Skip to main content

tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  May 31, 2018 2:00pm-4:59pm BST

2:00 pm
hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 2pm: a new crackdown on high—interest [ending but consumer groups say the proposals aren't tough enough. we owe it to the more vulnerable members of society, to frankly ensure that they get credit on better terms because they need it, to buy essential goods and spread the cost. an islamic state supporter who called forjihadis to attack prince george admits a string of terrorism offences. nhs trusts in england report a combined financial deficit of £960 million — nearly twice the expected figure. coming up on afternoon live — all the sport — john watson has that. zinedine zidane? yes, a surprise announcement that zinedine zidane has quit as manager of real madrid, just five days after their success in the final of the champions league. thank you. and phil has all the weather. not too bad. further so the met
2:01 pm
office have a weather warning for southern england. i will have all the details on that coming up. thanks, phil. also coming up... well, he does speak. we will hear from him later on. the number two seed at the french open wins his match, but is defeated by a yorkshire accent. have a listen to this. you clearly love your tennis... not as much as your accent, buddy, i love that. laughter hello, everyone — this is afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. britain's financial watchdog has announced a crackdown on companies which offer loans with high interest rates. the financial conduct authority wants a cap on the amount that can be charged by rent—to—own firms —
2:02 pm
where interest levels mean customers often end up paying many times what goods would cost on the high street. but the fca said it needs to do more work before deciding whether to cap bank overdraft charges, as emma simpson reports. doncaster — a town where there are no shortage of stories about the high cost of credit. i got one with a finance company, got me into a mess, and i've never looked at them since. so i've got a washer, i've got a dryer... and this single mum uses her purchase as so—called rent—to—own to buy her big ticket items. it's basically been about 40 quid a week that i spend, which is a lot, and i do think the fees and that that they do charge are really, you know, expensive. she's one of 400,000 customers using rent—to—own, where the costs can be easily three times as much as the off—the—shelf price. the financial regulator is now
2:03 pm
proposing a cap on these fees. and it's looking at a ban on the sale of extended warranties, saving consumers millions of pounds a year. at the moment they are not getting a good deal, and we owe it to them — we owe it to the more vulnerable members of society, to frankly ensure that they get credit on better terms, because they need it, to buy essential goods and spread the cost. and it's frankly not there at the moment. it's notjust rent—to—own companies like this one which can charge sky—high fees. unauthorised overdrafts from banks can also cost consumers dear. unplanned overdraft are a big moneyspinnerfor the banks. they made nearly £700 million from them in 2016. the regulator wants banks to use mobile phone alerts to warm customers about their overdrafts, and to help them better manage their accounts. but that's not enough for some... we're really disappointed to see
2:04 pm
that the regulator hasn't taken action today to put a cap on unplanned overdraft fees. it's already taken action in other high cost areas, like payday loans, and now unplanned overdraft are more expensive than payday loans in some scenarios, yet banks are still getting away with charging customers rip—off fees for unplanned overd rafts. but the regulator says a cap on overdraft charges is still on the table. its message — more fundamental changes could eventually be on the way to protect vulnerable consumers. emma simpson, bbc news, doncaster. an islamic state supporter has admitted encouraging a terror attack targeting prince george. husnain rashid changed his plea half way through his trial at woolwich crown court. the court heard rashid used a messaging group to call for an attack on prince george. our correspondent caroline davies is here. first of all, can you tell us what
2:05 pm
he admitted to doing? when the trial started initially husnain rashid pleaded not guilty, the preparation of a cts pleaded not guilty, the preparation of acts of terrorism, giving people the tools to carry these things out and giving them —— encouraging them to do so. he did this on a messaging app called telegram, not entirely dissimilar to whats app, with google can subscribe and see the messages, and he was providing people with information and in one of them he posted a picture of prince george not long after he started school with superimposed images ofjihadi fighters next to him, and he posted the address of the school and a postcode, and he then left a note saying "school start early," with the suggestion he was encouraging people to attack prince george. when he was arrested, his phone was crucial evidence for the police? yes, she ran away from the police
2:06 pm
and through the telephone over the side of the wall and it was described as having a treasure trove of evidence. the also then fainted when the police came to arrest him. in terms of his importance, he himself bores is less of a threat, but he did influence other people? that is exactly the point. he is providing information to people who then might want to carry out attacks, and in fact there is some suggestion he did influence a man who did plead guilty last year of planning to carry out a knife attack, so these sorts of messages, although they might not directly be planning an attack on cellcom he make be giving other people the tools to do so. what happens now? -- and attacked himself, he might be giving other people. youth sentenced ofjune. the judge has giving other people. youth sentenced ofjune. thejudge has said it is likely to be a lengthy sentence —— he will be sentenced on the 28th of june. you are watching afternoon live on bbc news. thank you, caroline. nhs trusts in england have reported a combined financial
2:07 pm
deficit of nearly £1 billion — almost double the amount they had planned for. the regulator, nhs improvement, said the service had endured its toughest winter in a decade, with increased patient demand, especially at a&e departments. ministers have promised a new long—term financial plan for the nhs, which is expected within weeks, as our health editor hugh pym reports. the figures covering hospital, ambulance, mental health and other trusts in england show the finances getting worse. the regulator nhs improvement said a surge in patient demand had affected performance in key areas including waiting times. more than 2,600 patients were waiting longer than 12 months for non—urgent treatment in march, a 75% increase over the year. the regulator said hundreds of thousands more patients than the previous year had been to a&e but the nhs didn't buckle under pressure. today's report says that nhs trusts in england had planned for a total deficit of 496 million for the financial year which ended in march. but the actual figure was 960 million, higher than the £791 million the previous year. some analysts argue the underlying position was even worse. there's a lot of windowdressing
2:08 pm
in today's figures which are bad enough on the face of them. but they are flattered by the very large amounts of one—off emergency funding which will not be available in future years, one—off savings, and also one—off sales of land and property that the nhs has managed to find last year, but obviously you can't sell a spare hospital building every year. nhs leaders argued there were significant challenges for the service creating intense pressure on hospitals and other trusts and their staff. we've got rapidly rising demand, so 3.5% more people coming to a&e every year, we've got really big workforce shortages — 93,000 vacancies — and we are in the middle of a very long and deep funding squeeze. so there's a real issue about the pressure that the nhs is under. if you think about those pressures it's actually quite a good result, but we now have to do something to put the nhs on a long—term sustainable footing. the prime minister says she's
2:09 pm
planning a new long—term strategy for nhs funding in england, and that is expected within weeks. hugh pym, bbc news. let's return to our main story. consumer groups have welcomed moves by the financial watchdog to curb excessive credit interest charges — but say they should go further. let's talk to labour mp, stella creasy who has been campaigning on high interest rate for very long time now. this problem has been around for a very long time now. yes, and that's one of the concerns i have, that anything is better than nothing. today the financial conduct authority have said they are going to put a cap on rent to own, so people buying things from companies, capping what you can be charged, but this is a bit like one of those children's games whack a mole, because as soon as you deal with one issue location, another one pops up, and that is why people like myself
2:10 pm
have been saying we should just have a cap across that these. the crazy situation now if you have more protection with a payday loan than if you try to borrow on your credit card, so we really think the financial conduct authority should goa financial conduct authority should go a lot further than they have done today. you will know better than me, but some of the figures involved in terms of the repayments are staggering? it is absolutely eye—watering. it is not by accident. look, these companies make their money by pushing people into debt then lending more money to keep them in that debt. it is very noticeable to me, and the citizens advice bureau, they did a piece of work on rent to own deals, and found a lot had borrowed to be able to pay off that debt, which is why it is not much about the individual products, credit cards, rent to own deals or doorstep lending, it is the fact that this industry as a whole is trying to evade these regulations, saw in my local community in waltha mstow saw in my local community in walthamstow i see an organisation trying to push these credit on people. and they are owned by provident, doorstep lender, that is
2:11 pm
why tackling the industry as a whole rather than individual products is best. dooley include banks, because overdraft charges are also being looked at? 12 million people were caught by these overdraft charges. —— do we also include banks? the question is what is a fair rate of return and what is a rate of return that doesn't then create an incentive for these companies to keep pushing into debt and lending money. people will know they are often offered extensions on their credit cards when borrowing more and more. that is not by accident. all the measures looked at today by the fda are mainly about changing consumers, telling them when they are getting into debt. if you don't have enough money to pay off your debts, being told you are getting into debt doesn't really help you. we have to change the incentives for these companies, including banks, to stop pushing people until they are in debt. people are known as zombie debtors, paying off their interest but not the capital on their loans and there are millions of these in our communities. but where do you
2:12 pm
draw the line between the problem here and personal responsibility? many of us have credit cards, and, you know, we pay them off when we can, but we are talking about a relatively small group of people who are perhaps already vulnerable, but who need help at an early stage and don't ask for an? well, i'm really glad you've asked me that, because actually in this industry we see lots of problems —— don't ask for it? let me give you a good example. an eagle loans, a relatively new product that has turned up in the last couple of years where somebody at —— amigo loans. somebody else a cts at —— amigo loans. somebody else acts as a guarantor for your home machismo. i had a man in my constituency who got into debt with an amigo loan, he sought advice, but the company still continued to chase the company still continued to chase the guarantor because they worked out they could get more that way —— they have a guarantor to vote for you. this industry is still there for making a packet and that is what needs to change. stella creasy, thanks so much, even with the
2:13 pm
backing of the london traffic we heard every word. thank you. thank you! the ukrainian authorities have been heavily criticised after admitting that its security services faked the murder of a russian journalist — in order, they claimed, to save him from an assassination plot by russia. moscow said the world had been misled by propaganda, europe's security body, the osce, said it deplored ukraine's tactics. he our moscow correspondent, steve rosenberg, says many people believe the affair might ultimately play into the kremlin‘s hands. what we have been seeing today is the russian state media using this fake murder in kiev to try to undermine the credibility of some of the many accusations that have been levelled against russia over the last few years. so, for example, the government newspaper today likened the story of arkady babchenko to the case of the skripals, poisoned in salisbury, claiming that their recovery was somehow similar to the resurrection of a russian journalist. i think the aim is clear, to lump all of this together as fake news,
2:14 pm
and i think from now on, every time russia will be accused of something, whether it's hacking or meddling in elections, or cyber attacks or whatever, the russians will point to what happened in kiev yesterday and cry fake news louder than ever. meanwhile, the ukrainian authorities have come in for international criticism over the way they organised this sting. the osce, the organisation for security and cooperation in europe said it deplored the decision to spread false information on the life of a journalist. ukraine is unrepentant. officials there say they have arrested a ukrainian national who they say offered a hit man $30,000 to carry out the proposed assassination of the russian journalist. we will just take you we willjust take you to new york
2:15 pm
because the us secretary of state mike pompeo has been meeting kim jong—un‘s right—hand man, head of the singapore nuclear summit. they met yesterday and had a steak dinner to try to get back contract with the proposed summit between north korea and the united states. he is the most senior north korean official to visit the united states in many yea rs, visit the united states in many years, but in the last moments, updates from the president donald trump, with a tweet. i will read them in order. he hopes that the north korean summit onjune the 12th, the first one. second, he says "may not get everything done in one day in the summer with north korea. may need other meetings." then, slightly confusingly, "it is also possible the north korea meeting may not happen." possible the north korea meeting may not happen. " that possible the north korea meeting may not happen." that is what we are getting. those news flashes coming in the last few moments. he has said again, in the last few seconds, that
2:16 pm
the meetings have been very positive, so the mood music is positive, so the mood music is positive but also that caveat that they may not happen at all. we will keep you up—to—date with the changes and updates on that story. you're watching afternoon live. a man has died after being stabbed in west london. the man, believed to be in his 40s, was found in kensington with multiple injuries last night. paramedics were called but he died at the scene. no arrests have been made. there's been a warning that free schools — one of the government's flagship education policies — are failing to live up to their original purpose. a study from the sutton trust, and the national foundation for educational research, says only a fifth of free schools have been set up by parents and they don't appear to be any more innovative than other types of schools. the department for education says free schools are helping to raise standards. you're watching afternoon live — these are our headlines britain's financial watchdog proposes a new crackdown on high interest lending. a supporter of so—called
2:17 pm
islamic state has admitted encouraging a terrorist attack targeting prince george. nhs trusts in england have reported a combined financial deficit of nearly £1 billion — nearly twice the amount they had planned for. in sport, zinedine zidane quit as manager of european champions real madrid, just days after leading the clu b to madrid, just days after leading the club to their 13th european title. he spent three seasons there are, lifting the champions league in three successive seasons. frank lampard has been appointed the new manager of derby county on a three—year deal. he was one of 20 applicants, conceding the job won't be easy but was too good an opportunity to turn down. heather watson is out of the french open, beaten in straight sets by the belgian mertens, ending the british interest in that tournament. i will have more on those stories at half—past. an update on the proposed meeting
2:18 pm
between donald trump and kim yong—chol. you heard something from me, let's hear from yong—chol. you heard something from me, let's hearfrom donald trump... we are doing very well with north korea. our secretary of state has had very good meetings and he is meeting again today. i believe they will be coming down to washington on friday, and a letter is going to be delivered to me from kim jong—un friday, and a letter is going to be delivered to me from kimjong—un on, soi delivered to me from kimjong—un on, so i look forward to seeing what is in the letter, but it is very important to them so they will be probably coming down to washington, dc on friday, and i look forward to the delivery of the letter. well, with ten months to go until britain leaves the eu, we're in liverpool looking at brexit and what it means for the creative industries, the fastest growing industry in the uk. our arts correspondent lizo mzimba is there. yes, thank you very much. we are here in liverpool. nearly 15 years to the day it was named european
2:19 pm
capital of culture, a title is then took up in 2008. there were lots of exa m ples took up in 2008. there were lots of examples around here of what that has meant for liverpool. of course leaving the eu means uk cities are no longer eligible to be named capital of culture for europe, one of the more visible effects leaving the eu has had on the arts and culture industry, but of course it is something that has affected entire swathes of british life. my colleague david sillitoe has been looking at what post brexit britain might look like, the potential benefits and deficits for what might happen once we do leave the eu in a rts happen once we do leave the eu in arts and culture... what you're looking at is the work of a british company called jellyfish, which isjust a part of the uk's fast—growing visual effects industry. this is rogue one, star wars, we've done a lot of work on star wars within the last two or three years. this is really high—end hollywood stuff, though. yeah, and we are one of the — if not the leading centre for doing visual effects animation in the world. this has become very big business. there are more people making special effects in the uk these days
2:20 pm
than work in the coal industry. but what's really striking is how international the workforce is. as you can see everyone's busily working away here. this fellow‘s from spain, poland, ireland, belgium, sweden. well, if we're going to really show you what it's like here we've got to get everyone together. here they all are. now, if you take away the workers from other european union countries you begin to see just how much they rely on access to european talent. and, what's more, all the technology and software is stored remotely on cloud computing. the office just needs a good internet connection. the only reason they're here is because of the people. this office in particular has no
2:21 pm
computers — it's silent, it's very rare in our industry. that gives us the ability to pick this up and move it to where the talent is, and we will do that if we have to, and many of us are already doing that. but what of other parts of the so—called creative industries? this is the city of birmingham symphony orchestra. colette overdijk is from holland. her orchestral life began in the eu's youth orchestra, which was based in the uk and is now moving to italy. you feel part of one big european family and it feels very sad that this is now ripped apart. but for the man in charge, leaving the eu is all about practicalities. much of their income comes from touring europe. if we had to go and sort out visits to embassies, visas, work permits, all of that, just to go to germany, france or the netherlands actually those tours become non—viable, which is a problem because we rely on that income but we also rely on that reputational pull.
2:22 pm
the same is true, frankly, of the instruments. paperwork for every instrument crossing every frontier is not what they want. so there are many questions. but the big issue, though, is how can we continue to grow our creative exports and it is possible the new trade deals we are going to do with the rest of the world will assist that. but there is a caveat, and that is the creative industry is really about selling digital packages around the world. you don't need lots of rules, regulations and standards for that. and we don't want the new trade deals we do to say you should run yourselves differently. so there are hopes that brexit could help unlock new global trade deals, but there is clearly still much to resolve. david sillito, bbc news, birmingham. i'm joined here in liverpool by
2:23 pm
music producer steve levine, a man who has worked with everyone from the clash to culture club. how do you think the eu will affect the music industry, both musicians and people behind—the—scenes? i think different sectors will be affected in different ways. as a music producer, if i want to use musicians from europe it is easy to get a work permit. here in liverpool we have a large numberof permit. here in liverpool we have a large number of overseas students at the various universities, and many of them stay here, so there are a great source of musicians they would have to then return. liverpool supports lots of new talent and that tale nt supports lots of new talent and that talent really cut its teeth on touring, andl talent really cut its teeth on touring, and i can imagine a very difficult situation, if i am old enough of remembering the days of having to have car... and with smaller bands the equipment they ta ke smaller bands the equipment they take on tour with them, having to
2:24 pm
have a car named for every european country, it could be a time wasting exercise and phenomenally expensive. is it more the uncertainty that some of these issues have not yet been ironed out on what will specifically happen? you're absolutely right, there has been no discussion about there has been no discussion about the minutiae of things which can really unravel and cause all sorts of problems. —— really unravel and cause all sorts of problems. -- yes, you're absolutely right. musicians travelling to america, they need visas, and if they perform they need a work visa, which can cost up to £3000 or £4000 per pound, so already made no firm evidence of america this can be prohibitive and expensive for a young, emerging band. if we are to stay in the customs union, perhaps that work situation can be revolved, but at the moment it doesn't look particularly good. you want some kind of situation where this kind of ease of freedom of movement with musicians, artists, within the eu can be maintained, to an extent? absolutely, because you have to look at the physical person travelling
2:25 pm
and also there equipment, the value of that equipment, having insurance, things do go astray, and it is certainly true of some of the smaller bands they will not fly from country to country, they will use a tour bus, transit van, something like that, so every border, the equipment or has to come out and be checked, so that adds cost, and also the uncertainty is a difficult thing. as you know, tours are booked 18 months ahead, so we don't know where we will be, and we will be out of it in less than a year. very briefly, looking for, what are the potential benefits? make it encourage us to concentrate more on home—grown uk talent? encourage us to concentrate more on home-grown uk talent? that, i totally agree with, and i think we need to take a leaf out of the book of france, or even canada. in france the government has lots of great policies in place to help both brand—new emerging acts, and those who are more established, and canada has the same. they have a play quarters, the support, so i think the uk government, whatever flavour it must be, —— may be, it has to
2:26 pm
look at a way of, as you say, being pro—british music. look at a way of, as you say, being pro-british music. sagna, thank you for talking to us, live in liverpool. back to you in the studio. —— steve levine, thank you for talking to us. lizo, thank you very much. nick grimshaw is stepping down from the radio1 breakfast show, after six years presenting it. audience figures have been declining — the show lost 600,000 listeners in the first three months of this year. his fellow radio 1 presenter greg james will take over the slot. it's one of the nation's best—loved comedy moments — the classic two ronnies sketch in which ronnie barker walks into a hardware shop looking for fork handles, and is offered four candles. now fans of the duo can get their hands on the original hand—written script which is up for auction in bristol. it's expected to fetch tens of thousands of pounds, as jon kay reports. it's one of the most famous sketches in the english language. there you are. four candles. no, fork handles. well, there you are, four candles! no, fork 'andles! 'andles for forks! laughter
2:27 pm
four candles. fork handles. and here it is, ready for auction. ronnie barker's script. every word so familiar. there you are, four candles. it's all written by him in his own hand in red pen across four pages of blank writing paper. four pages? four pages! it's just four pages of writing but too many people it's much more than that. something that's made millions and millions of people laugh over a 40 year period. laughter the script is expected to sell for at least £25,000. the auctioneers have even had interest from america and australia. when i first saw it and first opened it up it was kind of like a light bulb in a briefcase moment, kind of like it shone out of the box at me. why does this matter so much? it's the sketch really. it's the comedy sketch that kind
2:28 pm
of epitomises british humour. it's got a bit of everything. it's got some wordplay in it, it's got the character acting, and it's kind of a tightly made sketch, and everybody loves it, everybody knows it, it's completely iconic. nearly every single day, particularly in this profession, i hear people drop into it every now and then as customers collect stuff. you know, it's part of the british conscience. ronnie barker wrote the sketch under his pseudonym gerald wiley with production notes suggesting this was a first draft. it was uncovered on the bbc‘s antiques road show 12 years ago after being found in a bag of rubbish. now four pages — for sale — if you're prepared to fork out. jon kay, bbc news, bristol. time for the weather now with phil avery. it is not a laughing matter! hello, once again. thanks forjoining. let's get you up—to—date with the weather, and there is much to speak of as well, especially across the
2:29 pm
southern half of the british isles. the british met office have an amber warning out for the rest of the day, andindeed warning out for the rest of the day, and indeed on into the wee small hours of friday, because these thunderstorms are again around and about. not everybody getting to see them, by any means at all. certainly not a problem in the north of britain, the northern half, starting friday. but lukas mai you will know about it, lots of surface flooding as well —— around here you will know about it. these thunderstorms getting a good dealfurther north, into scotland and northern ireland, still there across western england and through wales. a lot of people on the move for the weekend and that will be a real issue. saturday, again, the storms are there. scotla nd again, the storms are there. scotland and northern ireland, fewer of the report says of the border. one or two perhaps, and a similar sort of thing on sunday. this is bbc news.
2:30 pm
our latest headlines... new controls on high—interest lending — but consumer groups say the proposals aren't tough enough. president trump says he hopes a summit between the us and north korea will still take place. he commented on ongoing talks between the two countries. i just want to tell you we're doing very well with north korea. our secretary of state has had very good meetings. he is meeting again today. i believe they will be coming down to washington on friday and a letter is going to be delivered to me from kim jong—un. so i look forward to seeing what is in that letter but it is very important to them, so they will probably be coming down to washington, dc on friday for the delivery of a letter. i look forward to that. a man who called for terrorists to attack prince george pleads guilty in court. nhs trusts in england report a combined financial deficit of £960 million pounds — nearly twice the expected figure. sport now, on afternoon live, withjohn watson. surprise as zinedine zidane announces he's quitting as real madrid manager? yes, this is a real shock.
2:31 pm
zinedine zidane has quit as manager of real madrid just five days after leading the club to their 13th european cup. it was a third successive triumph in the competition for zidane, having won the champions league in every season he was in charge. our football reporter john bennett has been reflecting on the announcement. it does come as a surprise, florentino perez the madrid president said he was shocked. if you look back on the last 48 years of history of real madrid on the one headquarters lasted more than three yea rs. headquarters lasted more than three years. in that context, it does not come as a surprise. zinedine zidane was probably getting tired and exhausted. even though he had all of that success, and weighs heavily on your shoulders, thatjob.
2:32 pm
that success, and weighs heavily on yourshoulders, thatjob. he that success, and weighs heavily on your shoulders, thatjob. he said this decision had to be taken for the good of everyone, the players, the good of everyone, the players, the club and everyone behind the scenes because he felt that the players needed a new voice to keep on winning. whoever takes over will have a very difficultjob because it is unprecedented, the success that he had in such a short space of time, to world cup cups, three champions league titles on the trot. one la liga title. very difficult job for florentino perez to find a successor. who will come to replace him now, that is the question? he will not be in charge next season. it must be arsene wenger? surely! and news about frank lampard committee has ta ken and news about frank lampard committee has taken his firstjob as a manager. frank lampard has been appointed as the new manager of derby county on a three—year deal. he spent 21 years at the top as a player with chelsea and manchester city before moving to the states where he ended his career.
2:33 pm
derby finished sixth in the championship last season and missed out on promnotion to the premier league after defeat in the play—offs. from the championship but says the job was too good to turn down. having had a long career, i know the road i wanted to take was towards management. when i finished i quickly worked to get my fa coaching badges which i have now achieved. i am excited and i cannot wait to get to work. having had my career, i was always tending to win and working ha rd always tending to win and working hard and that remains part of me. you cannot they could be that desire even when you finish playing. everton will announce that marco silva will be the new manager. the 48—year—old portuguese has been a top priority for the club after sam alla rdyce was top priority for the club after sam allardyce was sacked after six months in charge. he has signed a three—year deal. riyad mahrez is expected to join manchester city from leicester by the end of the week. city walked away from a deal for mahrez in january because of the asking price —
2:34 pm
he's going to cost them he‘s a gézysafzgld ethan's their stamford bridge stadium and say that they have not set a time frame as to when they may revisit the plans. they say it's down to an unfavourable investment climate. kyle edmund remains the only british player left in the singles at the french open after booking his place in the third round. he came past the hungarian marton fucsovics in four sets he won fucsovics in four sets. he won the first set 6—0, but dropped the second 6—1,
2:35 pm
before winning the next two to progress. cameron norrie though is out, resuming his match which was stopped at bad light yetserday, he attempted to pull level to force a fifth set but lost it on the tie break. pushing hoem favourite lucas pouille close in his foirst appearance in the main draw at roland garros. britain's heather watson has been knocked out in the second round of the french open, ending british interests in the women's singles. she lost in straight sets to belgium's elise mertens. it continues a bad run for watson who lost eight straight matches in the lead—up to rolan garros. england have not yet named their team to face pakistan in the second test tomorrow as they continue to assess ben stokes's injury. the all—rounder has been in the nets this morning ahead of a scan on his calf injury this afternoon. surrey bowler sam curran has been put on standby, but it would be a blow to lose stokes with england already one down in the two test series. that's all the sport for now. thank you for that, we will speak to you later. so how significant is the eu for britain's creative industries? our reality check
2:36 pm
correspondent chris morris had a look at what it could mean for broadcasters. it has often been said that brexit will have an impact in every part of the british economy but what does it mean for us right here? when the prime minister gave her big speech on brexit and future economic relations with the eu at the mansion house in march, she highlighted two sectors of the economy that have never been part of a free trade agreement before — financial services, and broadcasting. on broadcasting we recognise that we cannot have exactly the same arrangements with the eu as we do now. currently, because of the country of origin principle, a company based in uk can be licensed by ofcom and broadcast into any eu member state and vice versa. the relevant directive will not apply to the uk as we leave the eu and relying solely on precedents will hurt consumers and businesses on both sides. so let's break that down a bit. under current rules, if your channel is licenced in the uk, you can then broadcast throughout
2:37 pm
the eu, and vice versa. and a majority of multinational broadcasters have their european operations based in the uk. the uk regulator ofcom says it has issued just over 400 licences the uk regulator ofcom says it has issued just over 400 licences for broadcast into the rest of the eu, but industry sources say in reality the number of channels involved is higher even than that. but none of it will be possible once the uk has left the single market. so unless the government can negotiate a special deal, hundreds of channels will have to find another eu country in which to get a licence. among them, all the well—known names... disney, the bbc‘s own international channel bbc world news and turner. plenty of countries have already been touting for business leaving the uk, among them — ireland, germany and the benelux countries, belgium, the netherlands and luxembourg. in some cases, companies may have to move part of their workforce to the eu — in others they will be able to rely on what are known as 'secondary technical criteria' to be licenced in a country from where their satellite signal is uploaded. but the concern in london is that if channel licencing has to change, the uk economy will take a hit. it could mean a loss of revenue for ofcom which currently charges
2:38 pm
for ofcom which currently charges channels a percentage of their pan—european revenue. and if some companies decide to move part of their production or editorial teams to other countries, that would have an even bigger impact on the economy as a whole. a report commissioned by the commercial broadcasters association estimates that the international broadcast sector was worth just over £1 billion to the uk economy in 2017, if you take into account all sorts of things like content commissioning, post—production, transmission and marketing. so there's a lot at stake. the uk — and london in particular — is likely to remain a creative broadcasting hub come what may. but it's no surprise that the government wants to resolve the licencing issue if it can, nor that other eu countries may well be asking — why should we allow you to be a special case once you've left? the muslim council of britain
2:39 pm
has repeated its demand for the conservatives to hold an independent inquiry into alleged islamophobia within the party. the group, an umbrella organisation for 500 mosques and schools, says there are "more than weekly incidents" involving tory candidates and representatives. our political correspondent jonathan blake is in westminster what has sparked off this argument? the muslim council of britain has called on the conservative party chairman to do more to combat islamophobia. bob blackman, the mp has been singled out for a post he made on social media and meeting a hindu nationalist figure in parliament. he has responded saying they did not host any such meeting and that the social media posts were made by mistake and he will work with all communities in his constituency and condemns islamophobia. the letter continues to list half a dozen or so other
2:40 pm
cases and comments made largely online by conservative party members or candidates, where the muslim council of britain has said that more action should have been taken. it describes those as the tip of the iceberg, believing clearly that there is a wider problem within the party. if this problem, as the muslim council of britain please it to become an issue of islamophobia within the tory party, does not seem to be as widespread or serious as the accusations facing the labour party and its handling of anti—semitism within the party, but it does raise a lot of the same issues in terms of the image the party has and its ability to clamp down on this racist behaviour and appeal to people from ethnic minorities, which we know within many cases it struggles to do. but this call for action is going to the top of the party and earlier today the former party chairman anne 's farce called on theresa may to tackle this problem head—on. ——
2:41 pm
baroness warsi. well, what i would like, first and foremost, is a very clear statement of acknowledgement of the issue and the fact that the party will tackle it. and i want that to come from the top, either from the prime minister or the chairman of the party, because i think, sadly, up until now, there have been certain parts of the party that have been in denial about this issue. the muslim council of britain as well as calling on the party to undertake a review wants compulsory training for people in the party to help tackle islamophobia as well, and a statement of intent from the party leadership. in response to this, the conservative party have said ina this, the conservative party have said in a statement that they take all such incidents seriously, that is why they have suspended all those who behaved inappropriately and launched immediate investigations. downing street also is clear and keen to demonstrate that we are taking action and have pointed to the prime minister setting up a racial disparity audit and also the appointment of sajid javid as the
2:42 pm
first ethnic minority home secretary. thank you for that. consumer groups have given a qualified welcome to new proposals from the financial conduct authority designed to curb high interest charges. the regulator is proposing a series of measures including a cap on the amount charged by so—called rent—to—own companies. but the fca said it needed to do more work before deciding whether to impose a cap on bank overdraft charges which many campaigners had called for. the chief executive of the fca andrew bailey has been discussing the changes with our correspondent emma simpson who began by asking him why he is taking action on rent to own. well, let me give you one of the examples. a washing machine that costs £400 if you purchase it with cash can cost up to £1200 if you purchase that differently. that seems to us to be a very hard to
2:43 pm
justify increase which affect some of the most vulnerable people in society with low incomes, who are vulnerable. so you have to tackle the question, why is it that the cost of essential goods is so much higher when these forms of credit are involved? so, what are you proposing to do? how big a crackdown are you looking at for rent alone? well, if you look at the proposals we have brought forward, there are two parts to this. the first is the terms and conditions of sale is. on rent to own, we have said that we think that bundling up extended warranties and charging for them at the same time as a seal, customers properly find that hard to understand what they are paying for and that is something that needs to be tackled immediately. but we have also put the idea on the table which we will have to do more work on because we are under legal
2:44 pm
obligations to make these ideas stand up and we will do that as soon as possible, of introducing caps on prices, that is one we in terms of tackling the issue. we will have more run this in the business news shortly. moving on now... the reality television star, kim kardashian west, has met donald trump in the white house to discuss reform of the us criminaljustice system. she used the visit to raise the case of a 63—year—old great grandmother who has spent more than two decades in prison for a first—time drug offence. this report from simonjones contains some flash photography. donald trump declared it "a great meeting". one reality star visiting another, who went on to become president. cameras caught kim kardashian west arriving at the white house to raise the case of a 63—year—old great—grandmother who is serving life in prison. alice—mariejohnson was jailed for her involvement in a drugs conspiracy that saw her pass messages between dealers. kim kardashian west is paying for a new legal team for miss johnson. speaking before the meeting, she explained why.
2:45 pm
to go and spend my money buying material things just doesn't satisfy me the way that it used to and i am just in a different place in my life, so i thought, well, if i could put the money into a shopping spree, which sounds ridiculous, to save someone's life, and do that once a year, then that would make my heart fuller. many on social media have criticised her unlikely role as a prison reform advocate, saying there are thousands of cases that deserve closer examination. her husband, the rapper kanye west, has also been under fire recently for treating his support for the president. we have been friends for a long time. after the meeting, she tweeted... ultimately it will be the president who decides if she should be pardoned. simon jones, bbc news. in a moment the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live...
2:46 pm
britain's financial watchdog proposes a new crackdown on high interest lending. a supporter of so—called islamic state has admitted encouraging a terrorist attack, targeting prince george. president trump says talks with north korea in new york have been very positive and he is expecting the delegation from pyongyang to travel to washington on friday to deliver a letter to him from leader kim jong—un. here's your business headlines on afternoon live... overdrafts, doorstep loans and hire purchase or "rent to own" agreements.. are all covered by those plans that simonjust mentioned from the financial conduct authority. it wants to cut how much people have to pay for credit. it says expensive credit is used by three million people in the uk — and young single parents are more
2:47 pm
likely to have a high cost loan. uk house prices rose more slowly than expected in may according to figures from nationwide. they were up 2.4% in the year to may, that's slower than the 2.6% increase for the year to april. prices were down 0.2% from april, the third time this year that they've fallen on a monthly basis. shares in firstgroup have fallen by as much as 14% today after the transport operator reported a £327 million loss for 2018. the firm has been dragged down by a £277 million charge linked to its us greyhound bus service. firstgroup also sacked boss tim o'toole after what its chairman called a disappointing year. breaking news, the exemption that was due to expire on friday will not be extended. remember back in march
2:48 pm
the us introduced a 25% tariffs on steel and also on aluminium and the idea was to encourage us manufacturers to use steel and aluminium made in america. canada and mexico were given a temporary extension and that expires on friday and wilbur ross a commerce secretary, i said that will not be extended. that is despite eu leaders saying if you want us to open up the european market the american goods, you will have to extend the exemption. clearly, that has fallen, perhaps not on deaf ears, but unwilling years. this is a big deal. absolutely, it will put up the cost of importing those metals for manufacturers in america. the best case scenario as far as the administration is concerned is that manufacturers in the us will park is at home, steel and aluminium made in america, and protect jobs at home, steel and aluminium made in america, and protectjobs at home and wages at home. if they have to import these metals, the higher
2:49 pm
prices will be passed onto consumers and people might find the cost of what the purchase going up. it depends on how it pans out. our correspondent at the new york stock exchangejoins us correspondent at the new york stock exchange joins us now. correspondent at the new york stock exchangejoins us now. kim, what more details do we have won this breaking news? so, ben, i am sorry to be talking about trade once more but let us put these figures into context. what has been happening is that there have been grumbling is a monster donald trump supporters that he had gone soft on trade. he made a big misses but was slowly walking them back when it came to china. but when it comes to tariffs on imported steel and aluminium, these are big, the us imported something like $40 billion worth, that's £36 billion worth of steel and aluminium last year and if you take outjust worth of steel and aluminium last year and if you take out just the amount it imported from the eu, canada and mexico, that is something like 50% of the total imports. so the import these tariffs from eu,
2:50 pm
canada and mexico, it sends a message that the donald trump administration is hard on its protectionist trade policy. the question is where to go from here because the reason that these tariffs were imposed was under the guise of national security. the donald trump administration has said that because the steel and aluminium ministries were suffering in the us asa ministries were suffering in the us as a result of cheap imported steel, we needed to do something to help those domestic industries, otherwise the national security could be at sta ke. the national security could be at stake. this is an argument that has not gone over well within the european union, which likes to consider itself as one of america's strongest allies. the question is whether these were actually be imposed and what the eu response will be in imposing tariffs in retaliation. thank you for that update, tim. on that reading use of those exemptions from import tariffs on steel and aluminium for the eu which expire on friday, they will not be extended and that has just
2:51 pm
broken to others in the last few minutes. and just looking now at excuses that were given for not employing women at higher levels within companies. some ridiculous excuses. it is like someone has produced a report from the 1950s! this is a review on gender balance at the top uk companies. it has been commissioned by the government and it has set a target. it wants by twe nty20 at it has set a target. it wants by twenty20 at least one third of board members on the uk's 350 biggest companies to be women. things are improving. as recently as 2011 there we re improving. as recently as 2011 there were 152 of the uk's top firms had on all uk board and that was down last year to just ten. so things are improving but some of the excuses
2:52 pm
really are quite staggering. they do not fit in, they do not want the hassle and women struggle with complex issues. that is what some of these reports suggest were being used as excuses. moving on! the london ftse 100 is on course to end may as the best performing major european index this month. commodities—related stocks have helped boost it today. metal prices have risen thanks to positive manufacturing data out of china — that pushes up demand for metals and pushes up their price. as a result shares in mining companies like glencore, anglo american and rio tinto rose. yes, the impact of that breaking news will perhaps become apparent within one hour. lots to happen. join us then. thank you for that, ben. a secluded bay in thailand, made famous by the film the beach,
2:53 pm
has been closed by the authorities to protect it from environmental damage. the thousands of tourists who flock to maya bay are now a threat to the coral and sea life around it. newsbeat‘s steve holden reports. in the film, leonardo dicaprio's character, richard stumbles across paradise. in reality, it's now become an extremely busy paradise. thousands of tourists descend here on maya bay on koh phi phi every day and getting that photo to make it look like you're the only one here, well that's tricky. camera shutter clicks we came here, we didn't think it would be this busy. but it's still really good, isn't it? yeah. have you managed to take a photo, where you're the only ones in it? no! so, that's what we're trying to do now, near the long—tail boats, it's so difficult. you can see it's so busy. most tourists only stay for a couple of hours before leaving on one of the many boats that dock here. but environmentalists say that is damaging what's under the water. a decision was made earlier this
2:54 pm
year to shut maya bay from the beginning ofjune. when it opens four months later, the plan is to cap visitor numbers to around half what they are now and ban speedboats from docking in the bay. i think we just thought we are entering some serene empty white beaches by ourselves. you look around, it's not so empty but it's still beautiful. thailand is receiving more tourists, year on year. and some say that means it's not just maya bay that needs protecting. when danny boyle made the beach, he probably didn't think maya bay would become the draw that it is today. tourism brings huge amounts of money into thailand, but authorities have to make sure that doesn't come at a cost
2:55 pm
to the environment, in the long term, otherwise the very beauty that people come here for could be ruined, forever. steve holden bbc news, koh phi phi. now lots of brits are in action in the french open today — cameron norrie, kyle edmund and heather watson. but what aboutjonathan pinfield? he's a reporterfor an online radio station — and stole all the headlines at roland garros after this interview with german tennis player alexander zverev. you've enjoyed some good success on the atp tour with some big title wins, haven't quite translated it into a grand slam yet, but do you feel like roland garros could be a turning point for you in terms of having a run in this tournament, and if so, what will the difference be? where are you from, buddy? do you want to guess? yorkshire, in england. 0k, nice. if they ever make a tournament there, i'm definitely coming just because of that accent! love it. i didn't understand a word you're
2:56 pm
saying, but it's not important! you clearly enjoy your tennis, you say you don't... not as much as your accent, buddy, i love that. i'll come to every one of your press conferences now. good, nice, i'll love that. if you get to the final we'll make sure i can ask a question then. 0k. because i get edged out. i'll definitely make sure if i get to the final you're asking multiple questions. welcome to yorkshire have treated that alexander zverev is welcome to visit yorkshire any time! time for a look at the weather. here's phil avery. we have developments this afternoon. the met office has issued an amber warning for summer thunderstorms that could affect parts of england and south wales during the course of the day. they were brewing from
2:57 pm
earlier. our weather watchers in the south—east got an early sight of those. i take off my cap and immediate direction of scotland because you are a long way away from the cv of low pressure that is powering these storms towards the north—west. that ribbon of cloud was the first signs of what was to come. through this evening and overnight we will see that threat of storms present. across midlands, wales and the south of england it is present. for the north, no great problems. but there will be poor visibility around and bear that in mind. i am sure knew this travel warning for heavy rain. this is more for the north of britain because it will come as something of a shock. the sort of conditions described in the south could become more prevalent for northern ireland and scotland, which would be an interruption to your unbroken days of sunshine in many western part of scotland and northern ireland, look at the
2:58 pm
situation as we get on the friday. that is why we have concerns about what you might be confronting in the latter pa rt what you might be confronting in the latter part of the day across scotla nd latter part of the day across scotland and northern ireland. for that you have to thank this rather innocuous looking area of low pressure just throwing that little lobe of low pressure up towards the north—west of scotland and in the northern ireland. the weekend looks like we could see a focus of the showers across the north. better conditions further south, feeling warm and there is the prospect of a little bit of mist and fog around about the course is for example. on saturday we do have showers for scotla nd saturday we do have showers for scotland and further towards the south but there is decent weather. if you have a plan for the weekend across england and wales, the weather is very much on your side. and here we are as far ahead as sunday, fewer showers the report, perhaps one or two over scotland. similar prospect for northern ireland. further south once more, watch out for the strength of the
2:59 pm
sun and it will feel warm along the east coast. hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 3: a new crackdown on high—interest lending — but consumer groups say the proposals aren't tough enough. we owe it to the more vulnerable members of society, to frankly ensure that they get credit on better terms because they need it, to buy essential goods and spread the cost. an islamic state supporter who called forjihadis to attack prince george admits a string of terrorism offences. president trump says talks with north korea in new york have been very positive and he's expecting to receive a letter from kim jong—un tomorrow. coming up on afternoon live — all the sport. sport withjohn sport with john watson. sport withjohn watson. zinedine zid—out?
3:00 pm
sport withjohn watson. zinedine zid-out? yes, zinedine zidane quits as manager of real madrid. after doing it five days after winning the champions league. i will have more on that. thank you, john. and phil has the weather... yes, these thunderstorms likely to run on through the rest of the day. i will have more on that coming up. also coming up — the number two seed at the french open wins his match,
3:01 pm
but is defeated by a yorkshire accent. you clearly love your tennis... not as much as your accent, buddy, i love that. laughter hello, everyone — this is afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. britain's financial watchdog has announced a crackdown on companies which offer loans with high interest rates. the financial conduct authority wants a cap on the amount that can be charged by rent—to—own firms — where interest levels mean customers often end up paying many times what goods would cost on the high street. but the fca said it needs to do more work before deciding whether to cap bank overdraft charges, as emma simpson reports. doncaster — a town where there are no shortage of stories about the high cost of credit. got one with a finance company, got me into a mess, and i've never looked at them since. so i've got a washer, i got a dryer... and this single mum uses her purchase as so—called rent—to—own to buy her big ticket items. it's basically been about 40 quid a week that i spend, which is a lot, and i do think the fees and that that they do charge are really, you know, expensive. she's one of 400,000 customers using rent—to—own, where the costs can be easily three times as much as the off—the—shelf price. the financial regulator is now
3:02 pm
proposing a cap on these fees. and it's looking at a ban on the sale of extended warranties, saving consumers millions of pounds a year. at the moment they are not getting a good deal, and we owe it to them — we owe it to the more vulnerable members of society, to frankly ensure that they get credit on better terms, because they need it, to buy essential goods and spread the cost. and it's frankly not there at the moment. it's notjust rent—to—own companies like this one which can charge sky—high fees. unauthorised overdrafts from banks can also cost consumers dear. unplanned overdraft are a big moneyspinnerfor the banks. they made nearly £700 million from them in 2016. the regulator wants banks to use mobile phone alerts to warm customers about their overdrafts, and to help them better manage their accounts. but that's not enough for some...
3:03 pm
we're really disappointed to see that the regulator hasn't taken action today to put a cap on unplanned overdraft fees. it's already taken action in other high cost areas, like payday loans, and now unplanned overdraft are more expensive than payday loans in some scenarios, yet banks are still getting away with charging customers rip—off fees for unplanned overd rafts. but the regulator says a cap on overdraft charges is still on the table. its message — more fundamental changes could eventually be on the way to protect vulnerable consumers. emma simpson, bbc news, doncaster. earlier i spoke to stella creasy, the labour mp, who's been anything is better than nothing. today the financial conduct authority have said they are going to put a cap on rent to own, so people buying things from companies like brighthouse,
3:04 pm
capping what you can be charged, but this is a bit like one of those children's games whack a mole, because as soon as you deal with one issue, another one pops up, and that is why people like myself have been saying we should just have a cap across that these. the crazy situation now if you have more protection with a payday loan than if you try to borrow on your credit card, so we really think the financial conduct authority should go a lot further than they have done today. and you will know better than me, but some of the figures involved in terms of the repayments are staggering? it's absolutely eye—watering. and it is not by accident. look, these companies make their money by pushing people into debt then lending them more money to keep them in that debt. it is very noticeable to me, and the citizens advice bureau, they did a piece of work on rent—to—own deals, and found a lot had borrowed to be able to pay off that debt, which is why it is not much
3:05 pm
about the individual products, credit cards, rent to own deals or doorstep lending, it is the fact that this industry as a whole is trying to evade these regulations, so in my local community in walthamstow i see an organisation trying to push these credit on people. —— an organisation trying to push these credit cards on people. and they are owned by provident, doorstep lender, that is why tackling the industry as a whole rather than individual products is the best way forward. do we include banks, because overdraft charges are also being looked at? 12 million people were caught by these overdraft charges. nobody is saying that when you are loaned money there shouldn't be a rate of return. the question is what is a fair rate of return and what is a rate of return that doesn't then create an incentive for these companies to keep pushing into debt and lending money. people will know they are often offered extensions on their credit cards when borrowing more and more. that's not by accident. all the measures looked at today by the fda are mainly about changing consumers, telling them when they are getting into debt. well, if you don't have enough money to pay off your debts, being told you are getting into debt doesn't really help you.
3:06 pm
we have to change the incentives for these companies, including banks, to keep lending to people and pushing them until they are in debt. people are known as zombie debtors, paying off their interest but not the capital on their loans and there are millions of these in our communities. but where do you draw the line between the problem here and personal responsibility? many of us have credit cards, and, you know, we pay them off when we can, but we are talking about a relatively small group of people who are perhaps already vulnerable, but who need help at an early stage and don't ask for it? well, i'm really glad you've asked me that, because actually in this industry we see lots of problems, even when people are doing the right thing. let me give you a good example. amigo loans, a relatively new product that has turned up in the last couple of years where somebody
3:07 pm
else acts as a guarantor for your loan. i had a man in my constituency who got into debt with an amigo loan, he sought advice, but the company still continued to chase the guarantor because they worked out they could get more that way. this industry still making a packet is what needs to change. thank you. these tariffs, breaking news. the french have described them as unjustified and dangerous, and the french government said it is deeply disappointed by the american decision on steel and aluminium ta riffs decision on steel and aluminium tariffs and says it will continue to work closely with the eu and us administration to achieve a permanent exemption. this follows the announcement from the us commerce secretary, wilbur ross, who is in europe, and said that a temporary exemption is being lifted the night at midnight. we will have much more on this in the business news, coming up.
3:08 pm
an islamic state supporter has admitted encouraging a terror attack targeting prince george. husnain rashid changed his plea half way through his trial at woolwich crown court. the court heard rashid used a messaging group to call for an attack on prince george. our correspondent, caroline davies, told me what rashid had pled guilty to. originally husnain rashid pleaded not guilty. this is about preparation of acts of terrorism, giving people the tools to carry these things out and encouraging them to do so. he did this on channel called telegram, a messaging app not entirely dissimilar to whatsapp, but you can run your own channel where people can subscribe and see the messages, and on that channel he was providing people with information, and in one of them he posted a picture of prince george not long after he started school with superimposed images ofjihadi fighters next to him, and he posted the address of the school and a postcode, and he also then left a note saying "school starts early," with a suggestion that he was encouraging people to attack prince george. when he was arrested, his phone was crucial evidence for the police?
3:09 pm
yes, he ran away from the police and threw the phone over the side of the wall. it was described as having a treasure trove of evidence. he also then apparently fainted when the police came to arrest him. in terms of his importance, he himself poses less of a threat, but he did influence other people? that is exactly the point here. he is providing information to people who then might want to carry out attacks, and in fact there is some suggestion he did influence a man who pleaded guilty last year of planning to carry out a knife attack, so these sorts of messages out there, although they might not directly be planning an attack himself, he might be giving other people the tools to do so. so what happens now? he is waiting to be sentenced. he has pleaded guilty to four of these charges. he will be sentenced of the 28th ofjune. the judge has said it is likely
3:10 pm
to be a lengthy sentence. caroline davies talking to me a short time ago. you'll remember if you have been watching, we took you toa you have been watching, we took you to a news conference in ukraine, and the story of a journalist and his appearance, arkady babchenko, which made international news because he had been reported that the day before. let's see what is happening on ukrainian television right now because he is giving another press conference justifying that collusion with state authorities which led the world to believe he had been shot dead, but the finger pointed firmly at the kremlin. ukraine staging the murder, in what it said was a sting operation to thwart a russian assassination plot. he is talking about his decision. not even his wife knew he was faking his own murder, she is facing some fairly tough questions and we will listen tough questions and we will listen to that to you, and if any news comes from out of that we will bring that to you. here, nhs trusts in england have reported a combined financial deficit of nearly £1 billion —
3:11 pm
almost double the amount patient demand, especially at a&e departments. ministers have promised a new long—term financial plan for the nhs, which is expected within weeks, as our health editor hugh pym reports. the figures covering hospital, ambulance, mental health and other trusts in england show the finances getting worse. the regulator nhs improvement said a surge in patient demand had affected performance in key areas including waiting times. more than 2,600 patients were waiting longer than 12 months for non—urgent treatment in march, a 75% increase over the year. the regulator said hundreds of thousands more patients than the previous year had been to a&e but the nhs didn't buckle under pressure. today's report says that nhs trusts in england had planned for a total deficit of 496 million for the financial year which ended in march.
3:12 pm
but the actual figure was 960 million, higher than the £791 million the previous year. some analysts argue the underlying position was even worse. there's a lot of windowdressing in today's figures which are bad enough on the face of them. but they are flattered by the very large amounts of one—off emergency funding which will not be available in future years, one—off savings, and also one—off sales of land and property that the nhs has managed to find last year, but obviously you can't sell a spare hospital building every year. nhs leaders argued there were significant challenges for the service creating intense pressure on hospitals and other trusts and their staff. we've got rapidly rising demand, so 3.5% more people coming to a&e every year, we've got really big workforce shortages — 93,000 vacancies — and we are in the middle of a very long and deep funding squeeze. so there's a real issue about the pressure that the nhs is under. if you think about those pressures it's actually quite a good result, but we now have to do something to put the nhs on a long—term sustainable footing. the prime minister says she's planning a new long—term strategy
3:13 pm
for nhs funding in england, and that is expected within weeks. hugh pym, bbc news. some breaking news coming in from everton. we are hearing they have appointed the former watford and hull city boss, marco silva, as their new manager, and that is on a three—year deal. the 40—year—old replacing sam alla rdyce three—year deal. the 40—year—old replacing sam allardyce who was sacked at the end of the season after only six months in charge. you may remember silva was sacked by watford in january, may remember silva was sacked by watford injanuary, with watford blaming the decision on everton's approach for the portuguese back in november. whatever‘s happened in between, everton confirming now their decision to appoint marco silva as the new manager. there will be plenty more in sport in the next 15 minutes. now, president trump says his secretary of state's meeting with top north korean officials in new york has gone "very well".
3:14 pm
general kim yong—chol is the most senior north korean official to visit the united states in decades. he's met mike pompeo in new york to pave the way for a summit between donald trump and the north korean leader kim jong—un. mr trump had cancelled the summit, but both sides have since made fresh efforts to restart talks our correspondent in new york is barbara plett—usher. barbara, the president is waiting for a letter from barbara, the president is waiting for a letterfrom kim barbara, the president is waiting for a letter from kim jong—un tomorrow which presumably will push things on? one would have thought so, yes. president trump is saying he is expecting a liver to be delighted —— letter to be delivered to him tomorrow, friday. yesterday it was said it was expected a letter would be delivered in response to the one mrtrump would be delivered in response to the one mr trump said that week which, remember, was a bit of an ascii shock, when he cancelled the summit because of angry statements from north korea of which now he has backtracked on and they are trying to get it back in place so kim
3:15 pm
jong—un has sent a letter. the interesting question is who will deliver it. the way mr trump was speaking it sounded like he was talking about the north korean allegation, and the state department has not ruled that out, but they did say they would be a bit surprised if kim yong—chol himself delivered the letter. of course he is supposed to be on letter. of course he is supposed to beona letter. of course he is supposed to be on a travel blacklist because he is sanctioned by the united states, a former spy chief. that would be quite unusual, but mr pompeo did meet kim jong—un when he went to north korea, so we will see what happens. when this very powerful north korean official does go to the white house, or whether he gives the letter to mike pompeo to deliver. again mrtrump spoke letter to mike pompeo to deliver. again mr trump spoke about what would happen on june 12, again mr trump spoke about what would happen onjune12, so clearly he wanted to add the political will is there to make it happen if they can get the agenda sorted out. he could always de—add him on twitter, i suppose. let's hearfrom could always de—add him on twitter, i suppose. let's hear from the president because this is what he
3:16 pm
had to say a short time ago. ijust want to tell you we're doing very well with north korea. our secretary of state has had very good meetings and he is meeting again today. i believe they will be coming down to washington on friday, and a letter is going to be delivered to me from kim jong—un, so i look forward to seeing what is in the letter, but it is very important to them so they will be probably coming down to washington, dc on friday, for the the delivery of the letter. and i look forward to that.|j and i look forward to that. i don't know if you are a betting woman, but do you think it is going to bejune the 12th? it certainly looks that way. it is what the white house keeps talking about. they haven't committed to it. yesterday at the state department briefing he said, look, that decision can still be
3:17 pm
made, the president can decide whether or not to fly, but it is clear that is what mr trump would like. when the white house gives briefings, they talk about shooting forjune12, and when he makes state m e nts forjune12, and when he makes statements he says they want that to happen, but we don't have a lot of information about the detail behind that which would make it happen. there are talks taking place in the demilitarised zone between the koreas, from top—level diplomats, and of course there are these talks in new york and the two are working together, i think, to try to narrow the gap on the biggest problem, which is the nuclear disarmament of north korea, the extent and pace of it, about which there are still significant differences. what we have been told by the state department is mr pompeo wa nts to by the state department is mr pompeo wants to clarify what the north koreans would be willing to put on the table, be willing to commit to, and you would like to know that before the summit. barbara, thank you very much, barbara plett—usher they are, in new york. there, in new york. a man has died after being
3:18 pm
stabbed in west london. the man, believed to be in his 40s, was found in kensington with multiple injuries last night; paramedics were called but he died at the scene. no arrests have been made. there's been a warning that free schools — one of the government's flagship education policies — are failing to live up to their original purpose. a study from the sutton trust, and the national foundation for educational research, says only a fifth of free schools have been set up by parents and they don't appear to be any more innovative than other types of schools. the department for education says free schools are helping to raise standards. you're watching afternoon live — coming up to 20 past three. these are our headlines: britain's financial watchdog proposes a new crackdown on high interest lending. a supporter of so—called islamic state has admitted encouraging a terrorist attack targeting prince george. president trump says talks with north korea in new york have been very positive and he is expecting the delegation from pyongyang to travel to washington on friday to deliver a letter to him from leader kim jong—un. in a moment...
3:19 pm
it's one of the fastest growing parts of our economy, so what will brexit mean for the uk's creative industries? and in sport: zinedine zidane quits as manager of european champions real madrid, days after leading the club to tehir13th european cup. he spent three seasons at the club, lifting the champions league three successive seasons in a row. frank lampard has been appointed as the new manager of derby county on a three—year deal. he was one of 20 applicants, conceeding the job won't be easy but was too good an opportunity to turn down. and kyle edmund is the only british player left in the singles of the french open. he reached it in four sets. cameron norrie and heather watson are both out. i will be back with more on those stories at around half past. torrential rain and severe thunderstorms have been predicted in wales and the south west later. the met office has issued an amber warning between four o'clock this afternoon and 06:00 on friday, meaning there is a potential risk to life.
3:20 pm
let's get more from phil avery. these are very difficult to predict exactly which idiots get hit? yes, and they certainly won't be a feature here. this is a picture of the waverley in the gairloch, and i put it in not only because it is a glorious sunny view, but also because i happened to steam past the waverley myself selling the western side of scotland last week. it wasn't quite as glorious as that, but they have had a great spell of weather. it isn't like that everywhere. if we just come out of the gairloch, and that is just to prove it was they are, we will go across the irish sea just a few miles and it is as dull as that on the coast of county down. newcastle. this all goes to support the fact that it this all goes to support the fact thatitis this all goes to support the fact that it is really quite tricky to be a forecaster in the modern era, despite the technology. i know you will be submitted to that. then we come a little further south when the coroner, pembrokeshire way, then to
3:21 pm
swa nsea, coroner, pembrokeshire way, then to swansea, glorious again, then this is the really interesting one, if i still have your... you have! i will ta ke still have your... you have! i will take you to the sunderland coast. it looks as dull as ditchwater they are, and that is the mist and fog rolling and off the north sea. you can see, and the sharp eye amongst you, you may have spotted one or two shadows in there, and the sun is actually out, yet just shadows in there, and the sun is actually out, yetjust offshore it is absolutely foggy. occasionally that rolls in which is what is giving these eastern parts of both england and scotland are really dull start to some of the days of late, but other parts are basked in glorious sunshine. if i could have shown you another picture taken almost at the sometime —— same time, and it is in blue. there is an amber warning out and i am looking at the map at the moment. the southern half of wales in the next few hours looking very rough? absolutely. it doesn't do to think they are all home and hosed, in the clear, not the case. that was my little mash to
3:22 pm
you, because i know you like to go round the regions, and we are big fa ns round the regions, and we are big fans of you even though we work in the weather centre. enough of the flattery, because we don't really get on... laughter simon introduced me by mentioning the thundercloud problem. it is this band of cloud from france that has cost concerns, and as he said within the next hour this amber warning sta rts the next hour this amber warning starts for southern england and the southern parts of wales. this is how things are shaping up. not all of this is a thunderstorm activity. we have put in some of the lightning for you, but you can see it is just beginning to kick off across parts of wales in the west country, the really heavy downpours there, so if you're on the move,s' four, m32, it could be really quite tricky. further north, you can see there are no great issues at all, just one or two showers over the highlands, and no problems with the temperatures —— m4 or m32. inland, many of you are around about the 20s. remember that amber warning is still in force
3:23 pm
working into the wee small hours of friday morning, and the showers we think by this stage, getting across wales in the south—west of england in what will be another close night, 14, 15, 16 degrees, something of that order. i am sure you this, what we call a travel warning, because i wa nt to we call a travel warning, because i want to highlight there will be a lot of surface water and spray around, but not in the same sort of the areas as lately. this is particularly aimed at you in scotla nd particularly aimed at you in scotland or indeed northern ireland, friday. it doesn't start that way but pretty soon into the day you see we get the feeling that thunderstorms will drift into the heart of scotland, maybe northern ireland, and they will still be there across wales in parts of the south west. having established that pattern, i think it will probably do us for the weekend as well, heavy showers in the north, sunny in the south, it will feel pretty warm and still that risk of mist and fog around some of the coastal stretches as well. so a quick reprieves of what we get the seat at the weekend. saturday, look at the showers, thunderstorms all
3:24 pm
over a good part of scotland, in the northern ireland as well, and dropping further south, if you have a plan for most parts of england and wales, you picked the right weekend because here i have changed the day but the game is still the same, whether —— with an awful lot of sunshine. not the same intensity as of late, but if anywhere it will be over the higher ground of scotland that helps to get that atmosphere a little bit more unstable and gives the sense that that could be the focus for thunderstorms at that stage. real issues in the short term, as i say, and within the next 24 hours, scotland, northern ireland, it could be your turn, too. thank you very much, phil. we will have more obviously throughout the afternoon as we get a clearer picture of the weather that is hitting. you're watching afternoon live. let's just bring you the latest from that remarkable news conference in kiev, because once again we have been hearing from the dissident russian journalist, arkady babchenko, who this time yesterday
3:25 pm
sent shock waves around the world when he appeared before the world's media, who had the previous 24 hours reported he had been killed in a russian assassination attempt. he has been speaking in the last few minutes and has been describing that covert operation alongside the ukrainian security services, to pretend to have been murdered, so they could expose what they are describing as a russian assassination team. well, he has told journalists in the last few moments he used peg's blood and a make—up artist was employed to fake his own death —— pig's blood. the pictures of him released lying in a pool of blood with gunshot wounds in his back we now note were fake. he also was taken away in an ambulance and that anglers knew about the operation —— we now know that they we re operation —— we now know that they were fake. he was taken to a mordt, where he then changed his clothes, and sat watching the news, which of
3:26 pm
course was dominated by the news of his murder. —— he was taken to a morgue where he then had changed is closed. facing some awkward questions because many journalists feel he has been totally wrong to work alongside the ukrainian authorities in faking his own murder. we are keeping an eye on that news conference and any more lines that come from that news conference, we will let you know. you are watching afternoon live. we are with lizo mzimba in liverpool looking at what the lydia ko british cultural and will be affected by leaving the eu. yes, my colleague david sillitoe has been looking at
3:27 pm
some of the potential positives and negatives for the creative arts in the post—brexit britain. what you're looking at is the work of a british company called jellyfish, which isjust a part of the uk's fast—growing visual effects industry. this is rogue one, star wars, we've done a lot of work on star wars within the last two or three years. this is really high—end hollywood stuff, though. yeah, and we are one of the — if not the leading centre for doing visual effects animation in the world. this has become very big business. there are more people making special effects in the uk these days than work in the coal industry. but what's really striking is how international the workforce is. as you can see everyone's busily working away here. this fellow‘s from spain, poland, ireland, belgium, sweden.
3:28 pm
well, if we're going to really show you what it's like here we've got to get everyone together. here they all are. now, if you take away the workers from other european union countries you begin to see just how much they rely on access to european talent. and, what's more, all the technology and software is stored remotely on cloud computing. the office just needs a good internet connection. the only reason they're here is because of the people. this office in particular has no computers — it's silent, it's very rare in our industry. that gives us the ability to pick this up and move it to where the talent is, and we will do that if we have to, and many of us are already doing that. but what of other parts of the so—called creative industries? this is the city of birmingham symphony orchestra. colette overdijk is from holland.
3:29 pm
her orchestral life began in the eu's youth orchestra, which was based in the uk and is now moving to italy. you feel part of one big european family and it feels very sad that this is now ripped apart. but for the man in charge, leaving the eu is all about practicalities. much of their income comes from touring europe. if we had to go and sort out visits to embassies, visas, work permits, all of that, just to go to germany, france or the netherlands actually those tours become non—viable, which is a problem because we rely on that income but we also rely on that reputational pull. the same is true, frankly, of the instruments. paperwork for every instrument crossing every frontier is not what they want. so there are many questions. but the big issue, though, is how can we continue to grow our creative exports and it is possible the new trade deals we are going to do with the rest of the world will assist that. but there is a caveat, and that is the creative industry is really about selling digital
3:30 pm
packages around the world. you don't need lots of rules, regulations and standards for that. and we don't want the new trade deals we do to say you should run yourselves differently. so there are hopes that brexit could help unlock new global trade deals, but there is clearly still much to resolve. david sillito, bbc news, birmingham. all afternoon we've been talking to people on both sides of the debate. iamjoined by people on both sides of the debate. i am joined by will vranken. it seems that people working in the creative industries, the most of them are remain the voters. has that had an affect on people's perceptions and on comedy?” had an affect on people's perceptions and on comedy? i think it's opened the debate. when brexit happen it confounded the expectations of the artistic
3:31 pm
community and the media as a whole, and all ofa community and the media as a whole, and all of a sudden there was an opposing viewpoint that all of a sudden needs to be heard and politicians have made themselves heard and now it's time for the artists to say we support it. making the creative case for brexit. ijust came from the cavern club in liverpool and i'm with strangers from all over the world is celebrating for working—class lads from the city who completely change the face of music and did it without eu funding because of necessity is the mother of invention and i think we need to get back to that and britain needs to look back to its own special cultural history. of course, the uk has a huge tradition of satire in all media forms. do you think that is being blunted or enhanced by what happened in the referendum? hopefully the referendum will sharpen it. i think a long time we have been fed platitudes about togetherness and fairness and that is all nice but it doesn't really
3:32 pm
offer up is all nice but it doesn't really offerup any art. is all nice but it doesn't really offer up any art. i always quote william blake, without contrary is, there is no progression. so brexit and in my case donald trump, they open up the debate that will hopefully lead to a new creative renaissance. nobody 's feelings are getting hurt with the remaining camp but we are not getting any art, so art requires a few loose cannons and unhinged personality and that is what it should do. we have been hearing from people working in the artistic community who say that brexit will harm the way they have operated over the last two or three decades and you must have some sympathy with their viewpoint? the word there is community. i personally believe art comes from an individual creative voice. the community, well, too many cooks spoil the soup, but it rings true in this case. when artists are in agreement, it's usually not art, it's a business. but there are firms
3:33 pm
who employ lots of people from outside the european union and they face a lot of uncertainty. if i was getting funding from the european union i might have a different opinion, but luckily i'm a freelance quy opinion, but luckily i'm a freelance guy so i can be honest about it. i think the money factor might change people's political outlook, possibly but there is a new revolution happening. thank you for talking to us. we are here all afternoon, but the time being, back to the studio. with me is the chief executive of the uk screen alliance, neil hatton. it might be worth explaining, you represent who? we represent postproduction houses, and the tv and film studios,, likejellyfish pictures in the previous peace. and you share the concern we heard in the piece about the difficulties people will face in future coming into this country to with you. people will face in future coming into this country to with youm people will face in future coming into this country to with you. it is more the impact on the workforce we are concerned about because we do a
3:34 pm
lot of work for american companies and the hollywood studios but our workforce is made up of 33% europeans and 13% from the rest of the world, so the worry is the loss of free movement of labour after brexit. we think we will be ok up to 2020 because of transitionary arrangements but it is ready what the visa policy looks like after that and we've not had any indication from the government of what that could be. it is the not knowing that is causing damage at this stage? i don't think it's causing damage but it certainly causing damage but it certainly causing apprehension. when you are apprehensive about something you do have back—up plans. is there a worry that what this means is an industry like yours which could go to a cloud anywhere in europe and then pick up quickly, that people might go and do that? there is a possibility. it's more likely the larger companies who have established operations in places like canada who start bidding for projects out of cities like montreal in vancouver, they are well
3:35 pm
established as a competitor. gordon brown's government were keen to encourage filming and there were still tax incentives which put london hi. the tax incentives are competitive and brought in a lot of work and visual effects probably accou nts work and visual effects probably accounts for 12 or 13% of work coming in through the tax credit. that's a substantial amount of money. effectively visual effects they had value to the economy and we estimate that at about 600 million and that is not bad. 600 million? that's not bad for an industry that only employs six and a half thousand people. a lot of punch for your money. briefly, what do you want to hearin money. briefly, what do you want to hear in the next few weeks that might allay those fears? the free movement of labour, the issue is in the hands of the government and it's not part of bilateral negotiations with europe. the future visa policy
3:36 pm
is in the governments own hands so we need to make the right decision about how expensive a visa will be and if we will have sufficient quotas and how flexible and how quickly we can get people in because we need an agile workforce to flex up we need an agile workforce to flex up and down quickly, and at the moment you can actually phoned up somebody in paris and say we need you in london tomorrow and you can get them here and they can work. will we be able to do that after brexit? i doubt it. neil, very good to talk to you. in the past half—hour the us have said they will start levying ta riffs half—hour the us have said they will start levying tariffs on imports of steel and aluminium from the eu, canada and mexico. it follows weeks of talks that have failed to produce a compromise. (pres) for more on the decision let's cross to paul blake in our new york bureau. this is coming from the us commerce secretary while he is in europe, of course. yes, he has been in europe hoping to win some sort of exemption
3:37 pm
for the european union but the announcement the silk —— this morning says that is not coming. meetings were taking place yesterday in paris and it comes just before the secretary moves to china to continue trade negotiations with chinese officials. is thisjust bloody—minded nurse or is this something long—term? bloody—minded nurse or is this something long-term? you have seen the us administration is picking trade disputes around the world and the key bit here is that the european union is a traditional ally of the us along with canada and mexico who are going to see tariffs imposed on them tomorrow, friday, so the key here is that these are core us allies on the receiving end of these tariffs that are coming in this weekend. paul, thank you. our business correspondent, jonty bloom is here. the eu is particularly unhappy about
3:38 pm
this. yes, they were trying to talk to the us government to maintain the exemptions and those talks have not succeeded. the us has said they are not getting what they want so they are not imposing the tariffs and the eu say they do not negotiate when they hold a gun to the head, and thatis they hold a gun to the head, and that is the problem. there is only one winner, because they impose the tariff as of midnight tonight, something will have to give and that won't be the us. but the eu will retaliate may have said that. is starting a trade war? it does seem like that and it will be limited to start with and the eu will impose ta riffs start with and the eu will impose tariffs that impose about the same economic damage on the us as the us ta riffs economic damage on the us as the us tariffs on the eu and it will target it, so it will basically go for politically sensitive things like us motorbike manufacturers because they know certain politicians they fiaamugnrmsfi. 1314255 is! 1.4.5. fiaaemuegrgiuse u'lele lie! is! 133
3:39 pm
el l msg‘eei‘f‘fie ’lr' ""’ ' ’ gm 7 7 does sagging“; “‘mmf ' f put us in this impasse, sell like se of like §--- --- not the major to the us, but that's not the major influence. the major influences that the us market is virtually cut off so all of the steel made in the uk and the eu or canada is sloshing around in the world market trying to find somewhere to go, so that forces down prices. that's good for lots of
3:40 pm
industries but bad for the uk and european steel industry because they won't get what they thought we would get for the steel they produce. very quickly, there is brexit overhanging everything and this at the moment is a row with the eu. yes and we are still in the eu, so there's very little we can do about this independently. we have sided with brussels and been protesting in america and the foreign secretary has been there and numerous officials trying to persuade them not to impose sanctions on the eu and maybe after brexit we could cut our own deal, but until then the eu basically does our trade negotiations for us and we are with them. thank you very much. the reality television star, kim kardashian west, has met donald trump in the white house to discuss reform of the us criminaljustice system. she used the visit to raise the case of a 63—year—old great grandmother who has spent more than two decades in prison for a first—time drug offence. this report from simonjones contains some flash photography.
3:41 pm
donald trump declared it "a great meeting". one reality star visiting another, who went on to become president. cameras caught kim kardashian west arriving at the white house to raise the case of a 63—year—old great—grandmother who is serving life in prison. alice—mariejohnson was jailed for her involvement in a drugs conspiracy that saw her pass messages between dealers. kim kardashian west is paying for a new legal team for miss johnson. speaking before the meeting, she explained why. to go and spend my money buying material things just doesn't satisfy me the way that it used to and i am just in a different place in my life, so i thought, well, if i could put the money into a shopping spree, which sounds ridiculous, to save someone's life, and do that once a year, then that would make my heart fuller. many on social media have criticised her unlikely role as a prison reform advocate, saying there are thousands of cases that deserve closer examination. her husband, the rapper kanye west, has also been under fire recently for treating his support for the president. we have been friends
3:42 pm
for a long time. after the meeting, she tweeted... ultimately it will be the president who decides if she should be pardoned. simon jones, bbc news. chelsea's russian billionaire owner roman abramovich has put the club's stadium plans on hold after delays to the renewal of his uk visa. the estimated cost for a new 60,000 seat stamford bridge has increased to £1 billion after delays. it's understood mr abramovich, whose uk investor visa expired some weeks ago, is unwilling to invest in a major project in a country where he is not allowed work. i'm joined in the studio by our correspondent, andy moore. is this just is thisjust a is this just a fit of pique? essentially, yes. we had this very
3:43 pm
brief statement on the record from chelsea saying plans for the stadium we re chelsea saying plans for the stadium were on hold and they said that the clu b were on hold and they said that the club does not have a time frame set for reconsideration of the decision and said the decision was due to the current unfavourable investment climate. what is unfavourable? chelsea have made more money in the last few years and put billions aside for the stadium and money has never been cheaper to borrow, so can we see through that?” never been cheaper to borrow, so can we see through that? i think current unfavourable investment climate is that the owner hasn't got a beaver —— a visa. it's as simple as that. bbc sources understand it was a personal decision from roman abramovich and he has not got this visa and he cannot work in the uk at the moment. we understand he has israeli citizenship so he can come here but he cannot work, so yes, this is collateral damage of the frosty relationship between russia and the uk. this was a big project, and the uk. this was a big project, a slight understatement. a huge project, £1 billion and the club was
3:44 pm
due to go to wembley for about four yea rs, due to go to wembley for about four years, 2019/20 was due to be their last season at stamford bridge and this was a stadium of 62,000 to replace their current 40,000 stadium, soa replace their current 40,000 stadium, so a huge project and i suppose the question is, if roman abramovich gets his visa, will you be back on again? and if he doesn't, will he want to continue his association with chelsea? it must be crossing their mind. we understand his investment in the club, the day—to—day running, will continue. we did not see him at the cup final and we haven't seen him in the uk for some time but we understand the clu b for some time but we understand the club is unaffected by this and that is the reassurance for the supporters of chelsea, but it does have a lump —— long—term impact if they don't move to a new stadium. consumer groups have given
3:45 pm
a qualified welcome to new proposals from the financial conduct authority designed to curb high interest charges. the regulator is proposing a series of measures including a cap on the amount charged by so—called rent—to—own companies. but the fca said it needed to do more work before deciding michael sheen has funded an initiative aiming at providing alternatives to high cost lending and says there needs to be greater awareness of how to access more affordable credit. these companies are out there but we have to do better at signposting and directing people towards them and make sure that they have the level and fairer playing field to be able to compete against these other countries, and thatis against these other countries, and that is really important. i welcome the fact that the fca is looking at bringing a cabin on rent to own in 2019, looking at april 2019 so we have to work to make sure the alternatives are there so the cap can do its work, and as people are moved away from those more exploitative high—cost credit
3:46 pm
companies there is something there to be able to provide the service to them because obviously the demand is there and the supply has to be met. in a moment the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. the united states is going ahead with tariffs on steel and aluminium imports from the european union, canada and mexico. britain's financial watchdog proposes a new crackdown on high interest lending. a supporter of so—called islamic state has admitted encouraging a terrorist attack targeting prince george. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. as you've been hearing, the us is going ahead with those 25% tariffs on steel and 10% on aluminium imports from the eu, canada and mexico which will begin at midnight tonight. the decision, revealed by commerce secretary wilbur ross, will affect several key us allies in europe. the uk said it was "deeply disappointed" by the move, while europe's trade commissioner
3:47 pm
cecilia malmstrom called it a "bad day for world trade". ove rd rafts, doorstep loans, and hire purchase or "rent to own" agreements are all covered by those plans just mentioned from the financial conduct authority. it wants to cut how much people have to pay for credit. it says expensive credit is used by three million people in the uk and young single parents are more likely to have a high cost loan. shares in firstgroup have fallen by as much as 14% today after the transport operator reported a £327m loss for 2018. the firm has been dragged down by a £277 million charge linked to its us greyhound bus service. firstgroup also sacked boss tim o'toole after what its chairman called a disappointing year. so — this is big news — this decision by the us to impose
3:48 pm
tariffs on metals imported from the eu? do we expect them to back down, because it does change the whole memento. expecting the us to back down, i don't know. asking them, thatis down, i don't know. asking them, that is what eu leaders were pushing for and that is why wilbur ross was in paris for talks to see if the deal could be reached. this relates to worldwide tariffs that the us slapped on imports from all around the world back in march. it gave a temporary exemption to the eu, canada and mexico and that exemption is due to run until tomorrow, friday, and the eu had been saying, look, we want the exemption to continue beyond that. the us was saying we will have to see how the talks go, and the verdict from the commerce secretary, wilbur ross was that the negotiations were not good
3:49 pm
enough to justify extending the exemption, so from midnight tonight those tariffs which already apply to a lot of other countries will take effect, 25% on steel and 10% on alimony to imports into the us from canada, mexico and the eu. a lot of reaction. the uk has already said it is deeply disappointed and the european trade commissioner has called it a bad day for world trade. the french finance minister said it would be unjustified and dangerous and suggested that the eu would take all necessary measures to respond. what do they mean by that? the us wa nts a ccess what do they mean by that? the us wants access to the european markets so they can sell goods more easily, but that is all called into question. here in the uk, the cbi called the tariffs deeply concerning but urged all parties to be cautious
3:50 pm
given the potential cost to everyone ifa given the potential cost to everyone if a trade war escalates. a trade war between the us and the eu. this is really huge, isn't it? what effect on the markets? they have reacted. us stocks have fallen, shares of boeing and caterpillar are the biggest drag on the dowjones. interestingly, shares in us steel companies they have all gained between three and a half and 7% and one aluminium producer rose more than 3% so there are some winners in this, if you can put it like that in terms of the share price but also a lot of concern causing nervousness amongst investors. will be talking about that through the day and the week and next week, but let's move on because we got a clearer idea about car sales. the car industry's engine
3:51 pm
seems to be revving, doesn't it? well yes — on a quick glance — but there's a difference between revvong and actually sustaining a journey. on the face of it — good news for the car industry when the figures show that in april, the number of cars built in the uk in april rose 5.2% compared with the same month last year. this is from the industry body the society of motor manufacturers and traders. i'm going to slam the brakes on the optimism. could you get any more carp ponds in? i'm doing my best. let's look at the long—term picture. joining us now is emma butcher from the society of motor manufacturers and traders. emma, is it fair to say this is an outlier month and the overall trend isa outlier month and the overall trend is a gloomy one in the uk? yes, it's the first month of growth we have seenin the first month of growth we have seen in the past five, so while it is great news that the industry and the hundreds of thousands ofjobs supported in this month it's not the
3:52 pm
trend we have seen recently and certainly in the year to date we are still around 3.9% down overall.” was reading that four fifths of cars are exported, the ones made in the uk, so that means all the talks of tensions in trade globally must be making car manufacturers a bit nervous. of course. this is an industry heavily dependent on exports, as you say, more than 80% are sent overseas and the majority of those go to europe, more than half go to the eu, and the rest to key markets all over the world so, yes, the importance of free flowing trade is big for us. emma, thanks very much. good to talk to you. a quick look at the markets and you
3:53 pm
can see the effect that the announcement has had. the ftse100 just about in the green but nowhere near what it was doing earlier this afternoon. the frankfurt dax and paris firmly in the red. let's flip the page and look at the us market, because you can really see the effect their —— the effect there. the nasdaq is a bit more immune because it is focused on technology but you are starting to see the effects by the announcement from the us. i think that reaction could be summarised as a bit of concern but those figures do not suggest panic at this stage. we seemed surprised by it, but we shouldn't have been maybe? trade -- traders are good at pricing in what may or may not happen and hedging against the unexpected, so that is why the markets are maybe a bit more sanguine than the rest of us. who knows? we will keep an eye and updater in the next hour. thanks, ben. if i mentioned roland garros,
3:54 pm
you would think about tennis. you would not think about medical penfield until now. this is why. you've enjoyed some good success on the atp tour with some big title wins, haven't quite translated it into a grand slam yet, but do you feel like roland garros could be a turning point for you in terms of having a run in this tournament, and if so, what will the difference be? where are you from, buddy? do you want to guess? yorkshire, in england. 0k, nice. if they ever make a tournament there, i'm definitely coming just because of that accent! love it. i didn't understand a word you're saying, but it's not important! you clearly enjoy your tennis, you say you don't... not as much as your accent, buddy, i love that. i'll come to every one of your press conferences now. good, nice, i'll love that. if you get to the final we'll make sure i can ask a question then. 0k.
3:55 pm
because i get edged out. i'll definitely make sure if i get to the final you're asking multiple questions. it is great. we've been out and about in yorkshire to see what people make of it. i think it's wonderful. there's nothing wrong with yorkshire accent, is there? do people ever say to you who don't understand what you're saying? eh, yeah. i've got friends that live in south yorkshire, and ifind that, you know, you get talking to them, me yorkshire accent gets a bit stronger, yeah. i think people, like, from other places, like, for instance, like, america or something like that, i think they'll come over because they like us accents more. alexander zverev: i'm definitely coming just because of that accent — love it. i didn't understand a word you were saying, but it's not important. well, that's weird because it was quite a normal accent, that. it wasn't really a broad yorkshire accent, was it? it is great. time for a look at the weather. here's phil avery.
3:56 pm
let's bring you right up to date with how we see things developing across the british isles. there are indeed developments and the met office, they have issued an amber warning for some thunderstorms, which will affect southern part of england and south wales during the course of today. they were brewing from earlier on. weather watchers down on the far south—east got an early sight of those. i doff my cap immediately in the direction of scotland, not a concern here, nor in northern ireland, because you are a long way away from the big area of low pressure powering the storms ever further to the north and west. that great ribbon of cloud was the first signs of what was to come. through the evening and overnight, we will see that threat of storms still there to be had across the south and west midlands, wales, down into the south—west of england and all the while further north, no great issues with the weather. along the eastern shores there will be some poor visibility around, comesjust bear that in mind.
3:57 pm
i am showing this travel warning for heavy rain. this is more for the northern parts of britain, because it will come as something of a shock, the sort of conditions we have described in the south may well become more prevalent for northern ireland and scotland, which will be a real interruption to your unbroken days of sunshine many western parts of scotland, northern ireland too. look at this situation as we get on through friday, that is why we have some concerns about what you might be confronting the latter part of the across scotland and northern ireland. for that, you have to thank this rather innocuous looking area of low pressure, just throwing that little logo of low pressure up towards the north—west of scotland and into northern ireland. the weekend looks like we will see a focus on the showers. better conditions further south, feeling pretty warm, and still that prospect of a little bit of mist and fog around the coast. saturday for example, the bulk of the showers fine, maybe one or two further towards the south, but there are a lot of decent weather. if you have a plan for this weekend across england and wales, i think the weather is very much on your side.
3:58 pm
here we are as far ahead as sunday, fewer showers to report perhaps across scotland, maybe one or two, similar sort of prospect into northern ireland, but further south again watch out for the strength of the sun and it will feel very pleasantly warm away from the east coast. hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 4pm — fears of a trade war — as the us goes ahead with tariffs on steel and aluminium imports from the eu, canada and mexico. it's totally u na cce pta ble it's totally unacceptable that a country is imposing unilateral measures when it comes to trade. a new crackdown on high—interest lending — but consumer groups say the proposals aren't tough enough. we owe it to the more vulnerable members of society to, frankly, ensure that they get credit on better terms, because they need it to buy essential goods and spread the cost. the journalist, who faked his own death, in order to evade
3:59 pm
what he says was a russian assassination plot, reveals pig's blood and and a make—up artist were used to help stage his murder. coming up on afternoon live — all the sport. loads going on. there is indeed but the top story today, surprise as zinedine zidane quits as real madrid manager, just five days after winning the champions league. philip avery has the weather, that particular photographer will be disappointed? indeed, sun; disappointed? indeed, sun lover was happy first % iii— m7;
4:00 pm
it lieeee; if; eel. sell; - l. .- . .- - --, ,
4:01 pm
l-
4:02 pm
4:03 pm
4:04 pm
4:05 pm
4:06 pm
4:07 pm
4:08 pm
4:09 pm
4:10 pm
4:11 pm
4:12 pm
4:13 pm
4:14 pm
4:15 pm
4:16 pm
4:17 pm
4:18 pm
4:19 pm
4:20 pm
4:21 pm
4:22 pm
4:23 pm
4:24 pm
4:25 pm
4:26 pm
4:27 pm
4:28 pm
4:29 pm
4:30 pm
4:31 pm
4:32 pm
4:33 pm
4:34 pm
4:35 pm
4:36 pm
4:37 pm
4:38 pm
4:39 pm
4:40 pm
4:41 pm
4:42 pm
4:43 pm
4:44 pm
4:45 pm
4:46 pm
4:47 pm
4:48 pm
4:49 pm
4:50 pm
4:51 pm
4:52 pm
4:53 pm
4:54 pm
4:55 pm
4:56 pm
4:57 pm
4:58 pm
4:59 pm
5:00 pm
5:01 pm
5:02 pm
5:03 pm
5:04 pm
5:05 pm
5:06 pm
5:07 pm

69 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on