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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 1, 2018 1:30pm-2:01pm BST

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fact ffistit if‘ai‘ii ii‘ul‘ei (hf— over the fact that the chinese government forces western companies to hand over their intellectual property if they want to do business in china. they are doing that firstly to prove that the existing world trade rules work. you don't need to rip up the rule book, you can use the rules that exist. secondly, they are sending a signal to president trump himself, because thatis to president trump himself, because that is any hue he cares about as well. adam fleming in brussels, many thanks. time for a look at the weather... here is phil avery. some atrocious conditions in some parts of the country? indeed, so i thought i would throw some calm into the mix. the storm clouds have bothered. there has been another humid start to the day. we are still in the same sort of circulation with a big area of low pressure dominating our and throwing the heat and moisture atlas
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across the british isles. my concern in the short—term is that we still haveissues in the short—term is that we still have issues with. localised flooding and disruption possible. if you are on the move, bbc local radio will be all over this sort of thing. it doesn't look like much on this scale, but each of those individual specs can be a real issue. notice how we have started to push this not only in the south, but in the central belt of scotland and northern ireland. there is a dotting through the north—west of england and wales as well. and further towards the south and east, there are individual cells which, if you run into one, will change your day from being rather lovely and warm and close into something a bit trickier, especially if you are on the move. so how do we see things through the rush—hour and the evening? they are still there, but by the small hours of saturday, they fade away on what will be another close night. that is how we start
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the weekend. don't be fooled by the dry start. if you are out and about across eastern parts of england and the north of england, the southern uplands of scotland, we are again into that mixture of torrential downpours, causing some issues. towards the south—west, both on saturday and sunday, there isn't any real issue. it is dry, fine and sunny. but across northern and eastern parts, the sharp eyed will notice the potential for the odd sharp shower and maybe the odd thunderstorm. do we change things any time soon? into the start of next week, we will see somewhat drier conditions. perhaps by this stage, it will start to feel fresher. i will see you soon. there are fears for the british
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steel industry, which employs some 30,000 people. we are equally worried, from the whole sector point of view, of a flood of steel that would normally have gone to the us, coming to our market, leading to find a new home in europe, dropping down prices and destabilising our sector. that's all from the bbc news at one , so it's goodbye from me — and on bbc one we nowjoin the bbc‘s news teams where you are. have a good afternoon. good afternoon. here is your latest sports news. england have made an
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encouraging start on the first day of the final test against pakistan as they look to arrest their recent slump inform. as they look to arrest their recent slump in form. they have to win to square the two match series after a nine wicket defeat in the first test. hat—trick geary is live at leeds. what has happened this morning, patrick? this is an england tea m morning, patrick? this is an england team that lost six of its last eight test matches, run stretching back at the start of the ashes. they have had a pretty miserable week, losing a first test on sunday, then losing their all—rounder ben stokes to injury this morning. they've lost the toss, but it got better from there, because they bowled well. stuart broad in particular, in his first over, he got rid of a batsman, caught at slip, and then another, again to stuart broad. broad's place in this team was questioned by the forming and captain michael vaughan, no less. pakistan recovered a little but hayles was caught at slip off the bowling of chris woakes, and that gave the advantage right back to england. he got rid of shafiq as
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well shortly before lunch to hammer home that advantage, so it is 68—4, definitely england's session after losing the toss, particularly, and a bit of good news just when a new did some. to england clearly on top. what can we expect this afternoon? they will want to hammer home that advantage and get rid of pakistan as cheaply as possible. pretty gloomy, so cheaply as possible. pretty gloomy, so that might help the bowlers. pakistan decided to bat earlier because this is a pretty good pitch, so because this is a pretty good pitch, so they will still be comfortable making it a decent score. i think the big point for this afternoon, the big point for this afternoon, the real test, is whether that confidence is returned, whether lessons have been learned when england come to bat. patrick, thank you. the former world heavyweight champion tyson fury has told bbc sport he believes he can beat every major name in the division, including current titleholders anthonyjoshua including current titleholders anthony joshua and including current titleholders anthonyjoshua and deontay wilder. fury returns to the wing that would ring next weekend more than two yea rs ring next weekend more than two years since his last fight. he
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admitted it has been a difficult time away from the sport. to be honest, it was very dark, very dark, very dark and lonely. grey days every day. i would wake up in the morning and, let's face it, i didn't have anything to be depressed about. i had fame, titles, a loving family, but i suppose anyone with depression who has been suffering with it can relate to where i am coming from. i have never experienced anything like this ever in my life and i would not wish it on my worst enemy. it is the most horrible thing, and if you haven't ever witnessed it, you might think i ama ever witnessed it, you might think i am a nutcase or whatever, but it is very hard, and i think now more than ever people are speaking openly about it. spurs boss mauricio pochettino says there is no clause in his new contract allowing him to succeed zinedine zidane at real madrid, despite emerging as a favourite for thejob. zidane despite emerging as a favourite for the job. zidane announces shock resignation yesterday just days after leaving rialto their third successive champions league triumph. he is their most successful manager
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in modern history, winning nine trophies injust two in modern history, winning nine trophies in just two and a half seasons. pochettino hasjust signed a five—year deal to continue as spurs boss. leeds united have sacked their manager paul hacking bottom after just four months in charge. the former barnsley boss only took over in february but managed just four wins ini6 in february but managed just four wins in 16 matches. it means leeds will start the new season with a new managerfor the will start the new season with a new manager for the fifth year in a row. manchester city women have signed scotla nd manchester city women have signed scotland captain caroline we're on a two—year contract. the midfielder joins city from liverpool, where she has spent the last two seasons. they finished runners—up to chelsea in a women's super league, and city's enrolment is already in force for next season. a previous arrival was pfa player of the year lauren hamp from bristol city. that is all the sport for now. find out more on all of those stories on oui’ out more on all of those stories on our website. from all of us, by finau. --
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our website. from all of us, by finau. —— by macro for now. thanks very much. let's get more now on our main story. the eu, canada and mexico have all warned they will retaliate in kind against new us tariffs on steel and aluminium imports. the eu's trade commissioner cecilia malmstrom has accused the us of not playing by the rules and further weakening tran—atlantic relations with these new tariffs. she's been speaking in the last half hour. let's hear what she had to say. this is very unfortunate. it is u nfortu nate this is very unfortunate. it is unfortunate because it will cause a lot of damage to our steel and aluminium industries. it is u nfortu nate aluminium industries. it is unfortunate because the motivation behind this, the section 232 that the americans are using, internal security, is not relevant. it is pure protectionism. european steel and aluminium exporters to the united states cannot be seen as a threat to their internal security.
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it is unfortunate, because this is further weakening the transatlantic relations, and it also increases the risk of severe turbulence in the markets globally. protectionism can never be a solution, and this will hurtjobs here in the european union, but also in the us. the european union wanted to avoid this situation. we have spent a lot of time, numerous talks, via different channels, to try and present rather a positive agenda, a positive transatlantic trade agenda. as friends, allies. and you have seen the conclusion from the sofia summit only a week ago with the heads of state, where they unanimously articulated the elements of such a positive trade agenda, and i have to remind you, that could include volu nta ry remind you, that could include voluntary regulatory cooperation on such areas where there is potential
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to cooperate. it could lead to cooperation and energy, particularly gas. it could include cooperation to reform and work to strengthen the wto, including to unblock the very u nfortu nate wto, including to unblock the very unfortunate situation of the blocking of the appellate body are betrayed her is. —— arbitrators. and it could include a discussion towards how to achieve a smaller agreement for tariffs on industrial goods on both sides that would be mutually beneficial and where we could discuss industrial goods and public procurement. so we had these numerous talks and we have also explained from the european union's side that we think the core reason for the concerns that the us have on steel and aluminium is not the european union. we are not the cause of this. we have also suffered from the overcapacity, from the dumping thatis the overcapacity, from the dumping that is mainly caused by china, and
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we have a positive agenda here as well. we have also explained to american counterparts what we have donein american counterparts what we have done in order to counter the dumping and the overcapacity from china. with our anti—dumping measures, with reforming our trade offends instruments, etc. the us were not ready to engage on these premises. they tried to push us to make concessions before we knew what would happen with this, to limit trade and our exports on a quota basis. this is not the way the european union negotiates. so here we are. we have tariffs. they were so we are. we have tariffs. they were so imposed this morning on canada and on mexico. we have been very clear about the consequences of doing this. the european union will today send a request for consultations and later a panel to
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the wto. other countries will as well. maybe not today, but in the coming days. we have started the preparation for the so—called rebalancing measures. we will do that in a proportional and measured way ina that in a proportional and measured way in a couple of weeks. the deadline for this is the 20th of june, as announced in the official journals. so we have started our preparation and we will of course consult with member states in the coming days. and our safeguard investigations, surveillance on the market of steel another many in europe to see whether there is steel and alimony and mentoring here —— steel and aluminium entering here thatis steel and aluminium entering here that is intended for the american market. we are determined to protect the multilateral system. the wto is not perfect. we have constructed this together with our american partners, and we are expecting everybody to play by the rules. had the same time, paradoxically, we'll so the same time, paradoxically, we'll so have —— we also have a parallel situation with the us and japan over
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issues of overcapacity on forced technology transfer, et. in the us, we met with the trade minister and the ministerfrom we met with the trade minister and the minister from japan to discuss how we can enforce the rules in the wto and also see if we can develop new rules, because of course, wta needs to change all the time, and we had a long meeting yesterday in paris. because we believe in the system and we are ready to reinforce the system, but also to bring those responsible who break the rules, and thatis responsible who break the rules, and that is why we also today decided to launch legal proceedings in the wto against china. this concerns the chinese legislation that undermines intellectual property rights of european companies. it has been a long concern for our companies and our business. when they come to china, they are forced to grant ownership and use rights of the technology to chinese companies. as you know, technological innovation, know—how is the bedrock of a
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knowledge—based economy. it keeps our economy competitive in a global markets and supports hundreds of thousands of jobs markets and supports hundreds of thousands ofjobs across the european union. so we cannot let any country european union. so we cannot let any cou ntry force european union. so we cannot let any country force our companies to submit giveaway this knowledge —— to simply give away this knowledge when you cross a border, and that is something that goes against the rules of the wto. so if players in the world do not stick to the rule book, the system might collapse, and thatis book, the system might collapse, and that is why we are challenging today both the us and china at the wto, and it demonstrates we are not choosing any sides. we stand for the multilateral system for rule—based global trade. so the eu's trade commissioner cecilia malmstrom speaking in the last few minutes. the high street cosmetics chain lush has become embroiled in a social media storm after launching a campaign which appears to accuse police officers are being paid to lie. critics have accused the company of being anti—police, and some customers have been tweeting that they will boycott the chain.
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lush says the campaign aims to highlight the abuse that people face when their lives have been in full throated by undercover police. our correspondent simonjones has been explaining the background to the story. it might seem a surprising thing for a cosmetics chain to get involved m, a cosmetics chain to get involved in, but around 100 stores are participating in the uk, and it is using the sock fronts of some of those stores to make its point. on some of those shop fronts you see a picture of a police officer, his face half in uniform, half not in uniform. it is supposed to be an undercover officer, and it is accompanied by the words "paid to lie" and "spy cops". the company says it wants to highlight the lack of progress into an investigation taking place into infiltration by undercover policing. this report is not due to be published another five yea rs, not due to be published another five years, and the company says that because it is not because it is taking so long, we are getting the stories of how some women widget
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into relationships with undercover police officers. but as you say, the campaign has got a lot of controversy. i will take you through some of the responses on social media. first a response from christine fulton. also, peter kirkham, a former police others. and quite an interesting one from the head of a —— v national crime in the agency. she has actually invited lush to visit them and hear more about this
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type of policing. you also mentioned customers. we spoke to some of them outside the shops here in london, and some are saying they are potentially going to consider boycotting lush, and on social media there is also a hashtag where people are putting lush products down the toilet to share what they think of the campaign. but they are saying it is not an anti—police campaign, but they do wa nt to anti—police campaign, but they do want to highlight the things that went wrong in this undercover policing operation in the past. simonjones reporting. we have a summary of the business news, but first the headlines. the european union has promised to defend its interests of the donald trump slapped new tariffs on imports of european steel and aluminium. the transport secretary may be forced to appear in front of mps after chaos caused by the railway
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timetables. spain's prime minister mariano rajoy loses a parliamentary vote of confidence. there will now be a new government. in the business news... is a trade war looming? the european union issues a io—page list of tariffs on us goods ranging from harley—davidson motorcycles to peanut butter. it also plans to challenge trump's 25% levy on steel and aluminium imports at the world trade organization. growth in the eurozone might be slowing a little — that's according to a key manufacturing survey. the ihs markit‘s pmi index for the 19 nations fell in may to a 15—month low of 55.5 from april's 56.2. a reading over 50 does still indicate growth — but it's been weakening since the start of the year, and the manufacturing pmi measure has now declined for five months in a row. more on this in a moment.
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and funerals costs are to come under scrutiny as two separate reviews being launched — the competition and markets authority is reviewing funeral costs, "to ensure that people are not getting a bad deal". meanwhile, the treasury is focusing on concerns over pre—paid funeral plans. activity in the uk manufacturing sector edged up last month, according to a closely—watched survey. but underlying weaknesses still persist. the markit/cips purchasing managers' index rose to 54.1; in may, up from april's 53.9, which was a i7—month low. however, the report said the headline figure "masked several areas of potential concern". joining us now is sarah hewin, chief economist for europe at standard chartered bank. good afternoon. what did you make of the manufacturing survey? well, at first glance, the markets
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we re well, at first glance, the markets were good. we were expecting to see another decline in may in manufacturing activity, and in fact, the survey showed that activity picked up. the lagoon behind the headlines, i think there are a couple of reasons for concern. first is that the activities seem to be building inventory, and second is that orders were particularly weak this time, so it suggests that u nless we this time, so it suggests that unless we see a recovery in demand over the next few months, manufacturing output may slow. we have been talking about trade and ta riffs we have been talking about trade and tariffs today. i'm sure you have as well in the course of the last few hours. what impact would some sort of trade war, however limited, have on britain's manufacturing sector, would you say? well, it would have an impact. our manufacturing sector is very good at exporting, and exports have done well because the
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pound has been weaker in the past 18 months or so. having said that, if we get tariffs imposed, which are being imposed, and an escalation of a trade war, that would be bad news for uk exporters and bad news for uk manufacturers. britain's pound against the euro fell markedly after the referendum almost two years ago. that should have been an opportunity for manufacturers to whom, would it not, so they could sell a lot more stuff for potentially 15—20% less in the eurozone? but it hasn't happened in that sense, has it? we did see quite a strong that sense, has it? we did see quite a strong recovery that sense, has it? we did see quite a strong recovery in manufacturing after the referendum, so i think to some extent there was support from the more competitive pound. what's missing is investment. investment has been very subdued, and much wea ker has been very subdued, and much weaker than you should have expected, even over the past year. the strength in export orders that we have seen. so looking at today's
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numbers, when we see relatively weak overall output and still weak investment, that is not a particularly good story. sarah hewin, the chief economist the europe that standard chartered bank, thank you very much. and we will show the markets. the ftse is up almost three quarters of a percent. the dax having a good day, but affected yesterday when it was confirmed that mr trump would proceed with his tariffs on steel. germany is europe's largest exporter of steel products to the us. dignity shares are down, as you can see, substantially. 18%, because of this investigation we were telling you about at the competition and market authority into the funeral sector. in the pound is at $1.33. ben. think you're much. see you later. the lack of blood, stem cell and organ donors within black and asian communities is leading to a "silent crisis"
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for those who need treatment, according to a group of mps. today, they‘ re recommending a new public health campaign to target these communities. the b positive choir are all affected by a lack of donors — and earlier this week they performed on britain's got talent. tim muffett went to meet them. # rise up # yeah # rise up...# in 2016, my kidneys failed. i spent 1a months on dialysis. about ten months in, we found my brother was a match. and so last year — june 30th — i had a kidney transplant. for davinia and the members of b positive, it's been a remarkable year. a semifinal place in britain's got talent. # reaching for the stars... a chance to spread a vital message. there isn't a lot of blood donors out there. i mean, they need, i think is it 6,000 daily? and they need 40,000 new black donors to come forward.
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# we'll rise up... all of the choir either have or know someone with sickle cell disease, an inherited blood disorder. i rely on blood every six weeks in order to live a normal, healthy life. for my blood group, i need a afro—caribbean donor, and it's very sort of like rare blood types which only afro—caribbean people hold. some people don't understand the need and the urgency, that how important blood is. a review into the lack of blood, organ and stem cell donors within black and asian communities will publish its findings today. for the members of b positive, it's long overdue. why do you think donation levels are so low within certain communities? it's historical that folks just don't consider giving. others are just tabboos. others are just taboos. and they say, oh, my religion doesn't allow it. it's just a misunderstanding.
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people misinterpret parts of their faith. today's review calls for a culture shift when it comes to donation. it says increased awareness, at a local and national level, is urgently required. there's a disconnection between nhs and the community, full stop. the importance of it is not resonating with the afro—caribbean community. one donation can save the life of up to three people. boom! # foryou #. time is1:55 p:m.. time for a look at the weather. thank you very much, then. i have a feeling if you put that choir in
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this arena setting behind me, we would all nod off. perhaps you will a nyway would all nod off. perhaps you will anyway if i talk to you for three and a half minutes! the story of recent days has been whether he'd has got through and pops off showers, if not thunderstorms. we are importing this heat and humidity from the near continent. the moisture comes in from biscay and the near atlantic up and across the british isles, and the secret there is across the british isles, because my concern through the afternoon as we may get thunderstorms where you have not seen them of late, which could well include scotland and northern ireland too. please be aware of that if you are on the move. it is friday afternoon, so many people are indeed on the move. and into areas where we have seen glorious sunshine and record temperatures for the year, across parts of scotland and northern ireland, look at this. middle part of the afternoon, we're just seeing those storms drifting ever further north, getting through northern ireland and through the central belt of scotland. other showers to be had there, not discounting the
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possibility across a good part of england and wales as well. you avoid those, really lovely early summer's afternoon, meteorologically speaking, the 1st ofjune being where we switch from spring to summer. though showers continue in the first part of the evening, tending to fade away for the most pa rt into tending to fade away for the most part into the early hours of saturday. another close old knight from any part of the british isles. then we're off and running into the weekend. not very long into saturday, we think we will see quite an area of disturbed weather getting initially into east anglia, then the east midlands, then up through lincolnshire and yorkshire, and then we popped off those showers and thunderstorms widely across central and western parts of scotland. northern ireland, wales and southern counties, you should be in for a dry day, five and 11. if you have a plan, a show on, you pick the right sort of day. and then fewer showers come sunday, but still with us the threat of a little mr merk around,
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—— mistand threat of a little mr merk around, —— mist and merk around, especially on these northern shores. the home counties reaching around a 25 degrees mark. towards the start of next week, probably fresher feel to proceedings through monday, tuesday and wednesday. still a lot of dry weather around by this stage, because high weather will be —— high pressure will be the dominant feature. they are in mind that possibility of a sharp shower. hello, you're watching afternoon live, i'm ben brown. today at 2. the eu has promised to defend its interests after donald trump imposed new tariffs on imports of european steel and aluminium. there are fears for the british steel industry, where 30,000 people work. we are we a re really we are really equally worried from the whole sector point of view of a flood of steel that would normally have gone to the us coming to our market, needing to find a new home
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in europe, dropping down prices and destabilising our sector. calls for the transport secretary to resign following more problems on the railways things are beyond a joke, lives are being ruined by this shambolic rail industry.
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