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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  June 1, 2018 2:00pm-5:00pm BST

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hello, you're watching afternoon live, i'm ben brown. today at 2. the eu has promised to defend its interests after donald trump imposed new tariffs on imports of european steel and aluminium. there are fears for the british steel industry, where 30,000 people work. we are we a re really we are really equally worried from the whole sector point of view of a flood of steel that would normally have gone to the us coming to our market, needing to find a new home in europe, dropping down prices and destabilising our sector. calls for the transport secretary to resign following more problems on the railways things are beyond a joke, lives are being ruined by this shambolic rail industry. the end of an era in spanish politics, a vote of no confidence forces prime minister mariano rahoy out of office. the pinball kids of the care system,
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a warning that thousands of children are at risk because they're moved around the system too often. coming up on afternoon live all the sport, damian johnson. including the cricket. england's bowlers have ripped into pakistan's top order, taking five, six wickets now, as they look to square the two match series. and let's look at the weather with phil. playing ball for the most part, serena slam is for some across the british isles but we still have this threat of some really punchy thunderstorms, we will have all the details injust a few minutes. thanks phil. also coming up, hanging up her collection tin at last,
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after 97 years of selling poppies, this former second world war nurse finally retires from fundraising for the royal british legion. hello everyone, this is afternoon live. the european union says it will bring in tariffs on imports from the united states in 20 days in retaliation against new us tariffs on steel and aluminium. the tariffs of up to 25% came into force this morning. in a speech within the last hour, the eu's trade commissioner, cecilia malmstrom warned that the tariffs will affect jobs in europe and the us. the french president emmanuel macron told mr trump in a phone call last night that the new duties are illegal. theo leggett reports. donald trump has made it clear time
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and time again, he thinks that imports of steel and aluminium have been harming the american industry. ravaged by aggressive foreign trade practices, it is really an assault on the country. his tariffs are meant to protect the workers at steel mills in pennsylvania, michigan and indiana but they could end up costing jobs outside the united states. the new tariffs could have a significant impact on the uk's steel industry, last year, british businesses exported about 350,000 tonnes of steel and steel products to the united states, it is a trade worth around £350 million a year and it accounts for about 7% of total production. people within the industry are worried that damage to the sector could go beyond the loss of some sales. we are worried about the direct impact of the market being closed off to us, in terms of
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exports to the united states, but from a whole sector point of view we are worried about a flood of steel that would have normally gone to the us coming to our market, finding a new home in europe, dropping down prices and destabilising our sector and pushing us right back into a steel crisis. 31,000 people work within the british steel industry and many more across the rest of europe, now the european union is banning its response. it is u nfortu nate banning its response. it is unfortunate because this is further weakening the transatlantic relations and also increases the risk of severe turbulence in the markets globally, protectionism can never be a solution, and this will hurtjobs here in the european union but also in the us. consumers may suffer too, us imports such as harley—davidson motorcycles may become more expensive, they are on a long list of all american imports which the eu has targeted for ta riffs of which the eu has targeted for tariffs of its own, so how likely is
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a full—blown trade war? tariffs of its own, so how likely is a full-blown trade war? hard to say, easier to describe this as a high—stakes poker game, everyone is waiting to see who will be first to give in to this. we think trump is bluffing, we are not yet sure. give in to this. we think trump is bluffing, we are not yet surem give in to this. we think trump is bluffing, we are not yet sure. if no one backs down, more tariffs may be one backs down, more tariffs may be on the way. that could help some workers in the so—called american rust belt, analysts say it will come ata high rust belt, analysts say it will come at a high price for consumers on both sides of the atlantic. let's talk to dr linda yueh, economist at oxford university and london business school & author of the great economists. thank you for being with us, we have heard from the eu saying they will bring in tariffs on american imports in 20 days' time, does it look like we are now entering a trade war
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between europe and america? looks like the first phase, difficult to know how much this will escalate. clearly, they do believe that what president trump is doing is not allowed, under world trade 0rganisation rules, he hasjustified this previously as a national security exemption, in other words, he needs to prevent steel from coming into the united states because it protects america's national security. we know the eu does not believe that, they are challenging that before the wto and under the eto rules, they can levy ta riffs of under the eto rules, they can levy tariffs of their own, they are targeting tariffs in the home district of congressmen, members of congress who can put pressure on president trump to step back from the brink because what could happen is more rounds of tariffs and taxes and that would lead us down the road towards a trade war. what is often said about trade wars is that there
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is never any winners, you cannot really win a trade war. unless you are donald trump, he says they are easy to win! you may be one of the few people who say that because yes, trade wars are economically damaging, think about the next page of escalation, if the europeans go down the chinese roots, because this is what the commerce secretary wilbur barossa has said, he wants the tariffs are lifted, then they need to do what the chinese have done, to get to the point where the chinese made concessions, the americans are restricting chinese investment, causing one of the biggest chinese companies, zte, to cease production almost, so that implies that these tariffs are being used to open up trade negotiations, and over the last couple of months, when there was a temporary lifting of these tariffs, the europeans have not come back, like the chinese have, to say they will reduce the trade surplus with the americans,
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and that is why we have the escalation today. what does all this mean for britain specifically, do you think, because first of all, in terms of the steel industry, but also, longer term, in terms of the steel industry, but also, longerterm, in a post—brexiteer, the united states is one of the countries that britain is going to be looking towards for a new trade agreement. going to be looking towards for a new trade agreementlj going to be looking towards for a new trade agreement. i think the steel industry will come under pressure, so steel industry will come under pressure, so i'm thinking of full colour but, the three major steel companies, remember there is also a tariff on aluminium, 10%, slightly less tha n tariff on aluminium, 10%, slightly less than on steel. some of those workers will be affected as well. —— port talbot. there will be localised pressure on the industry, on the whole, if we don't have an escalation of this, there will be an impact in terms of prices, that is why trade wars are no good for anybody, but that would suggest that
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the trade stance has got to a 21st—ce ntu ry the trade stance has got to a 21st—century version of gunboat diplomacy, in other words, 21st—century version of gunboat diplomacy, in otherwords, he 21st—century version of gunboat diplomacy, in other words, he did not really abide by the normal rules of trade and negotiation, he will hang tariffs over the heads of countries, in order to get what he wa nts countries, in order to get what he wants out of trade negotiations. for britain, after brexit, we will be negotiating with a president who very much likes to win on trade and one of the biggest pet peeves he has had throughout the campaign and now is he does not like america to have a trade deficit, sell less to countries than what it buys, and britain needs a trade surplus with america, that will mean that any deal we do with america will be difficult to negotiate because president trump will want terms that reduces the surplus. remember, there are no rules governing what he is
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demanding, if you are going up against the united states as one country, that is going to be tough. there is always the wto, which is what other countries, like the eu, canada and mexico are resorting to, but that is about resolving trade dispute, we would be entering a whole new trade agreement. i think they are going to be a tough negotiating partner for a trade deal. good to speak with you as ever. there's renewed pressure on the transport secretary, chris grayling, after another day of chaos for rail passengers in the north of england. customers have vented their anger at northern and govia thameslink railway following weeks of disruption blamed on the introduction of new timetables. the two operators were responsible for almost a thousand late or cancelled trains in just one day alone. mr grayling insists the government is driving the biggest modernisation of the network since victorian times. alison freeman reports. they stand, they watch, they wait.
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for almost three weeks now, passengers on the northern rail network have been facing severe disruption after a new timetable was introduced. here at manchester piccadilly station, frustration is growing. very inconvenient and inconsiderate. i don't think it's cost—effective, what they're doing. everybody‘s disgruntled with it. every day, it's the same thing, it's cancelled or delayed. after work, i have to get a taxi to get home. these things probably don't count for the national rail service, but for me, it's money lost out of my pocket. it's five miles into manchester and you'd rather catch the train, but it seems to me that people are going to stop using the trains and go back to the car. they keep saying there's no drivers. well, the drivers were there before they changed the times. i don't understand it. northern rail says this isn't a problem caused by a lack of staff or rolling stock.
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instead, it's blaming logistics, saying under the new timetable, it's struggling to get trains and their drivers in the right place at the right time. the information board paints a picture of the problem, trains delayed or cancelled. it's the same story every day for hundreds of services between the north‘s major cities. the passenger action group northern fail says 2,224 routes have been fully cancelled since 18th may and a further 1,377 routes have been part—cancelled. today, all trains have been cancelled on the lakes line in cumbria, a total of 3a services. it sometimes feels to me like northern commuters are invisible to them. they just don't care, and the time of northern commuters is not the same as commuters in london and the south. well, frankly, as mayor of greater manchester, i'm not going to accept that. things are just beyond a joke at the moment. people's lives are being ruined
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by this shambolic rail industry. the rail workers' union, the rmt, has accused the transport secretary chris grayling of going into hiding, leaving front—line staff to deal with the brunt of public anger. they've called for his resignation and the rail company to be sacked, with the network brought back into public ownership. but in the meantime, the disruption and frustration for passengers continues. 0ur correspondent alison freeman is live at manchester piccadilly station. what is the scene? we have been watching it gets busier and busier. problems tend to worsen as the days go on, we are seeing trains coming and going, trends and drivers end up in the wrong places, trying to work together. northern rail have
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cancelled a total of 212 trains, 81 have been part cancelled, that means there will not stop at every stop they are meant to or they will not finish the journey they are meant to take. we have been chatting to people, they have said it is not just the inconvenience of the delay, it is costs, they are being hit in the pocket because they are paying for trams or taxis to make up the bits of the route that they cannot complete. meryl greater manchester andy burnham is calling for northern rail to lose the franchise if they do not sort out the problem soon. so many problems and passengers getting pretty angry, is there any indication any of this might be resolved any time soon. emergency timetable introduced on monday, mixed response to that, andy
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burnham has said this is a threadbare second—class service, no solution, northern rail say there is a number of options to sort things out. as we mentioned, chris grayling, transport secretary, has been heavily criticised, accused of going into hiding by the rmt, today he released a statement. in that, he described how he has been in discussions with the rail network, with network rail and the rail companies, but the situation has been wholly unacceptable. thank you very much indeed. spain's prime minister mariano rajoy has been forced out of office after losing a vote of confidence in parliament. the opposition socialist party will now form a new government. gavin lee is in madrid. political first in melbourne spanish history, a successful motion of no—confidence against the prime
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minister, mariano rajoy is gone, the government is gone, in comes the new prime minister, 46—year—old pedro sanchez, socialist leader, brought about the downfall of mariano rajoy with this motion in the first place, and the noose tightened politically around the neck of the prime minister last week, it was the high courtjudgment, minister last week, it was the high court judgment, combination of minister last week, it was the high courtjudgment, combination of a long—running corruption scandal, which involved the jailing of more than one dozen ex—members of the governing party, going back to the 19905, governing party, going back to the 1990s, in which they took more than 1990s, in which they took more than 1 million euros in exchange for handing out government contracts, the party was implicit in widespread corruption, it was said by the judge, and mariano rajoy, his testimony was questionable, 180 mps voted against the prime minister, he is gone, the new prime minister, pedro sanchez, in a speech said that he would stabilise spain, they are calling it a frankenstein movement because there is other smaller parties, catalan nationalists,
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basque nationalists, yet to understand what they want in exchange for supporting the new prime minister. political movements that could turn into a monster, is how it was put by mariano rajoy. first day of a new government, unprecedented times for spying. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. the eu says it will bring in tariffs on imports from the united states within 20 days after donald trump imposed new tariffs on imports of european steel and aluminium. the transport secretary may be forced to appear in front of mps over the chaos caused by changes to the rail timetable. spain's prime minister, mariano rajoy, loses a parliamentary vote of confidence. the opposition socialist party will now form a new government. in a moment, a review of blood, stem cell and organ donation among black, asian and ethnic minority
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communities in england has found that demand is disproportionately high, while supply remains very low. in sport, pakistan wickets continued to tumble, england seized the initiative in the final test against pakistan at headingley. mauricio pochettino says there is no clause in these new spurs contract allowing him to succeed zinedine zidane at real madrid, despite emerging as favourite for the job. tyson real madrid, despite emerging as favourite for thejob. tyson fury believes he can beat all the major names in the heavyweight division to regain his world title head of the comeback fights next weekend. i will be back with more on those stories at half—past. join me then. now, there's a warning today that too many young people are being shifted around the care system. the children's commissioner for england, anne longfield, says that in one year, nearly 2,400 children in care changed their home, their school and their social worker. she described them as "pinball kids", being "pinged around the system."
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ministers insist they have taken steps to create a more stable environment for vulnerable children. 0ur education correspondent, elaine dunkley, reports. jack, not his real name, went into care three years ago after a troubled home life. but he struggled with the instability of constantly being moved around to different foster homes. at first i was a bit more, i don't want your help, i'm just here because you guys have put me here. so i was being a little baby, for instance. i wasn't really trying to let them help me, because i needed the help. and as i got older and started getting involved in the activities, i realised that they do care. julie has been a foster carer for 11 years and says constant disruption is a problem, particularly for older children. there is a massive shortage of foster carers, and anyone who wants to foster generally wants to foster someone who's going to behave or be less problematic. and that tends to come with smaller
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kids, that are more manageable. teenagers, by their title, are more problematic. the report by the children's commissioner for england found in the past three years, around 2500 children moved home five times or more. over 4000 children moved school in the middle of the year, with 400 missing a whole term as a result. some of these children have challenging emotional and behavioural needs — a shortage of foster carers and tight local authority budgets, all part of the problem. there are issues around cost, often with my advice line, i get calls from children who are being moved quickly without being consulted, and they and the people around them understand that that's about cost. now, i know local authorities are stretched in terms of finances, but the children's needs have to be paramount. children in care are amongst the most vulnerable in society. in a statement, the department
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for education says it's investing close to £4 million to help create a stable environment in foster homes, and is prioritising school admissions for those in care. elaine dunkley, bbc news what appears to be a trade war in the making between the european union and the united states after america slapped tariffs of up to 25% on steel and aluminium, imports from europe, from mexico and from canada, the eu has said it will respond within the next 20 days with retaliation. we havejust had another tweet on this from donald trump, really attacking canada in particular, not so much the eu but focusing his anger on canada, saying, canada has treated our agricultural business and farmers very poorly for a very long period of time, highly restrictive on
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trade, they must open their markets and take down their trade barriers. they report a really high surplus on trade donald trump has been accused of protectionism, saying that they, the canadians, are highly restrictive on trade. more on that, and all the developments under folding there, in what, as we say, looks like the first phase of a trade war between the united states and europe, canada and mexico. a review of blood, stem cell and organ donation among black, asian and ethnic minority communities in england has found that demand is disproportionately high and supply is extremely low. the study was commissioned by labour mps and it says
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there's a "silent crisis". in some communities the review found a lack of awareness of the importance of becoming a donor. with me is 0rin lewis the co—founder of african—caribbean leukaemia trust which promotes donation with a focus on the african, caribbean and mixed race communities. his step—son daniel died aged 21 in 2008 from complications due to multiple—organ failure. and also i'm joined by kidney research uk's neerja jain from birmingham. you have very sad personal experience of this problem, outlined the problem for us as you think it exists. not enough black, beijing, ethnic minority people realise the significance of their racial identity when it comes to matching someone identity when it comes to matching someone of their own kind who needs blood or an organ transplant or stem cell transplant, that lack of awareness also complicated by taboos
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and mistrust, has elevated this silent crisis, where we need nearly 30,000 more black blood donors, because of the huge sickle cell crisis happening for patients, and the local donation, not many blacks and agents carry organ donor cards, stem cell cards, blood cards. there isa stem cell cards, blood cards. there is a lack, there is inertia, the supply line is small, the demand is getting bigger and bigger and supply line is small, the demand is getting biggerand biggerand if supply line is small, the demand is getting bigger and bigger and if we are not careful, there is going to be far too many funeral people are going to because of this inertia. daniel was symbolic, 21, his journey, he needed a stencil transponder, waited six years, needed blood transfusions as part of his treatment but in the end he needed an organ transplant, because of the convocations of not having matched blood on a regular basis, which meant his organs packed up in the end and we lost in ten years ago. how do you see the problem and
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what do you think can be done to address it? it is a massive problem, sadly and shockingly, three people will die today and every day waiting foran will die today and every day waiting for an organ transplant, imagine the effect that has on them, their family, their friends. it effect that has on them, their family, theirfriends. it has effect that has on them, their family, their friends. it has been a long ongoing issue, and we urgently need to address this, by people simply being more aware about the life—saving need for organ donation, discussing it with their families, who can then enable them to carry out their final wishes so they can save up to nine lives. what we did the research uk have been doing for a numberof years the research uk have been doing for a number of years is working very closely with these affected communities, and developing the peer educator model, this is simply a model whereby we in gauge very closely with members of affected communities, we train them, and they
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ta ke communities, we train them, and they take out those valuable messages, to their community, so the solution is really within the community itself, and we having date with many thousands of people, we have many thousands of people, we have many thousands of people signed up onto the nhs organ donor register, the solution lies within the communities themselves, and we are very proud to be working closely but a lot more needs to be done. we know there is not enough donors anyway across the uk but this is a particular problem as you see it. as we have been seeing from mps in the black age and ethnic minority communities. there is hope, work is being done, in various different ways, and the charity alone, has found many stem cell donors, five this year, 17 last year, but there is so many more things that need to be done, collaborative work with ourselves, kidney research, national kidney federation, so many organisations along with the national health of
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this, blood and transplant, nhs england, department of health, collaborative, not top—down but collaborative, not top—down but collaborative, working together, getting resources out to these organisations at the coal face who are working in those communities, not the message, it is the messenger thatis not the message, it is the messenger that is important in making this happen, and we know that black and ageing communities and mixed—race communities, they hear the message, if they hear it and feel it, they will come in their droves, that is what we need. the question of education, getting this message out there to save lives? yes, absolutely, totally agree, and together, with all other organisations, this is what we need to do, this is not a top—down approach but it is empowering, and giving resources to those communities, at grassroots level, and organisation such as ourselves, national charities working closely with the target communities, so that awareness, absolutely getting out
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the awareness, that is fundamental. it is urgent, a question of lives every day. yes, absolutely. good to talk to the both of you, thank you very much. there are commemorations this sunday to remember those who lost their lives in the terror attack on london bridge, one year ago. eight people were killed, and dozens more injured, when three men drove a van into pedestrians on the bridge, before getting out of the vehicle and then stabbing people enjoying a summer night out in borough market. my colleague jane hill is there for us now, jane. hello, thank you, busy, noisy, bustling borough market, for people who do not know london, it is always extremely busy down here, both with local people and many tourists, here, tomorrow, and sunday, there
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will be period of reflection and commemoration to remember those who died and those who were injured, some of them very seriously indeed. i have been talking to one young woman who very nearly lost her life that night. she was walking across london bridge, crossing the bridge, a normal saturday night out to meet friends for a drink on a beautiful warm june friends for a drink on a beautiful warmjune evening. friends for a drink on a beautiful warm june evening. the van that was being driven by those three terrorists she saw careering towards her, it only narrowly avoided her, it ploughed into a couple who were walking right behind her. she is a colleague of hours, bbc producer, on a day off, trying to enjoy the london sunshine. this is her recollection of that saturday evening. i was just walking by myself and i was looking at my phone, and i was alerted to what sounded like an engine really over—revving. so i looked up and that was the first time i saw this van, a white van, and it was heading
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south and it kind of came onto the bridge and it completely went straight into a group of people. and i know that one of the people, well, one of the persons went into the river. and then it was like skittles going off. i've never felt fear like it. it was kind of like when you hear the phrase that your life flashes before your eyes, i can understand that now, what that means. i was frozen to the spot, and i remember seeing it coming directly towards me and there was a couple that were behind me, and something in the back of my mind just said "get out of the way". and i couldn't tell you how it happened. i remember looking directly in the eyes of the van driver, and i managed to get out of the way but unfortunately, the van then hit the couple that were behind me also. and i just remember, i got up and people were screaming. there were bodies all over the road. it was absolute chaos. has london changed at all for you?
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do you feel that it got back to normal quite swiftly? ifeel like london has definitely bounced back from this. and notjust london, but the whole of the uk, like with the manchester attacks. the response of the people who have been out there and the support has just been overwhelmingly astounding, really. and on the day of the first anniversary, what will you do? i will actually be with friends, surrounded by close friends. i'm in touch with some of the people that were injured that night. so no doubt i will be in touch with them throughout the day. we've actually been messaging. i'm meeting some of them this week, which will be incredible. 0n the night itself, i was comforting a french lady. all i knew was that her name was christine. i didn't know anything more about her. i waited with her until she went into the ambulance and that was
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the last i heard of her. a few weeks after the incident, i was approached on twitter by christine's sister, and she said, "she wants to be in touch with you, she wants to contact you." since then, we've messaged every day, pretty much, or at least a few times a week and we've got a really good friendship now. will you two be speaking on sunday? yes, we will. we've got plans to see each other, so yes, we will definitely be speaking. hollyjones with her reflection of that night nearly one year ago. as a result of the attacks both what holly was talking about on the bridge and here on the fringes of barat market, this market and its many, barat market, this market and its any barat market, this market and its many, many stalls was forced to shut for the best part of two weeks. let's talk to one of the traders who has worked in this area for a long time. thank you for talking to us, i can't believe you have run this
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stall for decades, as is a! what are your memories of that weekend? we had already closed and we were going home, we werejust had already closed and we were going home, we were just getting a few phone calls during the night and then we saw what was happening on television. given that you have spent your entire working life here, what went through your mind? mixed emotions. you know anger and sorrow that people lost their lives here. and the market was shut for the best pa rt and the market was shut for the best part of two weeks. what was that first day like when you all gathered here together and reopened ? first day like when you all gathered here together and reopened? such a lovely atmosphere, children from all over britain sent these rosettes and they were all around the cathedral, it was really touching.|j they were all around the cathedral, it was really touching. i notice you are all wearing badges now, the love borough market badge. yes, we wear it with pride. what will you be
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doing this weekend, when you're on. will just be doing this weekend, when you're on. willjust be at home. i know there is as it is in the cathedral, i don't know if we can get there on sunday morning because we've got family coming to stay with us. but we will be thinking about it. has it changed borough market and changed london? i think it has bring er bring it closer together. it hasn't changed for the worse, it has changed for the worse, it has changed for the better. positives have come from it. because people have come from it. because people have come from it. because people have come together? management, local businesses, the community all came together. jock stark, i will let you go back to running your stall! thank you. the service we mentioned is on sunday afternoon at southwark cathedral which is just on the edge of borough market and we will have full coverage of those
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commemorations from sunday lunchtime on the bbc news channel. full coverage of that service from southwark cathedral. jane, thank you. the headlines in a moment, let's have the weather first with phil avery. if you are heading to the cathedral for the service the conditions are likely to be on your side but at the moment there is a mishmash where some of us are enjoying glorious sunshine and it is there to be had but we still have the possibility of thunderstorms, and not just but we still have the possibility of thunderstorms, and notjust where we have had them that they've moved further west to northern ireland and up further west to northern ireland and up to scotland. another close and humid night. don't be fooled, it might start dry but the showers are
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getting very quickly into the eastern side of east anglia, up to yorkshire across the border to scotla nd yorkshire across the border to scotland into the islands. further south and west drier and finer prospects into sunday. fewer showers but still some in the mix, a lot of dry and fine weather further south, and high of 25. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. the eu says it will bring in tariffs on imports from the united states within 20 days in retaliation against new us tariffs on steel and aluminium. transport secretary chris grayling has come under attack after days of disruption on the railways, following changes to timetables. things are just beyond a joke at the moment, people's
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lives are being ruined by this shambolic rail industry. the spanish prime minister, mariano rajoy, has been forced out of office in a vote of no confidence, after his party became embroiled in a corruption scandal. the children's commissioner for england says too many children are being shunted around the care system, creating damaging instability in their lives. and in a moment.. after 97 years of selling poppies, this former second world war nurse finally retires from fundraising. sport now on afternoon live with damien. in the cricket it's the second test between england and pakistan. england were disappointing in the first test, they need to make some progress now. good news at last for england cricket fans, long overdue, they were hammered by nine wickets in the first test, as you alluded
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to. the day started with bad news with star all—rounder ben stokes out through injury. that meant eddie b for sam curran, 19—year—old. england are going really well, they have been tearing into the pakistan openers, you may remember that stuart broad and james anderson's places came under scrutiny, michael vaughan called on the selectors to drop them but they have answered their cricket very well, they are 108-7 their cricket very well, they are 108—7 and england are very much on top in the opening day. two wickets each for anderson and stuart broad. and the future of the tottenham manager? the runners and riders, arsene wenger has been mentioned on solaris antonio conte but spurs manager mauricio pochettino says there is no clause in his contract
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meaning that he might succeed zinedine zidane at real madrid. zinedine zidane at real madrid. zinedine zidane at real madrid. zinedine zidane announced his resignation in a surprise move a few days ago, he is real madrid's most successful manager in recent years. mauricio pochettino has just successful manager in recent years. mauricio pochettino hasjust signed a five—year deal to continue as spurs boss. leeds united have sacked manager paul heckingbottom after just months in charge, he only took overin just months in charge, he only took over in february but managed just four wins since then. it means leeds united. the season with a new managerfor the 50 united. the season with a new manager for the 50 running. manchester city women have signed scotla nd manchester city women have signed scotland captain caroline weir on a two—year contract. she joined scotland captain caroline weir on a two—year contract. shejoined city from liverpool where she spent the last two seasons after finishing runners—up to chelsea in the women's super league. recruitment is already in full wing for next season. she is the second signing in as many days
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following the arrival of the pf a young player of the year lauren hemp. chelsea ‘s decision to put stadium development stands on hold is no surprise. it has come just before and a bronze which is due to renew his uk visa. he's not willing to invest in a project in a country where he would be allowed to work. his visa ran out days ago and tensions are increasing between london and moscow. muggy so marginal economic decision that has always been on the brings of being approved not by the owner and the practicalities of this project also have been a major stumbling block, essentially a four you're building project needing chelsea to find an alternative home for such long period. the most practical solution, wembley, many people in the club have not been sure about the wisdom of getting fans to travel so far. long away from home. so far
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practicalities away from economics isa practicalities away from economics is a sensible decision not to pursue this project and no surprise to me that this is the decision they've ultimately taken. tyson fury has told the bbc he believes he can beat every major name in the division including they aren't a wild and anthonyjoshua. yuri including they aren't a wild and anthony joshua. yuri returns including they aren't a wild and anthonyjoshua. yuri returns to competition next week and more than two years since his last fight. he admits it has been a difficult time away from the sport. to be honest it was very dark, very dark and lonely, grey days every day. i would wake in the morning and on the face of it i had nothing to be depressed about, i had nothing to be depressed about, i had faith, titles, a loving family but i suppose anyone who has suffered with depression can relate to where i'm coming from, i've never experienced anything like this in life and i would not wish it on my worst enemy, it is the most horrible thing, if you haven't witnessed it you might think i'm a nutcase but
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it's very hard. now more than ever people speaking openly about it. from the test match pakistan 113—7, england's day so far. that's all the sport for now. thank you, damian, see you later. two police officers are being treated in hospital after being stabbed in greenock in western scotland. a man has been detained. 0ur scotland correspondent lorna gordon has more. police were called to a house in this quiet residential area of greenock just before this quiet residential area of greenockjust before nine o'clock this morning. 0ne male officer was stabbed in the neck, we understand. it is thought his injuries are very serious. a female officer was stabbed in the arm, both of the officers families are being informed and both are being treated at inverclyde hospital, less than one mile away from here. the man who was detained in relation to this is also being treated at the same hospital. people who live here say the area is
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very quiet with usually no trouble. another eyewitness said he saw two officers running past his house, he heard them shouting stop, a carjust a few hundred meters down the road has been damaged, it is understood that the man detained in relation to the incident may have been hit by at least one police vehicle in the course of what happened this morning. lorna gordon there. the north korean leader, kim jong—un, has said he wants denuclearisation of the korean peninsula to be carried out in a phased manner. it again highlights differences with the white house which has called for rapid and concrete disarmament. 0ur correspondent howell griffith reports now from the de—militarized zone between north and south korea. searching for any sign of progress. while the world waits to learn if kim jong—un will meet president trump on the southern side of the korean demilitarised zone, they're optimistic, north and south are still officially at war.
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many here feel the summit could help secure peace. translation: getting rid of nuclear weapons will only bring positive results, and i hope the summit will help improve things between the north and south. translation: the summit will happen. there won't be results straight away but it will bring opportunities to help our relationship. while much of the world seems fixated by the prospect of a singapore summit, over this border in north korea, as much as we can tell, there is very little discussion about donald trump. rather, the headlines there are all about russia and an invitation for kim jong—un to travel to moscow to meet president putin. the state newspaper is filled with details of the special relationship with russia, and yesterday's meeting between its foreign minister and kim jong—un. during their talks, the north korean leader spoke of denuclearisation happening stage by stage. it doesn't sound much like the complete, irreversible process the us demands.
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the north korean general who's been negotiating in new york will today hand—deliver a letter to the white house. it will be another diplomatic coup for a regime which was just a few months ago an international outcast. what that letter says could have an impact on people on both sides of this border. or it mayjust perpetuate the global guessing game. hywel griffiths, bbc news, on the north—south korean border. two lions, two tigers and a jaguar are reported to have been recaptured after escaping from a zoo in germany. police say the private eifel zoo, in the town of lunebach, was flooded overnight after a storm which allowed the animals to escape. a bear also escaped but it was shot. let's bring you the latest on the
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politics in italy. after a week of negotiations italy is about to get a government. giuseppe conte, a political novice, will be sworn in later today. to break the deadlock the populist parties have agreed to changed their choice of finance minister to someone less opposed to the euro and the eu in general. james reynolds in rome has been gauging the political temperature. the apprentices at the sargassi hair academy in rome know what their country's new prime minister must be feeling. starting a newjob, with no experience, can be nerve—racking. romana andriani comes here twice a week. she trusts both her hair and now her country to newcomers. i hope, i hope. i trust him. you trust the new prime minister? yes. because i...
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you don't know him, you don't know him. but he has been selected by people who have experience, so, yes, and he is good—looking. he's good—looking? yeah. he's good—looking. he seems a nice person. so what advice do these apprentices have for their fellow novice, prime minister giuseppe conte? translation: i hope they give more opportunities to young people to gain entry into the workplace. because it's not easy. we can get very discouraged. the trainee cooks at the italian chef academy, in rome, have some sympathy for their country's new leader. they told me that no—one really enjoys being thrown in at the deep end. translation: a bit of anxiety and uncertainty on the first day. i thought i wouldn't manage to overcome some obstacles, but if you have the commitment and the passion, you can easily overcome them.
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these trainees have time to learn their craft. their prime minister does not. james reynolds, bbc news, rome. ina in a moment the business news with joel line. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. the european union says it will bring in tariffs within 20 days after donald trump slapped new ta riffs after donald trump slapped new tariffs on to imports of european steel and aluminium. the transport secretary may be forced to appear in front of mps over the chaos caused by changes to the rail timetable. spain's prime minister, mariano rajoy, loses a parliamentary vote of confidence — the opposition socialist party will now form a new government. i'mjoel line with
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i'm joel line with the business headlines on afternoon live. growth in the eurozone might be slowing a little — that's according to a key manufacturing survey. the ihs markit‘s pmi index for the 19 nations fell in may to a 15—month low of 55.5 from april's 56.2. a reading over 50 does still indicate growth — but it's been weakening since the start of the year, and the manufacturing pmi measure has now declined for five months in a row. more on this injust a moment. the unemployment rate in the us has fallen to an 18 year low, more to come on that in a moment. and funerals costs are to come under scrutiny as two separate reviews being launched — the competition and markets authority is reviewing funeral costs, "to ensure that people are not getting a bad deal". meanwhile, the treasury is focusing on concerns over pre—paid funeral plans.
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you mentioned the american jobs figures and it looks like we are on the brink of a trade war between the usa and europe! we are in one! jobs is the reason that president trump says he is doing this, this is why he's slapping tariffs on steel and aluminium. this figure is good news for the trump administration? yes, really strong figures, almost a quarter of a millionjobs really strong figures, almost a quarter of a million jobs created really strong figures, almost a quarter of a millionjobs created in may, there's a certain and of estimation about it and and implement is down to 3.8%. average hourly earnings has also risen 0.3% so more people are getting jobs and they are learning a little more as well so it's very good news for the trump administration. it was a big pa rt trump administration. it was a big part of his campaign, to protect americanjobs part of his campaign, to protect american jobs and create part of his campaign, to protect americanjobs and create new part of his campaign, to protect american jobs and create new ones, and just before this announcement he was writing about it on twitter.
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it's friday so there must be a controversial tweet! just before these sensitive numbers were published and they do move markets, billions of pounds are moved in the minutes, hours and days before these payrolls are put in place. he tweeted that he was really looking forward to the jobs numbers. that's basically huge, not very subtle hint that the numbers are going to be really strong. because once he has the information, if they were rubbish numbers, he probably wouldn't have tweeted. he would have probably said they would be downbeat numbers. so he tweeted and then the numbers. so he tweeted and then the numbers came back pretty strongly. we can go to new york, paul blake our new york business reporter can join us. is it causing
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consternation, trump treating the numbers? they see it as the president breaking with decades of protocol, by tweeting about the numbers one hour before they came out a lot of papers see that is quite controversial. they are looking into whether the president potentially broke any rules in doing so. potentially broke any rules in doing so. the markets looked at it and sat hang on, could this be a preview of positive numbers and we did see them about an hour later. they definitely we re about an hour later. they definitely were positive numbers. my guess is that it were positive numbers. my guess is thatitis were positive numbers. my guess is that it is a precedent that the president was given sight of the numbersjust president was given sight of the numbers just before they were published, normally a president would say nothing but this one did, could he be in trouble with the securities and exchange commission for hinting strongly at market
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sensitive data? donald trump has never worried very much about breaking with tradition especially when it comes to his twitter account! whether he broke any rules remains to be seen. it's a federal rule that bars federal employees from commenting on them up to one hour after the numbers are released. this is after they are made publicly available, petrol employees are supposed to stay mum until one hour after they are released, the question is will this apply to the president of united states saw a lot of people will be wondering if this is. we wonder if any rules apply to this president. let's go back to the tariffs. the europeans have already filed an objection with the world trade organisation and they will publish a list of retaliatory measures on harley—davidson ‘s and orangejuice from
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measures on harley—davidson ‘s and orange juice from florida and measures on harley—davidson ‘s and orangejuice from florida and levi jeans. what effect is that having an the markets so far? potentially retaliatory measures on iconic american brands? the reaction yesterday was pretty swift from world leaders, justin trudeau of canada was also swift and terse and strong in his condemnation of the tariffs. the markets this morning we re tariffs. the markets this morning were mostly looking at job tariffs. the markets this morning were mostly looking atjob numbers but there's been a focus on trump and the canadian prime minister justin trudeau. trump has already come out swinging with it tweet saying that canada has treated the us farmers very poorly. it is significant because the us is still renegotiating the north american free trade agreement with canada and mexico, two of the countries targeted in this new announcement of the tariffs. the president has
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really been taking aim at the canadian prime minister both with that tweet and a statement out of the white house repeating trump's thread that he would prefer to pull out of the trade agreement with canada than get a bad deal. paul blake, thank you forjoining us. let's look at the markets. they are over my shoulder! at my age i've got to go like this! the ftse is still up to go like this! the ftse is still up by to go like this! the ftse is still up byjust over half of 1%, the dax had a bad day yesterday. i include dignity, the investigation into funeral dignity, the investigation into fu neral costs dignity, the investigation into funeral costs is causing it to have got a bad day. thank you, joe. we've been hearing from the white house that president trump spoke to the french president, emmanuel macron, about the trade issues. according to the white house, president trump
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underscored the need to rebalance trade with europe. they've had a good relationship until now but emmanuel macron has reacted quite furiously to those new american ta riffs furiously to those new american tariffs on steel and aluminium. more about that in the coming hour. now another look at the weather with phil. thank you again forjoining me. through the next few hours and the rest of the forthcoming weekend, it's a mishmash at the moment, glorious in some places, no complaints at all and the temperatures matching the sunshine. however in other places all that heat and humidity is sparking a lot of cloud development and pretty heavy showers and thunderstorms again. we're still in the same circulation, a big area of low pressure dominating, curtis luck area which is why when you pick up on the showers you tend to keep them for a while. and today we've seen the bulk of the showers across the north of the british isles, the ones
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who deserve tend to be more isolated. another close might in prospect, rather murky as has been the case in recent nights, never lower than about ten or 11 to 1516. how does this set up the weekend, downpours in the north and east, sunnier in the south and west and still that nuisance of coastal fog patches. not much activity first thing on saturday morning although not long into morning we will begin to see the arrival of thunderstorms coming into east anglia and then through linkage into yorkshire, then up through linkage into yorkshire, then up into the heart of scotland. generally speaking the further south and west you are the dryer your day will be. but as we have had to say in recent days, if you catch some of this heavy rain, they could be localised flooding, disruption could be possible, bbc local radio is a lwa ys be possible, bbc local radio is always a good source of information in these setups. 0n into sunday, not
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much difference except you get the sense that there are fewer showers to report. there are still some, you'd have to be prepared in the north and east to run into something. again temperatures away from the east coast are responding nicely to the sunshine, a high of 25. to start next week it's a different story because high pressure is dominating but the flow is coming at as of the north sea. that means a lot of moisture and clout to start the day and some of you are probably going to keep that cloud the greater part of the day, i thought perhaps the area around ayrshire could be favoured with a high of around 21. hello, you're watching afternoon live, i'm ben brown. today at 3. the eu says it will bring in tariffs on imports from the united states within 20 days after donald trump imposed new tariffs on imports of european steel and aluminium. it is pure protectionism, european
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steel and aluminium exports to the united states cannot be seen as a threat to their internal security. calls from unions for the transport secretary to resign following more problems on the railways. the mayor of greater manchester attacks the government's performance things are just beyond a joke at the moment, people's lives are being ruined by this shambolic rail industry. the end of an era in spanish politics, a vote of no confidence forces prime minister mariano rahoy out of office. a.§’1}
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z plenty!
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into force this morning. aggressive foreign trade practices. his tariffs are meant to protect the workers at steel mills in pennsylvania, michigan and indiana. but it could end up costing jobs outside the united states. the new tariffs could have a significant impact on the uk's steel industry. last year british businesses
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exported about 350,000 tonnes of steel and steel products to the united states. it's a trade worth around £350 million a year and it accounts for about 7% of total production here. but people within the industry are worried that damage to the sector could go beyond the loss of some sales. but people within the industry are worried that damage to the sector could go beyond the loss of some sales. we're worried about the direct impact, but we are really equally worried from the whole sector point of view about a flood of steel that would normally have gone to the us coming to our market, needing to find a new home in europe, dropping down prices, and destabilising the sector and pushing us right back
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into a steel crisis. 31,000 people still work within the uk steel industry. unions are worried thatjobs could be at risk if the us continues with it current policy. the european union is planning its response. it increases the risk of severe turbulence in the market globally. protectionism can never be a solution, this will hurtjobs in the european union but also in the us. consumers may suffer, too. us imports such as harley—davidson motorcycles may be about to become more expensive. they are on a long list of american imports which the eu has targeted for tariffs of its own. so, how likely is a full—blown trade war? it's hard to say. i think it's easier to describe this as a high—stakes poker game and everyone is waiting to see who will be first to give in, whose bluff is going to work best. we think trump is bluffing but we are not sure yet.
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but if no one backs down, then the conflict could escalate and more tariffs might soon be on their way. that could help some workers in the so—called american rustbelt. but analysts say it will come at a high price for businesses and consumers on both sides of the atlantic. theo leggett, bbc news. donald trump has put new tariffs not only on european imports but also from canada as well. in the last hour, president trump has attacked canada's trade policy. he tweeted accusing canada of treating us farmers very poorly for a long time, and said they had been highly restricted on trade. he called for them to open up their markets and take down their barriers. let's go to washington
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and talk to sarah mcgregor, economic policy editor of bloomberg. does it look like we are notjust on the brink of a trade war but in a trade war? yes, we are definitely on the edge of one, i would say, for sure, this idea of president donald trump slapping tariffs on some of his closest allies, looked like china was in his sights during much of the campaign, his allies were not expecting this, right up until the last minute they were fighting for relief, saying we are your closest security allies, trading partners, why would you possibly do this to us, it is definitely escalated, we
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have not heard from the wto or any leaders officially declaring this a trade war, but i think we will see how this plays out in the days ahead to see if it brings us to this point. we have heard from the eu in the last two or three hours, preparing to renounce mac write an measures. things hearing like harley—davidson, blue jeans, cranberries, florida orange juice, lots of american products. —— preparing to renounce retaliatory measures. it will be the opening salvos of a trade war. mexico, canada and the eu, dollarfor dollar, targeting us imports, i think what is very important to point out is that these are notjust on steel and aluminium, from america's perspective, they are trying to hit politically sensitive goods, things like bourbon, which
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comes from mitch mcconnell‘s state, making a pinch where it will hurt, this, we have rational midterms coming up, i think they want to send a message to donald trump, if you are going to hit us, we will find sensitive spots to hit you back. how worried will donald trump be by retaliatory measures? he has been pretty defined so far, the biggest surprise out of all of this was the prime minister in canada standing up yesterday and having some pretty harsh words for the us, obviously the largest trading partners with each other and justin trudeau had it in his towel, in trade dispute with the trump administration, things like nafta. but yesterday it seemed like nafta. but yesterday it seemed like the gloves were off and canada said it would target $13 billion of us goods, so i think we are seeing an escalation, and definitely tempers are running high. good to talk to you, thank you so much for your analysis will stop we can go to
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brussels as well and speak with our reporter, adam fleming, we have been hearing from the eu trade commissioner, details of what sort of retaliation they are considering. as you have been discussing, the eu has this big long list of iconic american products, orange juice to peanut butter to motorcycles to genes, which it will now start putting tariffs on, and getting its ducks in a row to do that, that could be as soon as the 20th of june, that those tariffs are stuck on, in retaliation, though they have never used that word, they use the word rebalancing. they don't wa nt use the word rebalancing. they don't want to escalate the situation. —— jeans. and that is what it is called in law. this list is more, located thanit in law. this list is more, located than it looks, it is made up of two separate list, one set of products which can have extra tariffs put on them soon, a second list, tariffs can be applied to other products in months and years ahead, as this rumbles on, the other thing they
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have announced, the eu will challenge these tariffs at the world trade organisation in geneva, that isa trade organisation in geneva, that is a process which can take years and years and years. this could ramble on for a lot longer yet. initially they are saying, some of these retaliatory measures could be imposed pretty soon, sometime within the next 20 days. 20th ofjune is the next 20 days. 20th ofjune is the date people are talking about and that is because it is 30 days since the eu officially lodged this list with the world trade organisation as something they might potentially do. that is because the eu has known for quite some months that this was on the horizon and this was a possibility, a possibility they tried hard to avoid but they have been getting administrative ducks in a row for a very long time so that as soon as donald trump pressed his button on his tariffs, they could press their button on there is. a bit of diplomatic activity with the 28 eu member states, to adopt. member states, to the diplomatic activity with the 28 eu member states, to the eyes and cross
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the tees and then these are the tariffs that will be imposed. a tit—for—tat kind of way. what the eu is worried about is whether this escalate and donald trump has his eye on other european economic sectors, the car industry, phenomenally important to germany, and then once other sectors are targeted, is it harder for the eu to maintaina united targeted, is it harder for the eu to maintain a united front or will the unity breakdown, that is what they are worried about. straight to italy, the new prime minister is being sworn in, we are just seeing some live pictures of the swearing in of the new administration, the coalition government, formed of italy's two main antiestablishment parties, being sworn in their by the country's president, those parties have been promising radical change, the administration led by giuseppe conti, a lawyer, an academic, and
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actually chosen of something as a compromise candidate by the 5—star movement and the league. and the parties have been promising billions of dollars worth of tax cuts and a universal income for the poor and unemployed. and being sworn in there, after yet more political instability there, in rome, antiestablishment government, really, being sworn in. that is after months of political deadlock, and it means that new elections have been avoided, but still, a lot of concerns about the eurozone's third—largest economy, whether it is drifting towards euro scepticism, drifting towards euro scepticism, drifting towards euro scepticism, drifting towards opposition to the euro, italian financial markets jumping on the announcement of the
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first populist government there... those weeks of political drama in italy that at one stage did seem certain to lead to new elections, they have ended with this political novice, really, giuseppe conte, being named and sworn in as prime minister, and so there you are, members of the new government, this rather unlikely alliance, between the league and 5—star, suddenly finding itself in government. the latest from italy, we will bring you more on that as it comes to us. there's renewed pressure on the transport secretary chris grayling after another day of chaos for rail passengers in the north of england.
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customers have vented their anger at northern and govia thameslink railway following weeks of disruption blamed on the introduction of new timetables. the two operators were responsible for almost a thousand late or cancelled trains in just one day alone. mr grayling insists the government is driving the biggest modernisation of the network since victorian times. alison freeman reports. they stand, they watch, they wait. for almost three weeks now, passengers on the northern rail network have been facing severe disruption after a new timetable was introduced. here at manchester piccadilly station, frustration is growing. very inconvenient and inconsiderate. i don't think it's cost—effective, what they're doing. everybody‘s disgruntled with it. every day, it's the same thing, it's cancelled or delayed. after work, i have to get a taxi to get home. these things probably don't count for the national rail service, but for me, it's money lost out of my pocket. it's five miles into manchester and you'd rather catch the train,
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but it seems to me that people are going to stop using the trains and go back to the car. they keep saying there's no drivers. well, the drivers were there before they changed the times. i don't understand it. northern rail says this isn't a problem caused by a lack of staff or rolling stock. instead, it's blaming logistics, saying under the new timetable, it's struggling to get trains and their drivers in the right place at the right time. the information board paints a picture of the problem, trains delayed or cancelled. it's the same story every day for hundreds of services between the north‘s major cities. the passenger action group northern fail says 2,224 routes have been fully cancelled since 18th may and a further 1,377 routes have been part—cancelled. today, all trains have been cancelled on the lakes line in cumbria, a total of 34 services. it sometimes feels to me
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like northern commuters are invisible to them. they just don't care, and the time of northern commuters is not the same as commuters in london and the south. well, frankly, as mayor of greater manchester, i'm not going to accept that. things are just beyond a joke at the moment. people's lives are being ruined by this shambolic rail industry. the rail workers' union, the rmt, has accused the transport secretary chris grayling of going into hiding, leaving front—line staff to deal with the brunt of public anger. they've called for his resignation and the rail company to be sacked, with the network brought back into public ownership. but in the meantime, the disruption and frustration for passengers continues. with us now is robert nisbet,
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regional director of the rail delivery group, which represents the rail industry. andy burnham has said it is a shambles, and a joke. andy burnham has said it is a shambles, and ajoke. this andy burnham has said it is a shambles, and a joke. this has not gone as well as we would have liked it to have done, areas have been unacceptable in some areas, for that, network rail, gti unacceptable in some areas, for that, network rail, gt! and northern have apologised i can throw statistics at you, there are personal stories behind each person who has been delayed, whether it is a work reason they are trying to travel or family a work reason they are trying to travel orfamily or a work reason they are trying to travel or family or whatever, i appreciate this is difficult, the bigger picture is we are trying to make the system better, and that is what the timetable change was all about, trying to add more capacity, more trains, faster trains to the network, clearly in some areas it has not been up to scratch. you have made it worse tried to make it better, people will say in 2018, surely, if you are going to mastermind a timetable change, and
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you have time to prepare for it, you can do better than this! it is not a question of going into a station, a board, ripping it off and putting another one up, what you have to do in effect is scheduled trains, make sure that there are two trains not running on the track at the same time, lots of different companies using one stretch of track, so you can understand, with chains, 100,000 services, 60% of all trains in great britain on one day, that is a logistical and complex hill to climb. by by you saying —— phil avery. you few had more time, it would have been better? mistakes were made, delays to infrastructure problems, that cause other delays in approving various service changes, that in time meant the train operating companies were not able to organise their people and staff and have
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trains in right places, sometimes they had only three weeks rather than the expected 12 weeks to prepare for the timetable change, and so there was a knock on problem hundreds of people working urgently now, all i can say, in gtr and northern to rectify this. there will be an announcement from northern rail later today. announcement of what, a new timetable? an attempt to ameliorate the situation, that will mean ameliorate the situation, that will m ea n twea ks ameliorate the situation, that will mean tweaks and changes but what they do not want to do is rush out something to try to make it better which only makes matters worse, there want to make sure they tested it, then they have to go to network rail to get approval of it before it can be lamented, but clearly, northern rail know that this is a matter of some urgency, and they are doing everything they can to put the situation and the plan in place that will help those passengers. you have been retraining drivers, why was that necessary? it is not the question of retraining, it is getting drivers to know what their
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new routes are, although rita change, they may be used to running the 8:54am service from a today, but instead now they are missing out some and putting in others. —— it is that routes have changed. —— from a to b. this is part of the long—term plan to improve railways, since 1994, demand has doubled, we are a railway that is running at capacity, we have to try to put more trains on the track, better services where they are needed. that is long-term, but in the short term, in the next few days, can you give as a promise that things will get better? cannot give you that promise, but what i can say and can promise is there are people working around the clock to deliver that as quickly as possible, we are asking customers, passengers do bear with us and if they have lost out because of this to go through the delay repay compensation system to claim back any money they
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may have lost. robert nisbet, thank you very much for being with us. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. the eu says it will bring in tariffs on imports from the united states within 20 days after donald trump imposed new tariffs on imports of european steel and aluminium. the transport secretary may be forced to appear in front of mps over the chaos caused by changes to the rail timetable. the end of an era in spanish politics, a vote of no confidence forces prime minister mariano rajoy out of office. inga's underperforming bowlers produced the perfect report to their critics, ripping into the pakistan bats men in the final test at headingley. gareth southgate has led to the defence of raheem sterling, saying his controversial rifle to do is deeply personal, and there is no need to police players tattooed is. tyson fury believes he can beat all
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the major names in the heavyweight division to regain his world title, as he prepares for his comeback fight next weekend. i will be back with more on those stories at half—past. and spain's prime minister mariano rajoy has been forced out of office after losing a vote of confidence in parliament. the opposition socialist party will now form a new government. gavin lee is in madrid. it is a political first in modern spanish history, a successful motion of no—confidence against the prime minister, mariano rajoy is gone, the government is gone, in comes the new prime minister, 46—year—old pedro sanchez, socialist leader, brought about the downfall of mariano rajoy with this motion in the first place. i think the noose
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tightened politically around the neck of the prime minister last week, it was the high courtjudgment, combination of a long—running corruption scandal, which involved the jailing of more than one dozen ex—members of the governing party, going back to the 1990s, in which they took more than 1 million euros in exchange for handing out government contracts, the party was implicit in widespread corruption, it was said by the judge, and mariano rajoy, his testimony was questionable, 180 mps voted against the prime minister, he is gone, the new prime minister, pedro sanchez, in a speech said that he would stabilise spain, they are calling it a frankenstein movement because there is other smaller parties, catalan nationalists, basque nationalists, yet to understand what they want in exchange for supporting the new prime minister. political movements that could turn into a monster, is how it was put by mariano rajoy. first day of a new government, unprecedented times for spying. now, a young footballer
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was coerced in to repeatedly carrying out sex acts by a former youth coach at southampton football club, a court has heard. bob higgins denies 50 counts of indecent assault against 24 boys between 1971 and 1996. our correspondent katy austin is outside salisbury crown court. bring us up—to—date. bring us up-to-date. bob higgins sat in the dock as the jury heard evidence that his behaviour was not confined to his time as a football coach, we heard allegations that bob higgins had assaulted a younger boy while he himself was still a teenager, that boy was not involved in football, they are entitled to anonymity and we are calling them
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complainant a. we were shown video of complainant a explaining how he was coerced into performing a sex act and returning the act, he said he knew that the abuse was wrong but it continued at least twice a week. there was an axe attack on higgins, i was going to kill him because of what he did, pay him back. later on he said higgins told him, i have found god, i need to say i am sorry, but did not specify abuse. complainant a says at the time of the abuse he was too frightened and ashamed to talk to anybody about what he says happened, it was seeing abuse claims on a bbc programme in 2016 that made him come forward, he said he thought higgins would not get away with it this time, he was struck by the line, if you remain quiet, you are protecting your abuser, he decided not to remain quiet anymore. bob higgins went on to bea quiet anymore. bob higgins went on to be a highly regarded youth coach,
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working for such football clubs as southampton and peterborough united. the prosecution here say that he was also waging a widespread campaign of sexual abuse against many of those in his charge, over a period of time spanning 25 years. bob higgins denies all 50 charges against him, the trial here at salisbury crown court is expected to carry on for a further seven weeks. there's a warning today that too many young people are being shifted around the care system. the children's commissioner for england, anne longfield, says that in one year, nearly 2,400 children in care changed their home, their school and their social worker. she described them as "pinball kids", being "pinged around the system." ministers insist they have taken steps to create a more stable environment for vulnerable children. our education correspondent, elaine dunkley, reports. s jack, not his real name, went into care three years ago after a troubled home life.
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but he struggled with the instability of constantly being moved around to different foster homes. at first i was a bit more, i don't want your help, i'm just here because you guys have put me here. so i was being a little baby, for instance. i wasn't really trying to let them help me, because i needed the help. and as i got older and started getting involved in the activities, i realised that they do care. julie has been a foster carer for 11 years and says constant disruption is a problem, particularly for older children. there is a massive shortage of foster carers, and anyone who wants to foster generally wants to foster someone who's going to behave or be less problematic. and that tends to come with smaller kids, that are more manageable. teenagers, by their title, are more problematic. the report by the children's commissioner for england found in the past three years,
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around 2500 children moved home five times or more. over 4000 children moved school in the middle of the year, with 400 missing a whole term as a result. some of these children have challenging emotional and behavioural needs — a shortage of foster carers and tight local authority budgets, all part of the problem. there are issues around cost, often with my advice line, i get calls from children who are being moved quickly without being consulted, and they and the people around them understand that that's about cost. now, i know local authorities are stretched in terms of finances, but the children's needs have to be paramount. children in care are amongst the most vulnerable in society. in a statement, the department for education says it's investing close to £4 million to help create a stable environment in foster homes, and is prioritising school admissions for those in care. elaine dunkley, bbc news they stand, they watch, they wait. the weather forecast for you now.
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let's look at the rest of the weather prospects, and into the weekend, still the last of the day showers there or thereabouts across the northern half of the british isles, tending to peter out through the night, one ortwo isles, tending to peter out through the night, one or two left behind on what is going to be another close night, across some central and southern parts, and as we get on into the weekend, downpours, primarily across northern and eastern britain, sunny skies to the south and west, here we go, right from the word go, on saturday, chance of one or two showers in the south—east, then becoming more widely spread across east anglia, up into the heart of scotland, top temperature 24, very pleasant conditions across many of the western areas. here we are on into sunday, fewer showers to report, still a spotting of them there, primarily across northern and eastern parts of the british isles,
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some coastal murk but with the sunshine you could see 24, 20 5 degrees. -- 24, 25 degrees. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. the eu says it will bring in tariffs on some imports from the united states within 20 days in retaliation against new us tariffs on steel and aluminium. transport secretary chris grayling has come under attack after days of disruption on the railways, following changes to timetables. things are just beyond a joke at the moment. people's lives are being ruined by this shambolic rail industry. the spanish prime minister, mariano rajoy, has been forced out of office in a vote of no confidence, after his party became embroiled in a corruption scandal.
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a coalition government, formed of italy's two main anti—establishment parties, has been sworn in by the country's president, promising radical change. and the children's commissioner for england says too many children are being shunted around the care system, creating damaging instability in their lives. let's go straight to greenock in scotland, there is a press conference on the stabbing but to place this morning. two officers came to an address in greenock this morning to support officers from another partner agency. during the incident to officers suffered serious injuries. both were taken to inverclyde hospitalfor serious injuries. both were taken to inverclyde hospital for treatment and remain under medical care. one officer has been transferred to the
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queen elizabeth hospital in glasgow for further exploratory treatment. both remain in a serious condition. our thoughts are with our injured collea g u es our thoughts are with our injured colleagues and of course their families at this time. 43—year—old man been arrested and has currently been assessed at a local hospital. i would like to stress that this incident is not as terrorist related and has been contained without any further risk to the public. i would like to take this opportunity to praise the incredible bravery shown by these two officers dealing the extremely difficult and challenging situation they faced this morning. they have been seriously injured going about their duties and both they and their colleagues who subsequently attended to assist demonstrated courage and the utmost professionalism, both during and after the incident. they received the flanks and the support of eve ryo ne the flanks and the support of everyone within the police scotland.
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and this incident demonstrates our officers commitment and utmost professionalism in terms of their determination to keep the communities of scotland safe. i would like to reassure the public that there is now a major investigation into all the circumstances surrounding this morning ‘s incident, and in addition over the course of the weekend, there will be additional patrols in this area. the game in closing if anyone has any information regarding this morning please contact us. can you tell us, you have said they are both in a serious condition, can you tell us how serious the injury is? not classified as life—threatening but very serious. would it have made a difference if they had had taser
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is with them? potentially. this shows the danger facing officers on a daily basis, if the officers had had taser it could have been resolved. the fact of the matter is officers receive training and had to deal with individuals that are violent, the training kicked in and tha nkfully violent, the training kicked in and thankfully the individual has been arrested and is not posing a further threat to the public. can you say anything about the actual incident they were called to attend? again i have to be discreet because a man has been arrested, but we have the support of a partner agency. i can't go into this at the moment. how many officers were on the scene? initially the two initial attending officers who were there to assist the agency and incrementally that
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number rose, as you can see looking around just now there are dozens of officers who have been here throughout the day but initially there was probably around half a dozen or so after the officers put up dozen or so after the officers put up call urgent assistance. i can't discuss that. i beg your pardon? where is the man involved? is at hospital, i understand he has minor bruising and cuts and grazes. he has been assessed in terms of his mental well—being. been assessed in terms of his mental well-being. what must it feel like for the colleagues of these officers today facing something that happened today facing something that happened to two of their own? i went to the hospital and i spoke to both officers. they were in remarkably good spirits. i am blown away by just the courage of them. they didn't quite shut to egg shrug their shoulders but they said, we are in
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the police, they accept that being a police officer brings with it a degree of risk. i was moved and proud to speak with them. i then went back to greenock police station and sat with the rest of the team. they are really emotional. they are hurting. they are upset, angry and distressed because of the end of the day this is a colleague. and of course it is like everything else, if only he had turned left instead of right, if only we had got there quicker because of the end of the day police officers are humans and this is a hard one for everyone in police scotland to take. potentially could have made a difference but that as decorative, with the taser have been deployed in time, with the officer have hit the target, probably yes but greenock is going to be one of the areas where dealing a rolling period they will be specially trained officers deployed. you mentioned the mental well—being
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of the suspect being assessed, can you say more on that? we do that with every person who comes into custody to make sure if there is any vulnerability about them, it's a standard process we go through. are these life changing injuries to the officer? it depends how you determine life changing, whether it is physical or psychological. i would say they will have physical scars, and for that i am sure and certain they will have emotional scars will stop but i guarantee you that everyone in police scotland will do whatever we can to help these officers, their family and the wider police family as well. we had one of the police officers was only one of the police officers was only on thejob for a one of the police officers was only on the job for a short time? the female officer is still in her probationary period, that's correct, the male officer is very experienced and that is what we do, we match
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probationary officers with experienced ones. i'm sorry i can't give you more information on that. thank you very much. that was assista nt thank you very much. that was assistant chief constable bernard higgins talking about the stabbing of those two police officers, one experienced male officer, one probationary female police officer, both in serious condition after that stabbing incident, a man of 43 arrested and being assessed at a local hospital. not terror related, we just heard from the assistant chief constable of police scotland. but craving what to egg praising what you call the incredible bravery of those two officers, showing bravery, he said and the utmost professionalism. he was questioned by some reporters about whether if the officers had had taser ‘s that might have made a difference. that's the latest from the incident in
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greenock in the west of scotland where two police officers have been stabbed and are being treated for serious injuries in hospital. more on that as it comes into us throughout the afternoon. sport now on afternoon live with damien. let's start with the cricket, going well for england for a change! very much england's day so far at headingley, the bowlers have been underfire headingley, the bowlers have been under fire recently with former captain michael vaughan urging the selectors to have the courage to drop anderson or stuart broad. they've come good today after a difficult couple of weeks. they have been tearing into the pakistan batting line—up, at headingley 174 batting line—up, at headingley174 all out, pakistan. england have been on realform all day. stuart broad, anderson and chris woakes have all taken wickets anderson and chris woakes have all ta ken wickets and anderson and chris woakes have all taken wickets and the 19—year—old all—rounder sam curran has made his test debut because ben stokes was ruled out with a hamstring injury. very much england's day so far,
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something for england fans to cheer, finally! and now england football fans? what might they be cheering about with the world cup coming up. gareth southgate has defended raheem sterling and is to do. certainly one of the headlines this week, the player has had the image of an assault rifle tattooed on his leg, it's divided opinion, some critical, somejumping it's divided opinion, some critical, some jumping to his it's divided opinion, some critical, somejumping to his defence, the player says it's in memory of his late father. gareth southgate says tattoos are a personal thing. late father. gareth southgate says tattoos are a personalthing. in my view and that it was like a work of art, a very individual thing, the meaning is with the individual and the person. what has been clear from his own statement and his own experiences that he is not someone who supports, wants to promote guns in the way that was perceived at
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first. mauricio pochettino the spurs manager is the favourite to succeed zinedine zidane and real madrid. he is in spain but not in the capital, he's in barcelona where he used to manage espa nyol. he's in barcelona where he used to manage espanyol. he is promoting a book despite pledging his allegiance to spurs last week listen to what he says. i understand all the rumours around the world but that is our life, that is the sport where we choose to stay, that is the passion that relates to everyone. look, i'm so happy, i'm so excited, i signed a new contract just days so happy, i'm so excited, i signed a new contractjust days ago. what is going to happen tomorrow, i don't know. chelsea 's decision to put major stadium redevelopment plans on hold as no surprise to former managing director christian personal. it comes after delays to
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roman bromwich renewing his uk visa. he's not willing to invest in a major project in a country where he isn't allowed to work. his visa ran out a few days ago and delays in the renewal have come as tensions increase between and moscow. marginal economic decision that has a lwa ys marginal economic decision that has always been on the brink of being approved or not by the owner, and the practicalities of this project have also been a major stumbling block, essentially a four your project needing chelsea to find an alternative home to the period. wembley is the most practical solution, many in the club have not been sure about the wisdom of getting fans to travel so far for some long away from home. so practicalities and economics it's a sensible decision not to pursue this project and no surprise to me that that's the decision they've taken. former world heavyweight champion tyson fury has told bbc sport he
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believes he can beat every major name in the decision including anthonyjoshua name in the decision including anthony joshua and name in the decision including anthonyjoshua and deontay wilder. tyson fury returns to the ring next weekend two years after his last fight and admits it's been a difficult time away from boxing. to be honest it was very dark, very dark and lonely, grey days every day. i would wake up in the morning andi day. i would wake up in the morning and i didn't have anything to be depressed about. i had fame, titles, loving family. i suppose anyone who's suffered from depression can relate to where i'm coming from. i have never experienced anything like this in life, it is the most horrible thing and if you have never witnessed it you might think i'm a nutcase but it's very hard. and i think now more than ever people speaking openly about it. novak djokovic, the former world one is in a marathon match at the french open, he's in the fourth set against roberto bautista agut good of spain.
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find out more about that and all the sport on the bbc website. i will be back later. thank you damian. let's bring you up to date with italian politics. in the past half an hour, guiseppe conte, a political novice, has been sworn in as prime minister of italy. he's heading a coalition government formed of the anti—establishment five star movement and the far—right league party. the leaders of these parties have also been sworn in as mr conte's deputies. yesterday, after weeks of political drama that looked like it was leading to fresh elections, the populist parties agreed to change their choice of finance minister to someone less opposed to the euro and the eu in general. james reynolds in rome has been gauging the political temperature. the apprentices at the sargassi hair academy in rome know
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what their country's new prime minister must be feeling. starting a newjob, with no experience, can be nerve—racking. yes, he's likely nervous and shy because basically i'm a shy young man. romana andriani comes here twice a week. she trusts both her hair and now her country to newcomers. i hope, i hope. i trust him. you trust the new prime minister? yes. because i... you don't know him, you don't know him. but he has been selected by people who have experience, so, yes, and he is good—looking. he's good—looking? yeah. he's good—looking. he seems a nice person. so what advice did these apprentices
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have for their fellow novice, prime minister giuseppe conte? translation: i hope they give more opportunities to young people to gain entry into the workplace. because it's not easy. we can get very discouraged. the trainee cooks at the italian chef academy, in rome, have some sympathy for their country's new leader. they told me that no—one really enjoys being thrown in at the deep end. translation: a bit of anxiety and uncertainty on the first day. i thought i wouldn't manage to overcome some obstacles, but if you have the commitment and the passion, you can easily overcome them. these trainees have time to learn their craft. their prime minister does not. james reynolds, bbc news, rome. joe line is standing by with the business news, first the headlines. the eu says it will bring in tariffs on imports from the united states within 20
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days after donald trump imposed new tariffs on imports of european steel and aluminium. the transport secretary may be forced to appear in front of mps — over the chaos caused by changes to the rail timetable. and the end of an era in spanish politics — a vote of no confidence forces prime minister mariano rahoy out of office. hello, i'mjoel line hello, i'm joel line with the business headlines for afternoon live. —— joel line. growth in the eurozone might be slowing a little — that's according to a key manufacturing survey. the ihs markit‘s pmi index for the 19 nations fell in may to a 15—month low of 55.5 from april's 56.2. a reading over 50 does still indicate growth — but it's been weakening since the start of the year, and the manufacturing pmi measure has now declined for five months in a row. 223,000 jobs were created in the usa last month, beating expectations.
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the unemployment rate fell to 3.8%, bringing the rate to an 18—year low. and average hourly earnings went up as well. and funerals costs are to come under scrutiny as two separate reviews are being launched. the competition and markets authority is reviewing funeral costs, "to ensure that people are not getting a bad deal". meanwhile, the treasury is focusing on concerns over pre—paid funeral plans. joe, the big question, is there a trade war between europe and the united states, are we in one, are we on the brink of one? i think we are in one. because even though the eu has not yet formally imposed retaliatory measures it has said clearly that it will do so. mexico has said it will do so, the eu has already launched a formal complaint,
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theissue already launched a formal complaint, the issue that consumers will be worried about is what it might mean for them. is this trade war, if we are in one, drive up prices to certain things? if you are a harley davidson customer, i know that you area big davidson customer, i know that you are a big fan! does it mean that the price of your harley will go up as a direct result of eu retaliatory measures. does it mean you might pay more for levi's jeans even though they might be made in asia? and then this florida orange juice. you could be on this florida orange juice. you could beona this florida orange juice. you could be on a harley davidson wearing jeans drinking orange juice. be on a harley davidson wearing jeans drinking orange juicem might be illegal! and expensive! a bit more expensive from next month. let's talk to victoria from economy.
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consumers end up paying the most the trade was don't they. absolutely, there is the proof that governments are playing with people's personal finances, some of the items that could have tariffs added are as specific as orange juice, peanut butter, it brings somehow politics affects people's personal lives. the real concern is that we will end up with a tit—for—tat retaliation battle, if we have the eu, canada, mexico, china, all of these continuing to say if you put tariffs on this we will put tariffs on that the people paying the price are consumers. a study from the peterson institute talked about the last trade war when the obama administration put tariffs on chinese made tyres and it ended up
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costing: soon as something like $900 per tyre purchase. half a million ca rs are per tyre purchase. half a million cars are sold every year, the americans could say we are putting a towel for all eu maids products. yes, that could happen in the uk, there could be manufacturers who will see a real drop in their business, it might not be good for american consumers who might pay more as well so this whole thing is
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coming under the guise of america first, but it's also apparently america lashing out against china so it does feel that the they are playing with people's lives. victoria, thank you very much. let's ta ke victoria, thank you very much. let's take a quick look at the markets. harley were down about 2% about an hour ago. i don't know how many they sell over here that they are pretty popular. you can hear them coming a mile away. the turnout up four fifths of 1%, it was down yesterday when tariff measures were concerned, we talked about funeral care issues, shares were down 13%, and her
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majesty's treasury. come back to me with those harley figures when you have them. without delay. thank you. two lions, two tigers and a jaguar have been recaptured after escaping from a zoo in germany. police say the private eifel zoo, in the town of lunebach, was flooded overnight after a storm which allowed the animals to escape. a bear also escaped but it was shot. a former second world war nurse is planning to retire from selling poppies — 97 years after she first began. rosemary powell, who's 103 and from london, is believed to be the longest serving and oldest poppy seller in britain, as jessica parker reports. for nearly a century, it's been the symbol of remembrance. the poppy appeal began in 1921. that same year, a young rosemary powell sold her first
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poppy on richmond bridge. they ran out so quickly that her mother had to make more using red crepe paper. rosemary recalls, "ever since the age of six, i've been selling poppies and i remember it all so well. collecting has kept me going all these years". it certainly has. 97 years later, rosemary, now aged 103, is set to retire. i couldn't even begin to estimate how much money she's raised. more importantly, it's that devotion of our volunteers, the way they go out at all times of year in all weather to support our work. a second world war nurse, rosemary is no stranger to the cost of conflict. in world war i, her father, charles astonjames, was wounded. she would later lose her first fiance and younger brother. she says she sells poppies in memory of those men who were killed for their sacrifice. and while few people will manage to give quite so much time to the cause as rosemary, it is hoped that her story
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will serve to inspire others. jessica parker, bbc news. amazing story. 97 years selling poppies for the british legion. now the weather with phil. thank you for joining me, let's get you through the next hours and the forthcoming weekend. a mishmash at the moment, glorious in some places, no complaints and temperatures matching sunshine. but in other places all that humidity is sparking of cloud development and some heavy showers and thunderstorms. a big area of low pressure still dominating, rather slack area of pressure, today we see the bulk of the showers across the northern half of the british isles, another close might in prospect, rather murky at times, never lower
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than ten or 11 to 16. downpours across northern and eastern areas, and still that nuisance of patches. not long into the morning we will see the arrival of thunderstorms into east anglia, then through lincolnshire to yorkshire across the border and into the heart of scotland, the further south and west you are the drier your day will be but as we've said lately, if you catch some of these downpours, there could well be localised flooding, bbc local radio is always a good source of information in these setups. on into sunday now, you get the sense that there are fewer showers to report. you have to be prepared again primarily in northern
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and eastern parts, there are temperatures despondent about height of sunshine, it's a different kettle of sunshine, it's a different kettle of fish because high pressure is dominating, the flow is coming off the north sea which means a lot of moisture and clout to start the day and some of you will probably keep that cloud for the greater part of the day. i would have thought the central belt, like ayrshire, could be well favoured with a high at this stage of about 21. hello, you're watching afternoon live, i'm ben brown. today at 4. the eu says it will bring in tariffs on imports from the united states within weeks after donald trump imposed new tariffs on imports of european steel and aluminium. it is pure protectionism, european
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steel and aluminium exports to the united states cannot be seen as a threat to their internal security. calls from unions for the transport secretary to resign following more problems on the railways. the mayor of greater manchester attacks the government's performance. things are just beyond a joke. things are just beyond a joke. things are just beyond a joke. things are being ruined by the shambolic rail industry. the end of an era in spanish politics, a vote of no confidence forces prime minister mariano rahoy out of office. —— mariano rajoy. -- mariano rajoy. -- mariano rajoy. the pinball kids of the care system, a warning that thousands of children are at risk because they're moved around the system too often. coming up on afternoon live all the sport, damian . pakistan skittled out as england
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battled to save a two match series. good news on the weather front? hedging my bets, it depends, no complaints across the shores of north devon but if yourjourney in the next few hours takes you near the next few hours takes you near the central belt of scotland, maybe the central belt of scotland, maybe the top end of the m6 then there are thunderstorms aplenty. . also coming up. hanging up her collection tin at last, after 97 years of selling poppies, this former second world war nurse finally retires from fundraising for the royal british legion. the european union says it will bring in tariffs on imports
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from the united states within weeks in retaliation against new us tariffs on steel and aluminium. it is now discussing which of its 10—page list of possibilities it will choose. the eu's trade commissioner cecilia malmstrom warned that the new us tariffs of up to 25% will affect jobs in europe and the us. the french president, emmanuel macron, told mr trump in a phone call last night that the new duties are illegal. theo leggett reports. donald trump has made it clear time and time again, he thinks imports of cheap foreign steel and aluminium are harming the us industry. the american steel and aluminium industry has been ravaged by aggressive foreign trade practices. it's really an assault on our country. his tariffs are meant to protect the workers at steel
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mills in pennsylvania, michigan and indiana. but they could end up costing jobs outside the united states. the new tariffs could have a significant impact on the uk's steel industry. last year british businesses exported about 350,000 tonnes of steel and steel products to the united states. it's a trade worth around £350 million a year and it accounts for about 7% of total production here. but people within the industry are worried that damage to the sector could go beyond the loss of some sales. we're worried about the direct impact, but we are really equally worried from the whole sector point of view about a flood of steel that would normally have gone to the us coming to our market, needing to find a new home in europe, dropping down prices, and destabilising the sector and pushing us right back into a steel crisis. 31,000 people still work
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within the uk steel industry. the european union is planning its response. it is unfortunate because it is further weakening transatlantic relations. it increases the risk of severe turbulence in the market globally. protectionism can never be a solution, this will hurtjobs in the european union but also in the us. consumers may suffer, too. us imports such as harley—davidson motorcycles may be about to become more expensive. they are on a long list of american imports which the eu has targeted for tariffs of its own. so, how likely is a full—blown trade war? it's hard to say. i think it's easier to describe this as a high—stakes poker game and everyone is waiting to see who will be first to give in,
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whose bluff is going to work best. we think trump is bluffing but we are not sure yet. but if no one backs down, then the conflict could escalate and more tariffs might soon be on their way. that could help some workers in the so—called american rustbelt. but analysts say it will come at a high price for businesses and consumers on both sides of the atlantic. theo leggett, bbc news. among the american goods that could be targeted by the european union in retaliation, harley—davidson motorcycles, cranberries, florida orangejuice, also, motorcycles, cranberries, florida orange juice, also, blue jeans, motorcycles, cranberries, florida orangejuice, also, bluejeans, levi strauss, jeans company, have just released a statement on this saying, that they "support open markets and free trade where everyone plays by the roles, unilateral tariff risk destabilising the global economy. lets head to washington now,
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and our reporter anthony zurcher. companies are getting pretty worried about what looks like a transatlantic trade war in the making. there has been some consideration up until now that this was a negotiation, and negotiating position the trump administration mistaking, they would not follow through, first they had been proposed several months ago, and then suspended, but now, now it looks like it will become a reality, in theory, economic harm for some of these companies, and for employees of some of these companies, who worked in from friendly states such as the midwest and the industrial heartland, they are going to start feeling economic pain, up until now, it has all been theoretical. we will see how much of a stomach the trump
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administration has when this proposed trade war becomes an actual shooting war, so to speak. it is going to become a fully fledged trade war, but how much support does donald trump have? obviously protecting american jobs was a big pa rt protecting american jobs was a big part of his election campaign. right, and up until now, it has all been theoretical, the pain he will feel from this, has not cost any jobs, in certainty has been introduced into the us economy, because of the possibility of reciprocal sanctions. —— uncertainty has been introduced into the us economy. but, that has not yet been felt on the ground, we are talking to trump supporters in iowa, ohio, trams which went heavily for —— states which went heavily for trump and they give him the benefit of the doubt, they say he is a businessman, he knows how to get deals done, this is part of a negotiating system, obviously we have not seen past
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presidents use this kind of rhetoric before, involving trading cauchy agent, although the bush administration did attempt to impose some steel tariffs back in 2003, they backed down when it became clear that there would be retaliation from the eu and canada and they would be taken before the world trade organisation. this is going to take a little more time to play out before the see if there is any political implications for donald trump. here in the us. but right now, at least at a higher level, among businesses, there is a fairamount of level, among businesses, there is a fair amount of concern that this is going to cost american jobs across the bottom line, companies that thought they might be able to benefit from a conservative administration. what happens in a trade war, you have the first salvos and then more and more tit—for—tat retaliatory measures and against more and more goods on both sides of the atlantic will be potentially affected. exactly, the way donald
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trump is conducting this, i think he may be reluctant to back down and appeared to accept any sort of defeat, in the past, as i mentioned, the bush steel tariffs, the eventual dispute de—escalated, but donald trump has put a lot of his political capital on being able to strike fair trade deals. look at the steel tariffs, particularly when it comes to canada and mexico, these larger negotiation that are going on with the north american free trade agreement, if no deal is reached and it looks like there is key sticking point is about a sunset provision of any newly negotiated nafta dispute resolution provisions, country of origin provisions, that will take time. it is becoming brinkmanship on the part of the trump administration, putting this all together. he is putting a lot of his political chips on this, staking his reputation on this to strike a good deal. a fair amount of motivation to
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see this through even if it does get worse. for the moment, thank you very much. more now on the european perspective. the eu are considering which american goods they will target. a short while ago, our reporter in brussels adam fleming gave us detail about the eu's reaction. big long list of iconic american products, from orange juice big long list of iconic american products, from orangejuice to peanut butter to motorcycles to jeans which it will now start putting tariffs on and get its ducks ina row, putting tariffs on and get its ducks in a row, that could be as soon as the 28th of june, in a row, that could be as soon as the 28th ofjune, that the tariffs are slapped on in retaliation. —— june 20. this list is more complicated than it looks, it is compensated because it is made up of two separate lists, one set of
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compaq back product which can have ta riffs compaq back product which can have tariffs put on the pretty soon and a second list tariffs applied to other products in months and years ahead as this rumbles on, the other thing announced, the eu will challenge these tariffs at the world trade organisation in geneva, that is a process which can take years and yea rs process which can take years and years and years, so this could ramble on for a lot longer yet. initially they are saying, some of these retaliatory measures could be imposed pretty soon, sometime in the next 20 days. the 20th ofjune is the date people are talking about, thatis the date people are talking about, that is because it is 30 days since the eu officially launched this list —— lodged this list with the world trade organisation as something they might potentially do, because the eu has known for quite some months that this was on the horizon and a possibility, a possibility they tried hard to avoid, but they have been getting administrative ducks in a row for a very long time so as soon as president trump pushed his button on his tariffs, they could
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push their button on their tariffs. there will be a bit of diplomatic activity with the 28 eu member states in the next couple of weeks, and then these are the tariffs that will be imposed on the united states asa will be imposed on the united states as a result of this, in a tit—for—tat way. the eu is worried about whether this escalates and donald trump has his eye on other economic european sectors, like the car industry, which is phenomenally important to germany, and then once other sectors are targeted, is it harderfor other sectors are targeted, is it harder for the other sectors are targeted, is it harderfor the eu to retain its united front, with its 28 members, or will the unity breakdown? that is what they are worried about. there's renewed pressure on the transport secretary chris grayling after another day of chaos for rail passengers in the north of england. customers have vented their anger at northern and govia thameslink railway following weeks of disruption
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blamed on the introduction of new timetables. the two operators were responsible for almost a thousand late or cancelled trains in just one day alone. mr grayling insists the government is driving the biggest modernisation of the network since victorian times. alison freeman reports. they stand, they watch, they wait. for almost three weeks now, passengers on the northern rail network have been facing severe disruption after a new timetable was introduced. here at manchester piccadilly station, frustration is growing. very inconvenient and inconsiderate. i don't think it's cost—effective, what they're doing. everybody‘s disgruntled with it. every day, it's the same thing, it's cancelled or delayed. after work, i have to get a taxi to get home. these things probably don't count for the national rail service, but for me, it's money lost out of my pocket. it's five miles into manchester and you'd rather catch the train,
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but it seems to me that people are going to stop using the trains and go back to the car. they keep saying there's no drivers. well, the drivers were there before they changed the times. i don't understand it. northern rail says this isn't a problem caused by a lack of staff or rolling stock. instead, it's blaming logistics, saying under the new timetable, it's struggling to get trains and their drivers in the right place at the right time. the information board paints a picture of the problem, trains delayed or cancelled. it's the same story every day for hundreds of services between the north‘s major cities. the passenger action group northern fail says 2,224 routes have been fully cancelled since 18th may and a further 1,377 routes have been part—cancelled. today, all trains have been cancelled on the lakes line in cumbria, a total of 34 services. it sometimes feels to me like northern commuters
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are invisible to them. they just don't care, and the time of northern commuters is not the same as commuters in london and the south. well, frankly, as mayor of greater manchester, i'm not going to accept that. things are just beyond a joke at the moment. people's lives are being ruined by this shambolic rail industry. the rail workers' union, the rmt, has accused the transport secretary chris grayling of going into hiding, leaving front—line staff to deal with the brunt of public anger. they've called for his resignation and the rail company to be sacked, with the network brought back into public ownership. but in the meantime, the disruption and frustration for passengers continues. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines
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the eu says it will bring in tariffs on imports from the united states within weeks after donald trump imposed new tariffs on imports of european steel and aluminium. calls from unions for the transport secretary to resign following more problems on the railways. the end of an era in spanish politics, a vote of no confidence forces prime minister mariano rajoy out of office. in sport, the underperforming bowlers in cricket produced the perfect‘ their critics, pakistan all out for 174 in the final test at headingley. england manager gareth southgate leaps to the defence of raheem sterling, saying his controversial rifle tattooed is deeply personal and there is no need to police players tattooed is. and former world number one novak djokovic survives a near four hour marathon against spain roberto bautista agut to go through to the fourth round at the us open. i will
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be back with more on those stories out of past. two police officers are still in a serious condition in hospital after being injured on a call out greenock in inverclyde. a male officer is in a very serious condition after being stabbed in the neck; his female colleague has an arm injury. a man has been arrested. assistant chief constable bernard higgins of police scotland gave this statement in the last hour. around 8:45am, two officers attended an address in gateshead gardens, greenock, to support colleagues from a partner agency, during greenock, to support colleagues from a partneragency, during an incident, the two officers, one male and one female, suffered serious injuries. both officers were taken to inverclyde hospital for hospital, to inverclyde hospital for hospital, to the serious injuries, and they remain under medical care. one
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officer has since been transferred to the queen elizabeth hospital in glasgow, for further exploratory treatment. both remain in a serious condition. our thoughts are with our colleagues, and of course, their families at this time. 43—year—old man has been arrested, and is currently being assessed at a local hospital. i would like to stress that this incident is not being treated as terrorist related, and has been contained so there is no further risk to the public. i would like to take this opportunity to publicly praise the incredible bravery shown by these two officers, during the extremely difficult and challenging situation they face this morning. they had been seriously injured going about their duties and both they and their colleagues who subsequently attended to assist demonstrated courage and the utmost professionalism, both during and after the incident. that was
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assista nt after the incident. that was assistant chief constable bernard higgins of police scotland with the statement on the stabbing of two police officers in greenock. spain‘s prime minister mariano rajoy has been forced out of office after losing a vote of confidence in parliament. the opposition socialist party will now form a new government. gavin lee is in madrid. it is a political first in modern spanish history, a successful motion of no—confidence against the prime minister, mariano rajoy is gone, the government is gone, in comes the new prime minister, 46—year—old pedro sanchez, socialist leader, brought about the downfall of mariano rajoy with this motion in the first place. i think the noose tightened politically around the neck of the prime minister last week, it was the high courtjudgment, combination of a long—running corruption scandal, which involved the jailing of more than one dozen ex—members of the governing party, going back to the 1990s, in which they took more than 1 million euros in exchange for handing out government contracts, the party was implicit in widespread corruption, it was said by the judge, and mariano rajoy, his testimony was questionable, 180 mps voted against the prime minister,
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he is gone, the new prime minister, pedro sanchez, in a speech said that he would stabilise spain, they are calling it a frankenstein movement because there is other smaller parties, catalan nationalists, basque nationalists, yet to understand what they want in exchange for supporting the new prime minister. political movements that could turn into a monster, is how it was put by mariano rajoy. first day of a new government, unprecedented times for spying. we have had a statement, from visa, they say there has been problems
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they say there has been problems they have been experiencing, customers have been experiencing, a spokesman has said, currently experiencing a service disruption, this incident is preventing some these transactions in europe from being processed, they say that we are investigating the cause and working as quickly as possible to resolve the situation. —— some visa transactions. they are not sure how widespread that is, how many customers might have been affected by that, visa are saying that they are currently experiencing a service disruption and it is preventing some visa transactions in europe from being processed, and they are investigating the cause and trying to resolve the situation. we will be trying to find out more about that, and finding out the extent of those problems with visa payments and we will bring you more on that as it
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comes in. the a young footballer was coerced in to repeatedly carrying out sex acts by a former youth coach at southampton football club, a court has heard. bob higgins denies 50 counts of indecent assault against 24 boys between 1971 and 1996. katie austin what has the court heard today allegations made that bob higgins had assaulted a younger boy while he himself was still a teenager. he said, i was going to kill him
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because of what he had done, pay him back, he done me harm. later on he said, he told him, i have found god, i need to tell you i am sorry, but did not specify abuse. complainant a says that at the time of the abuse he was too frightened and ashamed to tell anyone, and it was seeing abuse claims ona tell anyone, and it was seeing abuse claims on a bbc programme in 2016 that made him come forward, he said he thought higgins would not get away with it this time and was struck by the line, if you remain quiet, you are protecting your abuser. he decided not to remain quiet anymore. bob higgins went on to become a highly regarded youth coach, working for subtle book clubs as southampton and peterborough united. —— working for such clubs. he was also waging a widespread campaign of sexual abuse against many of those in his charge, over a
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period of time, spanning 25 years. bob higgins denies all 50 charges against him, the trial is expected to carry on for a further seven weeks. there are commemorations this sunday to remember those who lost their lives in the terror attack on london bridge, one year ago. eight people were killed, and dozens more injured, when three men drove a van into pedestrians on the bridge, before getting out of the vehicle and then stabbing people enjoying a summer night out in borough market. my colleaguejane hill has been down there for us. for people who do not know london, it is always extremely busy down here,
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both with local people and many tourists, here, tomorrow, and sunday, there will be period of reflection and commemoration to remember those who died and those who were injured, some of them very seriously indeed. i have been talking to one young woman who very nearly lost her life that night. she was walking across london bridge, crossing the bridge, a normal saturday night out to meet friends for a drink on a beautiful warmjune evening. the van that was being driven by those three terrorists she saw careering towards her, it only narrowly avoided her, it ploughed into a couple who were walking right behind her. she is a colleague of hours, bbc producer, on a day off, trying to enjoy the london sunshine. this is her recollection of that saturday evening. i was just walking by myself and i was looking at my phone, and i was alerted to what sounded like an engine really over—revving. so i looked up and that was the first time i saw this van, a white van, and it was heading south and it kind of came onto the bridge and it completely went straight into a group of people.
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and i know that one of the people, well, one of the persons went into the river. and then it was like skittles going off. i‘ve never felt fear like it. it was kind of like when you hear the phrase that your life flashes before your eyes, i can understand that now, what that means. i was frozen to the spot, and i remember seeing it coming directly towards me and there was a couple that were behind me, and something in the back of my mind just said "get out of the way". and i couldn‘t tell you how it happened. i remember looking directly in the eyes of the van driver, and i managed to get out of the way but unfortunately, the van then hit the couple that were behind me also. and i just remember, i got up and people were screaming. there were bodies all over the road. it was absolute chaos. has london changed at all for you? do you feel that it got back to normal quite swiftly? ifeel like london has definitely bounced back from this. and notjust london, but the whole of the uk,
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like with the manchester attacks. the response of the people who have been out there and the support has just been overwhelmingly astounding, really. and on the day of the first anniversary, what will you do? i will actually be with friends, surrounded by close friends. i‘m in touch with some of the people that were injured that night. so no doubt i will be in touch with them throughout the day. we‘ve actually been messaging. i‘m meeting some of them this week, which will be incredible. on the night itself, i was comforting a french lady. all i knew was that her name was christine. i didn‘t know anything more about her. i waited with her until she went into the ambulance and that was the last i heard of her. a few weeks after the incident, i was approached on twitter by christine‘s sister, and she said, "she wants to be in touch with you, she wants to contact you." since then, we‘ve messaged
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every day, pretty much, or at least a few times a week and we‘ve got a really good friendship now. will you two be speaking on sunday? yes, we will. we‘ve got plans to see each other, so yes, we will definitely be speaking. time for a look at the weather. real mishmash on offer across the british isles, sending you pictures through the afternoon of sunshine around coasts, still affected by missed and fog and here we are, first or fourth, some thunderstorms, i will show you this injustice second, if you run into those, watch out for localised flooding, pretty punchy, disruption could be possible. notjust
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punchy, disruption could be possible. not just scotland, punchy, disruption could be possible. notjust scotland, also wales and northern ireland picking up wales and northern ireland picking up on the unsettled theme of late as well, you see this collection of under storms, central belt of scotland, also top and of the m6 coming over the cumbrian fells. those showers will be there for the greatest part of rush—hour and for some on through the evening, do not discount what i am showing you there a way towards the midlands, because if you catch some of the shower must you really will know all about it, intense downpours, another close night right across the piece, 11 to 16 degreesjust night right across the piece, 11 to 16 degrees just about covering it. hello again, you‘re watching the bbc
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news, our latest headlines. the eu says it will bring in tariffs on some imports from the united states within 3 weeks in retaliation against new us tariffs on steel and aluminium. transport secretary chris grayling has come under attack after days of disruption on the railways, following changes to timetables. things are just beyond a joke at the moment, people's lives are being ruined by this shambolic rail industry. the spanish prime minister, mariano rajoy, has been forced out of office in a vote of no confidence, after his party became embroiled in a corruption scandal. a coalition government, formed of italy‘s two main anti—establishment parties, has been sworn in by the country‘s president, promising radical change. the children‘s commissioner for england says too many children are being shunted around the care system, creating damaging instability in their lives.
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in a moment. after 97 years of selling poppies, this former second world war nurse finally retires from fundraising. now time for the latest sports news with damian. let‘s start with the cricket again. how are england‘s doing, the first test against pakistan was so disappointing. what about this one? pakistan bowled out for 174, it was very much england‘s day. the bowlers had been underfire with, captain michael vaughan urging selectors to drop either anderson or stuart broad. they stuck with them and it has paid off, they‘ve come good today and they were ripping into the pakistan batting line—up. the tourists all out for 174, the
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wickets shared between all the pace bowlers and a first test wicket from 19—year—old all rounder sam karen on his debut. he was included after ben stokes was ruled out through injury. england in reply 39—0. so very much so far england‘s day. england in reply 39—0. so very much so far england's day. let's talk more about raheem sterling and his controversial tattoo of a gun on his right leg. it caused a stir in the world of football. gareth southgate england manager has been talking about it. yes in his daily news conference, one of the first things he was asked about. this story dominated the headlines, he had the image ofan dominated the headlines, he had the image of an assault rifle tattooed on his leg. some like the anti—gun lobby took offence, others jumped to the manchester city players defence. he himself says it is in memory of his late father who was shot when
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raheem sterling was young. gareth southgate says it is a personal thing. in my view a tattoo is like any work of art, and individual meaning, what has been clear from his own statement and his own experience is that he is not somebody who supports or wants to promote guns in the way that was perceived at first. mauricio pochettino, the spurs manager, is in spain. he is the favourite to succeed zinedine zidane at real madrid but he is not in the capital, he‘s in barcelona where he used to manage espa nyol. he‘s in barcelona where he used to manage espanyol. promoting a new book. he pledged allegiance to totte n ha m book. he pledged allegiance to tottenham last week that this is what he had to say. i understand all the rumours around the world but thatis the rumours around the world but that is our life. that is the sport that is our life. that is the sport
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that we choose to stay in, but is the passion that translates to everyone. i am so happy, so excited, i signed a new contract a few days ago. what is going to happen tomorrow, i don‘t know. ago. what is going to happen tomorrow, i don't know. not ruling it out completely then. leeds united have sacked manager paul heckingbottom afterjust have sacked manager paul heckingbottom after just four have sacked manager paul heckingbottom afterjust four months into outcome he only took the job in february but managed just four wins in16. february but managed just four wins in 16. leeds will begin a new season with a new manager for the fifth year running. manchester city women have signed scotland captain caroline wear for two years. she joins from liverpool where she has spent the last two seasons after finishing runners—up to winners chelsea in the women‘s super league city recruitment is an full swing to the new season, this is their second signing in as many days after the arrival of pfa player of the year — young player of the year lauren
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hamp. djokovic came through a gruelling match against roberto bautista agut to reach that extract of the french open. he got his toughest test this year but one in four sets after three hours and 48 minutes, the serbian air is only seeded 20th as he seeks for a return to form after an elbow injury. he will play fernando verdasco in the fourth round. that‘s all the sport from me for now. hugh ferris will have more in the next hour. now on afternoon live let‘s go nationwide, and see what‘s happening around the country in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. let‘s go to rob smith in tunbridge wells, who can tell us more about a british adventurer hoping to become the first man in history to attempt
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a certain swimming challenge. and alex lovell is in bristol, where ronnie barker‘s famous four candles sketch has sold at auction this afternoon. but first to rob. we covered the story yesterday, we‘ll find out how much and went for. rob, what is this chap proposing to do? i hardly know where to begin. his name is ross edgeley and he‘s going to try to swim around the coastline of great britain in 100 days. he‘s leaving from margate in kentand 100 days. he‘s leaving from margate in kent and head clockwise but the idea is that he won‘t touch dry land in all that time, he will swim for six hours, get onto the support boat for six hours and he will do that every day for 100 days running. it is mind—boggling. he says that by swimming with the tide he could
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cover between 30 and 50 kilometres a day, the equivalent of the english channel. he will cover in total 2700 kilometres of swimming. if he does and he will finish at tower bridge on september nine. he has to cope with the cold and saltwater and the jellyfish, the birds the seaweed, the lobster and perhaps the worst thing of all, the chafing. it is a ludicrous challenge! i've always had this in late desire to push the boundaries and do what other people think men be possible. i don‘t recommend my lifestyle to of people but i hope they will pay attention. i‘m going to apply my principles when people are lying in bed on sunday morning i‘m going to go out and do something. it‘s all very well
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him talking about it but is it possible, i am exhausted thinking about it not to mention the jellyfish and the chafing. absolutely, if someone came up and told you i‘m going to swim around britain, you would be disbelieving but edgley does have form. he once rana but edgley does have form. he once ran a marathon pulling a car, he once did a charity challenge that involved him pulling himself up the equivalent of mount everest and he did an obstacle course that he nicknamed the tree—athlon because you run the course subtitles by red bee media. .. log and he once did a swimming challenge which covered 126 kilometres. if anyone is bonkers he is so if you look up the great british swim you will do that. he estimates is going to eat around 1.5 million calories to keep himself going through the challenge. that could feed a family of five for four months. he wants to inspire people
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to be more active and i‘m just exhausted thinking about it!|j to be more active and i‘m just exhausted thinking about it! i think he will need all those calories. budget alex lovell, i saw you pulling a face when we talked about the jellyfish! when you talked about what he was going to eat i thought, while he was swimming! it sounds disgusting but admirable. tell us about the four candles scutt, such a slice of british comedy history and now auctioned off. yes, you talked about it yesterday, superbly written by gerald wiley, the pseudonym of ronnie barker. it seems to me that the charm of this is notjust what to in terms of this brilliant sketch but the fragility of the item. there we re but the fragility of the item. there were four pieces of lined paper with those hilarious lines written in red ink. if you look closely you could even see the occasional note which
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was meant for the production teams to consider look for example is discussed. badree is extra personnel. it shows how much he must have been happy to develop it further. regarding the provenance of the script it was apparently discovered in an episode of the antiques road show in 2006. where it was before i don‘t know but the handwriting was quickly authenticated by ronnie corbett. and this is a lovely fact, ronnie corbett also explained that the idea came from a real situation between hardware owner and a customer, who must have not quite understood each other. this person wrote and told the comedians have funny and was so let‘s remind ourselves of their brilliant play on words. four candles. four candles? here you are four candles. no fork handles. there
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you are, four candles. no fork handles. handles for forks. such a great sketch, it makes me laugh whenever i see it and i have seen it so many times. we thought it might go for around £40,000, what is the price? that opened at £40,000, dropped to £30,000, one bid had been left at £27,000 and that is what we expected it might go for but it was topped by another thousands of the final price was £20,000. if you add value added tax and fees, we know it was a phone bid in the uk, from a massive fan sub ben it‘s goodbye from me... and it's goodbye from
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them! is that what you wanted me to say. for viewers of the two ronnies thatis say. for viewers of the two ronnies that is the way they always ended the show. thank you alex thank you rob, great stories from both of you. to see more on any of those stories you can see them through the bbc i player and we go nationwide every weekday afternoon at 4:30pm here on afternoon live. let‘s bring you the latest on the italian political situation. in the past half hour, giuseppe conte a political novice has been sworn in as prime minister of italy.
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he‘s heading a coalition government formed of the anti—establishment five star movement and the far—right league party. the leaders of these parties have also been sworn in as mr conte‘s deputies. yesterday, after weeks of political drama that looked like it was leading to fresh elections, the populist parties agreed to changed their choice of finance minister to someone less opposed to the euro and the eu in general. james reynolds in rome has been gauging the political temperature. the apprentices at the sargassi hair academy in rome know what their country‘s new prime minister must be feeling. starting a newjob, with no experience, can be nerve—racking. romana andriani comes here twice a week. she trusts both her hair and now her country to newcomers. i hope, i hope. i trust him. you trust the new prime minister? yes.
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because i... you don‘t know him, you don‘t know him. but he has been selected by people who have experience, so, yes, and he is good—looking. he‘s good—looking? yeah. he‘s good—looking. he seems a nice person. so what advice do these apprentices have for their fellow novice, prime minister giuseppe conte? translation: i hope they give more opportunities to young people to gain entry into the workplace. because it's not easy. we can get very discouraged. the trainee cooks at the italian chef academy, in rome, have some sympathy for their country‘s new leader. they told me that no—one really enjoys being thrown in at the deep end. translation: a bit of anxiety and uncertainty on the first day. i thought i wouldn't manage to overcome some obstacles, but if you have the commitment and the passion, you can easily overcome them. these trainees have time
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to learn their craft. their prime minister does not. james reynolds, bbc news, rome. there‘s a warning today that too many young people are being shifted around the care system. the children‘s commissioner for england, anne longfield, says that in one year, nearly 2,400 children in care changed their home, their school and their social worker. she described them as ‘pinball kids‘, being ‘pinged around the system‘. ministers insist they have taken steps to create a more stable environment for vulnerable children. our education correspondent, elaine dunkley, reports. jack — not his real name — went into care three years ago, after a troubled home life, but he struggled with the instability of constantly being moved around to different foster homes. at first, i was a bit more, i don‘t want your help. i‘m just here because you guys are putting me here. so i was being a little baby, for instance, like. i wasn‘t really trying
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to let them help me, because i needed the help. and as i got older and i started getting involved in the activities, i realised that they do care. the report by the children‘s commissioner for england found in the past three years, around 2,500 children moved home five times or more, over 4,000 children moved school in the middle of the year, with 400 missing a whole term as a result. julie has been a foster carer for 11 years and says the constant disruption also leaves children vulnerable to being groomed by gangs. there is a massive short as shortage of carers and anyone who wants to foster once someone who's going to behave and be less problematic than that comes with smaller kids who are more manageable. teenagers, by their title, are more problematic. the report by the children‘s commissioner for england found in the past three years, around 2,500 children moved home five times or more, over 4,000 children moved school in the middle of the year, with 400 missing a whole term as a result. some of these children have
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challenging emotional and behavioural needs. the shortage of foster carers and tighter local authority all part of problem. there are issues around cost, often with my advice line i get calls from children who are moved quickly, them and the people around them know that the authorities are stretched by financial concerns but the care has to be paramount. children in care are amongst the most vulnerable in society. in a statement, the department for education says it‘s investing close to £4 million to help create a stable environment in foster homes and is prioritising school admissions for those in care. elaine dunkley, bbc news. two lions, two tigers and a jaguar have been recaptured after escaping from a zoo in germany. this bear also escaped but it was shot dead. police say the private eifel zoo, in the town of lunebach,
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was flooded overnight after a storm which allowed the animals to escape. the other animals were recovered after a massive search involving police, firefighters and veterinarians. a former second world war nurse is planning to retire from selling poppies — 97 years after she first began. rosemary powell, who‘s 103 and from london, is believed to be the longest serving — and oldest — poppy seller in britain, as jessica parker reports. for nearly a century, it‘s been the symbol of remembrance. the poppy appeal began in 1921. that same year, a young rosemary powell sold her first poppy on richmond bridge. they ran out so quickly that her mother had to make more using red crepe paper. rosemary recalls, "ever since the age of six, i‘ve been selling poppies and i remember it all so well. collecting has kept me going all these years". it certainly has. 97 years later, rosemary,
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now aged 103, is set to retire. i couldn‘t even begin to estimate how much money she‘s raised. more importantly, it‘s that devotion of our volunteers, the way they go out at all times of year in all weather to support our work. a second world war nurse, rosemary is no stranger to the cost of conflict. in world war i, her father, charles ashtonjames, was wounded. she would later lose her first fiance and younger brother. she says she sells poppies in memory of those men who were killed for their sacrifice. and while few people will manage to give quite so much time to the cause as rosemary, it is hoped that her story will serve to inspire others. jessica parker, bbc news. a great story, selling poppies for 97 years. and she‘s given up, what a slacker! joe will be here with the
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business news, first, the headlines on afternoon live. the eu says it will bring in tariffs on imports from the united states within weeks — after donald trump imposed new tariffs on imports of european steel and aluminium. calls from unions for the transport secretary to resign — following more problems on the railways. the end of an era in spanish politics — a vote of no confidence forces prime minister mariano rajoy out of office. i‘m joe lyname and here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. growth in the eurozone might be slowing a little — that‘s according to a key manufacturing survey. the ihs markit‘s pmi index for the 19 nations fell in may to a 15—month low of 55.5 from april‘s 56.2. a reading over 50 does still indicate growth — but it‘s been weakening since the start of the year, and the manufacturing pmi measure has now declined for five months in a row.
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an mp investigating the recent meltdown of tsb as part of a parliamentary committee has told the bbc it might have broken new gdp our data rules after some customers got letters containing other people‘s details. the bankers apologise to errors and says it is working with others to understand the error. and mothercare has backed a restructuring plan that will mean the closure of 50 stores, the company is putting stores at risk which are part of the arrangement which are part of the arrangement which are part of the arrangement which are allowing some companies to close shops and reduce rents. let‘s talk about italy because we have reported on the swearing in of the new government, the new prime minister. it‘s caused great concern is on the market, what‘s happening
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in italy. is there relief now there‘s a government in place? in italy. is there relief now there's a government in place? yes, there's a government in place? yes, the cost of borrowing government bond yields spiked to double what it was a week or two ago. the formation of the government means the cost of borrowing has come back down a bit to 2.6%. borrowing has come back down a bit to 2. 6%. investors borrowing has come back down a bit to 2.6%. investors were worried that this might lead to another eurozone crisis, they wanted to put in place a controversial economy minister, he has a job but not as the economy minister. this talk of a trade war between europe and the united states, a re we between europe and the united states, are we in a trade war or bordering on one? think we can safely say we are in one simply because the europeans, the mexicans and the canadians have said they
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will respond in kind to the tariffs which are now in force by the americans on all steel coming into the united states, 25% on steel and 2496 the united states, 25% on steel and 24% on aluminium. the europeans have reported the issue to the world trade organisation, the watchdog, and they will be publishing their retaliatory measures which could hit harley—davidson ‘s, levi jeans, florida orangejuice. harley—davidson ‘s, levi jeans, florida orange juice. the harley—davidson ‘s, levi jeans, florida orangejuice. the eu commissioner says the eu will not negotiate with the us on the issue. they are drawing a red line under the issue. it is causing consternation. you mentioned mothercare. tell us more because they are agreeing to a plan with their creditors? this is the volu nta ry their creditors? this is the voluntary arrangement which is a type of insolvency, in case people get the impression they are just chatting with creditors, they sit down with their creditors and
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they‘ve agreed to a plan to cut rents which will allow them to close 50 stores, shares have risen by 40% today. let‘s turn to michael curry from fidelity international. our mothercare out of the woods?” from fidelity international. our mothercare out of the woods? i think there are still a lot of question marks around them. they have not reacted to increased competition into the way that our spending habits have changed and of course the online proposition has not been as watertight as it could have been so still a lot of questions around mothercare, the continuing story that we've seen on the high street where those retailers that don't adapt to consumers spending habits changing and the fact that more of us are staying at home and buying things online from the sofa is impacting mothercare quite heavily. shares in harley—davidson are down today, they and some american firms
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might be in the firing line for eu retaliation. what should be whooped —— what should we be watching? mum are quitea —— what should we be watching? mum are quite a few companies, it reiterates the fact that global trade is important to us, important to trade creation dashed job creation, and by building a fortress like trump is doing by imposing these tariffs and the eu retaliating by slapping on tit—for—tat tariffs on things like harley—davidson and levi jeans and bourbon whisky, it just means that the consumer suffers because prices get higher. you will seekjob because prices get higher. you will seek job losses. it because prices get higher. you will seekjob losses. it really is a no — when the consumer. and the economy like the us is driven by the consumer. let‘s go back to italy. there was a correction, little, and bond yields from italy today. whether markets generally worried that the italians could leave the euro zone this week? a big sigh of
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relief. there's been three months of political stalemate as italy struggled to form but coalition government, it all came to on tuesday when we saw bond prices falling, use going up, they move in opposite directions and share prices of italian companies falling. in italian investors have breathed a sigh of relief now the government has been formed and italy's place in the eurozone and the prospect of further elections in the summertime are further elections in the summertime a re off further elections in the summertime are off the table. this is good news for the are off the table. this is good news forthe eu. are off the table. this is good news for the eu. thank you forjoining us. some visa card users, apparently it‘s not just in us. some visa card users, apparently it‘s notjust in the uk, some
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transactions in europe are not being processed, the cause is being investigated and work is being done as quickly as possible to resolve the situation. there have been references to this on social media. a quick look at the markets. just to book the week. mothercare shares up by 0.65% because of their news, the ftse having a good day, and the dax also having a good day in germany. joe line, thank you. that‘s it from the afternoon live team today, time for a look at the weather now with phil. thank you forjoining me, let‘s look at the weather prospects into the weekend. still showers mainly in the north of the british isles, petering out through the night, one or two left behind on a
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close might, timber just night, one or two left behind on a close might, timberjust between 11 and 17 in central areas. sunnier skies further to the south and west on saturday, right from the start, there‘s that chance of showers in there‘s that chance of showers in the south east than becoming more widely spread across east anglia up into the heart of scotland, top temperature on the date around 24, very pleasant conditions across many of these western areas. into sunday, fewer showers to report, still spotting of them there, primarily across northern and eastern parts of the british isles, still some coastal murkiness, with sunshine you could see 2425. coming up on news watch tonight why no mention of the arrest and jailing of this man although hundreds of thousands of people knew about it. joint us tonight on bbc news. today at 5pm: the us is warned it‘s
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playing a ‘dangerous game‘ — by imposing import tariffs on steel and aluminium. the european union says it will retaliate with tariffs of its own within weeks — but warns of the consequences of a trade war. protectionism can never be a solution and this will hurtjobs here in the european union but also in the us. we‘ll be examining the legality of the us move with an official from the world trade organisation. the other main stories on bbc news at 5pm: calls for the transport secretary to resign — as thousands of trains are cancelled following the introduction of new timetables. technical problems for visa — customers are experiencing issues using their cards in europe. two police officers are stabbed in an incident in greenock — both are in a serious condition in hospital.
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