the criminal cases review commission, the body which investigates miscarriages ofjustice. the programme also uncovers fresh evidence in two alleged wrongful convictions, previously rejected by the commission. mark daly has this report. kevin lane spent almost 20 years in prison for a murder he‘s always said he didn‘t commit. released on parole in 2015, he‘s rebuilding his life. i‘d love to be able to stand on the court of appeal steps and say, "i told you... i told you i never done this, i told you at trial, i told you when i was convicted
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and i have been telling you for 2h years now and i‘ve still been fighting it." it must mean something. kevin lane was jailed in 1996 for the gangland murder of robert mcgill after lane‘s palmprint was found alongside a single particle of gunshot residue in a pipe in a car linked to the shooting. but experts panorama spoke to think that gunshot evidence is now worthless. in today's terms, no evidential strength would be placed on the findings of a single particle. i certainly wouldn't have concluded that a gun had been placed within the pipe. kevin lane now plans to submit a new application to the criminal cases review commission — a body many believe is failing. panorama has obtained internal board minutes which reveal case managers have there "large, sometimes unworkable portfolios" and there were concerns of a culture developing where finding new evidence in cases was seen as troublesome, because of the work pressures. the ccrc can only refer a case
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to the court of appeal if there‘s a real possibility it will overturn a conviction and its referral rate has dropped sharply over the past year. but a former court of appeal judge told panorama the ccrc has become more cautious, because the court has set the bar higher than in living memory. it's become much more difficult for an appellant to succeed and therefore that will no doubt influence them on what cases they send through. you‘re a very high profile former court of appealjudge and here you are saying that the test that is currently being applied at the court of appeal is wrong. i'm saying that. the ccrc denied it was too cautious and added: panorama also looks at the case of eddie gilfoyle,
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convicted of murdering his pregnant wife, paula in 1993, but he always protested his innocence. i haven‘t done it. i never killed my wife and baby. i never did it. the ccrc said both eddie gilfoyle and kevin lane were welcome to make new submissions. almost 11.30. now the weather. the weather is not that bad everywhere, across the country northern ireland and western scotla nd northern ireland and western scotland beautiful, another very warm day with temperatures in the mid—20s but overall across the country in a thunderstorm risk continues over the next few days. some downpours crossing the country at the moment through the midlands and two northern parts of england or
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later, someone could still produce lightning and thunder, and the sun comes out but belfast and glasgow by far the best of the weather today. yesterday in scotland and was in the high 20s, mid 20s today so still warm. cloudy and maggi two mates in the south, temperatures are around 15 degrees, 1a in the north and in tomorrow for the downpours with the potential for flash flooding as they affect southern and central areas of the uk. ticket tomorrow. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. a report by one of the voluntary groups that led the aid effort after the grenfell fire says that the local authorities‘ response was slow and lacked direction. belgian officials say the man who shot dead two policewomen and a student teacher in liege yesterday killed a fourth person the day before. ukraine‘s prime minister accuses moscow of being behind the killing of russianjournalist and kremlin critic,
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arkady babchenko. moscow is calling the claim a smear. "ajoke in bad taste" — roseanne barr apologises for a racist tweet about a former obama adviser — but her revived sitcom is cancelled. in a moment... dangerous drones. pilots will have to pass online safety tests — or face fines — to tackle the growing number of near—misses with aircraft time for sport with will perry. hello, welcome to sport today, live from the bbc sport centre. coming up on this programme... the catsuit has got everybody
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talking. as well as the fact this was serena williams says match since giving birth and a very well what victory in the end against a player who has been playing regularly on tour where there are still a few signs of rust from serena williams. she won in straight sets and matches on andy catsuit was worthy of a lot of comment from selena herself. she says she has always lived in a fa ntasy world says she has always lived in a fantasy world and want to be a superhero but she also points out there was a fun and functional side to the suit. she suffered from a blood clot when she gave birth to her daughter in september and personal problems in the past so it was a practical reason why she was wearing that as well together for extra compression. what about the second round, question mark the as not even been a professional for a
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full year yet at this assist 52nd week as a professional and he has made a phenomenal start by breaking into the top 100 just last week. he made a splash in the davis cup in february against spain and took like a duck to water to the atp tour and grand slams as well. he has won a round admittedly by retirement and was ahead when his opponent pulled out. this is a brand—new experience for them, another challenge, a court which is played host to great champions in the past against one of the big french stars, the 15th seed. i think it will probably enjoy it and thrive on the occasion but he will have to play well if years to come through. the fa cynical support
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and northern ireland i hated swimming, hit everything about it but in my year off i think you give mea but in my year off i think you give me a prospective of what the sport is for me and it is my life and something that is notjust my life, it isa something that is notjust my life, it is a hobby as well it is just so huge so i i decided to get back in august and give it that one more shot. more sport and the next hour. one after another the 72 people killed by the grenfell towerfire have been publicly remembered over the past week, as the official inquiry begins its work. the details shared have painted a fuller picture of the way they lived, but also the way they died. tom burridge is at the inquiry in west london. this morning the public enquiry has learnt about most raymond bernard known as moses, who lived in 201
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g re nfell tower known as moses, who lived in 201 grenfell tower on the top four for 30 years. he would have turned 64 last week. his sister made a moving tribute describing him as a beloved son and father and brother, someone who was patient and kind and always believed that good would prevail over evil. she also spoke movingly about the fact he died alongside his dog and seven of his neighbours moved up into his flat on the night of the fire as the flames spread to seek refuge with him. she described how their remains and has remains we re how their remains and has remains were found and what that means to the family. raymond left in flats 201 on the top floor of grenfell tower with his dog marley for over 30 years with the tragically lost his life. —— where he tragically lost his life. on the 14th ofjune. 2017 aged 63
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and afire on the 14th ofjune. 2017 aged 63 and a fire which took the lives of 71 and later on one other this year. on that fateful night seven individuals located in his flat, deborah, jessica a mother and her son and others. as there was no way down to escape the only alternative was to head towards the top floor. there they met raymond and took refuge in his flat. the positioning
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of the bodies were on my brother‘s bed with him resting beside the bed on the floor. this shows the respect he gave to those who lost their lives at night and we know that he would have given comfort to each of them before they took their last breaths and departed this world. remedy being a man and the strongest was probably the last to die. he would have been so alone. we know from the corner as he was a hero of that tragic night. that was bernadette run of speaking about her brother raymond known as moses who died in grenfell tower last year. she also spoke about the trauma it has caused her and the rest of her family. she says she still suffers from deep sleep deprivation,
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flashbacks of the orange flames and decide a profound affect on her daughter who watched outside the terminal like so many other relatives on that night as the fla mes relatives on that night as the flames moved up towards the top floor towards the flat of her uncle. she said her daughter has been a deeply traumatised by the experience like so many others that we have heard from throughout the past week. relatives who have given powerful tributes to their loved ones. we are now hearing the next commemoration is ongoing inside the public enquiry here to the family, another family where several relatives were killed in the grenfell tower fire. the public enquiry most that hearing more technical evidence about the night to establish the facts of what happened on the 14th ofjune 2017. that begins next week and in the
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coming weeks and months the public enquiry could last as long as two yea rs, enquiry could last as long as two years, it will begin in several months to look at the more complex questions about why the fire spread so questions about why the fire spread so quickly through the building and the refurbishment of the tower and the refurbishment of the tower and the role some of the materials and the role some of the materials and the punishment had and spreading the fire so quickly and killing so many people. new rules are to be introduced to make sure drones are used safely. they won‘t be able to fly closer than one kilometre of an airport boundary, and there‘ll be height restrictions too. the restrictions follow 89 reported near misses with aircraft last year. steve landells is the head of safety for the airline pilots‘ union balpa — he‘s in our dunstable studio. how much of an issue has this been? the number of near misses between drones and aeroplanes has been going
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up drones and aeroplanes has been going up over the years. in 2013 win over none to nearly 100 last year. it is a growing problem and possibly the tip of the iceberg of public concerns pilots and balpa is the potential between a drone and manned aircraft. we did some tests last year but showed beyond any doubt that if a drone hit a manned aircraft of the potential consequences could be catastrophic especially a helicopter so it is a major problem. it could take it out of the sky? certainly a drone could severely damage a helicopter or manned aircraft with a whole range of potential consequences, some of which are defined could be catastrophic. it seems extraordinary someone catastrophic. it seems extraordinary someone would fly a drone in the two aircraft. it is in the guidance but as the figures are indicating it is not always being followed. and you imagine why someone would do it? the
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vast majority of drone operators fly them at safeway and sensibly within them at safeway and sensibly within the rules and the understand the rules and commercial operators have a vested interest in flying them properly but there are a small group of people that either do not care about the rules do not know about them and they are putting lives in danger every day. that is the group we need to get to. we are pleased that the government has introduced some regulations although some give us cause some regulations although some give us cause for some regulations although some give us cause for concern. some regulations although some give us cause for concern. what is the worst incident that has happened is to your knowledge? around the world and there have been six or more collisions between drones and manned aircraft and so far it hasn‘t resulted in any clashes which is fortu nate resulted in any clashes which is fortunate more than anything. we are concerned that these impacts are happening, we need to do something about it and the government
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regulations some are great, not about 400 feet as good so that some separation there introducing a registration scheme is something balpa has been calling for so we are pleased to see that although the timescale was towards the end of next year which doesn‘t seem particularly challenging to me. the problem we have is one kilometre from an airfield boundary, that is far too close for anyone to fly a drone and sending out the wrong message. if you are telling someone you can fly 400 feet one kilometre from an airfield boundary, a passenger aircraft coming into land will be between two and 300 feet and thatis will be between two and 300 feet and that is ridiculous to have no separation built in. there are rules such as indigenous of an aircraft. if you fly your drone on the approach you could go to prison for five years is sending out the wrong message and one kilometre isjust far too close, should be near to five. thank you. some breaking news, we‘re a
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15—year—old boy has died following a in wolverhampton last night. west midlands police have just released that news, a modern investigation has been launched after the death of that 15—year—old boy. officers were called to the maryhill area of wolverhampton called to the maryhill area of wolverha m pton after called to the maryhill area of wolverhampton after 11pm following reports of disorder involving a group of youths. the teenager was taken to hospital with serious injuries but was sadly confirmed dead a short time later. officers are viewing cctv in the area to establish what happened. next of kin have been informed and our country being supported by specialist officers at this difficult time. in a moment a summary of the business news this hour but first the headlines on bbc newsroom live: a report into the aid response following the grenfell tower fire says the local authority was "slow and lacked direction". a man who shot dead three people in liege yesterday had already killed another person shortly after his release
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from prison, according to belgian officials. ukraine‘s prime minister accuses moscow of being behind the killing of russianjournalist and kremlin critic, arkady babchenko. russia says the claim is a smear. in a moment — while many of us might be hoping for sun, a major us study suggests taking exams in hot weather could impact performance. in the business news... a minister has told consumers not to use viagogo, one of the big four secondary ticket resellers. digital minister margotjames told bbc radio five live "don‘t choose viagogo — they are the worst" but also criticised other resellers. the advertising standards authority banned it and three others from using ‘misleading‘ ticket prices. de la rue, which makes passports and banknotes has reported an 11% fall in operating profits largely due to its loss making paper business.
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however it sold that operation last year, so if you take that out of the equation its profits actually rose — even after taking into account the roughly 4 million pounds it spend trying, and failing, to win the contract to make british passports. the government is considering fines of up to half a million pounds for bosses of firms which bombard people with nuisance calls. consumers received 3.9 billion nuisance phone calls and texts last year. a consultation paper is being launched about the plan which was first suggested two years ago. for 61 months now the prices in the shops have been falling, according to the british retail consortium. that may seem odd when we‘ve been talking about rising inflation over the last two years. but these figures from the british retail consortium just coverjust 500 items from shops. official inflation figures come from a wider range and include services, things like holidays, restaurants and so on.
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so in may prices specifically in shops fell 1.1% on a year earlier. so let‘s break these numbers down a bit — i‘m joined by rachel lund, head of insight & analytics, at the british retail consortium. bringing the idea of food and non—food, there is a slightly different performance about the shop items. what we saw this month is that food prices are up year—on—year by1.2% that food prices are up year—on—year by 1.2% whilst non—food prices are down 2.5%. why is there a difference? there are a number of factors, food is more strongly affected by the underlying price of the raw products of global food prices go up which they have then the price of food and shops close up. in the non—food sector, you have some of these pressures as well but actually there is a lot more to the supply chain. also very strong
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competition in some areas of non—food which is encouraging retailers to cut prices to attract consumers but also more opportunity for product innovation as well which enables retailers to give cheaper prices for some goods. this is generally good for consumers what is it like for shopkeepers? it is great news for consumers but for retailers basically it means lower revenues and what we have seen over the past year as profit margins have fallen. it has made the environment for retailing tougher. what part does online play and this? is it included in yourfigures are online play and this? is it included in your figures are as it‘s something which affects your figures? we have a mixture. they are featuring in the index so what online has done is make the market more competitive and giving consumers more information and
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enabling them to compare prices as well. which has put the pressure on retailers to reduce those prices. thank you. a quick look at the markets... everyone worried about the crisis in italy, the market fairly quiet day. the euro has been following and bounced back a little today, connected with italy. that‘s all the business news. a revolutionary neck collar has been developed to help thousands of people living with motor neurone disease in the uk. the head up collar is designed to ease pain and make everyday tasks like eating and communicating much easier.
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it‘s the first of its kind and has taken 5 years for experts in sheffield to develop. jamie coulson reports. when i was given the diagnosis we went home and i sat in this chair andi went home and i sat in this chair and i howled. three years ago philip was diagnosed we do know one disease, an incurable condition which damages the nervous system. he has developed significant muscle wea kness has developed significant muscle weakness in his neck which causes his neck to do. until recently he found it difficult to find the right support. traditionally patients with motoneuron disease might be given soft fabric collars but these can get quite hot toast or alternatively they may be given a rigid, but these
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can be bulky and uncomfortable so expensive in sheffield have been working on a revolutionary new design. the head up, as a soft fabric base and a series of supports can be added to provide stability to the head and neck. it has been developed by the two universities in sheffield and the teaching hospital with help from patients. it is available to buy and has been interest from the nhs with 25 trusts already using it. what we need is it your four at 12 we're awaiting we have to do best to improve the quality of life for patients living with the condition and this is a small part of that. i would struggle ifi small part of that. i would struggle if i did not have it. i cant imagine. the summer exam season is a firm tradition —
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but a major study by harvard and other american universities suggests that students are likely to perform less well in hot weather. researchers analysed the test scores of ten million students, over thirteen years and found a significant link between results and the weather conditions. they said for every half a degree celsius rise in average temperatures, pupil performance went down by about one per cent. our education correspondent sean coughlan is with me now. sounds interesting. we have all sat exams in the summer, a lot of us have children doing the same, tell us more. have children doing the same, tell us more. and what does it have to get to have an effect which work any increase of over 21 degrees seems to have a negative impact. you can imagine students saying i told you so, it is too hot. but this shows any mathematical way that each little notch of texture going up the juices performance and also in colder parts of america and notjust baking deserts. it proves the theory
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that learning and he‘d do not mix very well. we all feel less like being active when it gets hotter and hotter. what are the implications for here? it is research in america where there are much hotter areas than here but you are saying it has an effect which is cooler. it should apply elsewhere. america has many different climates but what would it possible to make the comparison is people were doing the same test when the weather was different in different races and when it got hotter results went down because people find it harder to concentrate. it raises questions about when we should be taking exams, what happens if you are born and a heatwave year. as the disadvantage as the years go on? it is opening a door on the relationship between heat and studying. i guess because it is the end of the academic year that is not a nyway end of the academic year that is not anyway it is going to change.|j think it would be difficult and it
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isa think it would be difficult and it is a tradition, almost a ritual and it is very tough if you are in somewhere overheated and stuffy to learn. in america the effect was found to be much greater on poorer families and the simple expedition, was the air conditioning is less good and the simple answer would be to improve the air conditioning and schools and homes will stop and fans up up and measures taken gritter muck it is one of the things that happens. some say keep on your blazer and others are more rights. there‘s no negative effect from cold but results were affected, it all about sheet. above 21 degrees, results were going down. we have got kids doing exams, there‘s been a mixed bag so far. thank you. the headlines are coming up on the bbc news channel.
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in a moment we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two — first we leave you with for a look at the weather. let‘s see what he has for us. duathlete i , not far enough into the future. thunderstorms lucking although we have had some earlier. the risks will continue over the next couple of days but in some parts of the country the weather has been stunning. a lovely picture of the isle of man from yesterday. storms from kent from yesterday so this mishmash of a beautiful weather and stormy weather is in place across
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the country right now. this is where the country right now. this is where the lovely weather is across western scotla nd the lovely weather is across western scotland and northern ireland. belfast enjoying the best of the sun today. fine for most of western scotland, temperatures into the mid—20s. showers across northern england, drifting from the south so in the north moving there today. later we expected to finally improve for a time across the south—east but not for very long. it will be cloudy and money to make but watch what happens towards the south. you can see doesn‘t look like a and for what at 6am but i need time of the rush—hour the storm starts to increase, into service south—eastern parts of england and the home counties and east anglia and these could be very heavy downpours, gusty
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winds, thunder and lightning and tricky conditions on the roads. northern part of the uk once again a little bit better and as we go through the course on thursday to friday, we continue to see storms drifting out of the continent but slow moving so anyone sitting underneath these heavy showers as it for quite some time. a different area on friday, affecting these more northern parts, so fewer storms towards the end of the week across the south. the revenue that will be relatively warm, temperatures typically in the low 20s. a quick look at saturday, showers and the north—west but actually saturday isn‘t looking too bad across most of england and wales, a bit of cloud but sunshine and temperatures into the 20s. for a few more days i think a list of showers, not necessarily in the same place and one thing that is going to continue as the warm
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weather for the time of the year. this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at midday. the grenfell inquiry hears a sister‘s tribute to ray bernard — who died alongside six other people who lived in the block who took refuge in his flat as the blaze spread through the fire: this shows the respect he gave to those who lost their lives that night and we know that he would have given comfort to each of them before they took their last breaths and departed this world. one of the groups involved in the aid effort after the disaster says the local authority response to grenfell "slow and lacked direction". a 15—year—old boy has died after being stabbed in wolverhampton last night. belgian officials say the man who shot dead two policewomen and a student teacher in liege yesterday killed a fourth person the day before. ukraine‘s prime minister accuses moscow of being behind the killing of russian journalist and kremlin critic, arkady babchenko. "ajoke in bad taste" —
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roseanne barr apologises for racist tweet about a former obama adviser, but her revived sitcom is cancelled. also this hour — the digital minister tells consumers not to buy tickets through viagogo. it comes as the advertising watchdog says the secondary ticketing site has missed a deadline to reform how it shows ticket prices and fees. good afternoon it is wednesday 30th may. welcome to bbc newsroom live. an independent report has accused kensington and chelsea council of being slow and lacking direction in the weeks following the grenfell tower disaster.
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the research, commissioned by muslim aid, suggests that the authorities relied on voluntary organisations to help those in need, and says the disaster should be a wake—up call about how to deal with future emergencies. ben ando reports. in the chaotic aftermath of the blaze at grenfell tower, everyone wanted to give. clothes, food, supplies, and hundreds of local people stepping forward with something just as precious — their time. according to a report commissioned by muslim aid working with local charity groups, the response from the authorities, primarily kensington and chelsea borough council, was weak and lacked direction or coordination. that, says the report, left local volu nteers, often with no experience of aid work, trying their best to cope but often overwhelmed. there was complete chaos. i‘ve been to many disasters around the world as an aid worker, and i really didn‘t expect to find this level of chaos and chaotic response in west london. i think what we need to reflect on is that the local—service actors
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are the ones that are part and parcel of that provision and that response. in response, the council said... the council said it couldn‘t comment further until the main public inquiry has concluded, but the charities say the lesson of this report is clear — in the aftermath of a disaster, the community itself should be put at the centre of the first response, not considered as an afterthought. the 72 people killed in the grenfell tower fire have been the 72 people killed in the grenfell towerfire have been remembered officially. this initial stage of commemoration ends today. 63 year old raymond bernard was one of those victims. he lived on the top floor of grenfell tower. his sister, bernadette, has been paying tribute. raymond lived on the top floor of
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g re nfell tower raymond lived on the top floor of grenfell tower with his dog, for over 30 years, where he tragically lost his life. on 14th on14thjune... on 14th june. .. 2017, aged on 14thjune... 2017, aged 63, in the fire which took the lives of 71 and later on, and later one other this year. on that fateful night, seven individuals were located in ray‘s flat. these were deborah,
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jessica, and one other. as there was no way down to escape, the only alternative was to head towards the top floor. there, they met ray and took refuge in his flat. the positioning of bodies of deborah, jessica, a and the others were on my brother‘s bed, with my brother resting beside the bed on the floor. this shows the respect he gave to those who lost their lives that night and we know that he would have given comfort to each of them before they took their last breaths and departed this world. ray being a man and the strongest most probably was the last to die. he would have been so the last to die. he would have been so alone. we know from the detailed shared with us by the core nor that ray was a hero on that tragic night.
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the new edition of the london review of books is devoted to the grenfell fire and its aftermath — its editor at large andrew 0‘ hagan spent ten months talking to survivors, council workers, fire fighters, local politicians and activists. he‘s been speaking to mishal husain on bbc radio 4‘s today programme. albeit there is an inquiry ongoing, i wanted to take an independent writer‘s stance and we looked at everything and i have to say that much of that understandable dismay and anger that we all started out with, it couldn‘t stand up alongside all the evidence that was suggested... you mean anger at the council? yes, people wanted accusation to stand for evidence in this case. that to call out the leader and the deputy leader of the council as being responsible for this, didn‘t at all stand up to the evidence that these were people, you
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don‘t work for councils through some sense of obligation, people are away with the fairies if think people who work for housing hate the poor. they we re work for housing hate the poor. they were accused of things like that. after months of evidence i discovered the council, despite reports even today, we just heard them, the evidence goes the other way when you look at it, that the council actually responded as well as they could under these tremendously difficult circumstances. one of the key accusation was about the cost of refurbishment and the documents that we re refurbishment and the documents that were obtained by the bbc and others that showed the council had tried to cut the cost of refurbishment to replace the zinc cladding. i don‘t know if you got into that detail.|j did very deeply and i have to say thatis did very deeply and i have to say that is incorrect. you say the council, what you mean is the tenant
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management organisation, people haven‘t been making the subtle distinction, that they have to make, because you‘re talking about in the end possible corporate manslaughter charges. the gunman who shot dead two police officers and a civilian in the belgian city of liege had killed someone the night before the attacks. belgium‘s interior minister said the gunman had murdered a man — a former prisoner — he met while injail. the attacker also took a female cleaner hostage at a school before being killed by police. prosecutors say they‘re treating the attacks as ‘terrorist murder‘ earlier i spoke to our europe correspondent damian grammaticus, who explained what we now know it was known yesterday that this man, he has been named in belgian media as benjamin herman, had been released op this temporary one night released op this temporary one night release from prison on monday. what‘s now emerging is that he appeared to have killed one man on
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monday evening, as you were saying, a former colleague of his, a cell mate, an inmate, he was in prison with, on monday evening. then on tuesday, in liege, so a different location, he carried out his killing spree and killed two policewoman and one passer by, before being shot dead himself. now, the questions around his release are becoming quite pointed, because people are saying and looking at this and questioning why he was out at all if he was a danger. the interior minister has been on belgian radio saying he is questioning his own conscience, because he felt responsible for the fact this man was on release when he carried out these killings. what are they piecing together about the potential motives here? well this is interesting, on the one hand, you have the prosecutors who have been giving a press conference saying
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they are treating this as terrorist murder and attempted terrorist murder. because of the nature of the events, because he targeted the police, because he seems to have shouted allah as he was doing it. he seemed to have been in contact with radicalised individuals in prison. but at the same time, they say they‘re keeping an open mind, because one, or two other possibilities are being looked at. he was in prison for drugs offences, so was he was in prison for drugs offences, so was he on drugs at the time? and the fact he carried out the killing on monday evening may have contributed to his state of mind. maybe, the interior minister suggested this, that he was, this man was feeling hopeless about his prospects if he went back to prison and then carried out these killings. the foreign secretary borisjohnson says he‘s "appalled" by the murder of a russian investigative journalist in ukraine.
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arkady babchenko, a critic of president vladimir putin, was shot dead in ukraine‘s capital kiev, where he was living in exile. russia‘s foreign minister, sergei lavrov, has rejected suggestions that moscow was behind the murder. caroline rigby reports. arkady babchenko was one of russia‘s best known investigative journalists. an outspoken critic of the kremlin, as well as russia‘s actions in syria and eastern ukraine, the 41—year—old claimed he had suffered a campaign of harassment and feared for his life in his home country. that, he said, led him to move to ukraine last year and it was at his apartment block in the capital kiev, where the 41—year—old was shot and fatally wounded. his wife told police she was in the bathroom when she heard gunfire. she found her husband lying in a pool of his own blood. he had been shot in the back and died in an ambulance a short time later. of course it is about finding out who was behind it. and as i have said it
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is too early to say. we see the russian pattern there. arkady babchenko had hosted a programme on the ukrainian channel atrtv. this is how the station broke the news of his death. and the ukrainian prime minister, volodymyr groysman, described the journalist as a true friend of ukraine, who told the world the truth about russian aggression. an investigation is now under way into arkady babchenko‘s death. police in kiev say the evidence points to a tar getted murder related to his work as a journalist. earlier, i spoke to our correspondent yuri vendik who knew arkady babchenko from their days as war reporters. i met imet him i met him in one of the places in ukraine in fact, during the uprising and then we met on several times, we
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have many friends in common. we were not close friends, no way, but yes, we knew each other, we exchanged messages. the last one was this january. when i was in prague and he was there too. but he left one day earlier. i called him to drink some beer. that is where i knew him. he was a reporter and he was a journalist and as to this, the motives of murder, everyone who knew him, all his friends and colleagues, they all agree that he had no business conflicts, no conflicts in his every day life whatsoever. he was a very, in his common life, he was a very, in his common life, he was a very nice and benign person. all agreed that no motives other than what he wrote and what he said on air, there could be no motives for this murder. tell us more about
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what he wrote and said on air. he was, you couldn‘t call him even opposition activist, because he was kind of a stand alone opposition activist. he didn‘t join kind of a stand alone opposition activist. he didn‘tjoin any political force in russia activist. he didn‘tjoin any politicalforce in russia before leaving and after leaving. he was not only a reporter, he was a soldier, a former soldier, he went to the first chechen war as a conscript, as a young boy. he suffered under post—traumatic stress disorder, as he said himself and he went to the second chechen war as a volunteer soldier, as a surgeon. after that, he became very much disappointed in the state, in the authorities of russia and he became authorities of russia and he became a very fierce critic of them and so
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he became a journalist after that. he wrote books, wrote reports. but eve ryo ne he wrote books, wrote reports. but everyone admits he was never a balanced and indifferent reporter. he was very much imbalanced. and very fierce critic of the authorities. bill browder, a prominent anti—corruption campaigner and critic of russian president putin, has been arrested, but then released, by police in spain. the arrest took place at moscow‘s request, but the warrant was then found to be invalid. earlier, mr browder put out an alert on twitter: in the last hour foreign secretary borisjohnson said he had spoken to mr browder and was glad that he‘d been released. mrjohnson also said that russia should concentrate on finding the killers of mr browder‘s former lawyer, sergei magnitsky, who died in a russian prison in 2009 the headlines on bbc newsroom live:
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tributes are paid to ray bernard — who died at grenfell tower alongside six people who took refuge in his flat — as the inquiry holds its final day of commemorations. police confirm a 15—year—old boy has died after being stabbed in wolverhampton last night a man who shot dead three people in liege yesterday had already killed another person shortly after his release from prison, according to belgian officials. now an update on the sport with hugh. good morning. the action is back under way at the french open. british interest focuses on cameron norrie, who hopes to continue his good form. it is a tough match against the 15th seed. norrie will ta ke against the 15th seed. norrie will take confidence into the contest saying he played his best tennis in
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the opening round. simona halep is through. the two—finalist recovered to win in three sets. it has been announced that the huddersfield town manager david wagner has signed a new contract with the club. he guided them to safety in the premier league and he has committed his future to the club for three years. northern ireland were held overnight to a goalless draw in panama who are in england‘s world cup group. and an inexperienced scotland side lost 2—0 to peru in lima. alex mcleish‘s side conceeded the goals either side of half time, with goalkeeperjordan archer making a couple of mistakes on his debut. england‘s ashley young says the players have talked about what to do if they‘re subjected to racism during the world cup in russia. it‘s a big issue in the country, with the russian football union recently fined 22 thousand pounds
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for racist chants by fans in a friendly against france. hopefully uefa and fifa will, if anything‘s is to come about they will be able to deal with it. you know, whether it‘s going to happen whether or not pitch, i‘m not sure how you react to it. i‘m sure we will talk about it and we have talked about it in the squad and what to do and whatnot talked about it in the squad and what to do and what not to do. paralympic champion ellie simmonds says she came close to quitting swimming after losing her love for the sport in the build—up to the rio games. instead of retiring, the five—time paralympic champion took a break after winning gold and bronze in brazil and went travelling. her time off included camping under the stars in the australian outback, an emotional trip to the water cube in beijing, plus visits to thailand, america, mexico, south africa and vietnam. she‘s now hoping to regain a place on the british para—swimming team for august‘s european championships in dublin
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i hated swimming, but my year off gave me perspective and it is something that is my life and the opportunities it gives me isjust so huge. so i decided to give it one more shot. that is all the sport for now. the american actress, roseanne barr, has apologised after her popular tv show was cancelled following a racist comment she posted on twitter. she‘d compared a former aide to president obama to an ape. the head of the abc network said the comments were abhorrent, repugnant and inconsistent with its values. this report from our correspondent james cook in los angeles contains flash photography mum, can i have some money? i don‘t know. mum, can i have some money? i don‘t know, can i have some money? roseanne barr fronted a tv sensation. housekeeping! a hugely popular sitcom from the 1980s and ‘90s, which made a triumphant return this year. "beep!"
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that didn't go through. i heard a beep. millions tuned in to see a sympathetic portrayal of white, working—class, trump—supporting america. it came crashing down in a vitriolic twitter tirade. roseanne barr‘s nastiest slur was aimed at an african—american political opponent. she was referring to valerie jarrett. i think we have to turn it into a teaching moment. lam fine. i worry about the people out there who do not have a circle of friends and followers who come to their defence. ms barr also attacked hillary clinton and her daughter chelsea, and she falsely called the billionaire investor george soros, who as a jewish child who survived the occupation of hungary, a nazi. that tweet was shared by president trump‘s son, donald trump jr. ms barr issued a partial apology, but it wasn‘t enough for the abc, who called her commments. ..
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roseanne‘s downfall was clearly her own doing, but it‘s likely to strengthen stereotypes in a divided america with each side accusing the other of intolerance and hatred. in italy, there are reports this morning that the two leading anti—establishmnent parties to try again to form a government. but early elections — perhaps as soon asjuly — appear likely. i spoke to our correspondent james reynolds in rome, who gave us the latest update. by by the time i finish this sentence, things will have changed, but as things will have changed, but as things stand, italy has a prime
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minister designate who is a proeuro economist who has not been sworn in. the reports suggest he has not been sworn in, because he is seeing if there is any chance of bringing back a populist government that was vetoed on sunday. it was vetoed, because of the possibility of having a euro sceptic finance minister. so the prime minister is seeing if he can avoid early elections. if they can‘t find a way through, we were talking yesterday about elections being months away, is it going to have to be much sooner than that? yesterday, we started thinking elections might happen in early september. yesterday evening elections theoretically moved to 29th july. the elections theoretically moved to 29thjuly. the latest elections theoretically moved to 29th july. the latest theory elections theoretically moved to 29thjuly. the latest theory is they will try and keep elections away. it is almost impossible to know which one to predict, but there is a wider point — one party, the league party,
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a hard—right party, which is rising in the polls and it shows very little interest in trying to form a coalition with the current numbers. its best bet may be to wait for an early election and then rise up. so it might be difficult to put together a goovt with that party now. that is the party that wants to ta ke now. that is the party that wants to take italy out of eurozone? it is a very simple question, but it is a difficult question to answer, because they have said many different things. was not in their ma nifesto different things. was not in their manifesto or their potential contract with another party. but league party leaders have talked of their frustration with the euro and talked of leaving the euro. a lot of italians therefore have been worried about that party. some breaking news, ethan stables
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has been given an indefinite detention order after plotting to carry out a machete attack. he was arrested as he made what the prosecution described as a final visit to the new empire in baro barrow—in—furness in cumbria. he was targeting a gay pride event. he has been posting revealing he was intent on going to war and wanted to slaughter people. at his trial at leeds, he was convicted of preparing an act of terrorism, making threats to kill and possessing an explosive substance in suspicious
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circumstances. so we are hearing that ethan stables has been given an indefinite hospital order after plotting to carry out that attack. we hope to hearfrom our correspondent who has been following the case at leeds crown court. a government minister has told consumers not to use viagogo, one of the big four secondary ticket resellers. digital minister margot james told bbc radio 5 live that if fans had to use a secondary site to buy tickets, "don‘t choose viagogo — they are the worst". her warning comes after the advertising standards authority said viagogo was breaking uk advertising rules by failing to make additional fees clear. the four big choices, when you can‘t get a ticket from the primary seller and you have to go to a secondary site. there are four choices, just don‘t choose them, they‘re the worst. what are you going to do about them ?
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worst. what are you going to do about them? the best thing is for people to be made aware. we can‘t necessarily, because they‘re based out of uk. there are limits to what we can do to single them out. they will have to comply with the law in the end, it is just the other three big companies have agreed to do so in advance. but we are taking more steps to constrain the activities of secondary ticketing site, to make sure that users know what the charges are before they click they wa nt to charges are before they click they want to buy. that is happening on the three sites, but not on viagogo. consumers should vote with their feet. a new neck collar has been deviced
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to help people with motor neurone disease. when i had the diagnosis i sat in this chair and howled. three yea rs sat in this chair and howled. three years ago philip was diagnosed with motor neurone disease. he has developed significant muscle wea kness developed significant muscle weakness in his neck which causes his head to droop. he found it difficult to find the right support. that is fine. traditional patients might be giving soft fabric collars, but these can offer little support and be hot. or they can have a rigid collar, but they can be bulky and uncomfortable. so experts have been working on a new design. the head up collar has a soft fabric base and a
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series of shaped supports can be added to provide stability. the collar has been developed in by two universities in sheffield and it is available to buy. there has been interest from the nhs with 25 trusts using it. we need a cure for it, but while waiting for a cure, we have to do our best to improve the quality of life of patients. this is a small pa rt of of life of patients. this is a small part of doing that. i would struggle ifi part of doing that. i would struggle if i didn‘t have it. i can‘t imagine. i can‘t imagine. if i didn‘t have it. i can‘t imagine. i can't imagine. now the weather. today across the country from one extreme to the other. across scotland and northern ireland it is warm and sunny. other parts will stay cloudy and there will be some down pours around. in fact the risk of down pours will continue for
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the next few days. so showers across northern areas by the end of the day. they will have moved through the midlands. the best of the weather in glasgow and belfast. temperatures into the low 20s. tonight a lot of cloud across the uk. the further north you are the biggest chance of showers tonight. warm at 15 in london and in edinburgh14 warm at 15 in london and in edinburgh 14 celsius. thursday sta rts edinburgh 14 celsius. thursday starts off cloudy and then the sun should be out in northern and central areas. but down pours heading to the south, with thunder lightning and the risk of flash flooding in the south tomorrow. this is bbc newsroom live — our latest headlines. the grenfell inquiry hears a sister‘s tribute to ray bernard — who died alongside six other people who lived in the block who took refuge in his flat as the blaze spread through the fire. this shows the respect he gave to
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those who lost their lives that night and we know that he would have given comfort to each of them before they took their last breath and departed this world. one of the groups involved in the aid effort after the disaster says the local authority response to grenfell "slow and lacked direction" a 15 year old boy has died after being stabbed in wolverhampton last night belgian officials say the man who shot dead two policewomen and a student teacher in liege yesterday killed a fourth person the day before. ukraine‘s prime minister accuses moscow of being behind the killing of russianjournalist and kremlin critic, arkady babchenko. moscow is calling the claim a smear. in a moment... dangerous drones. pilots will have to pass online safety tests — or face fines — to tackle the growing number of near—misses with aircraft one after another —
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the 72 people killed by the grenfell tower fire have been publicly remembered over the past week, as the official inquiry has begun its work. the details shared have painted a fuller picture of the way they lived, but also the way they died. this initial stage of commemoration ends today. farah hamdan and her husband omar belkadi died in the fire — as well as their children, eight year old malak and leena, who was just six months old. their grandfather, el alami hamdan, has been paying tribute. his words are spoken through an interpreter (sot next) they used to call me grandpa. that was my name. do you like being a grandpa? they are my children. i will never forget them. what about lina ?
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it was once in a ramadan i was going to pray and on my way to the mosque she was going to pek cowan children from the school, it was the 15 pm. she told me credit you going and i saidi she told me credit you going and i said i am going to the mosque.
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she was in the pram. i uncovered her face and she was smiling. she would pretend she was asleep. maybe i did that twice or three times. ididn‘t i didn‘t know that that‘s night was the night when they would today. they would die. a 15 year old boy has died after a stabbing in wolverhampton.
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police were called to langley road in the merry hill area of the city just after eleven o‘clock last night. our correspondent phil mackie is in wolverhampton. this happened at around 11pm last night. labour‘s told reporters they heard a commotion. ambulance services said somebody dialled 999 and paramedics found the young boy suffering from stab wounds back there when it is cordoned off. there are ten to three cannot see from here. it took him to hospital but sadly they could not save his life. we have seen forensic work going on, you can see that car covered in tarpaulin. and this comes after west
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midlands police, sorry the home office revealed figures that knife crime in less west midlands has risen any greater rate than anywhere outside london and since those figures were published, this is the second fatality of a teenager, a young man was fatally stabbed in sutton coldfield and now this 15—year—old last night. west midlands police have lost a milder investigation and we are expecting a statement from them within the next hour. —— a murder investigation. statement from them within the next hour. —— a murder investigationm that any expedition finite time in the west midlands has risen fast? you are getting into politics there. the west midlands police and crime commissioner has been saying for a long time that cuts to the number of police officers has been drastically
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reduced has had a direct impact, neighbourhood policing has suffered and asa neighbourhood policing has suffered and as a result he says that has led toa and as a result he says that has led to a rise in crime. we have problems with gun and knife crime in the early to thousands, a lot of good work went on to reduce those figures but in the last three or four years we have seen a baton to something like the levels of 15 years ago. new rules are to be introduced to make sure drones are used safely. they‘ll only be able to fly up to 400 feet and within one kilometre of airport boundaries. 89 near misses with aircraft were reported last year. steve landells is the head of safety for the airline pilots‘ union balpa. he told us this earlier. the vast majority of drone operators fly them safely and sensibly within the rules and understand the rules and commercial operators have a vested interest in flying them properly but there are a small group of people that either do not care about the rules or do not know about them and they are putting
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lives in danger every day. that is the group we need to get to. we are pleased that the government has introduced some regulations although some give us cause for concern. what is the worst incident that has happened is to your knowledge? around the world there have been six or more collisions between drones and manned aircraft and so far it hasn‘t resulted in any crashes which is fortunate more than anything. we are concerned that these impacts are happening, we need to do something about it and the government regulations some are great — not above 400 feet is good so that some separation there introducing a registration scheme is something balpa has been calling for so we are pleased to see that although the timescale was towards the end of next year which doesn‘t seem particularly challenging to me. the problem we have is the one
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kilometre from an airfield boundary, that is far too close for anyone to fly a drone and sending out the wrong message. if you are telling someone you can fly 400 feet one kilometre from an airfield boundary, a passenger aircraft coming into land will be between 200 and 300 feet and that is ridiculous to have no separation built in. there are rules such as endangerment of an aircraft. if you fly your drone on the approach you could go to prison for five years but it is sending out the wrong message and one kilometre is just far too close, should be near to five. thank you. the transport secretary chris grayling has accused the rail industry of having ‘collectively failed passengers.‘ mr grayling spoke out following the widespread disruption faced by passengers after the overhaul of train timetables. in a letter to conservative mps, mr grayling blamed network rail for the problems, calling its performance unacceptable. he also promised that, once the new timetables
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were fully in place, passengers would be given a much better service. i‘m joined from bexhill by huw merriman, a conservative member of the transport select committee, whose constituency is affected by the govia thameslink problems how would you describe the problems? they have been particularly acute for the region, not so much my constituency when we have actually had an extra service added and on the whole it has worked quite well. around us it is really not what, it has been appalling, people have been let down and you have to build in mind this is a route that has already had terrible problems due to strikes. this is the last place we needed more disruption, it is impacting our local economy and causing outrage. for constituents who cannot get really need to get to. is it a case of trial and error
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and it will all turn out all right in the end? how long can a process be allowed to take when people are being affected as you describe?” don‘t think it is trial and error. i think what has happened from my understanding is that they should have got 12 weeks notice from network rail to put in the changes needed and they got only three weeks which made it impossible to plan because there were certain changes that network rail required of the train operator and the agreement was already in place with the unions to win the drivers would drive from. that could be unpacked and the whole thing is not good enough, these different organisations notjoined up, not nimble enough to deliver a service that people are spending a fairamount of the service that people are spending a fair amount of the readers to get from a to b and it is a failure of the real industry that is not up to modern times in terms of planning, delivery and everyone gets the blame. it is not good enough. how
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does it get fixed? the day after the timetable arrangements came in on sunday the transport select committee were wondering whether 24 hours was too short notice to see how these things better in but clearly we need an enquiry because it has not bedded in at all. it only gets fixed because you have one central command. we keep being told we will have joined up approach from network rail and the train operators but time and time again we get a brand and it never happens. i feel you cannot have the track and the train companies as separate beings, it doesn‘t seem to work. it is only going to work when you have the train operators operating the rail, the signals so one organisation makes decisions rather than other organisations not been joined makes decisions rather than other organisations not beenjoined up. until that happens this will carry one. is that effectively nationalisation you are talking about? i would flood that the other main seaward end up with a
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privatised network rail, i would flip it the other way. one train up with the singer responsible for the carriages and the drivers and the train that also track maintenance, with the cars and frilly signalling works. these are the desperate and asa works. these are the desperate and as a result they do not work. it is to be one body. i would rather it was private hands because the publicly owned operator network rail is being blamed for the lion‘s share of this so i do not feel that public ownership works. i don‘t think it will soon operators either. a white supremacist who planned a machete attack at a gay pride event in cumbria is being sentenced after being convicted of preparing an act of terrorism. leeds crown court heard how ethan stables, who‘s 20, was arrested after he posted details of his plans online, saying he was ‘going to war‘. our correspondent olivia richwald has been following the case at leeds crown court.
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tell us more about what he has been convicted of doing. we heard in court that ethan stables was a social misfit, described as a loner who planned and this machete attack ona who planned and this machete attack on a gay pride night in his local pub. he has been sentenced to an indefinite stay in a psychiatric hospital but he can receive treatment. he is a 20 adult diagnostic with asperger‘s and has spent hours online amassing himself and nazi ideology and sharing hateful and homophobic views from his tiny flat in cumbria he asserts how to make a bomb and where to source as ingredients. the gathered quantities of explosives and turned his attention to one of his local pubs, a mile away when he found out the new pub wanted to host a gay
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pride evening. he had been watching the pub and making threats online and then on the evening ofjuly 23 last year police had been tipped off to his activities and armed police surrounded the pub and started looking for ethan stables. when they went into his flat they found what a risky posed. there was a huge swastika flag on the wall and weapons including a machete, knives and an axe. here at leeds crown court he was previously found guilty of preparing an act of terrorism, threats to kill and possessing explosives but today at the court he was given his sentence. thejudge imposed an indefinite hospital stay and that means he will receive treatment at a psychiatric hospital in preston. there‘s no time limit on that treatment and it will be up to a mental health tribunal to decide if and when can be released. even when he is released thejudge also imposed a restriction order which means the conditions on that which
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means the conditions on that which mean he can be returned to hospital as needed. all of this was necessary judge to protect the public from ethan stables. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: tributes are paid to ray bernard — who died at grenfell tower alongside six people who took refuge in his flat — as the inquiry holds its final day of commemorations. police confirm a 15—year—old boy has died after being stabbed in wolverhampton last night. a man who shot dead three people in liege yesterday had already killed another person shortly after his release from prison, according to belgian officials. in a moment — while many of us might be hoping for sun, a major us study suggests taking exams in hot weather could impact performance. it is harder than it has been in living memory for a wrongly convicted person to overturn their conviction. that‘s according to a former court of appealjudge,
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who was speaking to a bbc panorama programme investigating the criminal cases review commission, the body which investigates miscarriages ofjustice. the programme also uncovers fresh evidence in two alleged wrongful convictions, previously rejected by the commission. mark daly has this report. kevin lane spent almost 20 years in prison for a murder he‘s always said he didn‘t commit. released on parole in 2015, he‘s rebuilding his life. i‘d love to be able to stand on the court of appeal steps and say, "i told you... i told you i never done this, i told you at trial, i told you when i was convicted and i have been telling you for 24 years now and i‘ve still been fighting it." it must mean something. kevin lane was jailed in 1996 for the gangland murder of robert mcgill after lane‘s palmprint was found alongside a single particle of gunshot residue in a pipe in a car linked to the shooting. but experts panorama spoke to think that gunshot evidence is
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now worthless. in today's terms, no evidential strength would be placed on the findings of a single particle. i certainly wouldn't have concluded that a gun had been placed within the pipe. kevin lane now plans to submit a new application to the criminal cases review commission — a body many believe is failing. panorama has obtained internal board minutes which reveal case managers have there "large, sometimes unworkable portfolios" and there were concerns of a culture developing where finding new evidence in cases was seen as troublesome, because of the work pressures. the ccrc can only refer a case to the court of appeal if there‘s a real possibility it will overturn a conviction and its referral rate has dropped sharply over the past year. but a former court of appeal judge told panorama the ccrc has become more cautious, because the court has set the bar higher than in living memory. it's become much more difficult for an appellant to succeed
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and therefore that will no doubt influence them on what cases they send through. you‘re a very high profile former court of appealjudge and here you are saying that the test that is currently being applied at the court of appeal is wrong. i'm saying that. the ccrc denied it was too cautious and added: panorama also looks at the case of eddie gilfoyle, convicted of murdering his pregnant wife, paula in 1993, but he always protested his innocence. i haven‘t done it. i never killed my wife and baby. i never did it. the ccrc said both eddie gilfoyle and kevin lane were welcome to make new submissions. and you can see panorama —
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last chance forjustice on bbc one at 7 thirty this evening. breaking news about ticket seller viagogo, the year the advertising standing authority has referred viagogo to trading standards for misleading advertising over failure to make changes to misleading prices on its website. that follows on from comments from the digital digital minister this book about ticket sellers saying there are four choices, just not choose viagogo, they the worst. we are feeding the bean referred to the advertising standards authority over misleading facing and submission. research seen by the bbc suggests that survivors of domestic violence are facing intimidation
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when their cases are heard in the family court. many have to come face—to—face with their abusive ex—partner. the charity women‘s aid says the process can be a major source of fearfor some women. the government says it is consulting on a bill which will tackle the issue. graham satchell reports. isabelle‘s relationship with a husband started to go wrong after the birth of our daughter. she says he became jealous and angry and abusive. we have changed the names to and voiced their words to protect their identities. he started getting angry, he would give me some money for everything so in the end i ended up for everything so in the end i ended up selling my things and eating cereal so the children have something to eat. i realised he couldn‘t hurt me any more, i was a shell, there was nothing left so he started on the children. they were really terrified of him. he would
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start getting more angry and violent andl start getting more angry and violent and i remembercrying start getting more angry and violent and i remember crying in the corner because i was so afraid. after some shouting at me for ten minutes. you we re shouting at me for ten minutes. you were afraid of him? terrified. after yea rs of were afraid of him? terrified. after years of abuse isabel finally left a husband. the police investigated the said it was her word against his and there was no prosecution. the case ended up at family court will eventually a judge decided the ex—husband should have contact with the children. he came to power cannot and she refused to go. she saidi cannot and she refused to go. she said i don‘t want to see you today and he physically picked up from the front door kicking and screaming and put in the car and slammed the door shut and drove off with her. it was, took for her. it was automatic for me. i did not want to see my dad. i wanted to have a voice in this whole thing which did not happen. you don‘t feel as though you were listened to? no. our brother said i
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hatejudges and listened to? no. our brother said i hate judges and the courts. why are they forcing us to see daddy when he is being so horrible to us? why do they not believe us? new rules were introduced to ensure the safety of children involved in domestic abuse but ina children involved in domestic abuse but in a study of 72 cases the charity women‘s 85 24% of domestic abuse survivors said they had been cross—examined by the exporter in court and 61% said there were no special measures in place like waiting rooms or screens to protect them. isabel says the family court is not doing enough and things need to change. i think it takes a lot for domestic abuse survivors to come forward and say this is what is happening to me. i need to be believed. you are hoping the court will protect you and your children andi will protect you and your children and i don‘t think that is happening at all at the moment. for linear no longer sees her father. at all at the moment. for linear no longer sees herfather. the most recent court order said she was now old enough to make good decisions.
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the government said is forjudges to determine what is best for the child in each case and it is reforming the law to protect victims and bring more offenders to justice. but campaigners say too often children‘s safety is at risk because survivors of abuse are not believed. the summer exam season is a firm tradition — but a major study by harvard and other american universities suggests that students are likely to perform less well in hot weather. researchers analysed the test scores of ten million students, over thirteen years and found a significant link between results and the weather conditions. they said for every half a degree celsius rise in average temperatures, pupil performance went down by about one per cent. the scottish government is banning single—use coffee cups in restaurants and cafes in its main buildings to cut plastic pollution. the measure is coming into force on monday. drinks will be served in reusable ceramic mugs for those sitting in, and staff are being encouraged to bring their own cups to take out.
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in a moment the news at1 with reeta chakrabarti. first the weather. let‘s try and get through the next few hours, the next few days will give you a sense of the weekend but in the short—term not a great deal of change. still have these combination of warm sunshine, thunderstorms but we may mix them up and that some areas where sunshine may end up with something a little bit more looking like this which has been the story for some parts of the british isles recently. there is a sense of change as we speak, the cloud across the border into the southern part of scotland, bringing the chance of sand storms and into the chance of sand storms and into the small hours of first, the sense we may drag some showers and to the
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far north of scotland and northern ireland. it will be quite a close night. on thursday, if we have the sums right, heavy and thundery downpours pushing north across this south—eastern quarter of the british isles. initially some doubt as to how far north they will get and how quickly, computer models telling different things. we will keep you up different things. we will keep you up to date. farther north somewhat drier, thursday to friday we sense the high pressure that was dominating is giving way to low pressure which is generated so many thunderstorms so from friday onwards it looks as though the balance of those thunderstorms is shifting further north. still rather close, many areas into the upper teens and low 20s and temperatures still with the prospect of fog on the coast and into the weekend the dominance of showers in the north and severe
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conditions in the south and it will feel warm but still the chance of the odd pocket of mist and fog. he is saturday for example, showers, negating across the northern part of scotland, and to northern ireland but farther south it could well be you get away with essentially a dry day and pleasantly warm and a deal on sunshine as indeed it may be on sunday as well with just the chance of one or two heavy and perhaps thundery downpours for scotland and into northern ireland as well. the grenfell tower inquiry hears of a grandfather who sheltered six people in his top floor flat on the night of the fire. raymond bernard gave refuge to families trying to escape the blaze as it consumed the block. this shows the respect he gave to those who lost their lives that night, and we know that he would have given comfort to each of them before
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they took their last breaths and departed this world. the tributes were made as the london borough responsible for grenfell said it would install more fire—resistant doors in thousands of its flats and houses. also this lunchtime: a man who shot dead three people in belgium yesterday, had already murdered a fourth person the night before. wholly unacceptable — the transport secretary‘s verdict on the disruption on the railways due to timetable changes.
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