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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  May 31, 2018 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at 11:00. cutting the high cost of credit — but campaigners say proposals to protect vulnerable consumers should have gone further. nhs trusts in england report a combined financial deficit of £960 million — nearly twice the expected figure. thatjust shows how difficult it is in the nhs and we really have to address that now. calls for the conservatives to hold an inquiry into alleged islamophobia within the party — we'll hear from its former chair baroness warsi shortly. also, what will brexit mean to they uk's creative industries? can the right note be struck to safeguard thousands ofjobs at stake? we'll speak to screenwriter, phil redmond in the next few minutes. and the young german tennis star — falling in love with
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the yorkshire accent. you clearly enjoyed your tennis. you say you don't know... not as much as your accent, buddy. i love that. good morning. it's thursday 31st may. i'm annita mcveigh. welcome to bbc newsroom live the uk's financial watchdog has announced a crackdown on companies which offer credit with high rates of interest. the financial conduct authority says the proposed changes will be rebalanced in favour of the consumer. let's take a look at some of the measures. in 2016 banks made an estimated £2.3 billion from overdrafts — the fca proposals include mobile alerts warning of potential charges, stopping the inclusion of overdrafts in the term ‘available funds‘. and requiring online tools to make the cost of overd rafts clearer. the high cost of rent—to—own
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purchases faces a cap — currently 400,000 people are in debt this way. the fca points to examples where people had paid more than £1,500 for essentials like an electric cooker that could be bought on the high street for less than £300. and measures to tackle doorstep lending include preventing firms from offering new loans or refinancing during home visits without the customer specifically requesting this. changes in this area are estimated to save consumers up to over £34 million a year. the chief executive of the fca andrew bailey has been discussing the changes with our correspondent emma simpson who began by asking him why he is taking action on rent to own. let me give you one of the examples we've published today. a washing machine that costs £400
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if you buy it with cash or buy it immediately, can cost up to £1200 if you buy it using rent to buy. now, that seems to us to be a very hard to justify increase, which affects some of the most vulnerable people in society with low income, who are vulnerable. so you have to tackle the question, why is it the cost of essential goods for instance, is so much higher when these forms of credit are involved? so, what are you proposing to do? how big a crackdown are you looking for rent own? if you look at the proposals we've put forward, there are two parts to it, i would say. one is about the terms and conditions of sales. for instance, in rent to own, we've said we think that bundling up extended warranties and charging for them at the same time as a sale,
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when customers probably find it pretty hard to understand what they're paying for at that point, it's something that needs tackling immediately. but then we've also put the idea on the table which we'll have to do more work, because we are under a legal obligation to make these ideas stand up, as it were and we will do that as soon as possible, of introducing caps on prices as one obvious way, in a sense, to tackle the issue. i'm nowjoined by the economic secretary to the treasury, john glen. they are going to rebalance the system in favour of consumers, do you think that is going far enough with these measures?” you think that is going far enough with these measures? i think what
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has been set out is going to help. the action is very significant, the cap, which i hope will be implemented during the course of this year, will be a massive influence. doorstop lending, is also significant and i am pleased with the rigour of the work. the rent to own sector faces a cap but there isn't a similar cap proposed for overdraft fees, but why not and do you think it should be? there is an ongoing review in banking by the fca. we have seen a lot of change in the banking sector is with regard to ove rd rafts. the banking sector is with regard to overd rafts. there the banking sector is with regard to overdrafts. there are more products available helping people access cheaper ways of dealing with ove rd rafts. cheaper ways of dealing with overd rafts. i
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cheaper ways of dealing with overdrafts. i think the banks will have to be on their toes to deal with what is a rapidly changing market. banks like loads have made some steps around their fees for arranged overdrafts. some steps around their fees for arranged overd rafts. the some steps around their fees for arranged overdrafts. the fca will be free to make further recommendations if they don't see changes in that sector. would you like to see that, would you like to see those overd rafts ? would you like to see those overdrafts? when you set up a regulator, like we did five years ago with the fca, they take analysis and show are bustline where there needs to be. with banks and ove rd rafts, needs to be. with banks and overdrafts, things are changing very rapidly. i would overdrafts, things are changing very rapidly. iwould rather we overdrafts, things are changing very rapidly. i would rather we had a close watching briefs on overdrafts and the way the banking sector is responding, rather than regulate prematurely when the market doesn't justify that. there has been a campaign on high—cost loans and the reaction is these reforms don't go far enough. the fca is looking at
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individual products rather than learning the lessons of the payday loa n learning the lessons of the payday loan industry and that is these companies of all to evade the regulation. we should have a simple rule in this country that nobody should end up paying more than double and what they borrow, is it something you would aspire to? we disagree on the speed of which these changes need to happen and also, we need to see the fca has a body of evidence to justify that. the fca have acted after a considerable amount of work to come to these conclusions today to put in this cap, which will have a massive impact. when you have a large amount of credit that is up to three times the cost of the product, it is unacceptable and that is why they have acted. but the market is very complex. there are lots of different providers of different sorts of products. we need to be sure any
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action we take all the fca takes doesn't have an adverse consequence in another area. but where i agree is the payday cap, she was very involved with, has actually said three quarters of a million consumers, £150 million a year since it was implemented three years ago. people agree there needs to be more financial education for everyone, but in terms of enshrining these proposals into law, when will that happen? we set up the financial forum and we will be looking at these in the months ahead. you will be taking a question on this next story as well and that is... they don't fit in, don't want the hassle, and struggle with "complex issues" — they are just some of the excuses given for not appointing women to the boards of the uk's top 100 companies, according to a report on gender balance.
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the government—backed review called it shocking, while a minister branded the reasons "pitiful". it has recommended that at least a third of the 350 ftse company board members are women by 2020. let's speak again to economic secretary to the treasury, john glen. you have to wonder what century some of those people were born in, making comments like that, they are outrageous? i felt i was reading a report from the 1950s or the 1970s. they are outrageous comments. we have some challenges to overcome. i lead the women in finance charter andi lead the women in finance charter and i have seen 200 city firms sign up and i have seen 200 city firms sign up to that, where they put somebody on the board to take responsibility for changing the culture in these organisations. 0ften for changing the culture in these organisations. often it is in the mid career point that actions need to be taken, so there are more candidates available for boardroom appointments. i don't see any reason why men and women should be treated any differently. we just need to
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challenge some of the prejudice that exist and they have been highlighted today. i hope we are seeing significant changes in boardrooms up and down the country, but it cannot come soon enough. thank you very much for your time. an islamic state supporter has admitted encouraging a terror attack targeting prince george. husnain rashid changed his plea half way through his trial at woolwich crown court. the court heard rashid used a messaging group to call for an attack on prince george. nhs trusts in england have reported a combined financial deficit of £960 million — nearly twice what was expected. the latest reported deficit is reached after taking account of extra financial support provided by the government. ministers have promised a new long—term financial plan for the nhs, which is expected within weeks. 0ur health editor hugh pym reports. the figures, covering hospital, ambulance, mental health and other trusts in england, show that finance is getting worse. the regulator, nhs improvement, said the surge in patient demand had
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affected performance in key areas, including waiting times. more than 2600 patients were waiting longer than 12 months for non—urgent treatment in march — a 75% increase over the year. the regulator said hundreds of thousands of more patients than the previous year had been to a&e, but the nhs didn't buckle under pressure. today's report says that nhs trusts in england had planned for a total deficit of £196 million for the financial year, which ended in march. but the actual figure was 960 million, higher than the 791 million the previous year. some analysts argue the underlying position was even worse. there's a lot of windowdressing in today's figures, which are bad enough on the face of them. but they are flattered by very large amounts of one—off emergency funding, which will not be available in future years — one—off savings and also one—off sales of land and properties that the nhs has managed to find last year,
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but obviously you can't sell a spare hospital building every year. the prime minister says she is planning a new long—term strategy for nhs funding in england, and that's expected within weeks. hugh pym, bbc news. chris hopson is the chief executive of nhs providers, which includes health trusts. he said today's figures highlighted the problems facing the nhs. given the work shortages in one of the worst winters on record, it isn't a bad performance, but it does show the enormous pressure the nhs is under. the fact we have missed the target for a third year in a row and we have £1 billion deficit, it shows how difficult it is in the nhs and we really have to address that 110w. ukraine has been heavily criticised for faking the assassination of russian
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dissident journalist, arkady babchenko. authorities in the country say it was an attempt to expose russian agents operating in the country. caroline rigby reports alive and well, the russian journalist and prominent kremlin critic, arkady babchenko, appearing ata critic, arkady babchenko, appearing at a press conference into his own death. nearly 20 hours after authorities in kiev reported he had been shot and killed. this, the reaction of shocked colleagues at the ukrainian tv channel where he worked. translation: i have buried friends and colleagues many times and i know the sickening feeling. i am sorry you had to experience it, but there was no other way. in an astonishing turn of events, it soon emerged arkady babchenko had been a willing participant in a security service
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sting we told aimed to foil a russian plot to kill him and up to 30 other people. one person has now been arrested. but as arkady babchenko met ukraine's president, relief he was alive had turned to debate about the ethics of the operation. i think our security services have worked specifically under the mandate and they have carried out their responsibilities professionally. russia's foreign ministry called the staged murder an anti—russian provocation. ukrainian authorities said the plot was justify, but many question whether this fake news assassination will have a lasting impact on the country's credibility and even that of its western allies. arkady babchenko is back on facebook and has been reacting to press. he
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said the english operation did more harm than good. he said, you want good, give me a uk passport and protection and then you can lecture me on how to save my family. 0ur correspondent from bbc ukrainian service, anastasiya gribanova is in kiev. has there been any explanation as to why the crainey and set up this sting operation to try to draw out the assassins? that is the question which many in ukraine have been asking. the only explanation which the ukrainian security services give, is that they had no other option other than keep it a big secret to make this operation successful. the primary goal was
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allegedly to expose hit men from russia who were trying to pay a contract killer in ukraine to commit the murder of arkady babchenko. the ukrainian security services said they knew there was a plot, an attempt of murder against arkady babchenko being planned, allegedly all the evidence was it was coming from russia. in order to make it happen, to make the operation successful, they had to contact arkady babchenko to keep it a big secret from his members of his family. very few people knew about it. they explain it in the only way that they had no choice. the less that they had no choice. the less that people knew the better, so the success that people knew the better, so the success of the operation could be guaranteed if it was kept quiet. has there been any response from arkady babchenko's wife? not at the moment.
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it has been a disputable figure in this situation. the very first thing arkady babchenko did when he emerged in public yesterday was apologise to his wife, saying she didn't know anything and she was not a witness in this case and he apologised everything she had to go too well imagining he was dead. but later on, the head of the ukrainian security services said his wife was supposed to have known the head —— about the operation. so far we haven't heard anything from her. but we know the family of arkady babchenko have been supplied with 2a southern security,
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so supplied with 2a southern security, soi supplied with 2a southern security, so i don't think we will be hearing from them. thank you very much. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: new proposals from the financial watchdog are being put forward to curb excessive credit interest charges. nhs trusts in england have reported a combined financial deficit of nearly a billion pounds — nearly twice the amount they had planned for. the muslim council of britain has repeated its demand for the conservatives to hold an independent inquiry into alleged islamophobia within the party. in sport, the former england midfielder frank lampard has been appointed as the manager of derby cou nty appointed as the manager of derby county on a three—year deal. this is his first managerial role. mo salah will be fit to play some part in egypt's mac world cup campaign. the tea m egypt's mac world cup campaign. the team doctor says he will be out for no more than three weeks. ben stokes will have a scan on his injured hamstring this afternoon as he proves his fitness ahead of the
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second test with pakistan. it is a must win match with england if they are to salvage a draw. i will have more on all of those stories at around 11:30am. the muslim council of britain has repeated its demand for the conservatives to hold an independent inquiry into alleged islamophobia within the party. the group, an umbrella organisation for 500 mosques and schools, highlights in particular one tory mp, who represents harrow east, bob blackman. they say he has a "consistent record endorsing islamophobia", including retweeting anti—muslim posts from tommy robinson, a figurehead for the far right, and hosting an outspoken anti—muslim campaigner in parliament. in a letter to the chairman of the tory party, they also list nine separate examples of conservative representatives or candidates from last month — though the letter does acknowledges the party dealt with all those incidents once they came to light. miqdaad versi, the assistant
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general secretary of the muslim council of britain, told the victoria derbyshire programme why an inquiry was urgently needed. when you have the most senior conservative muslim saying there is a simmering underbelly of islamophobic in the party and people like bob blackman not being dealt with and we have nine separate incidents over a five—week period... all of which were dealt with. but showed that something is happening within the party, action needs to be taken. when you have independent things of this level, it definitely merits an investigation. the mp bob blackman was unavailable for interview. but but he did give us this statement...
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and a conservative spokesman told us... "we take all such incidents seriously, which is why we have suspended all those who have behaved inappropriately and launched immediate investigations." 0ur assistant political editor norman smith is in westminster. there have been a number of incidents where people have been sacked and had to resign from the party, should there be an independent enquiry of the sort that has been called for? at the moment it would seem not but there must be
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conservatives who look across what happened to jeremy conservatives who look across what happened tojeremy corbyn and the allegations of anti—semitism and how much damage that did and wonder what they have to do to make sure these current accusations of islamophobia don't spiral into a similar crisis for the conservative party. because it's not just for the conservative party. because it's notjust the individual allegations which, of course have to be addressed, it's how the public see a political party responding to such allegations. whether they believe they are taking them seriously and it also impacts whether people see the culture of a political party in the way it responds. i would suggest with the conservative party there is a particular issue in that they have long struggled to attract voters from ethnic minorities. this is a long—standing problem the conservative party have faced. if you want to try and break that perception, then you had to take the sort of allegations seriously. that
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is the risk, i think, that conservative central office take, if they pushed to one side the calls foran they pushed to one side the calls for an enquiry they pushed to one side the calls foran enquiry and they pushed to one side the calls for an enquiry and training courses, which the muslim council are now making. norman, thank you very much. i can speak now to the former chair of the conservative party, baroness warsi. you have been quoted as saying there isa you have been quoted as saying there is a simmering underbelly of islamophobia in the conservative party. has anything changed since that? that is why i continue to raise my concerns. the issue that we have today is two fold. first of all, for two and a half years, i have been raising these issues with three successive chairmen, including a letter to the prime minister last year, asking for this matter to be
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dealt with internally. these issues of islamophobia, anti—muslim comments being made by individuals within the party, date back to even long before the ugly head of anti—semitism read its head in the left of politics. what concerns me is it is sad but it has come to the stage that we are now having to deal with this in a very public way, when we could have dealt with this two and a half years ago. so the muslim council of britain, in its letter, calls for four council of britain, in its letter, calls forfour things. council of britain, in its letter, calls for four things. the independent enquiry, which we have heard about. publication of a list of incidents of islamophobia within the party where action has been taken. adopting a programme of education and training and publicly reaffirming from the highest levels, a commitment against bigotry. do you support back call for an independent enquiry? what i have been calling for is an internal quire e. what i
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called for in my letter to the prime minister last year was a meeting where we could discuss and convene an internal enquiry and effectively get ahead of this story. there is a moral issue about making sure we root out all forms of bigotry from political parties. but it is also a political parties. but it is also a political issue, for me as a conservative i want to make sure we continue to be a party that is seen asa continue to be a party that is seen as a party for everyone in this country. when there are these continuous incidents, which in the past have not been dealt with, u nfortu nately we past have not been dealt with, unfortunately we end up with what happened in 2017 and back is we lose large sections of votes in this country and we saw that happen at the last general election. indeed, after the general election i wrote an extended brief, talking about the very issues around islamophobia, the way in which we campaigned for the mayoral election and other concerns that have arisen, which i think
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resulted in many ways, to the election result we ended up with. would an internal enquiry be enough to convince british muslim people who want to be part of the conservative party or vote for the conservative party or vote for the conservative party, would it be enough to convince them the party is not sticking its head in the sand on this issue, which is something you have accused the conservative leadership of doing in the past? what i would like, first and foremost, is a clear statement of an acknowledgement of the issue and the fa ct acknowledgement of the issue and the fact the party will tackle it. i wa nted fact the party will tackle it. i wanted to come from the top, either the prime minister or the chairman of the party. up to now, sadly there are certain parts of the party that have been in denial about this issue. i want a clear way to take this forward and if that is via an internal enquiry of members of the party involved in, possibly some external members involved in that, with a clear and transparent process which we can be published, showing how many complaints have been made,
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how many complaints have been made, how those people have been dealt with, whether they have been readmitted into the party. of course, a process of education. they cannot be the same member of parliament, time, and time again continues to get it wrong on this issue. surely it requires some form of disciplinary action followed by education? baroness, thank you very much. if you watch a blockbuster movie these days — there's a strong chance that much of it was made in britain. there are more than 6—thousand people working on special effects in london alone. but the creative industry also relies on talent from across europe and questions are being asked about what brexit will mean
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for this booming sector. 0ur arts correspondent david sillito has been to meet some of those concerned. what you are looking at is the work of a british company called jellyfish. and as you can see, it makes visual effects. this is star wars. we have done quite a lot of work on star wars in recent yea rs. this is high end stuff? absolutely. we are one of the leading centres for doing special effects animation in the world. this has become very big business. there are more people doing special effects in the uk these days than working in the coal industry. but what is really striking is how international the workforce is. everybody is busily working away. there are fellows from spain, poland, ireland, belgium, sweden... if we are going to show you what it is really like here, we have to get everyone together. here they all are. if you take away the workers from other european union countries, you begin to see how much business relies on access to european talent.
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it's all about the people. this firm doesn't have any computer hardware. it is all in the cloud. this office in particular has no computers. it is very rare in our industry. that gives us the ability to pick this up and move it to where there talent is. and we will do that if we have to. many of us are already doing that. but what of other part of the so—called creative industries? this is the city of birmingham symphony orchestra. this violinist is from holland. she began in the eu youth orchestra, which was based in the uk and is now moving to italy. you feel part of one big european family. it feels very sad that this is now ripped apart. for the man in charge, leaving the eu is about practicalities. much of their income comes from touring europe. if we had to sort out visits to embassies, visas, work permits
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and all of that, just go to germany, france, those tours become non—viable. not only because we rely on the income, but we rely on that reputational pool. paperwork for every instrument crossing every frontier is not what they want. so there are many questions. but the big issue is how we can continue to grow our creative exports. it is possible the new trade deals we will do the rest of the world will assist that. there is a caveat. the creative industry is about selling digital packages around the world. you don't need rules, regulations and standards for that. we don't want the new trade deals to say, you should run yourselves differently. so, there are hopes that brexit could help unlock new global trade deals. there is clearly still much to resolve. with ten months to go
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until britain leaves the eu, we're in liverpool looking at brexit and what it means for the creative industries, the fastest growing industry in the uk. 0ur arts correspondent lizo mzimba is there. yes, thank you very much, i am here in liverpool, european capital of culture in 2008, so where better to look at the impact of brexit on the creative arts and culture? i am joined by someone who was intrinsically involved for the european capital of culture for liverpool, the director of culture here, clare mcdonnell. what is the legacy of liverpool having that title ten years ago? it is a huge legacy, notjust title ten years ago? it is a huge legacy, not just what you can see around you, the new museum of liverpool, there's a huge physical legacy, but more importantly there isa legacy, but more importantly there is a huge emotional legacy. it was important to the city and we have
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built year—on—year on that legacy. 0bviously, built year—on—year on that legacy. obviously, the uk cities can no longer become european capital of culture, post—brexit. is there a way of harnessing what we have learned from the previous experiences to be able to make that mitigated? of course, there is the uk city of culture, which commentary is in 2021 and hull has just culture, which commentary is in 2021 and hull hasjust been, —— which cove ntry and hull hasjust been, —— which coventry is in 2021. but also the world, we did huge relationship building with china, indonesia and with america actually, around how we engage artists to do great things in oui’ engage artists to do great things in our cities and places, and to tell that story especially in places like liverpool, a port, a huge melting pot of cultures, how we tell that international story to the world. where do you see the balance lying between positive and negative as to what the cultural life of britain might be like outside the eu? the
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positives, we have to keep those relationships going and keep telling the stories of the uk and different places. we need to really invest in tourism, because obviously for liverpool and other cities like as it isa liverpool and other cities like as it is a massive growth sector, it is huge for us now. we need to look at how we betray ourselves internationally, and i think the art and culture do that beautifully. liverpool is a truly international brand, it opens doors throughout the world. it is how we use those cities like liverpool to open doors throughout the uk. we will be looking here all day at these issues but for the moment back to you in the studio. lizo, thanks very much. now a time to look at the weather forecast with tomasz schafernaker. storm clouds are brewing once again. before i clicked the clicker, this picture here, that is a storm cloud, thatis picture here, that is a storm cloud, that is probably something like two, maybe three miles across. when we say local downpours, that is exactly what we mean, and to predict these cloud is very difficult. it is very
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difficult to say x 0 where each individual cloud, sometimes we get clusters, will form. but the net office has issued an amber warning and we think there will be enough of them developing across parts of england, and into wales as we go through the course of this afternoon. earlier on, we saw this layer of cloud with some heavy rain affecting southern parts of the uk, but as we go through the course of the afternoon, we will see those individual storm clouds popping off here and there. they are a bit more exaggerated in size i think here, but just to give exaggerated in size i think here, butjust to give you a message, that is the sort of general area where we could season big downpours, some flash flooding, gusty winds, that sort of thing. some pretty unpleasant conditions on the roads to come during the course of this afternoon in some areas. the north of that into tonight, the weather is relatively calm and a really mild might as well. —— mild night. this is bbc news —
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our latest headlines. campaigners welcome proposals from the financial watchdog to curb excessive credit interest charges — but say it could have gone further. the nhs is almost a billion pounds in the red. the figure from nhs trusts in england is nearly twice as high as expected. the muslim council of britain repeats its demand for the conservatives to hold an independent inquiry into alleged islamophobia within the party. and a report into ftse—listed companies reveals the excuses given for not appointing women to boards. time for sport and let's cross to john watson with news of a newjob frank lampard. he is the new man in the derby cou nty he is the new man in the derby county hot seat, the manager presented to the media this morning. he has called it a huge opportunity
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but admitted the job will be far from easy. the club making the announcement via this announcement on social media this morning. after 21 yea rs on social media this morning. after 21 years as a player it will be his firstjob in football management. the championship side finished sixth last season, reporting simon stone, he will be expected to lead the team to the premier league. derby have had high standards, high goals over the last two or three years are not quite got there. they got beaten in the play—offs again. this season chairman noel morris is very ambitious, he wanted someone who would cross the great divide and get the club into the premier league. lampard signed a three—year contract. the quotes on the statement, mal morris said frank lampard isa statement, mal morris said frank lampard is a winner and a leader who has the charisma and character to be a fantastic manager for us. lampard himself says, i know it won't be easy but i am really looking forward to the challenge. the big question
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is can someone who has really only just finished their playing career, a stellar playing career, where he won a stellar playing career, where he wo n every a stellar playing career, where he won every major honour in the game, can he be an effective manager outside the top flight in england? someone who has backed his appointment is harry redknapp, his uncle, who was also his former manager at the start of his career at west ham. a great appointment from derby's point of view, and a great appointment for frank, his first—ever into management. great player, fantastic professional trainer, without doubt the best i have ever come across. so, yeah, i think it is a good fit. i mean, derby, they have gone longer last few years, derby, they have gone longer last few yea rs, never derby, they have gone longer last few years, never been quite good enough to get out of the championship. fresh blood coming in, frank having a go at the job, championship. fresh blood coming in, frank having a go at thejob, i couldn't be more pleased for him and for derby as well, it is a great appointment. mo salah will play some part
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in egypt's world cup campaign after their team doctor revealed his shoulder injury will keep him out no longer than three weeks. the liverpool forward picked up the injury in last saturday's champions league final defeat to real madrid, with fears he could miss the tournament. egypt open against uruguay on 15th june. britain's heather watson is ateempting a fight back against elise mertens at the french open. watson lost the first set (00v) of her second round match to the belgian 16th seed 6—3...having trailled in the second she's pulled it back to 4—4. she is currently trailing 5—4. kyle edmund is due out after watson in his second round match, cameron norrie resumes his match later. ben stokes wil have a scan on his injued hamstring this afternoon. the all—rounder has been in the nets this morning ahead of england's second test against pakistan, but hasn't bowled. surrey bowler sam curran has been put on standby, but it would be a blow to lose stokes with england already one down in the two test series. that's all the sport for now.
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you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. more now on the possible impact that brexit might have on the uk's creative sector. there are more than 6,000 people in the uk working in special effects in the uk's film industry — a sector that relies on talent from across europe. and it's one area of the creative industries asking questions about what brexit will mean for them — questions as yet unanswered by the negotiations. phil redmond, screenwriter and producer, joins us now. thank you for coming along. you were quoted before the referendum as saying if we do except there will probably be a short—term boost to the arts in the uk, because there will be curiosity, why do these guys decide to come out? they will want to talk
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to come out? they will want to talk to artists. is that still your opinion or have your views changed in the time since then?” opinion or have your views changed in the time since then? i don't think so. i have done a lot of thinking on this recently, and i thinking on this recently, and i think while liverpool has always been famous for is going to the banks of the river and looking out at the wider world. it has a ways been a global brand, and to have its artists, going right up to the football of the 80s, and the beatles and things. i think one of the interesting things, though we have lots of good names out there at the moment, like david yates did the harry potter film, we seem to have slowed down as a global brand since wejoined europe, slowed down as a global brand since we joined europe, and slowed down as a global brand since wejoined europe, and i think that is because we started to look at london for the eu funding. so i think actually brexit is what it is, you know, but think what we will probably do in liverpool is go back to our roots and look at our position in the global world, not just on the outer rings of europe,
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really. so you still think it could bea really. so you still think it could be a good thing? i think it is a thing wejust be a good thing? i think it is a thing we just have to deal with. nobody sat down and said, i know, what will be fantastic for the arts is if we leave europe. liverpool is a place that seizes every opportunity that comes along, and now we don't have to think about how we are going to fund things through europe, and how will that flow through london, i think it will give a big impetus towards fresh thinking and new ways of doing things. john campton, the chief executive the creative industries federation, has been quoted as saying one of the key reasons we are so been quoted as saying one of the key reasons we are so successful in britain is that britain is so open. is that perception not going to change, though, in your opinion, because it is notjust about the practicalities we will talk about in a minute probably, but the atmospherics as well?” a minute probably, but the atmospherics as well? i don't think so, if you look back, and pick up the beatles, they did not conquer
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the beatles, they did not conquer the world because they were part of europe or the european union. ijust think if you look at what is going on in liverpool now, with the terracotta warriors being here from china. i mean it was china's choice to actually come to europe, and they we re to actually come to europe, and they were looking for somewhere for the warriors to be and they chose liverpool as a city outside the centre that is actually a global city in its own consideration because we have the oldest chinese population outside china within the city. so we have always been open, but having always to look to london and then across to brussels might have been a hindrance, i am not saying it has been. i would expect people in liverpool and the north to think about more about where they are in the global cultural sphere. and then on those practicalities was talking about, the eu grants, which have sometimes been a lifeline for small arts creative industries companies, the movement of people,
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do you think that the creative industry in the uk is going to encounter issues there, or being a creative industry, is it going to find its way around these possible hurdles? i think the key word there is creativity, isn't it? when you look at what i have been witnessing as chair of the city of culture project, we have been going to cities like derry, londonderry, hull, and reminding them what liverpool bid with 2008, it was european capital of culture but it was a badge for us to really rediscover who we were and where we are. those cities have done that, and most of that sort of energy has come from the actual people within the cities themselves, you know? so i think there is a vast reservoir still of creative talent still to be unlocked, and now that we won't be looking that way, i come back to this fundamental point, i think we will be looking at ourselves on the global... it doesn't mean to say we
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won't stop working with europe but europe is a very small part of the rest of the world. phil redmond, great to have you with us. controversial feminist germaine greer has sparked outrage by saying that most rape is simply " bad sex" rather than a "spectacularly violent crime", and that some rapists should not be jailed. the comments have led to a furious reaction by rape survivors as well as campaign groups, who described her comments as an insult to victims of crimes such as rape. miss greer told the hay festival that most people found guilty of rape should have an "r" tattooed on their hand or cheek and given 200 hours of community service, rather than a prison sentence. joining me is criminal defence lawyer, penny muir. penny, i don't know, you may have defended people accused of rape, have you? defended people accused of rape, have you ? allan defended people accused of rape, have you? allan i have, yes, i defend anyone who comes my way and needs a defence. people charged with rape need a defence, it is the law. whatjermaine grey
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rape need a defence, it is the law. what jermaine grey is rape need a defence, it is the law. whatjermaine grey is saying, though and she is talking about all sorts of cases, clearly —— what germaine greer is saying is shocking, to say the least, isn't it? well, it is very peculiar she is saying it, she has long been a hero of mine, i am an early doors feminist, i have been an early doors feminist, i have been a feminist all my life, since i was an adult anyway. she was a hero. i don't know why she's doing this. not everything she says is crazy but she is throwing out statistics, she appears to be talking about, throwing out statistics about bad sex and so on. she has no basis for saying that. rape is always about lack of consent, it takes away a woman's agency, and in whatever situation that happens, clearly it is rape. and that comment about community service, and having an r tattooed on their hand, she said you
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would prefer on her cheek. it almost seems flippant. is she having a laugh? issue trying to get a debate? if that is what she is trying to do, she has done it very badly, hasn't she? if you look at the attention she? if you look at the attention she has had from it, it depends how you see it. rape is a very ordinary crime, in some ways she has got a point, you know, rape can vary from some drunken office party gone wrong to something much more, you know, stranger rape is the other end of it, but it is still rape and it is still where there is lack of consent, and consent is tested in court, it has to be. and she's right, sometimes that puts women through an ordeal and maybe that is one of the points she was trying to make, but the solution isn't as she seems to suggest, it is nuts really, as far as seems to suggest, it is nuts really, as farasi seems to suggest, it is nuts really, as far as i can see, and seems to suggest, it is nuts really, as faras i can see, and i seems to suggest, it is nuts really, as far as i can see, and i don't know why she has done it.” as far as i can see, and i don't know why she has done it. i think a lot of people share your view. thank
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you for coming to talk to us. the reality television star, kim kardashian west, has met donald trump in the white house to discuss reform of the us criminaljustice system. she used the visit to raise the case of a 63—year—old great grandmother who has spent more than two decades in prison for a first—time drug offence. this report from simonjones contains some flash photography. donald trump declared it a great meeting. 0ne reality star visiting another, who went on to become president. cameras caught kim kardashian west arriving at the white house to raise the case of a 63—year—old great—grandmother who was serving life in prison. alice mariejohnson was jailed for her involvement in a drugs conspiracy that saw her pass messages between dealers. kim kardashian west is paying for a new legal team for miss johnson. speaking before the meeting, she explained why. to go and spend my money buying material things just doesn't satisfy me the way that it used to and i am just in
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a different place in my life, so i thought well, if i could put the money into a shopping spree, which sounds ridiculous, to save someone's life, and do that once a year, then that would make my heart follow. many on social media have criticised her unlikely role as a prison reform advocate, saying there are thousands of cases that deserve close examination. her husband, the rapper can examination. her husband, the rapper ca n west, examination. her husband, the rapper can west, has also been under fire recently for treating his support for the president. we have been friends for a long time. after the meeting, she tweeted. .. altima aliyev will be the president who decides she should be pardoned. in a moment a summary of the business news this hour but first —— the headlines on bbc newsroom live: new proposals from the financial watchdog are being put forward to curb excessive credit interest charges. nhs trusts in england have reported a combined financial deficit of nearly a billion pounds — nearly twice the amount they had planned for.
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the muslim council of britain has repeated its demand for the conservatives to hold an independent inquiry into alleged islamophobia within the party. the financial conduct authority says it wants to cut how much we have to pay for overdrafts and clamp—down on other high costs for borrowing. so called ‘hire purchase‘ or rent to own agreements will also be in the spotlight. it says expensive credit is used by three million people in the uk. uk house prices rose more slowly than expected in may according to figures from nationwide. they were up 2.4% in the year to may, that‘s slower than the 2.6% increase for the year to april. prices were down 0.2% from april, the third time this year that they‘ve fallen on a monthly basis. shares in firstgroup have fallen 14% after the transport operator reported a £327 million
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loss for 2018. the firm has also been dragged down by a £277 million charge linked to its us greyhound bus service. the firm also sacked boss tim 0‘toole after what its chairman called a disappointing year. it is the sporting league of the business world. the ftse100 — the league of our biggest companies — and instead of results and scores, it‘s based on their stock market value. and last night was the day we found out who got promoted and who was relegated. 0nline retailer 0cado joined the league after seeing a big jump in its share price, following a year of new deals. also up was the betting firm gvc, owner of ladbrokes coral. but security firm gas and hospital firm mediclinic were relegated to the league below — the ftse 250. marks & spencer, which has been a feature of the ftse100
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since the index was launched in 1984, just avoided the drop. michael hewson is chief market analyst, cmc markets — who‘s in who‘s out — ocado — m&s survived (0s) — ocado — m&s survived i have touched on who is in and who is out, explain why this is releva nt. is out, explain why this is relevant. ftse 100 trackers are obliged to buy your stock. in the case of chief 0s and accardo, we have already seen significant share price rises in the past month. accardo up 65% and —— 0cardo. an awful lot of that may already be priced in. it is based on the value of the firm, whether it is in or out
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of the firm, whether it is in or out of this league. a lot of people have written off 0cardo, saying it has not have the deal it needs, that disastrous relationship with waitrose, but they have signed a view deals in the us senate is through the. it is. a year ago if you had said to me that 0cardo was in the ftse100 i would probably have laughed at you. it is very much a technology company, a lot of people think about it in terms of retail stock but it has signed deals with kroger ‘s in the us, so bees in canada, and also another deal in france. so i think it is starting to become an awful lot more diverse, in terms of its delivery of its technological solutions of the online shopping space. and i think the recent rise in the share price reflects that. it is investing an awful lot in capital expenditure, 173 million out last year, there is a concern that it is investing an awful lot of money in capital
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expenditure to the exclusion of its profits. i think to maintain the current value of the share price, it really needs to start delivering on its top line, in terms of profits. just a quick word on m&s, it narrowly avoided relegation, eve ryo ne narrowly avoided relegation, everyone was expecting it might drop down. indeed, it has hung on by its fingernails. it doesn‘t mean it won‘t get relegated in the september reshuffle, but what i would say is it has bought steven rose sometime, they are looking to close 100 stores by 2022. now i think we are looking for a clearly defined programme for reforming the business, the general merchandising and the food business, and riding that share price back up again. interesting one. thank you for that, michael. the ftse100 has barely changed on the day but the ones we were just discussing with michael, m&s, its shares down more than 3.5% today. despite narrowly
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avoiding hanging on to staying on in the 3100. first group, one of the biggest fall as after sacking their boss and disastrous result as far as its us greyhound coach service is concerned. but 0cardo again now promoted to the ftse100, as you can see up nearly 0.2%. all of that leaving the ftse100 index up 0.1%. more from me a little later. the yorkshire accent has just won itself a new admirer. world number three tennis star alexander zverev was so taken with one reporter‘s voice at a press conference yesterday that he‘s volunteered to pay a visit to the county should they hold a tournament. let‘s take a listen. you've enjoyed some good success on the atp tour with some big title wins, haven't quite translated it into a wins, haven't quite translated it intoa grand wins, haven't quite translated it into a grand slam yet, but do you feel like roland garros could be a
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turning point for you, feel like roland garros could be a turning point foryou, in feel like roland garros could be a turning point for you, in terms of having a run in this tournament, and if so what will the difference be? where ayew from, buddy? do you want to guess? yorkshire in england. nice. if they ever make a tournament there, iam nice. if they ever make a tournament there, i am definitely coming, just because of that accent. love it. i didn‘t understand a word you were saying, but it is not important. you clearly enjoy your tennis. not as much as your accent, buddy, i love that. i will come to every one of your press conferences now. if you get to the final we will make sure i get to the final we will make sure i get to the final we will make sure i get to ask a question.” get to the final we will make sure i get to ask a question. i will definitely make sure if i get to the final you are asking multiple questions. the headlines are coming up on the bbc news channel. in a moment we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two — first we leave you with for a look at the weather... tomasz schafernaker has got all of
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that for us. i am looking at multiple weather warnings coming left, right and centre, heavy rain, thunder, tell us more. again, my goodness, what do you want to know? well, today, like in the last few days, it will just to know? well, today, like in the last few days, it willjust be so difficult predicting where the storms will form. there is an amber warning from the met office. this is a storm cloud. they are only so big. it is very difficult to tell whether it will be over one town or another and it will be over one town or another a nd exa ctly it will be over one town or another and exactly at what time. we can only sort of give a rough area of the country and predict where they will be popping off. so this amber warning from the met office for the thunderstorms is suggesting these individual storms that will be brewing over the coming hours will cause torrential rain, capable of causing flash flooding. 0n the satellite, this is what has been bringing the wet weather to central
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and southern england in the last few hours but what will actually be happening during the course of the afternoon is storms will be brewing. this is a high—risk picture. notice, see individual thunderstorms breaking out. —— high—resolution picture. this is the best guess. this is what the computer is saying. clear gaps here but it does not necessarily mean in this clear gap there will not be any showers breaking out, it is pretty much random as far as these showers are going. southern parts of the uk, including parts of wales, so western england, wales, at risk of the downpours will stop further north, just to give you an indication we are not expecting any big downpours at least across this part of the world through the course of today. so here are the showers, a little bit enhanced, you can see visually the showers moving through parts of the showers moving through parts of the west country, into the midlands, wales possibly too. and then probably the weather improves a little bit across southern and south—eastern areas. all the while in the north it stays dry. a really
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muqqy in the north it stays dry. a really muggy night, 16 in the south, 12 to 13 in the north. tomorrow, again some showers in the forecast but look where they are this time. they area look where they are this time. they are a little bit further north, we‘re talking about maybe still some across the west midlands and wales, possibly even the south, some across scotla nd possibly even the south, some across scotland here, and also in northern ireland. so again we could see some spores, thunder —— some downpours, thunder and lightning. after today, the risk of getting downpours will tra nsfer the risk of getting downpours will transfer a little bit towards the north and a little bit towards the west. so eastern areas will probably hang on to the drier weather, and the dry warm weather will continue into the weekend, across many parts of the country. there is always a risk of one or two showers developing, but in the short term once again that amber warning from the met office, take it steady if you are travelling on the roads, because those downpours will come very suddenly and there will be a loss of rainfall in a short space of time. this is bbc new and these are the top stories
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developing at 12:00... cutting the high cost of credit — shops that sell goods for small weekly payments could face a price cap. a washing machine that costs £400 if you buy it with cash or buy it immediately can cost up to 1002 had pounds if you get it on rent to buy. nhs trusts in england report a combined financial deficit of £960 million — nearly twice the expected figure. thatjust shows how difficult it is in the nhs and we really have to address that now. a supporter of islamic state admits encouraging a terror attack — targeting prince george. also ...the reality television star, kim kardashian west, has met donald trump in the white house to discuss reform of the us criminaljustice system. to go and spend my money on material
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things doesn‘t satisfy me like it used to. i want meaning in my life. and the young german tennis star — falling in love with the yorkshire accent. you clearly enjoyed your tennis. you say you don‘t know... not as much as your accent, buddy. i love that. good afternoon. it‘s thursday 31st may. welcome to bbc newsroom live. the uk‘s financial watchdog has announced a crackdown on companies which offer credit with high rates of interest. the financial conduct authority says the proposed changes will be rebalanced in favour of the consumer. let‘s take a look at some of the measures. in 2016 banks made an estimated £2.3 billion from overdrafts — the fca proposals include mobile alerts warning of potential charges, stopping the inclusion of overdrafts
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in the term ‘available funds‘. and requiring online tools to make the cost of overd rafts clearer. the high cost of rent—to—own purchases faces a cap — currently 400,000 people are in debt this way. the fca points to examples where people had paid more than £1,500 for essentials like an electric cooker — that could be bought on the high street for less than £300. and measures to tackle doorstep lending include preventing firms from offering new loans or refinancing during home visits without the customer specifically requesting this. changes in this area are estimated to save consumers up to over £34 million a year. the chief executive of the fca andrew bailey has been discussing the changes with our correspondent emma simpson who began by asking him why he is taking action on rent to own. let me give you one of the examples
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we‘ve published today. a washing machine that costs £400 if you buy it with cash or buy it immediately, can cost up to £1200 if you buy it using rent to buy. now, that seems to us to be a very hard to justify increase, which affects some of the most vulnerable people in society with low income, who are vulnerable. so you have to tackle the question, why is it the cost of essential goods for instance, is so much higher when these forms of credit are involved? so, what are you proposing to do? how big a crackdown are you looking for rent own? if you look at the proposals we‘ve put forward, there are two parts to it, i would say. one is about the terms and conditions of sales. for instance, in rent to own,
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we‘ve said we think that bundling up extended warranties and charging for them at the same time as a sale, when customers probably find it pretty hard to understand what they‘re paying for at that point, it‘s something that needs tackling immediately. but then we‘ve also put the idea on the table which we‘ll have to do more work, because we are under a legal obligation to make these ideas stand up, as it were and we will do that as soon as possible, of introducing caps on prices as one obvious way, in a sense, to tackle the issue. jill hill told us her sister philippa, who has has learning difficulties, was targeted by doorstep lenders— and was encouraged to take out a loan she couldn‘t afford. it can‘t go on like this, it can‘t.
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you cannot have a situation where vulnerable people are consistently being told they can afford the repayments, when payton lead they cannot and they are living on the bread line. these people are targeting individuals, they are targeting individuals, they are targeting people on the bread line. they say nice things like, it is only £19 a month. but it is not because the debt gets rolled on and on. at one point, philip and her husband were spending 48% of their disposable income on debt repayment. for more on this i‘m joined by guy anker, who‘s the managing editor of money saving expert.com. these high cost credit deals, something you have been talking about for such a long time. give us your overview on these proposals from the financial conduct the authority. your 300 pound cooker, is an expensive way to borrow. we do
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wonder why the fca didn‘t go further on arranged overdrafts, why they didn‘t have a cap, we have a cap with payday loans, potential cap with payday loans, potential cap with rent to own. why not on overd rafts ? with rent to own. why not on overd rafts? £700 million with rent to own. why not on overdrafts? £700 million banks make from an arranged overdraft, but is 1.596 from an arranged overdraft, but is 1.5% from all their customers, an incredible amount of money.” 1.5% from all their customers, an incredible amount of money. i asked the minister about that and why there wasn‘t a cap on these proposals and he said the government wa nted proposals and he said the government wanted to see what more the banking sector would do of its own accord without imposing something on it at the stage. buy you seeing any signs the stage. buy you seeing any signs the banking issue will look at this issue of capping overdraft fees? lloyds banking group, lloyds, the halifax and the bank of scotland, it got rid of arranged overdrafts. santander got rid of arranged overdrafts. sa ntander has got rid of arranged overdrafts. santander has made noises on some of
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its accounts and it will get rid of some of the arranged overdraft fees. it is good news, but there are accou nts it is good news, but there are accounts in place that charge up to £6a accounts in place that charge up to £6 a day for breaching your overdraft limit. 0ver £6 a day for breaching your overdraft limit. over the month, that can have up —— add up to an astronomical amount. and the people who can least afford to repay discharges and they find themselves in this position so it is a good day to talk about financial education and more of it for all of us? these proposals, whatever happens months away. as of today we have incredibly expensive ways to borrow. you are right about financial education, we see people borrowing when they cannot afford to. if you need a cover, it is probably a necessity. there is a television and necessity? don‘t automatically go to these rent to own firms. there are loads of
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eligibility calculators on the internet where you can apply for a mainstream loan or credit card, check your chances of getting them. you might get a pleasant supplies so you don‘t have to go to these expensive rent to buy places. thank you. breaking news to bring you, this is the scene in madrid. let‘s see if we can bring you these images from madrid. there we go. you might be thinking what are we going to see there? the head coach of real madrid is expected to appear at a news conference after reports in the media that he has stepped down as manager of real madrid. just days after winning the champions league, it would be the third time that he had won the champions league with madrid. he did the la liga double in 2016, 2017 as well, so a glittering
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career as a manager. but we are getting these reports he is going to step down. he would be going on a high, if that is the case and of course everyone would want to know what is he going to next? after winning the champions leaguejust what is he going to next? after winning the champions league just a couple of days ago. that was against liverpool, of course. this is the scene liverpool, of course. this is the scene in madrid, but i think we will be coming back as soon as we know more information about what is happening with zinedine zidane and and what is future is going to be. nhs trusts in england have reported a combined financial deficit of £960 million — nearly twice what was expected. the latest reported deficit is reached after taking account of extra financial support provided by the government. ministers have promised a new long—term financial plan for the nhs, which is expected within weeks. 0ur health editor hugh pym reports. the figures, covering hospital, ambulance, mental health and other trusts in england,
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show that finance is getting worse. the regulator, nhs improvement, said the surge in patient demand had affected performance in key areas, including waiting times. more than 2600 patients were waiting longer than 12 months for non—urgent treatment in march — a 75% increase over the year. the regulator said hundreds of thousands of more patients than the previous year had been to a&e, but the nhs didn‘t buckle under pressure. today‘s report says that nhs trusts in england had planned for a total deficit of £496 million for the financial year, which ended in march. but the actual figure was 960 million, higher than the 791 million the previous year. some analysts argue the underlying position was even worse. there‘s a lot of windowdressing in today‘s figures, which are bad enough on the face of them. but they are flattered by very large amounts of one—off emergency funding, which will not be available in future years — one—off savings and also one—off sales of land
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and properties that the nhs has managed to find last year, but obviously you can‘t sell a spare hospital building every year. the prime minister says she is planning a new long—term strategy for nhs funding in england, and that‘s expected within weeks. hugh pym, bbc news. let‘s go back to spain now when zinedine zidane is about to announce that he is stepping down as manager of real madrid. we are hoping to get you a translation in the next few moments. it looks as though he is going to clarify what his position
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is at the bernabeu, after calling this news conference in madrid. he is 45 years old, french, as i am sure you will know and he led real madrid to what was their fourth champions league trophy in five yea rs champions league trophy in five years and the third under his management by beating of course, liverpool in p.m. management by beating of course, liverpool in pm. on saturday. he has had a huge amount of success as a football manager, which as you know, can be a precarious position. we are trying to find out what his next move is. is he leaving? if he is, what is he going to do next? 0nly is, what is he going to do next? only 45, certainly with this managerial track record behind him, one would imagine he would have the absolute pick ofjobs, shut the right opportunity become available
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to him. the reuters news agency is reporting that he has in fact step down as the manager of real madrid. he, of course, is a former player for the club, for juventus he, of course, is a former player for the club, forjuventus and bordeaux. he was under contract at madrid until 2020, so we shall try to find out some more information about this news conference for you, imminently. we can confirm, we can confirm ourselves that zinedine zidane and has stepped down as manager of real madrid. possibly the very definition of leaving on a high after the win against liverpooljust after the win against liverpooljust a couple of days ago to win the third champions league title under his management. we will have lots
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more on that for you in the sport. the us secretary of state, mike pompeo, says he had a good working dinner with general kim yong—chol, the most senior north korean to visit america in nearly 20 years. the pair are trying to smooth the way for president trump to meet kim jong—un next month. our correspondent barbara plett usher is in new york for us. tell us more about the mood music in this meeting? they met at a private residence in this apartment building and they will be meeting again in hours for more meetings. but last night it was a dinner and the state department released photographs of what happened. you look friendly you had the secretary of state mike pompey, showing the view over the hudson river. you had pictures of
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them clinking their glasses and they both signed the menu as well as a memorial. the images that came to looked quite positive. as you are saying, mike pompey said it had gone well. but the proof of the pudding will be in the meetings today because they will have to address difficult issues. we understand they are quite farapart difficult issues. we understand they are quite far apart on the main issue which is the nuclear disarmament of north korea. what exactly that leads to the north koreans and the americans? the americans are saying the north koreans must get of their nuclear weapons infrastructure and they must do so quickly. the north koreans wouldn‘t go that far, although they haven‘t said exactly how far they would go so one of the things the official state department said yesterday, we need to have a clear idea of what they are willing to do and he also said they have to do more than they have done before. and he also said they have to do more than they have done beforem is about reducing the gap between
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them on the scale and the pace of denuclearisation, i suppose? yes, they have different positions because the americans are demanding the complete elimination of the nuclear weapons programme. they to happen quite quickly and they also wa nt happen quite quickly and they also want it to happen, at least have a clear commitment and concrete steps taken before the north koreans would get any compensation in sanctions relief. because this is what it is about, largely. the north koreans have always wanted to do things in phases. they say we will do this, then we would like some sanction relief and then we will do that and then we have some sanction relief. last time, they didn‘t get what they wa nted last time, they didn‘t get what they wanted so they reversed their decision and the trump administration doesn‘t want that to happen. donald trump said it is all or nothing and i don‘t think if you can have a negotiation with that. it isa can have a negotiation with that. it is a question about what the
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americans are willing to accept and what the north koreans are willing to put on the table and whether that is enough to show serious intention to have a summit. but donald trump and kimjong—un to have a summit. but donald trump and kim jong—un have to have a summit. but donald trump and kimjong—un have indicated they wa nt and kimjong—un have indicated they want this meeting. so it seems at the moment it seems things are tracking towards the summit taking place on its original date, 12 of june. barbara, thank you very much. an islamic state supporter has admitted encouraging a terror attack targeting prince george. husnain rashid changed his plea half way through his trial at woolwich crown court. the court heard rashid used a messaging group to call for an attack on prince george. our home affairs correspondent dominic casciani joins me now, dominic what‘s the latest? this is about a man called husnain
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rashid, he is from nelson in lancashire. he was employed as a teacher at a local mosque. in november last year he was arrested. the reason the police raided his home is because he had posted a number of messages to an encrypted social media group used by would—be jihadi ‘s or extremists in the uk, effectively encouraging an attack against prince george. these m essa g es we re against prince george. these messages were posted in the weeks after the young prince started nursery in south—west london and what husnain rashid did was create a picture of the prince and superimpose on back, and above have jihadist, silhouettes of masked men planning an attack to take place. he also planned other attacks in this group. a lot of british extremists in this group so the police are trying to watch this closely. when
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the police went to his house to arrest him, he tried to throw away his devices in a panic, then prom ptly his devices in a panic, then promptly fainted. he refused to give the police any assistance at all as pa rt the police any assistance at all as part of their investigation and the three weeks at crown court he has denied all the charges against him. but literally out of nowhere, the defence team asked the courts to put the charges to him again, this time he pleaded guilty. thejudge said he will sentence husnain rashid next month but he is so dangerous this man but his incitement online, he might geta man but his incitement online, he might get a life sentence. thank you very much. three people have been charged following the death of a three—year—old boy. police say alfie lamb was found unconscious at a house in croydon in south london on the evening of the 1st of february. he died in hospital three days later. a 23—year—old woman has been charged with ill treatment of a child. an 18—year—old woman and a 25—year—old man have been
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charged with perverting the course of justice. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: new proposals from the financial watchdog are being put forward to curb excessive credit interest charges. nhs trusts in england have reported a combined financial deficit of nearly a billion pounds — nearly twice the amount they had planned for. a supporter of so—called islamic state has admitted encouraging a terror attack targeting prince george. it it is time for the sport and lots of news on limousine be done?
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yes, it is emerging that zinedine zidane is stepping down from his role with zinedine real madrid. this is the live press conference that is ongoing. it was called for 12 noon uk time. it was unexpected, zinedine zidane and is speaking in spanish so we are getting the translated version through, but he has said it is time to step down. the president is time to step down. the president is sat next to him, florentino perez. he said it was an unexpected decision for him and he was sad to see him go. he tried to convince him to stay on but zinedine zidane thinks this is the time for him to go. when you consider his achievements with the club, he won the champions league title three days ago. that was his third champions league title in three yea rs. champions league title in three years. he took over in 2016 and has won three champions league titles and a league title. that press
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conference is still ongoing. there is updates on the bbc sport website and we will keep you updated across the bbc news channel. speaking of managers, let‘s talk about frank lampard, he isjoining derby county as manager and he said it presented as manager and he said it presented a huge opportunity, but he admitted thejob would be a huge opportunity, but he admitted the job would be easy. the club made the job would be easy. the club made the announcement by this video and social media this morning. after 21 yea rs social media this morning. after 21 years as social media this morning. after 21 yea rs as a social media this morning. after 21 years as a player it will be his first managementjob. years as a player it will be his first management job. the championship side finished sixth this season and missed out on promotion. 0ne this season and missed out on promotion. one man who is expecting big things from frank lampard is harry redknapp, he managed him at his first club. great appointment from derby‘s point of view and a great opportunity for frank, his first step into management. great player, fantastic professional, trainer. it is a good fit. darby,
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they have gone along the last few yea rs they have gone along the last few years and they haven‘t been good enough to get out of the championship. i couldn‘t be more pleased for him and for derby as well, it is a great appointment. heather watson has lost her second—round match at the french 0pen. second—round match at the french open. the belgian took the first set which featured eight breaks of serve. the brakes continued in the second set. heather watson has reached the second round at roland garros six times, but is still to make it further. that is all the sport for now and i will have more on that zinedine zidane story in the next hour. yes, a strong football management tea m yes, a strong football management team in that bulletin, thank you very much. all day today we‘re looking
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at the potential impact of brexit on the uk‘s creative industries. with ten months to go, one area that could be hugely affected is the uk‘s significant broadcasting industry. 0ur reality check correspondent chris morris is here to explain. it‘s often been said that brexit will have an impact on every part of the british economy, but you may not have considered what it might mean for what we do right here — broadcasting. when the prime minister gave her big speech on brexit and future economic relations with the eu, at the mansion house in march, she highlighted two sectors of the economy that have never been part of a free trade agreement before — financial services, and broadcasting. 0n broadcasting, we realise we cannot have the same arrangements with the eu that we have now. the releva nt with the eu that we have now. the relevant directive will not apply to the uk as we leave the eu and
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relying solely on precedents will hurt consumers and businesses on both sides. so let‘s break that down a bit. under current rules, if your channel is licenced in the uk, you can then broadcast throughout the eu, and vice versa. and a majority of multinational broadcasters have their european operations based in the uk. the uk regulator 0fcom says it has issued just over 400 licences for broadcast into the rest of the eu, but industry sources say in reality the number of channels involved is higher even than that. but none of it will be possible once the uk has left the single market. so unless the government can negotiate a special deal, hundreds of channels will have to find another eu country in which to get a licence. among them, all the well—known names. disney, turner and the bbc‘s own international channel bbc world. plenty of countries have already been touting for business leaving the uk, among them — ireland, germany and the benelux countries, belgium, the netherlands and luxembourg. in some cases, companies may have to move part in others they will be able to rely
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on what are known as ‘secondary technical criteria‘ to be licenced in a country from where their satellite signal is uploaded. but the concern in london is that if channel licencing has to change, the uk economy will take a hit. it would certainly mean a loss of revenue for 0fcom which currently charges channels a percentage of their pan—european revenue. and if some companies decide to move part of their production or editorial teams to other countries, that would have an even bigger impact on the economy as a whole. a report commissioned by the commercial broadcasters association estimates that the international broadcast sector was worth just over £1 billion to the uk economy in 2017, if you take into account all sorts of things like content commissioning, post—production, transmission and marketing. so there‘s a lot at stake. the uk — and london in particular — is likely to remain a creative
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broadcasting hub come what may. but it‘s no surprise that the government wants to resolve the licencing issue if it can, nor that other eu countries may well be asking — why should we allow you to be a special case once you‘ve left? ukraine has been heavily criticised for faking the assassination of russian dissident journalist, arkady babchenko. authorities in the country say it was an attempt to expose russian agents operating in the country. caroline rigby reports alive and well, the russian journalist and prominent kremlin critic, arkady babchenko, appearing at a press conference into his own death. nearly 20 hours after authorities in kiev reported he had been shot and killed. this, the reaction of shocked colleagues at the ukrainian tv channel where he worked. translation: i have buried friends and colleagues many times and i know
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the sickening feeling. i am sorry you had to experience it, but there was no other way. in an astonishing turn of events, it soon emerged arkady babchenko had been a willing participant in a security service sting we told aimed to foil a russian plot to kill him and up to 30 other people. one person has now been arrested. but as mr babchenko met ukraine‘s president, relief that he was alive had turned to debate about the ethics of the operation. i think our security services have worked specifically under the mandate and they have carried out their responsibilities professionally. russia‘s foreign ministry called the staged murder an anti—russian provocation. ukrainian authorities said the plot was justify, but many question whether this fake news assassination will have a lasting impact on the country‘s credibility and even that
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of its western allies. caroline rigby, bbc news. with me is irena taranyuk from bbc ukraine. we haven‘t had an explanation why this plot was carried out to draw out these would be assassins? they haven‘t given us a satisfactory explanation but the final goal was to save the journalist‘s life, but if fades into insignificance when you think about the political game the security services will get from the security services will get from the successful foiling of this plot. and some details of how, what, when and why are still sketchy and we
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have been promised the picture will become clear with the coming days. the first 24 hours, it was a huge, emotional roller—coaster, for arkady babchenko himself, his family and the journalistic community and passions are still riding high. there was relief, rage and condemnation from some quarters. there has been pushed back from arkady babchenko and perhaps you can tell us how much defends the ukrainians have offered for this, against that criticism of what they‘ve done and the way they went about this, arkady babchenko for example saying, when me and my family have a safe home somewhere, then you can criticise me? he is very outspoken, i can only explain his tone, it was his life and his family‘s security was at
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sta ke. and his family‘s security was at stake. he was granted a round—the—clock protection by the president, and some political a nalysts president, and some political analysts in ukraine say ultimately it is the president, with his falling ratings, that is to benefit from this successful and very big case. the president praised ukrainian security services for a huge success, but when it comes to media storm particularly abroad for this fake assassination, it looks like security services might have saved his life, might have succeeded in foiling the plot and provided the evidence, sketchy as it is, but ultimately they undermined the moral high ground that ukraine claimed since being invaded by russia, because now russia criticises ukraine of spreading fake news. thank you very much. police say they believe a pilot who died in a helicopter
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crash near aldborough is barry dodd, the lord—lieutena nt for north yorkshire. the helicopter came down in a field near boroughbridge. there were no other passengers on board. north yorkshire police say — "our thoughts are with his family and friends at this difficult time." they don‘t fit in, don‘t want the hassle, and struggle with "complex issues" — they are just some of the excuses given for not appointing women to the boards of the uk‘s top companies, according to a report on gender balance. the government—backed review called it shocking, while a minister branded the reasons "pitiful". it has recommended that at least a third of the 350 ftse company board members are women by 2020. let‘s get the weather with phil avery. lots of weather warnings about.
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somebody has been listening, it a lwa ys somebody has been listening, it always worries me (i) things quite tricky at the moment across the southern half of the british isles. there could be scenes like this over the next 24 to 36 hours or so. so we are keeping a very close eye on proceedings indeed, as indeed are the met office, because they have issued an amber warning, their second level of warnings, for these thunderstorms forced you might not have seen them yet but there is a pretty good chance you will. 0n through the afternoon they drift away through the west, not getting that far north. you noticed that overnight it is dry for the most part, still quite close for scotland and northern ireland. you have had a great run of weather and that will continue for today. however, scotla nd continue for today. however, scotland and northern ireland, watch out, because all the scenes you have seen out, because all the scenes you have seenin out, because all the scenes you have seen in the south, they are coming to you, you don‘t have to go to them. a good part of scotland, northern ireland on friday, and again the western side of england, wales, a lot of people moving away
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for the weekend, could be really tricky on the roads. later on on friday and on into the weekend. plenty of thunderstorms again on saturday for scotland, northern ireland, one or two a bit further south, that is the same pattern for sunday. this is bbc newsroom live, our latest headlines. consumer groups have given a qualified welcome to new proposals from the financial conduct authority designed to curb high interest charges. the nhs reveals a deficit of nearly a billion pounds. the combined figure for trusts in england is nearly twice as high as anticipated. an islamic state supporter, who called forjihadis to attack prince george, has admitted a string of terror charges. and a report into ftse—listed companies describes as ‘shocking‘ — the excuses given for not appointing women to boards. the muslim council of britain has repeated its demand
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for the conservatives to hold an independent inquiry into alleged islamophobia within the party. the group, an umbrella organisation for 500 mosques and schools, has written to the party‘s chairman. in an open letter, it says there are now "more than weekly incidents" involving tory candidates and representatives — though the letter does acknowledges the party dealt with all those incidents once they came to light. miqdaad versi, the assistant general secretary of the muslim council of britain, told the victoria derbyshire programme why an inquiry was urgently needed. when you have the most senior conservative muslim, at least a couple of years ago, saying they we re couple of years ago, saying they were talking about there being a simmering underbelly of islamophobia within the party, when we have an individual not being dealt with after they series of allegations, when we have nine separate incidents
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only over a five—week period, all of which were dealt with, but show that something is happening within the party, this type of action needs to be taken, when there are four independent things of this level, they‘re definitely merits an investigation. 0ur assistant political editor norman smith is in westminster. so whether it is an independent enquiry oran so whether it is an independent enquiry or an internal enquiry, is the conservative party minded to lodge any sort of enquiry into this when it is saying today that it has dealt with the incidents that have been raised on an individual basis? the signs at the moment are they are not. but this does carry with it exactly the same risks as the anti—semitism allegations, which rocked the labour party. they may not be of the same scale and even significance, but there are the risks, in terms of how the party is perceived, a risk in terms of whether they are seen to take the
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allegations seriously enough, and a risk simply in terms of the impact on those voters who see a party cb glee not taking those concerns seriously enough. this lunchtime we heard from a former party chairman, said of rc, saying she thought one of the reasons why mrs may lost ground at the last election was because of a loss of support among the muslim community and other ethnic minorities. and her view was that some in the party are frankly in denial over the problem. and she believes that mrs may herself now has to give a lead. what i would like first and foremost is a very clear statement of an acknowledgement of the issue and the fa ct acknowledgement of the issue and the fact that the party will tackle it, andl fact that the party will tackle it, and i want that to come from the top, either the prime and i want that to come from the top, eitherthe prime minister or the chairman of the party, because i think up till now sadly there are certain parts of the party that have beenin certain parts of the party that have been in denial about this issue. there was close to mrs may point to
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the fact she has appointed sajid javid as home secretary, the first muslim home secretary. they also point to the fact she has set up this racial disparity unit, but i think the real risk for the conservative party is, as we know, they have long had a problem in attracting support from ethnic minority voters, and when you have the main organisation representing muslims in britain are accusing the conservative party of islamophobia, then that is only going to make it even harderfor them to reach out then that is only going to make it even harder for them to reach out to those voters. 0k, norman, thank you very much for that. norman smith in westminster, as ever. with ten months to go until britain leaves the eu, we‘re in liverpool looking at brexit and what it means for the creative industries, the fastest growing industry in the uk. 0ur entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba is in liverpool. thank you very much, this is liverpool, which most 15 years to the day was named european capital
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of culture, a title it took up in 2008, so where better to look at the impact of europe on the arts and culture ? impact of europe on the arts and culture? iam impact of europe on the arts and culture? i am joined impact of europe on the arts and culture? iamjoined by impact of europe on the arts and culture? i am joined by stand—up comedian will franklin. first of all, a lot of people in the creative industries seem to have voted remain. do you think this has created something of a problem? remain. do you think this has created something of a problem7m has inadvertently highlighted there isa has inadvertently highlighted there is a difference of opinion and for a long time in the arts, there has been one political direction only. by been one political direction only. by brexit happening, the people spoke up and all of a sudden they're artists speaking up as well saying i don't necessarily agree with the artistic status quo. finally we are starting to hear from those artists. hazard particularly affected you?” think so, i have a very big mouth andl think so, i have a very big mouth and i don't hold back as far as political correctness comes about. i was very vocal about supporting brexit and donald trump and i think there was a little bit of a backlash but i think things are starting to and around now, people think it might not be bad for britain now and
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especially the arts. britain has a great reputation with satire, perhaps going back to the likes of monty python, do you think that is something the uk is in danger of losing? what is the solution?” something the uk is in danger of losing? what is the solution? i hate to say i think it has lost it but i think brexit is a means for you to find it again. i was nine years old when i got turned on to pace on, anthony britain represented a place where satire and surrealism emanated from because american comedy was not doing —— and to me britain. from because american comedy was not doing -- and to me britain. do you think there is the appetite there?” believe in providence. we are in liverpool right now, and to me the story of the beatles is only one such toure. john lennon in his house through the wireless hearing heartbreak hotel from across the atlantic and in the second british invasion, and subsequently the satirical invasion of the states with peter cook, beyond the fringe, coming to america, sol with peter cook, beyond the fringe, coming to america, so i think it is quite likely will happen. have you
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noticed much of a change since the vote in the industry? in the industry itself, not so much. unfortunately comedians nowadays they have to be half artist and half businessmen, which i always thinks makes you not an artist at all. i think you are either pure artist or you are not. your real artist is a loose cannon, like a john lennon or a johnny rotten or what have you. a lot of the times people get saturated of the business side of it, but as far as the artist speaking up, that is starting to happen. slowly at first but starting to get louder. do you have a degree of sympathy for the lack of connections with europe, do you think 70 people in the arts and the creative industry in the last years and decades? the nature of a satirist is we make fun of things, of power structures. figures like nigel farage, i actually found him, i looked at the man as a comedian, because he actually did what comedians are supposed to do, subvert a power structure ?
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comedians are supposed to do, subvert a power structure? going back to the marx brothers. i think thatis back to the marx brothers. i think that is important. thank you very much for talking to us. we are here all day looking at the issues surrounding a potential post brexit britain, and for the time being, back to you in the studio. lizo, factory much. staying with this story. —— thank you very much. john kampfner is the chief executive of the creative industries federation which represents over 1,000 companies, organisations and individual practitioners. we call them artists! i was talking to phil redmond, the producer and screenwriter, and he sounded quite relaxed about any possible impacts that brexit might have on the creative industries here. how are you feeling at this point with ten months to go until brexit? we are seriously i‘m relaxed about it but that doesn‘t mean it will
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necessarily be —— not relaxed about it, but that is amenable be a great issue. the issue now is getting down to the detail, and so much of the detail is around access to talent. when i was doing a parliamentary enquiry not so long ago, i made the point that it is one thing to permit people to come to this country to work in our creative sector and our tech sector, the two fastest growing sectors by a country mile, it is one thing to permit them, it is quite another thing to welcome people. as soon as another thing to welcome people. as soon as the uk, and it is notjust london, it is liverpool, a great city, leeds, manchester, glasgow, cardiff. not forgetting northern ireland. the federation is everywhere. all the nations and all the regions. as soon as people feel they are here on sufferance, rather than the uk is absolutely a world leader in creativity, and that means openness, and that means welcoming, then that is when we will begin to
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suffer. and what matters actually, some people might say i don‘t give a monkeys about art or creativity, but this sector, this creative industry, 93 billion quid to the uk economy, it now gives more to the uk economy than life sciences, oil and gas, automotive and aviation put together. so this is a massive economic powerhouse. and we imperil it, if we imperil it, we imperil the wider uk economy and our reputation around the world. given the with the industry has, do you feel you are being listened to? we are actively engaged with nine government departments, the culture department, we have very good relations with, the brexit apartment, number ten and others. ultimately there is concern, that it others. ultimately there is concern, thatitis others. ultimately there is concern, that it is seen as somewhat tangential, somewhat soft, rather than being seen, to recast it at the
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centre of economic growth, at the centre of economic growth, at the centre of economic growth, at the centre of our thriving towns and cities. so we are being listened to but there is a lot of very granular work to be done over the next six months. you have spoken about how i‘ve bought and it is to get the atmospherics right, to attain that feeling of openness, britain being welcoming to talent from elsewhere. you have talked about the practicalities and movement of people and so forth. have you done any sort of studies to how much potentially this could cost the industry after brexit? at the moment, the concerns are there. there are anecdotal concerns about people not taking upjobs, about certain lack of investment, but for the moment we remain reasonably sanguine. this sector, and it is not just international talent, and eu talent by the way, we have to com pletely talent by the way, we have to completely change our education and careers system to make it much more modern to embrace creativity. if we get that right as well then this sector not only does not need to go
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backwards but it can actually go forwards. briefly, if the talent is here, finally, if the strong base is here, finally, if the strong base is here, would people ultimately be continued to be drawn to that? absolutely, and that is what we are working for. john kampfner, thank you for your time today. a railfirm which compared its poor service to chocolate from poundland has been threatened with legal action by the discount chain. thameslink received this tweet from one of its customers yesterday, complaining about delays to its services. thameslink replied saying, "very sorry kevin. appreciate at the moment the service is less ferrero rocher and more poundland cooking chocolate". that caught poundland retail director, austin cooke‘s, attention. he sent thameslink this tweet, saying "aside from breach of our trademark, we think you‘ve taken the chocolate biscuit". mr cooke continued... "if we everfall short, perhaps we‘ll describe ourselves as a bit thameslink. if you don‘t want to hear from our extremely twitchy legal team, we suggest you remove your tweet." govia thameslink later
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apologised to mr cooke and deleted its earlier tweet. the trial has started of a former southampton youth football coach, who‘s accused of historical sexual abuse. bob higgins, who‘s 65 denies 50 charges of indecent assault relating to teenage boys between 1971 and 1996. 0ur correspondent katy austin is at salisbury crown court. tell us what has the jury heard today? the crown's case is that bob higgins well being a talented youth coach also carried out a campaign of sexual abuse. today the jury has heard further specific examples of
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behaviour here is alleged to have carried out. one boy who was forced to put his hand inside higgins‘s open flies in the car, remembered boys cuddling up to the coach at his home, laying his head in his lap, and having naked soapie massa urges. another described him as being a kingmaker type, having the ultimate say in whether a boy would make it in football. he says he was groomed by the defendant to the extent that he became infatuated, sexual behaviour and intimate touching became normalised. 0nce behaviour and intimate touching became normalised. once he became so distressed he once fled the house semi naked and rang his parents from a phone box, the court heard. later, the court heard billy seymour‘s life imploded. he turned to drugs as a coping mechanism and was sentenced for holding up a knife to the throat ofa for holding up a knife to the throat of a taxi driver, telling his pa rents of a taxi driver, telling his parents he had done it because the man reminded him of bob higgins. higgins denies all the charges
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against him and the trial in total is expected to last up to eight weeks. katie austin there, thank you. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: new proposals from the financial watchdog are being put forward to curb excessive credit interest charges. nhs trusts in england have reported a combined financial deficit of nearly a billion pounds, nearly twice the amount they had planned for. a supporter of so—called islamic state has admitted encouraging a terror attack — targeting prince george. as we‘ve been hearing, nhs trusts in england have reported a combined financial deficit of £960 million, nearly twice the amount they had planned for. siva anandaciva, chief analyst at the kings fund, a think tank specialising in health care policy is with me. well, really, this just
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well, really, thisjust confirms, again, the dire straits in which the nhs finds itself, financially. i mean, what sort of difference do you think this will make to this settle m e nt think this will make to this settlement we know the government is looking at possibly in the next few weeks announcing for the nhs?” looking at possibly in the next few weeks announcing for the nhs? i hope it does make a difference, as you have said it highlights the tremendous, incredible pressure that nhs organisations are under. a&e waiting time standards are reaching appalling new lows, routine surgery delayed and cancelled, hospitals up and down the country and other nhs organisations losing money year after yea r. organisations losing money year after year. this new long—term funding settlement absolutely has to deliver if the nhs is to have a fighting chance over the next decade. we have heard from nhs providers, a 3% settlement for the nhs would allow it to stand still. it needs another two to £3 billion though to recover performance
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standards, that is 4%, and if the nhs has ambitions to do anything more than that, we are talking about 596 more than that, we are talking about 5% plus. but is that politically achievable, feasible? well, that is achievable, feasible? well, that is a problem the politicians will have two a nswer. a problem the politicians will have two answer. if you look at nhs funding at the moment, rising about 196 funding at the moment, rising about 1%a funding at the moment, rising about 1% a year, and you can consequences, patients having to wait longer for care. we think that funding has to rise by at least 4% a year if we are going to see the nhs both deliver services in a&e department and the routine surgery we expect, but also transform how these services are delivered in the future. ultimately you get what you pay for and if we are not willing to pay 4% a year, we will see what we see at the moment in terms of pressure. anything less than 4%, are we looking at a very difficult health service, cuts to services? i think cuts to services are something people would not want to consider but ultimately you would
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be forced into that. but that is the choice, isn‘t it? be forced into that. but that is the choice, isn't it? that is one of the choices. people talk about rationing health care, we are seeing a dilation of quality of health care at the moment, five to six years ago 96% of patients were being seen within four hours, now 85% at best being seen in that time. on a downward trajectory if we don‘t give the nhs the funding it needs. downward trajectory if we don‘t give the nhs the funding it needsm downward trajectory if we don‘t give the nhs the funding it needs. is the public largely supportive of the idea of paying more tax, if that extra tax was specifically designated for the nhs? we have done a few polling events, if you are events live with the public, and i have been surprised at the depth of feeling, and the willingness of the public to put their hands in their pockets to pay more tax to support the nhs. 0ver pockets to pay more tax to support the nhs. over 60% of people we surveyed said they would be willing to fund greater taxation to support the nhs. whether that comes from a specific tax earmarked for the nhs or the current route of general
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taxation again as a matter for the politicians, but the public are willing to pay for the service they wa nt to willing to pay for the service they want to see. just a question on the specific deficit, almost double what we thought it might have been. we know about rising demand, staff shortages, one of the worst winters on record. if we look at that last point, that alone can‘t possibly contribute, or can it? you are the expert. to the level of record deficit we are seeing reported. the winter was particularly bad, influenza like illness is were up compared to previous years, but once you look at the data over the previous years, yes, it was a bad winter, yes, it contributed to the deficits, but the position we are in with hospitals and other organisations losing £1 billion a year are duties something more fundamental and structural. eight yea rs of fundamental and structural. eight years of austere funding, cuts to services, the workforce with 100,000 vacancies, that didn‘t happen over the last few months of winter, that has been happening for the better
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pa rt has been happening for the better part of a decade, so we need to address that fundamental problem to give the nhs but it needs over winter and the rest of the year. thank you very much. the reality television star, kim kardashian west, has met donald trump in the white house to discuss reform of the us criminaljustice system. she used the visit to raise the case of a 63—year—old great grandmother who has spent more than two decades in prison for a first—time drug offence. this report from simonjones contains some flash photography. donald trump declared it "a great meeting". 0ne reality star visiting another, who went on to become president. cameras caught kim kardashian west arriving at the white house to raise the case of a 63—year—old great—grandmother who was serving life in prison. alice—mariejohnson was jailed for her involvement in a drugs conspiracy that saw her pass messages between dealers. kim kardashian west is paying for a new legal team for miss johnson. speaking before the meeting, she explained why.
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to go and spend my money buying material things just doesn‘t satisfy me the way that it used to and i am just in a different place in my life, so i thought, well, if i could put the money into a shopping spree, which sounds ridiculous, to save someone‘s life, and do that once a year, then that would make my heart fuller. many on social media have criticised her unlikely role as a prison reform advocate, saying there are thousands of cases that deserve close examination. her husband, the rapper kanye west, has also been under fire recently for treating his support for the president. we have been friends for a long time. after the meeting, she tweeted... ultimately it will be the president who decides if she should be pardoned. simonjones, bbc simon jones, bbc news. inafew in a few moments, we will have the bbc news at one with jane hill. just before we go to the weather, let me tell you about an updated warning
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from the environment agency. it has updated its flood risk advice for parts of england and wales from low to medium. lots of weather warnings out and about, heavy rainfall and more thunderstorms. let‘s catch up now with the very latest weather forecast with phil avery. let‘s bring you right up to date with how we see things developing across the british isles. there are indeed develop and is for the met office, they have issued an amber warning for some thunderstorms, which will affect southern part of england and south wales during the course of today. they were brewing from earlier on. weather watchers down on the far south—east got an early sight of those. i don my cap immediately in the direction of scotland, not a concern here, nor in northern ireland, because you are a long way away from the big area of low pressure powering the storms ever further to the north and west.
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that great ribbon of cloud was the first signs of what was to come. through the evening and overnight, we will see that threat of storms still there to be had across the south and west midlands, wales, down into the south—west of england and all the while further north, no great issues with the weather. along the eastern shores there will be some poor visibility around, comes just bear that in mind. i am showing this travel warnings heavy rain. this is more for the northern parts of britain because it will come as something of a shock, the sort of conditions we have described in the south may well become more prevalent for northern ireland and scotland, which will be a real interruption to your unbroken days of sunshine in many western parts of scotland, northern ireland too. look at this situation is to get on through friday, that is why we have some concerns about what you might be confronting the latter part of the across scotland and northern ireland. for that, you have to thank this rather innocuous looking area of low pressure, just throwing that little logo of low pressure up towards the north—west of scotland
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and into northern ireland. the weekend looks like we will see a focus on the showers. better conditions further south, feeling pretty warm, and still that prospect ofa pretty warm, and still that prospect of a little bit of mist and fog around the coast. saturday for example, the bulk of the showers fine, maybe one or two further towards the south, but there are a lot of decent weather. if you have a plan for this weekend across england and wales, i think the weather is very much on your side. here we are as far ahead of sunday, fewer showers to report perhaps across scotland, maybe one or two, similar sort of prospect into northern ireland, but further south again watch out for the strength of the sun and it will feel very pleasantly warm way from the east coast. a new crackdown on high—interest lending — but consumer groups say the proposals should go further. there will be restrictions on shops selling white goods and furniture for weekly payments — but there no limits are planned on bank overdrafts. it's it‘s basically been about 40 quid a week that i spend which is a lot,
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andi week that i spend which is a lot, and i do think the fees they charge is really, you know, expensive. we‘ll have more on the proposals from the financial conduct authority. also this lunchtime. an islamic state supporter who called forjihadis to attack prince george admits a string of terrorism offences. a deficit of nearly £1 billion — nhs trusts in england are facing double the expected debt after the toughest winter in a decade. zinedine zidane quits as real madrid boss — five days after leading them to a third straight
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