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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  June 2, 2018 7:00am-8:01am BST

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thanks for watching and we'll see you soon. hello, this is breakfast, withjon kay and babita sharma. back online after hours of disruption. visa apologises and says its card payment service is back to normal. customers across europe were unable to pay for purchases. the company says a hardware failure was to blame. good morning, it's saturday the 2nd ofjune. also this morning:
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off again, on again. donald trump says a summit with the north korean leader kim jong—un will take place later this month. emergency timetables, but will they finally bring weeks of chaos to an end? rail companies say they'll work together to try and get back on track. less than 2a hours after forcing out the spanish leader, mariano rajoy, the new prime minister, pedro sanchez, will be sworn in today. in sport, anderson and broad prove the doubters wrong and england take control of the second test against pakistan. and matt has the weather. good morning. a few more thunderstorms popping up today, especially to the northern and eastern half of the country, but for quite a few of dry day with warmth and sunshine. details on that and your weekend forecast coming up. see you then, matt, thank you. good morning. first, our main story. visa's payment system is now said to be operating at full capacity following widespread disruption to card payments across the uk
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and europe yesterday. the company says the problems were down to a hardware failure and has apologised to customers. john mcmanus reports. visa says its high—tech payment system can handle 65,000 transactions per second, but on friday that boast fell flat as cardholders in the uk and across europe found their plastic simply wouldn't work. the problem began in the afternoon, appearing to largely affect electronic payments rather than cash machine withdrawals. many shoppers took to social media to complain, with the company forced to apologise. these people in droitwich said it wasn't just customers who were caught out. you can tell the staff are on tender hooks, the manager'sjumping and down. he's being a bit firm with his staff because it's territory they're not used to being in i think. there was a couple in front of us, and we hear that all the cashpoints there... all the cards were down, and apparently it was all over the world. so i was, like, panicking. i've just gone on to barclays bank to get some money out. payment processing through visa
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systems accounts for £1 of every £3 of all uk spending, that adds up to a lot of unhappy customers. on friday night, the company said their cards were now largely working at normal levels and that the: as a nation, we're using cards more than ever. that's why friday's events left so many of us frustrated. but experts say it would be wise to have some backup payment options just in case, that's cash to you and me. the consumer group which? has warned people to be wary of any phone calls or e—mails about the visa problems. they mayjust be fraudsters trying to use the event to gain your personal details. john mcmanus, bbc news. donald trump has announced that his summit with the north korean leader,
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kim jong—un, is back on and will take place later this month in singapore. nine days ago, the president abruptly cancelled the meeting, blaming what he described as the open hostility displayed by pyongyang. but last night, diplomatic relations improved after a letter from the north korean leader was delivered to the white house. speaking after meeting the north korean deleation president trump said he was now optimistic about the future. i think it's going to be ultimately a successful process, we'll see. remember what i said, we will see what we will see but i think it's going to be a process that we deserve to have. i mean, we really deserve. they wanted, we think it's important, and i think we would be making a big mistake if we didn't have it. i think we're going to be having a relationship and it will start onjune i2. we can get more now from hywel griffith, who is in seoulfor us.
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interested to know how it's going down in south korea, hywel, this news, people had such high hopes and we re news, people had such high hopes and were so news, people had such high hopes and were so disappointed when it seemed like this summit was off. absolutely, so they are pretty excited, in the words of the south korean government, they are looking forward to it with excitement but calmly because they know there's a huge amount at stake. they will have noted donald trump's wording, he talked about a process of starting a relationship on june 12, he talked about a process of starting a relationship onjune 12, he isn't getting people to believe a deal on denuclearisation, for example, might be done on that date so we may be need to temper expectations about what will happen on the day. there will be an historic handshake, of course, maybe it will be seen as
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winning for both leaders. certainly kim jong—un has become a winning for both leaders. certainly kimjong—un has become a global figure having become a pariah. 0ne of the key moment might be the announcement of a peace treaty between north and south korea, who technically are still at war after 65 years. on-again for now. hywel, thank you very much indeed. the rmt union has called for the transport secretary, chris grayling, to resign following days of delays and cancellations on trains in the south and north—west of england. the government are blaming network rail for leaving it too late to finalise new timetables. yesterday, northern rail announced it is to introduce an emergency timetable from monday, scrapping i65 daily train services until the end ofjuly. we'll be hearing more from commuters and the rail delivery group in the next few minutes. lots to ask them about. indeed. if you've got questions, do let us know. the new prime minister of spain, pedro sanchez, will officially be sworn into office today less than 2a hours after forcing out the former leader, mariano rajoy.
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the head of the socialist party won the backing of several other parties to bring his motion of no confidence against mr rajoy. the bbc‘s europe reporter gavin lee is in madrid for us now. gavin, a wet day clearly on the streets of madrid, what is the mood? has been so much change, historic, unprecedented change, people getting their heads around it, is it going to come down? there are few genuine mouth opening wow moments in politics, certainly in europe we've had two this week with the government and absolutely in spain. it's been unprecedented to have a no—confidence motion, leading to the downfall of a sitting prime minister, there's only ever been four and this one is the only one
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that worked, mariano rajoy being replaced by the man that triggered the motion, a 46—year—old former economics professor, leader of the socialist party, who has been dogged in his attempts to oust the people's party of the government and he's now prime minister. he is supported in the motion by six other parties, all disparate parties, catala ns the motion by six other parties, all disparate parties, catalans and bask nationalists, all yet to find out what they will get in exchange for their support. some are calling it a frankenstein government, it could create a political monster, he talks about stability and ridding corruption. he is sworn in in three hours when he meets king felipe. thanks very much, gavin lee in madrid. the european union's trade commissioner has warned that the us is playing a dangerous game by imposing tariffs on european steel and aluminium. in response, the eu has issued a io—page list of tariffs on us goods ranging from harley—davidson motorcycles to bourbon. canada and mexico are also planning new taxes on us products. police scotland have named the two
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officers who were stabbed at a house in greenock yesterday. pc kenny mackenzie has a serious neck injury whilst his colleague pc laura sayer was stabbed in the arm. a 43—year—old man arrested after the incident is also being treated in hospital. five people have died in a major food poisoning outbreak in the united states. almost 200 cases of e.coli linked to romaine lettuce have been reported across 35 states. it's the largest us outbreak of its kind in more than a decade. football fans have just 12 more days until the start of the world cup in russia, some might say excitement has reached fever pitch, while others think it is out of this world. these russian cosmonauts are testing out the official match ball on—board the international space station. as you do! it's quite cool for shots. not so call for him! —— not
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so shots. not so call for him! —— not so cool. anton shkaplerov and 0leg artemyev showcased some of the possibilities for zero gravity football. unfortunately they are a long way from home and won't make it back in time for the opening match against saudi arabia onjune 14th. to swa p to swap places with them would be amazing. wouldn't that be cool? i'm worried about the ball, if that is a match ball, they would need it back for the world cup in 12 days! the rmt rail union has described the situation facing northern rail customers as carnage after the network announced it was scrapping i65 daily train services until the end ofjuly. it follows days of delays and cancellations after the introduction of a new timetable. here's what some passengers have made of the disruption to their journeys. frustrating. very inconvenient, very
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inconsiderate. scandalous, something needs to be done about it. long journey ahead of us, could do without the extra hour it's cost us. a bit ofa without the extra hour it's cost us. a bit of a shambles really. honestly i expect to finish work and get home ata certain i expect to finish work and get home at a certain time and with all the train delays and that i don't end up getting home until one or two hours later than what i should beat, and i've been late for work numerous times. incredibly frustrating and really stressful when you pay for a ticket to get somewhere and you don't get the service. they need to pull their fingers out and get their act together really. 0k, they've created a new timetable, but they knew that was coming in and therefore they should have planned for the additional drivers they say they need to meet the extra demands an extra trains their putting on. you can feel the anger watching that! network rail and train oprators have pledged to work together to get services back on track as quickly as possible. we're joined now by robert nisbet from the rail delivery group. good morning to you, robert. carnage, a shambles, you can't help
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but agree with those words? it's clearly not been good enough and we apologise to any customers and we apologise to any customers and all customers who have been affected by this. network rail, northern, gdr, although companies involved in the areas where there have been difficulties since the 20th of may at apologised and they say they have let down passengers and now it's up to the industry to make things right and give certainty to customers, hence the interim timetables, which will caa number of services reduced but overall there will be more trains than before the recent timetable change. -- will see a. people are glad to see things are being tackled with these timetables but how has this happened, why has this happened? this was an immensely complicated timetable change. timetable changes happen twice a year traditionally to ta ke happen twice a year traditionally to take account of the seasons, but as pa rt take account of the seasons, but as part of this attempt to modernise the railway network, which is the
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biggest modernisation effort since victorian times, we've been trying to put in more capacity, putting in the trains where they're needed and where customers tell us they want more trains, but as part of that process we've got to create space for those trains on the tracks and hence there was this big timetable change on the 20th of may. 60% of all trains in great britain were re— timed. this isn'tjust the case of saying the 9:24am becomes the 10:15 a.m., you have to inform the train drivers, station staff and customers because sometimes there are services using the same bit of track and obviously you have to make sure it is done safely and properly and approved. clearly there were delays for major infrastructure problems that then could have radiated down into a delay in service change approvals, which meant the train operating companies didn't have enough time to train the drivers. i know it affects lots of parts of the country, but there's a real
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sense in the north of england over this that they are particularly badly hit, that it belies a lack of infrastructure over many decades and investment in the north of england, and if the shambles of the last couple of weeks had been happening in the south of england it would have been tackled sooner, it's been left to hang in the north of england. do you accept that? this is an attempt to correct what many see as an imbalanced and northern have an ambitious plan to modernise that pa rt an ambitious plan to modernise that part of the network. pacer trains are going to be removed from service and there will be 2000 extra services by 2020 with major upgrades to liverpool lime street, which will be shut for two months while be in the structure is upgraded. there are attempts, and this is part of it, but clearly the implementation failed and we're looking at why that's the case and this interim timetable should give that certainty back to passengers so they know
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there will be a train waiting for them when they arrived at the station. we are pleased you are talking to us this morning but we would like to talk to northern rail, the company who have had so much criticism. we have tried, colleagues have tried, but they're not putting anybody up. they should be talking to us and directly to customers, shouldn't be? this is so complex, as i said earlier, there are a number of different organisations and groups involved in the timetable change so it makes sense i am taking your questions —— shouldn't they? this is network rail, government, operating companies working together in partnership to deliver a long—term plan to improve and change the network where it's needed. the truth is,jon, network where it's needed. the truth is, jon, the railway network in britain is running at capacity, one of the busiest railways in the world and since the mid— 90s the number of passengers travelling on the trains has doubled. what we're trying to do is address that, putting more trains where they are needed, but clearly with this timetable change in
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certain parts of the country it didn't go according to plan. but to give you the bigger national picture, nearly nine out of ten trains are linked to the new timetable, so it's not bad everywhere, but we except in the gtr and northern regions it wasn't as good as it should have been. you're taking the flak for them, we appreciate your time, but if you speak to northern tell them we will do it over skype, the phone, three 01’ do it over skype, the phone, three orfour minutes, do it over skype, the phone, three or four minutes, whatever‘s easiest, to a nswer or four minutes, whatever‘s easiest, to answer the viewer questions, that would be great. we live in hope. matt's here with a look at this morning's weather. good morning, a mixed leaves today, things getting better, more in the way of dry weather but this is a fairly familiar scene, grey skies overhead, that was in saltash in cornwall, and lots of cloud pushing in from the east which has already
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produced rain across parts of lincolnshire, yorkshire, parts of east anglia and east midlands and a few heavy showers running from northwest midlands through the merseyside and the far west of lincolnshire through the morning but elsewhere, lots of sunshine through the day across southern counties of england and wales, sunnier than late, sunshine in scotland away from mist and low cloud in 0rkney and shetland but storms kicking off again, maybe for northern areas. inland areas of scotland particular grampians through the upland, some in northern island, isolated so, at the red light winds in the forecast so if you get stuck under one you could be there for a length of time and it could drop a huge amount of rain and some close to headingley as well so further showers and thunderstorms down here as well. sometime and warmth across southern counties through much of wales, largely clear tonight, one or two mist and fog patches, showers and
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storms easing through the night, some showers across northern england the far south of scotland and maybe northern ireland and the double—figure temperature not across the board. human across scotland, northern ireland, northern england, fresh off late in the south but sunshine to start sunday. blue skies overhead for much of the day, some light cloud, maybe a shower in cornwall. some in northern england and northern ireland but not as many as today. on the heavy side where you have them. 25 degrees the high in southern england. 26 across scotland. call it still into monday, the high pressure to the north of us should keep many dry into the start of next week but around it will fade m, of next week but around it will fade in, more of the misty grey low cloud of the north—east soap areas, monday, misty and murky, spots of light rain and drizzle and maybe the odd shower possible on monday, the vast majority of the uk so will be dry. in this guys in the west and temperatures in the high teens low
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20s. not desperately hot but very pleasa nt 20s. not desperately hot but very pleasant indeed. i will have more through the morning. that looks pretty good, we will take that. if you have been trying to use a visa card over the course of yesterday evening, it has been a nightmare. visa has apologised to customers across the uk and europe after they faced problems using their cards yesterday. some businesses were forced to implement a cash—only policy. visa says all its systems are now working properly. jonathan harrison owns a restaurant and was one of those affected by the outage. hejoins us now. good morning to you. tell us what happened. well, we had a couple of customers come to pay at the end of lunch and the machine wouldn't work. connection failed it was telling us. sometimes we have issues with the handset where it needs to reconnect
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to the basics of the handset was reset but the issue persisted. we we re reset but the issue persisted. we were worried that we have lost our broadband connections that was reset. it carried on. contacted the provider via the customer support, which was engaged. rang several times, and then got an automated message from visa to say there was an issue. i bet that is the last thing you needed to have was an automated message! we have all been there but we have tried our calves repeatedly and we think what is going on at what point did you realise this was a serious issue and you would not be able to take any credit card transactions? pretty quickly, really, you can hop on social media pretty quickly and find out what other people are having happened to them and realise it isn't just local but happened to them and realise it isn'tjust local but people all over the country have the same issue. it
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caught up at a quiet period, just after the lunchtime rush and before evenin after the lunchtime rush and before even in chaos, but for the evening chaosis even in chaos, but for the evening chaos is contact customers and bookings to say that we had issues with the card machine and it is cash only, popping a note on the door and then managing it that way. to your business? for us, it wasn't really a n your business? for us, it wasn't really an issue and we could manage it but i think other people would struggle more, people shopping at supermarkets and having their cards to client would be fairly dramatic i think. it trolley full of shopping. jonathan, we are grateful to you sharing your story with us and tha nkfully sharing your story with us and thankfully for jonathan and sharing your story with us and thankfully forjonathan and his restau ra nt thankfully forjonathan and his restaurant it was just before the busy period but the cash only causes a lot of inconvenience for many of us. isil long queues late yesterday and people trying to get to the
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cashpoints to get their money out. before i saw long queues. in the studio with us is editor—in—chief of money.co.uk, hannah maundrell. have you ever known anything quite like this? not on this scale and not across europe. because it is visa and visa's used to back so many credit and debit cards, one in every £3 in europe is spent on a visa card but also payment systems that retailers and shops use to transfer the payments. so it is a massive scale and itjust caught everyone by surprise, the fact it was a friday evening as well when everyone is going in, doing theirweekly evening as well when everyone is going in, doing their weekly shop, it's exacerbated the issue. what i think is so scary, the statistics i've read, is so many of us now, it is second nature, 95% in the country rely on debit card translations to pay for goods and also with the co nta ctless pay for goods and also with the contactless payments we have now, we are encouraged to do that, it is about convenience, so how can this
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happen visa have said it is down to a hardware value, they have apologised and will no doubt look after it and you can bet your bottom dollar those regulations would be asking strict questions about what happened. it will be a wake-up call for the whole payment industry to make sure they build an extra resilience and this cannot happen again because as you say we are more reliant on credit or debit card these days. it seems a bit random how some people's visa cards were working, somewhere, some worked on chip and pin that not on co nta ctless, chip and pin that not on contactless, some people throwing woodwork, some people were not. it added to the chaos i guess for businesses that the killer. it also left a n businesses that the killer. it also left an element of uncertainty because businesses were not sure if it was them or an industrywide problem and certainly the customers initially there was confusion caused as to whether they had issues with their own accounts rather than the payment system itself. there is a lot of destruction but i think a lot
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of things is for people to remember that if you lost our financially in any way then make sure you get proof of that, receipts, keep notes of charges, and make a claim to visa for the money, i would imagine they would set up a redress scheme. if you took out cash on a credit card because you had no other means of getting that money, then it is likely you will be charged interest from today because with cash withdrawals on credit cards you get quite hefty rate of interest, around 27 or 28% plus potentially a £3 charge, so if you withdrew cash on your credit card, pay it off today and make sure you claimed the charges back and be aware of scammers, every time something big like this happens, scammers use it as an opportunity to contact people to offer to help them reclaim any money that they have lost. it is an opportunity to take advantage of people so be wary of anyone new contacting you out of the blue. that is what we do after we have fallen victim to this. how can we prevent ourselves being put in this
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situation? is it using different cards from different providers? hopefully this will not happen again on this scale that yes, it seems to make sense to have a visa, amex, mastercard. or cash. what is cash? hopefully this is a rarity and it shouldn't happen again but if you are concerned, potentially spread the risk by getting a number of different cards in your wallet. all banking under your mattress. it's interesting because visa are saying, we should stress if you have woken up we should stress if you have woken up and wondering if you can spend money, visa say they are back to capacity. you do wonder what would have happened if this went on to many more hours or if it happened at the beginning of the day and we had a whole day and night of it what would have happened. think indeed for now and hopefully we don't have to talk about this again with you in the future. i would love to do with
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the future. i would love to do with the financial cost has been to the country and all of us and i'm sure we will find out in coming days. do get in touch and let us know, if you are waiting in line and needed to get petrol or to be or a train or anything like that, you couldn't pay anything like that, you couldn't pay a hotel bill, let us know how it affected your life last night. losing your eyesight brings with it a range of challenges. for mona manahan, it meant the simple pleasure of putting on her make—up became near—impossible, so her husband des stepped in to help. this simple gesture of love eventually found its way onto social media and went on to pull on heartstrings around the world. we've been to meet des and mona. we have been married now 56 years. we are just enjoying life. we are still married, we think! as with any long—standing marriage, mona and des are a successful are a successful partnership. and as her eyesight deteriorated, des found a special way to help. her left eye is bad, really bad. when she tries to do something with the right eye, the left eye doesn't see anything.
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it's very relaxing. best thing to do is to keep you awake. so i would be doing little corrections like that. this birthday party came up, mona decided "i'm going to get my face done up for the party". so they enlisted a make—up artist. he was telling me this story that mona, her sight was bad and she was losing her sight and that she wasn't able to hold things properly. she had a lot of shaking in her hands. des took the brushes from my hand and wanted to have a try. if you do see the way he holds the brushes, their story came to the attention of mario dedivanovic, whose celebrity clients include katy perry, jennifer lopez and kim kardashian. he invited them to his show in london. mario, he was touched by the story and said to his manager "i want those two at my masterclass in london." he just — he just seemed to want to know us.
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he seemed to want to have us there. it's an effort for me even realise how big it was. make—up and mario and the kardashians — they were absolutely nothing in our lives until now. she hasn't changed a bit, really. i got a little bit make—up in my hair. i was trying to impress her with my attempts to sing like nat king cole. sings: they try to tell us we are too young. mona and i both agree on one thing and that is that less is more. and there's no way i want my lovely mona slapped up with stuff. he thinks i'm lovely as i am. i do. voila! we're done.
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0h! i love it! fantastic! thank you to them for sharing our story with us and i'm sure many people will understand and appreciate that have been through together. stay with us. headlines coming up for you. hello, this is breakfast with jon kay and babita sharma. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. visa's payment system is now said to be operating at full capacity following a hardware failure which prevented businesses processing card payments across the uk and europe yesterday. the company has apologised to customers, saying it recognises that it fell well short of its goals. visa said the disruption wasn't down to any unauthorised access or cyber attack. donald trump has announced that his summit with the north korean leader, kim jong—un, is back on and will take place
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later this month in singapore. nine days ago, the president abruptly cancelled the meeting, blaming what he described as the open hostility displayed by pyongyang. but yesterday diplomatic relations improved after a letter from the north korean leader was delivered to the white house. the rmt union has called for the transport secretary, chris grayling, to resign following days of delays and cancellations on trains in the south and north—west of england. the government are blaming network rail for leaving it too late to finalise new timetables. earlier on breakfast, robert nisbet from the rail delivery group told us that all the companies were now working on solutions. they have let down passengers and now it's up to the industry to make things right and give certainty
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to customers, hence the interim timetables, which will see a number of services reduced but overall there will be more trains than before the recent timetable change. the new prime minister of spain, pedro sanchez, will officially be sworn into office today, less than 2a hours after forcing out his predecessor, mariano rajoy. the head of the socialist party won the backing of several other parties to win his motion of no confidence after mr rajoy‘s conservative party became implicated in a corruption scandal. the european union's trade commissioner has warned that the us is playing a dangerous game by imposing tariffs on european steel and aluminium. in response the eu has issued a 10—page list of tariffs on us goods ranging from harley—davidson motorcycles to bourbon. canada and mexico are also planning new taxes on us products. police scotland have named the two officers who were stabbed at a house in greenock yesterday. pc kenny mackenzie has a serious neck injury
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whilst his colleague pc laura sayer was stabbed in the arm. a 43—year—old man arrested after the incident is also being treated in hospital. five people have died in a major food poisoning outbreak in the united states. almost 200 cases of e.coli linked to romaine lettuce have been reported across 35 states. it is the largest us outbreak of it's kind in more than a decade. thatis that is the news headlines this morning at 7:33am. john is here with this board. good morning. england in control of the second test —— john isner with the sport. thanks to a fired up stuart broad, which has come from comments michael vaughan, the former captain, said about him, saying after the disaster of the first test where we lost by nine wickets, perhaps he orjames anderson should be dropped to shake things upa anderson should be dropped to shake things up a bit ——john isner here with the sport. he was angered by the comments, fired him up —— jaunt is here.
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stuart broad responding in the best way possible with three wickets, james anderson with three wickets and chris woakes also taking three, pakistan all out for 174. and as england prepare to resume on 106—2, broad says he feels the comments weren't fair. i've always enjoyed listening to punditry. i think it's really interesting when you hear different people's opinions. i've always been very open to criticism when it's come my way when i feel it's fair. this week it was... there wasn't a huge amount of logic in it, which did disappoint me slightly, only two tests ago i did pick up eight wickets in christchurch. it was disappointing to read those comments but it's sort of the world we live in. england manager gareth southgate will no doubt be looking forward to focussing on the football rather than talking about things like tattoos when his team play the first of two friendlies later before departing for the world cup. nigeria the opponents at wembley. david 0rnstein is with the team.
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england's path to the world cup has been smooth, but with the tournament now fast approaching, the scrutiny has intensified. this week, raheem sterling moved to defend himself after revealing a tattoo of an assault rifle on his right leg. amid criticism from anti—gun campaigners, sterling said the artwork had a deeper meaning, that his father was shot dead when the player was just two years old and he made a promise never to touch a gun in his life. he understands how some people have perceived the tattoo, but in my view, a tattoo is like any work of art, it's a very individual meaning. he's not somebody that supports or wants to promote guns. this is a youthful england squad. the household names of the past are gone, so too perhaps
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the shackles of previous tournament failures. the nation will be behind us no matter what. the group of lads we've got now, you know, it's a high—profile group. many talents in the group. i think we've got a good chance of going far this year. the focus is clear, to succeed where so many have fallen short. expectations may be low, but spirits are high as england attempt to closing on football's greatest prize. david 0rnstein, bbc news, hertfordshire. well worth seeing nigeria's new kit. there's been a mad rush to get hold of it. here is it, all neon green and chevrons. since nike released it online, there were over three millon orders. that's arsenal's alex iwobi moidelling it. it sold out straight away, so lots people queuing for hours on oxford street in the hope
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of getting one in store, peter 0kwoche was there. it's just sam, the shop doesn't open until 10am. yeah. queueing up for four hours to buy a jersey? yeah. now, i got a lot of phone calls from nigeria yesterday talking about how expensive it is. do you know how expensive it is here? it's about £64. £64, that's about 40,000 naira. 40,000 naira, yeah. is that too expensive? in nigeria, yeah. but not in london? not in london, nah. so you've got yourjerseys now. gosh, is it what you imagined it would be? yeah. it's gold to you guys right now, isn't it? can i touch it? give it to me! well worth the four hour wait judging by the smiles on their faces. leeds rhinos thrashed leigh centurions in the quarter—finals of rugby league's challenge cup. leigh actually took the lead in the game but when the championship side had a man sent off, leeds ran riot scoring nine tries in total. 18year—old jack walker
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with the pick of them, 52—22 the final score. rugby union heads across the atlantic once again tonight, with wales facing south africa in washington, but the head of the premiership rugby is not happy about it. as a result, warren gatland will be missing his english—based players for the game in the united states. premiership rugby boss mark mccafferty says the game places an unnecessary burden on the clubs and players involved. the five—time paralympic champion ellie simmonds has criticised british swimming after she returned to elite action in sheffield last night. simmonds put in a european championship qualification standard performance at the british para—swimming international meet. she'd taken time away after the rio games, saying she hated the sport, and says that the governing body hasn't been there to support her. i think it's because i had something to prove to british swimming, because they've not been there for me at all this past couple of years. i'm doing it so low, well, not so low, but with a great team
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around me but ijust wanted to prove them wrong and that i'm still there. asean british swimming haven't responded to those comments. —— as yet british swimming. we know that england used a cool video online to announce the england squad. well, a belgian bedding company might just have ruined their nation's big announcement. this broadcaster showed footage of mattresses being loaded up for their departure for russia with labels indicating the player there to give it to. manager roberto martinez has already named a 28—man provisional squad, but his final squad of 23 wasn't due to be announced until monday. five were obviously missing out. if you're a belgian player wondering if you've made the cut, that's one way of finding out, slightly ruined it! they get the spike mattresses? all
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these marginal gains to make that little difference —— they get these bespoke mattresses. egyptian cotton, all that kind of stuff. take your pick, get your order in! five u nwa nted mattresses pick, get your order in! five unwanted mattresses have just been delivered to their houses! thanks very much, john, see you later. someone who might not have the problem you might expect with egyptian cotton and mattresses is roman abramovich. his future investments in the uk and chelsea football club are in doubt this morning after the bbc discovered that he has withdrawn his application for a new visa. the chelsea owner has also put plans for the expansion of the club's stamford bridge stadium on hold. so who is the russian oligarch? he started in business by setting up a company making dolls, before finding his fortune in the oil industry after the collapse of the soviet union and even serving as a russian regional governor. in 2003 he became chelsea's owner and has spent more than £2 billion on players and wages in the last decade. he's britain's 13th richest man,
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worth £9.3 billion. one man who knows more about abramovich than most is journalist dominic midgely, co—author of the book abramovich: the billionaire from nowhere. hejoins us from our london newsroom. hejoins us now he joins us now from hejoins us now from our london newsroom. good morning, thanks for joining us. this visa business this week, would that have come as a surprise to mr abramowitz that all ofa surprise to mr abramowitz that all of a sudden it wouldn't be quite as straightforward or simple as it has beenin straightforward or simple as it has been in the past —— visa —— abramovich. is the victim of the toxic atmosphere between the and russia over the sergei skripal incident —— he's the victim. there was the passing of the sanctions and the anti— money—laundering act, so everything has been ramped up. he is very close to president putin, the russian president, and he's a of that association. when you've got the kind of money we just described,
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the kind of money we just described, the personal fortune of billions, he's probably used to being able to do anything and everything he wants to do. being in this situation must have been unusual and probably infuriating for him? absolutely. when he bought the club in the first place, we asked a western businessman based in moscow what motivated him and he said it was the cheapest insurance policy in history —— western. immediately he became a household name in this country and if the kremlin moved against him it would create headlines around the world and he would be given asylum and everything would be hunky—dory. but by doing that, by keeping his close association with putin, now the threat has come from the other side, not moscow, but london. we hear he has put plans for a new sta mford we hear he has put plans for a new stamford bridge home for chelsea on hold maybe because he doesn't feel he is as confident in the uk as he
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has been until now. where does it leave abramowitz‘s links with chelsea, is this the beginning of the end for him, is he going to pull away? it's difficult to know, it is away? it's difficult to know, it is a naked power putting present on the government —— pressure. but the latest news is he has withdrawn his visa application and we hear he has israeli citizenship though he can come and go as he wants. but who knows if he's working, behind the doors of his £125 million kensington mansion. it is difficult to see how it will play out but the british government is under pressure to be hawkish about the russian oligarchs with links to putin in the aftermath of this sergei skripal affair, and we put pressure on the eu and america to expel diplomats and impose sanctions, we have to be seen to be going the extra mile ourselves. he might be the first and
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most high profile of a number of similar oligarchs have, casualties. dominic midgely, biographer of roman abramovich, thank you very much indeed —— similar oligarchs casualties. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. not bad for many, dry weather to come this weekend but i suppose all of today's whether summed up by one shot. a bit of cloud overhead, some brea ks shot. a bit of cloud overhead, some breaks and the sum it is also misty as well. the satellite imagery shows thicker cloud spreading in off the north sea through the night, this is the remnants of storms across central europe, rain across the grid for south yorkshire, north—east midlands and it towards east anglia and away from that, hefty downpours pushing through cheshire, wales towards merseyside. elsewhere, dry, the cloud in the south breaking up, sunshine developing, sunshine across scotla nd sunshine developing, sunshine across scotland but into the afternoon as
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temperatures rise we will see a few heavy and bunbury showers breakout. let's look at where they are likely to be, inland areas of scotland in the afternoon. some slow—moving because the light winds in the forecast, would be minorflooding, some frequent lightning and hail. fairly isolated though many will stay dry and unlike yesterday in northern england where the showers we re northern england where the showers were on the west, it will be on the east today and a few across the east it -- east today and a few across the east it —— east midlands. lots of sunshine across southern areas though, highs of 24. it could get to 2324 in scotland but cooler than recently. the storms will fade away the most and we will see some showers continuing in northern england, southern scotland and northern ireland and temperatures in double figures, muggy across northern areas, fresher than recent nights towards the south but it is here that we start sunday with lots of sunshine, a pleasant day in store
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for wales, midlands, southern england, some cloud towards devon and cornwall. the chance of the shower with more cloud across northern england, scotland and northern ireland but not as many as you are seeing yesterday and indeed today and temperatures in the sun in the south of the 25 or 26. the start of next week, the high pressure is still there but because it is slightly west of us it will start to dragon winds from a north—easterly direction though temperatures dropping relative to where they have been this week although we will start the week with mist and low cloud, central and eastern areas, it will burn to the coast through the day, some sunny spells for the majority, one or two stay great and isolated showers but most places dry and temperatures into the low 20s. plus the warmth this weekend, a few storms, a little cooler than next week but a lot of dry weather two. that sounds pretty good! but sounds all right. better than last week. we'll bring you the headlines at 8:00. now it's time for newswatch with samira ahmed.
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welcome to newswatch. i'm samira ahmed. on this week's round—up of your reactions to bbc news coverage, the world's media fall victim to a prime example of fake news as a russian journalist turns out not to have been murdered after all. and why there was no mention of the arrest and jailing of this man, although hundreds of thousands of people knew about it. first, the political turmoil in italy occupied plenty of airtime this week as that country struggles to form a government three months after a general election. that election saw the success of what has been called the anti—establishment five star movement and lega, normally described as a right—wing party. but these coalition partners have also been widely characterised across bbc news with a term that has proved controversial with some viewers. here is katya adler describing concerns of italians on wednesday's news at ten.
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they want those changes that populist politicians have promised them. they are trying to foist an unliked government of technocrats —— they are trying to foist an unelected of technocrats threatening the same old, same old, and trying to put a lid on things, thatjust didn't go down well. if there were fresh elections, it would probably explode into even more support for the populists. john shewbridge contacted us this week with the following query: well, we sought an answer to that from bbc news and they told us: semantics were also at the heart of some other feedback we received this week.
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the subject matter this time, the debate in the republic of ireland around last friday's referendum overturning the ban on abortion, and in particular a phrase used here by emma vardy, reporting on northern ireland's possible response. the dup leader arlene foster has said her party will keep its pro—life position and that friday's referendum in the south will have no impact on the law up here. 0ne twitter user was prompt to pose this question: 0ther viewers were more concerned about the way in which by sunday, bbc news was moving the story on from the vote in the republic of ireland. in belfast today, a sense the debate now moves here. northern ireland remains the only part of the uk were abortion is illegal, unless there
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is a risk to a woman's life. i would love to see a referendum appear. again, with the parties, it will probably never happen, but hopefully, it will start a bit of a conversation going. i would love the same sort of vote up here, so i would. could it happen? i don't know, not with our government. grace dalton rang us with her thoughts. i felt extremely depressed about the referendum result in ireland. it was confounded so much by bbc coverage the following day, throughout sunday night and most of monday, of supposed calls for abortion laws to be changed then in northern ireland. it seems bizarre to me that you would have a news report about "calls", as though some significant number of public statements have been made by significant figures. you vox popped people
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in the street but it wasn't news, it wasn't a news story. what you were doing was to stoke more division and more controversy and hurt. the bank holiday weekend also saw an event important enough to the news that one that it featured in friday's headlines — the bbc‘s festival of music, called the biggest weekend. —— to the news at one that it featured in friday's headlines — the bbc‘s festival of music, called the biggest weekend. billed as a massive celebration of live music, the event is being staged in four nations across four days. 0ur entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba joins us from belfast. what's happening where you are? well, the first acts came on stage just under half an hour ago to kick off this huge music event spanning four days and four nations. it has taken months and months of effort from hundreds upon hundreds of people and, of course, the most crucial ingredient is here too, and that is the passion of millions of fans across the uk.
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but kate merrin questioned the attention given to the biggest weekend on bbc news, writing: please let us know what you think about the subjects we're raising in this programme, or tell us your views on any other aspect of bbc news. stay tuned for details on how to contact us. it has been a challenging week forjournalism — one in which a murder was reported which turned out not to have taken place, and an arrest took place which lots of people knew about but which was not reported at all forfour days. the murder which never was was, of course, that of arkady babchenko in ukraine. at his apartment block in the capital, kiev, the 41—year—old was shot and fatally wounded. his wife told police she was in the bathroom and she heard gunfire. she found her husband lying in a pool of his own blood.
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he had been shot in the back and died in an ambulance a short time later. the problem was that arkady babchenko turned out the following day not to be dead after all, but a participant in a sting operation set up by ukrainian security services intended to foil what they said was a russian assassination plot. sarah louise—ellis thought there would be egg on the faces at bbc news: but if that was a prime example of fake news, it was a case of no news that concerned hundreds of viewers and earlier this week. —— earlier this week. last friday, the former english defence league leader tommy robinson was arrested and jailed for potentially prejudicing a court case. he was broadcasting on social media outside leeds crown court when a trial was taking place and a judge found him guilty of contempt of court. over 250,000 people viewed his footage, and many were bemused there was no mention of it
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on mainstream media, or of protests against his jailing over the weekend. james kearney wondered on monday: the silence was because the judge had ordered a temporary media blackout, fearing that reports of robinson's conviction could influence the jury in the very case he had broadcast about on facebook. the media challenged the ban, which was lifted on tuesday, allowing the strange tale to be told. bbc news explains: also on tuesday, bbc news brought
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us a story introduced here on the news at six. youtube says it has deleted more than half of the music videos which police claim are responsible for fuelling a surge in violent crime across london. the metropolitan police commissioner, cressida dick, says the groups which feature so—called drill music include lyrics which encourage knife attacks. the problem, in some eyes of the audience, articulated here byjennifer bates: the same day, bbc news told us that medical staff who treated the former russian spy sergei skripal and his daughter
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yulia skripal did not expect the pair to survive. here is rita chakravarthy on the news at one. in interviews with the bbc‘s newsnight programme, the staff said at first they thought the pair had suffered a drug overdose. mark urban reports. it'sjust before 5pm on the 4th of march. we were just told that there were two patients down in the emergency department who were critically unwell and they would be coming up to the unit. sarah clamp emailed us: finally, we're used to seeing the main news here at broadcasting house in the background of broadcasts. on occasion, the staff behind the presenter seem to catch more of the audience's attention than what is going on in the studio, and that was the case this week forjothacob, who sent us this screen grab with a message: thank you for all your
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comments this week. if you want to share your opinions on bbc news and current affairs or even appear on the programme, you can call us or email us. you can find us on twitter and do have a look at our website we you can catch up with previous discussions recorded. that is all from us. we will be back to hear your thoughts about bbc news coverage again next week. goodbye. hello, this is breakfast, withjon kay and babita sharma. back online after hours of disruption, visa apologises and says its card payment service is back to normal. customers across europe were unable to pay for purchases, the company says a hardware failure was to blame. good morning, it's saturday the 2nd ofjune.
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also this morning. off again, on again, donald trump says a summit with the north korean leader kimjong—un will take place later this month. emergency timetables, but will they finally bring weeks of chaos to an end? rail companies say they'll work together to try and get back on track. less than 24 hours after forcing out the spanish
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