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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  June 2, 2018 8:00am-9:00am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, withjon kay and babita sharma. back online after hours of disruption, visa apologises and says its card payment service is back to normal. customers across europe were unable to pay for purchases, the company says a hardware failure was to blame. good morning, it's saturday the 2nd ofjune. also this morning. off again, on again, donald trump says a summit with the north korean leader kimjong—un will take place later this month. emergency timetables, but will they finally bring weeks of chaos to an end? rail companies say they'll work together to try and get back on track. less than 2a hours after forcing out the spanish leader mariano rajoy, the new prime minister pedro sanchez will be sworn in today.
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in sport, stuart broad and jimmy anderson prove the doubters wrong as england take control of the second test against pakistan. and we'll take a look at the sport where the passenger gets a rough ride ahead of the british sidecar—cross championship. you sit at the side and you have a rough ride. i don't fancy that! you sit at the side and you have a rough ride. i don't fancy thanm looks like great fun! let's find out what the weather is doing. good morning. one or two thunderstorms p°ppin9 morning. one or two thunderstorms p°pping up morning. one or two thunderstorms popping up today particularly in the northern and eastern half of the country. for quite a few of you, a dry day with some more fans some sunshine. details coming up. good morning. first, our main story. visa payment system is now said to be operating at "full capacity" following widespread disruption to card payments across the uk and europe yesterday. the company says the problems were down to a "hardwear failure" and has apologised to customers. john mcmanus reports.
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visa says its high—tech payment system can handle 65,000 transactions per second, but on friday that boast fell flat as cardholders in the uk and across europe found their plastic simply wouldn't work. the problem began in the afternoon, appearing to largely affect electronic payments rather than cash machine withdrawals. many shoppers took to social media to complain, with the company forced to apologise. these people in droitwich said it wasn't just customers who were caught out. you can tell the staff are on tenter hooks, the manager'sjumping and down. he's being a bit firm with his staff because it's territory they're not used to being in i think. there was a couple in front of us, and we hear that all the cashpoints there... all the cards were down, and apparently it was all over the world. so i was, like, panicking. i've just gone on to barclays bank to get some money out. payment processing through visa systems accounts for £1 of every £3 of all uk spending, that adds up to a lot
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of unhappy customers. by friday night, the company said their cards were now largely working at normal levels and that the: as a nation, we're using cards more than ever. that's why friday's events left so many of us frustrated. but experts say it would be wise to have some back—up payment optionsjust in case, that's cash to you and me. the consumer group which has warned people to be wary of any phone calls or e—mails about the visa problems. they mayjust be fraudsters trying to use the event to gain your personal details. john mcmanus, bbc news. donald trump has announced that his summit with the north korean leader, kim jong—un, is back on and will take place
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later this month in singapore. nine days ago, the president abruptly cancelled the meeting, blaming what he described as the "open hostility" displayed by pyongyang. but yesterday diplomatic relations improved after a letter from the north korean leader was delivered to the white house. speaking after meeting the north korean delegation president trump said he was now optimistic about the future. i think it's going to be ultimately a successful process, we'll see. remember what i said, we will see what we will see but i think it's going to be a process that we deserve to have. i mean, we really deserve. they want it, we think it's important, and i think we would be making a big mistake if we didn't have it. i think we're going to be having a relationship and it will start on june 12th. we can get more now from hywel griffith, who is in seoulfor us. do people believe it's really on
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this time, or will it still be a nervous ten days waiting to see if it actually happens? it's been a roller—coaster getting this far. who knows with these two rather unpredictable leaders. the feeling in south korea is one of optimism, the government spokesperson telling us the government spokesperson telling us they are excited about the historic meeting on june 12. us they are excited about the historic meeting onjune 12. they will have also been trying to lead between the lines of what donald trump had to say. note the word process and the start of a relationship. this isn't going to be a donald trump deal announced on june 12. when it comes to denuclearisation, what we expect may not actually come through. the us had been talking about complete irreversible geek neutralisation, jimjohn —— irreversible geek neutralisation, jim john —— irreversible denuclearisation. what we could be
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expecting is the announcement of a peace treaty between the north and the south. there's been a 65 year stalemate since the korean war. that could be the piece of paper donald trump could help to sign and would give him, maybe, a legacy. finance ministers from the g7 group of nations have criticised new us tariffs on steel and aluminium imports. speaking during talks in the canadian resort of whistler, the chancellor, philip hammond, said the move was "worrying" and his canadian counterpart said us claims that the duties protected its national security were "absurd". the us defence secretary, james mattis, has accused china of trying to intimidate and coerce its neighbours by deploying missiles in the south china sea. speaking to south—east asian defence ministers in singapore, general mattis said that whilst the trump administration wanted a constructive working relationship with china, the us would compete vigorously if necessary. the rail industry has pledged to get train services in the north of england back on track as quickly as possible following days of disruption.
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northern has announced it will be running an emergency timetable until the end ofjuly, with 165 services scrapped. peter marshall has been speaking to passengers in the lake district: the majority of services were cancelled yesterday. for passengers like this, trying to get back home to liverpool, it's frustrating. it's scandalous. you can see people there with prams, dogs. there's nobody here to help. and this could go on for weeks on this line in particular? i think so, for weeks on this line in particular? ithink so, something needs to be done about it. businesses in the lake district rely
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on visitors coming back time and time again. tourism leaders fear poor rail services could do long—term damage to the lake district reputation around the world. to be let down at that very first point of contact with the county, to come out of that station and to not be able to have that smooth onward journey is just unacceptable. and now there's confirmation from northern that for an initial two—week period from monday, all lake line services are to be removed and replaced with a bus service as it struggles to cope with timetable changes and driver shortages. northern has apologised for the disruption and says it's doing all it can to improve the situation quickly. peter marshall, bbc news, oxenholme. it was pretty disastrous. we've had lots of people sending us comments. please keep them coming in on twitter. you saw the keys as well. yes, people waiting for trains and then couldn't pay with their visa
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cards, it was pretty disastrous. more on both those stories coming up. police scotland have named the two officers who were stabbed at a house in greenock yesterday. pc kenny mackenzie has a serious neck injury whilst his colleague pc laura sayer was stabbed in the arm. a 43—year—old man arrested after the incident is also being treated in hospital. the new prime minister of spain, pedro sanchez, will officially be sworn into office today, less than 2a hours after forcing out the former leader, mariano rajoy. the head of the socialist party won the backing of several other parties to bring his motion of no confidence against mr rajoy. the bbc‘s europe reporter gavin lee is in madrid for us now. gavin, what's the mood there? a state of turmoil for them for the last 2a hours if not longer, gavin. yes, when you think about the fact this is unprecedented in spanish politics, the success of a no—confidence motion against a
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sitting prime minister to oust him. mariano rajoy was seemingly an movable from office. they attempted to re m ove movable from office. they attempted to remove him year ago. his party, the former government embroiled in a corruption scandal and finally the high court saying the people's party was involved in systemic corruption. pedro sanchez, former economics professor and socialist leader. he will meet the spanish king in three hours' time and will be officially unveiled as spain's new prime minister. thank you. five people have died in a major food poisoning outbreak in the united states. almost 200 cases of e.coli linked to romaine lettuce have been reported across 35 states. it is the largest us outbreak of its kind in more than a decade. football fans have just 12 more days until the start of the world cup in russia,
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some might say excitement has reached fever pitch, while others think it is out of this world. these russian cosmonauts are testing out the official match ball on—board the international space station. if there's one place to do it, you're going to do it there. adding a more acrobatic edge to the beautiful game. anton shkaplerov and oleg artemyev showcased some of the possibilities for zero gravity football. unfortunately, they are a long way from home and won't make it back in time for the opening match against saudi arabia onjune 14th. it's natural slow motion, you don't even need a replay! it's 11 minutes past eight. visa says its services are now back to normal after customers across the uk and europe faced problems using their cards yesterday.
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people have been telling us they went out for meals and restaurants wouldn't take their cards, trouble in petrol stations and that kind of thing. we don't even know what the financial implications are. the company is blaming what it calls a "hardwear failure" for the problems. personal finance editor at the financial times claer barrett joins us now from our london newsroom. good morning. thank you for being with us this morning. what did you make of it and can you think of a reason why? we are trying to work out if it's a systems failure. it's really shocking that visa has put out so little information about what happened. there were reports across social media from 2:30pm yesterday saying people were having problems. at first many people thought their paycheque hadn't gone through, it was the first day of the month on their card was refused and there was
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embarrassment. this turned to panic as people thought there must be a bigger problem here. it took visa until 5pm uk time before its official social media channels said there was a problem. it took them until nearly 10pm before they said it wasn't a cyber attack and the system it wasn't a cyber attack and the syste m ha d it wasn't a cyber attack and the system had got back to normal. it's not just customers system had got back to normal. it's notjust customers like you and me trying to buy a meal on their way home or sun drinks in the pub on a friday night. even one of our readers in dundee was trying to buy a birthday cake for her son's tenth birthday. there's lots of little levels of disruption. think of the retailers and uk businesses, unable to ta ke retailers and uk businesses, unable to take payments. restaurants, petrol stations, the kind of places where you pay after you've consumed the food up at the petrol in their tank, they were having to take people's names and addresses. some retailers with the old—style swipe
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machines were getting both out of the back of the cupboard and using those. they really shocking outage, frankly. we've been inundated with comments on social media about this. not only the business implications but for us as users brings home how reliant we are on the system of debit and credit cards. what do you think we can do to protect ourselves to avoid this happening again, let alone what visa will be doing? visa is responsible for about 95% of the uk debit cards. for any failure to happen to its system, even for a couple of minutes left in several hours, i think they urgently need to investigate what was this issue, how can it be prevented from happening again. in terms of the impact on uk consumers, a lot of people on twitter are complaining they've gone on to their bank statements online and seen they've been charged more
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than once for those payments. there was a backlog of payments in the system. if you've tried to make payments and your card is refused, it would be sensible for you to check your statements and make sure that payments haven't been taken. maybe you went round the corner to a cashpoint and took out cash and paper something that had been declined, and the payment has later come out. it's a big hassle for consumers. it does show us that regardless of what people say about the cashless society, it's always worth carrying some cash. if you can have more than one bank account, there's nothing to stop you from having more than one and it's sensible to maybe have one that uses mastercard and one that uses these. only —— people only get paid a certain amount of money every month so certain amount of money every month so having cash at home is a luxury for the better paid amongst us and
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which is why we need more resilience in the system. maybe we're going back to the days of keeping cash under the mattress! it seems visa have got their house in order a bit. visa tweeted this update in the early hours of this morning saying they have resolved a technical issue, which occurred in europe and prevented some consumers from using visa for payments. they reiterate the issue was the result of a hardware failure and is not associated with any unauthorized access or cyberattack. that's a bit of a relief, i suppose, but it does little to ally our fears that this could happen again. the level of panic we saw yesterday, especially, for example in the ft office people were saying can i use my contactless office people were saying can i use my co nta ctless ca rd office people were saying can i use my contactless card to get home on the tube? london transport is almost entirely cashless now. you need to lead money onto an oyster card, more
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than half ofjourneys i made using a co nta ctless than half ofjourneys i made using a contactless card. there has been a lot of worries saying if this had been a more serious problem or the outage had affected all customers, because of course not all customers we re because of course not all customers were affected, some payments were going through, some retailers were u naffected. going through, some retailers were unaffected. i cycled home last night through pubs and stopped outside and spoke to people and said has your ca rd spoke to people and said has your card been refused. people who came into the pub after 6pm were blissfully unaware there had even been an issue. it was fairly intermittent but the scale of the problem and the nature of how little cash is used, especially in big cities like london, should be a wake—up call for us. i always carry a bit of cash in my diary if i ever need it. maybe if i lose my card on my phone and i can't do apple pay. i
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think there are some big questions for these to ask about why this happened and we'll continue to report on that. we need to speak them to find out what's happened. the advice is carry some cash and other cards as well. a lot of you are still getting in touch. add from manchester is on a canal boat this weekend with his girlfriend. they we re weekend with his girlfriend. they were going out for a special birthday meal. they couldn't pay for the meal with their card. the good news is they have 20 quid cash so just bought drinks instead. ellie says she was stuck in traffic on the severn bridge for 45 minutes as drivers were unable to pay the toll by card. itjust goes to show you're going to be affected in lots of
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ways. please keep your comments coming in. it was friday night, end of half term, lots of people moving around. it's nearly 20 past eight. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning. visa has apologised after businesses across the uk and europe were unable to process card payments. the company say the problems were down to a "hardwear failure". president trump has confirmed that his summit with north korea's kimjong—un is back on. the two leaders will discuss a formal ending of the korean war later this month. it looks like the good weather is back as well! here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. there will be sunshine around for many of you today. a cracking start in the highlands where we've seen cracking start in the highlands where we've seen a cracking start in the highlands where we've seen a phenomenal run of sunshine and warmth of late. there
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will be a few storms around, with some rain in the forecast this morning. we are seeing this cloud moving in from northern europe, that's been bringing outbreaks of rain through parts of east anglia, into parts of south and east yorkshire. heavy showers running through cheshire towards merseyside. elsewhere, dry with sunshine in scotland, more sunshine developing over the coming hours in southern counties. you'll notice the colour on the chart, in the northern half of the uk we could see some afternoon storms. notice fairly light winds on our wind arrows, an indication if you get stuck under a storm cloud, there could be isolated flooding too. lots of cloud with occasional rain and thunderstorms. yesterday it was on the western side of the pennines, today it's mainly on the eastern side. further south,
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lots of sunshine, should be dry across much of southern england and wales. showers few and far between and warm in the sunshine too. tonight, showers and thunderstorms clearing away many. northern ireland still prone to some rain overnight and into the morning. turning misty across the north of scotland, may be done towards east anglia later. fresh at night and into tomorrow morning. loads of sunshine through the day. one or two isolated showers. there will be if few showers. there will be if few showers with the odd rumble of thunder but not as many as recent days. temperatures still in the 20s. down in recent days here. maybe 26-27 down in recent days here. maybe 26—27 across southern parts of the country. i pressure building across -- high country. i pressure building across —— high pressure is building across the north. a lot of grey, low cloud to begin your monday morning commute. many places dry on monday
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with the morning cloud breaking up and plenty of sunshine to the west. note the temperatures, high teens and low 20s rather than mid—20s. of course, we thought mabel is pretty warm. the met office have confirmed it was the warmest may on record by day. we had to bank holidays and a royal wedding... day. we had to bank holidays and a royal wedding. .. which you thought would have cursed it! you're watching breakfast from bbc news. time now for a look at the newspapers. investment manager justin urqhart—stewart is here to tell us what's caught their eye. good morning. the visa story is what
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we're talking about. first, let's look at the front pages. in the guardian, chaos as visa card network crashes in the guardian, chaos as visa card network crashes in uk and europe. in the times, and google is cashing in on spy apps for stalkers. in the mail, high street chain's vile slur on police. in the sun, by sheer luck sherlock showed up, benedict cumberbatch foils four muggers. hejumped he jumped out of the taxi when he saw a cyclist being beaten up and ended up being the hero. sherlock saves the day! that's what happened, apparently! tell us about this visa story. it's everywhere. it is everywhere. i love the way the sun do it here. we've got to have
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separate cards, make sure you have some cash with you. this was a disaster last night. i came to sa lfo rd , disaster last night. i came to salford, in the evening the thing i desperately needed a drink! i was stuck. laughter panting in the holiday end. i finally got one, i was able to negotiate. it's amazing how poor by lots of people, we are not used to using cash any more. what if this had gone on for longer and we might have had to live like this days on end? you go to parts of southern italy and you'll find you don't use euro coins, they've swapped them with sweets. there's alternative. may they didn't serve you because of how you feel about sa lfo rd ! you because of how you feel about salford! i love salford! we've been
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talking about trains and the new timetables. this is interesting, about what goes on underneath the archers. every city and town has railway arches. lots of small businesses, sometimes cafes, pop—up restaurants but normally engineering shots. music shops. this is where they start. now network rail are planning to sell them off to a large private equity firm who are going to develop them. we'll be losing these little micro—businesses. it is a real part of our business culture. and yet another thing that affects the business culture with corner shops but also the demise of having entrepreneurs on the corners of your streets or in these railway arches. having a go. go back to 50 years ago, we didn't set up many businesses. now we set up over half a million a year. that's the one
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thing we should be make sure we continue. small businesses are the people who employ people and they will be the medium to large businesses in the future. the macarena. . do you agree that it can improve chances of having a longer life? if you were doing cardiopulmonary resuscitation, apparently used to use staying alive. now you've got to do the macarena. presumably that means you've got to move the body around! laughter it says that he just compressions at a rate of two per seconds. it can get the correct rhythm. help me out here with the tune... it's a bit irregular for a heartbeat, i would have thought! our
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director just heartbeat, i would have thought! our directorjust said things you never thought you'd do live on—air!m just seems a bit erratic to me, that's all. do you like it? the song? not wildly, no. if you're in a position you'd debris care if you like the song or not! a £52 million car. the holy grail ferrari, they call it. it is stunning. they make a wonderful noise, much nicer than modern cars. 1963, 250 gg wonderful noise, much nicer than modern cars. 1963, 250 66 oh, nicknamed the holy grail, 174 mph. one of only 36 built. there's good investment. if you'd bought it beforehand! laughter not so much
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now! we've been talking about fees and whether we should be carrying more cash. the general consensus is it's always good to have some loose change but maybe not if you've got decapitation... unfortunately, news comes in of someone being decapitated in pompeii. they've discovered this poor fellow running away. he is escaped most of it and then got hit by a large stone. they find the body and he's got cash on him. had he had plastic, it would have melted so visa would have been useless! the cash survived, he didn't. quite a bit of cash. £450 in loose cash. you could have a pretty good time in pompeii with that. you wonder whether he gathered everything he owned and was trying to escape with its. he probably was. he had escaped is except for this
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brick hitting him. maybe he had a premonition this was going to happen. not even the macarena would have saved him. thank you. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. still to come this morning. when mona's eyesite started failing her husband des took on the job of doing her make—up, it was a simple act of kindness that would be seen around the world. we'll hear their story. stay with us, headlines coming up. hello, this is breakfast withjon kay and babita sharma.
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a summary of this morning's main news. visa's payment system is now said to be operating at "full capacity" following a hardware failure which prevented businesses processing card payments across the uk and europe yesterday. the company has apologised to customers, saying it recognises that it "fell well short" of its goals. visa said the disruption wasn't down to any unauthorised access or cyber attack. donald trump has announced that his summit with the north korean leader, kim jong—un, is back on and will take place later this month in singapore. nine days ago, the president abruptly cancelled the meeting, blaming what he described as the "open hostility" displayed by pyongyang. but yesterday diplomatic relations improved after a letter from the north korean leader was delivered to the white house. speaking after meeting the north korean delegation,
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president trump said he was now optimistic about the future. i think it's going to be ultimately a successful process, we'll see. remember what i said, we will see what we will see but i think it's going to be a process that we deserve to have. i mean, we really deserve. they want it, we think it's important, and i think we would be making a big mistake if we didn't have it. i think we're going to be having a relationship and it will start on june 12th. from that we can presume it is on. i'd packed my bag, we will see. finance ministers from the g7 group of nations have criticised new us tariffs on steel and aluminium imports. speaking during talks in the canadian resort of whistler, the chancellor, philip hammond, said the move was "worrying" and his canadian counterpart said us claims that the duties protected its national security were "absurd". the us defence secretary, james mattis, has accused china
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of trying to intimidate and coerce its neighbours by deploying missiles in the south china sea. speaking to south—east asian defence ministers in singapore, general mattis said that whilst the trump administration wanted a constructive working relationship with china, the us would compete vigorously if necessary. police scotland have named the two officers who were stabbed at a house in greenock yesterday. pc kenny mackenzie has a serious neck injury whilst his colleague pc laura sayer was stabbed in the arm. a 43—year—old man arrested after the incident is also being treated in hospital. the rmt union has called for the transport secretary, chris grayling, to resign following days of delays and cancellations on trains in the south and north—west of england. the government are blaming network rail for leaving it too late to finalise new timetables. earlier on breakfast, robert nisbet from the rail delivery group told us that all the companies were now
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working on solutions. network rail, northern come gtr come all of the companies involved in the areas where there have been difficulties since the 20th of may have apologised and said they have let down passengers. now it is up to the industry to make things right and give that certainty to those customers, hence the interim timetables come into effect which will see a number of services reduced but overall there will still be more trains running than they're worth before the recent timetable change. —— abound there were. the new prime minister of spain, pedro sanchez, will officially be sworn into office today, less than 24 hours after forcing out his predecessor, mariano rajoy. the head of the socialist party won the backing of several other parties to win his motion of no confidence after mr rajoy‘s conservative party became implicated in a corruption scandal. five people have died in a major food poisoning outbreak in the united states. almost 200 cases of e.coli linked to romaine lettuce have been reported across 35 states.
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it is the largest us outbreak of its kind in more than a decade. those are the main stories this morning. let's find out what is happening in the world of sport. good morning. good news for cricket fans? yes, england are bouncing back which was much needed after the disappointment of that nine wicket defeat in the first test match. and if somebody suggests that stuart broad should not be in the team, you would want to prove them wrong, wouldn't you? and that's what he did. it got him geed up! he might say it was the reason he did it. michael vaughan said he felt broad should have perhaps been dropped. said he felt broad should have perhaps been droppedm said he felt broad should have perhaps been dropped. it was quite mean to say that! he was saying that england were playing so poorly that they needed a big change and he suggested that could be one way of
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getting it. stuart broad clinic disagreed and he showed white. stuart broad responding in the best way possible with three wickets, james anderson with three wickets and chris woakes also taking three as england bounce back after the first test, pakistan all out for 174. as england prepare to resume on 106—2, broad says he feels the comments were unfair. i've always enjoyed listening to punditry. i think it's really interesting when you hear different people's opinions and i've always been very open to criticism when it has come my way, when i feel it's fair. i think this week there was not a huge amount of logic in it, it did disappoint me slightly. only two test matches ago i picked up eight wickets in christchurch. i think it was... it was disappointing to read those comments but that's sort of the world we live in. england will want to build on that strong start later.
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talk of tatoos will be put to one side later as gareth southgate's england play the first of two friendlies, before departing for the world cup in russia. nigeria the opponents at wembley this evening. david ornstein is with the team. england's path to the world cup has been smooth, but with the tournament now fast approaching, the scrutiny has intensified. this week, raheem sterling moved to defend himself after revealing a tattoo of an assault rifle on his right leg. amid criticism from anti—gun campaigners, sterling said the artwork had a deeper meaning, that his father was shot dead when the player was just two years old and he made a promise never to touch a gun in his life. he understands how some people have perceived the tattoo, but in my view a tattoo is like any work of art, it's a very individual medium. he's not somebody that supports or wants to promote guns. this is a youthful england squad.
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the household names of the past are gone, so too perhaps the shackles of previous tournament failures. the nation will be behind us no matter what. the group of lads we've got now, you know, it's a high—profile group. many talents in the group. i think we've got a good chance of going far this year. the focus is clear — to succeed where so many have fallen short. expectations may be low, but spirits are high as england attempt to close in on football's greatest prize. david ornstein, bbc news, hertfordshire. kick—off is at 5.15pm, and it's well worth taking a look at the world cup kit nigeria will be wearing. it's so in demand, there been over three million orders for it. what do you think? arsenal's alex iwobi modelling it here. a bit ofa
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a bit of a nod to the 1994 world cup shirt. very retro. as it sold out online so quickly, fans were queuing for four hours before nike's shop opened on oxford street yesterday, to try and get their hands on one in store. that was not connected to these, was it?! how many sales? 3 million. amazing stuff. leeds rhinos thrashed leigh centurions in the quarter—finals of rugby league's challenge cup. leigh actually took the lead in the game but when the championship side had a man sent off, leeds ran riot, scoring nine tries in total. 18—year—old jack walker with the pick of them, 52—22 the final score. rugby union heads across the atlantic once again tonight, with wales facing south africa in washington. but they do so without their english—based players who haven't been released for the test match. premiership rugby boss mark mccafferty says the game places an "unnecessary burden" on the clubs and players involved and shouldn't be allowed to go ahead. the five—time paralympic champion
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ellie simmonds has criticised british swimming after she returned to elite action in sheffield last night. simmonds put in a european championship qualification standard performance at the british para—swimming international meet. she'd taken time away after the rio games, saying she "hated" the sport, and says that the governing body hasn't been there to support her. i think it's because i had something to prove to british swimming, because they've not been there for me at all this past couple of years. i'm doing it solo, well, not solo, but with a great team around me but ijust wanted to prove them wrong and that i'm still there. british swimming chose not to respond to those comments when approached by the bbc. we know that england used cool video online to announce the england squad. well, a belgian bedding company might just have ruined their nation's big announcement.
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this broadcaster showed footage of mattresses being loaded up for their departure for russia with labels indicating the player they're to be given to. manager roberto martinez has already named a 28—man provisional squad, but his final squad of 23 wasn't due to be announced until monday. there are five people on their who won't be going! that is one way of finding out! i think we should do government cabinet reshuffle to like this, the politicians are to see if they have one of those red boxes with that name on. do you know if everybody is doing that?|j with that name on. do you know if everybody is doing that? i doubt that if all the teams are come i don't know if england are taking their own mattresses —— i don't know. it is part of these marginal gains come if you can make those
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small differences and hopefully it will benefit the team in the long run. they are there for about a month so you might as well have a co mforta ble month so you might as well have a comfortable mattress. what about your pyjamas, teddy bear? apparently the nigerian mattresses have sold out! not sure you're guaranteed a good night's sleep in them. having your favourite mattress, i good night's sleep in them. having yourfavourite mattress, i love that. it is a new one. we should find out if england are doing it. mike bushell has been out doing his bit, sidecar racing this time. i think it will change what you have ever thought about motorbike that —— a motorbike racing. the british championship continues this month and mike bushell has been to hampshire, to meet the team for whom this unique style of racing is a family affair. it is not a typical way for a dad to
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spend time with his daughter at the weekend but this bone crunching sport will shake up much of what you put that you knew about sidecars which were originally popular at cheap alternatives to the motorcar. it's brilliant. where else can you spend an entire day with your teenage daughter and really enjoy yourselves? off the track dad is in charge but on the track i'm in charge. we shout at each other occasionally. she sometimesjoe thuney because i'm going to fast or hit a thuney because i'm going to fast or hita bump thuney because i'm going to fast or hit a bump too hard but it works really well. —— if i go too fast this could not be more different than the traditional image of a sidecar. it is sidecar cross and the passengers are not just sidecar. it is sidecar cross and the passengers are notjust there sidecar. it is sidecar cross and the passengers are not just there for the ride. in sidecar cross the passenger is in the most precarious position, throwing their weight around on the back. brian and his daughter spent years watching until
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clarissa suggested forming a team also the first time we took it out the run and started it up we drove into a tree within ten seconds! do you think he is mad to do it? kind of. we did have a few scares, especially at the start with all the noise and the others with you but it's great. it is notjust beginners who come a cropper, there is often carnage around every corner. who come a cropper, there is often carnage around every cometm who come a cropper, there is often carnage around every corner. it is painful, you spent a whole race behind some and your face can become numb because the stones hitting you, you can have a fat lip, bleeding gums, and! you can have a fat lip, bleeding gums, and i thoroughly enjoy that! not gums, and i thoroughly enjoy that! n ot exa ctly gums, and i thoroughly enjoy that! not exactly what i want to do here before my first lap as a passenger! is about transferring your weight. you have to switch over and take a seat like that. what do you need to bea seat like that. what do you need to be a good passenger? more fitness and strength, i'm not massively strong in my arms but you got to be pretty agile and fast moving. this is where i've got to do the
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work and lean over as brian turns the corner, over onto this side and tra nsfer the corner, over onto this side and transfer the wait. back to the middle. by the end ofjust one lap, my arms felt locked in position, my knees were like jelly. do you want yourjob back? it's all yours! i can see what you do, congratulations. there you go, a quiet weekend drive in the country! i want to have a go. i would like to go to the mcdonald's drive—through. i would like to go to the mcdonald's drive-through. grabbing the food as you go through! i think we should give it a go. maybe. it looks terrifying. i love the fact the
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father and daughter are doing it together. let's get out there. give ita together. let's get out there. give it a go. see you later. new figures out this week have revealed that the number of smart electricity and gas meters being fitted has fallen for the first time. every home is supposed to have them fitted by the end of 2020. but that could now prove a tough target to meet. paul lewis from moneybox on radio 4 is in our london newsroom and can tell us more. if you have not had one fitted can explain what these smart meters are all about? what they are supposed to do for customers is help us save energy because they show you in real time in pounds and pence what you are spending and you will concern learn that putting on the kettle or the tumble dryer costs money. maybe not a surprise to many, it is supposed to make us use less energy. it can't do anything about the standing charge we all pay but it might reduce our bills. most of the telly —— savings will not be made by us telly —— savings will not be made by us but by the energy companies and
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they are supposed to pass them onto us, saving money by getting rid of meter readers and reducing the helpline for customer complaints, thatis helpline for customer complaints, that is the theory. at the moment what is happening is we are paying the cost and the benefits are well down the track. sse, the latest of the big six supplies to put up prices, partly blamed smart meter installation costs is one reason it did so. all the other big six have said much the same thing. it looks like we are way behind target and it will never be done by the end of 2020, we will not happen in time?m certainly isn't. at the present rate, they are sitting around 20,000 each working day which is a significant achievement in itself but at that rate it would be the end of 2024 am not 2020 which is the government target, before we all might be able to have a smart meter. they have got to ramp that up and there are doubts if they can because
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for the first time the number being fitted has fallen and that is a shock and i think it is appointment to the industry because it had been going up steadily but now it has gone down. i think the target is looking less and less likely. we have had a sort of admission from the energy industry last night there we re the energy industry last night there were some problems, saying that the players remained committed inc —— committed to delivering the programme but there were still a number of challenges facing them, many of which were outside their control and they were working collaboratively with the government to solve them. they are kind of admitting there might be difficulties. the regulator, ofgem, said that if they do not meet the target, they could face fines. more on that later. you can catch money box on radio 4, today, at midday. while i have got you, can i ask you about the visa outage yesterday afternoon and evening? if people are waking up this morning and were not able to use it or had to try several
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times, what are the key things to think about as consumers? these are saying that the problem has just about been solved. it is extraordinary it did not have the resilience in its system that a hardware failure, to a place it in good time. from a consumer point of view, you should be looking at getting compensation if it has cost you money, if you had to spend more money travelling and certainly small businesses who will have lost a lot of money because they could not take payments, they should be looking to visa for compensation as well. in future, as it was said earlier, never rely on one payment system. the days of tucking a barclaycard into your pocket and relying on it all the time are probably gone. have all the time are probably gone. have a visa card and a mastercard and some cash, if you have the credit worthiness and resources to do it, but we can no longer assume that that system, which seems to be there
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24/7, can be reliable every single minute of the day. a lot of messages from viewers saying they don't use cash any more and they don't have cash any more and they don't have cash on them but yesterday they had to rethink how they reorganised their wallet! and cash machines were running dry because everybody was taking their weekend money out. thank you very much for the advice. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the weather looks pretty good, tell us the weather looks pretty good, tell us it is going to last. there is a poisoned challis! lovely out there for some, this was west sussex, a bit grade in other parts of the country and there is some rain and nasty thunderstorm in the forecast today. looking at the details, already some rain this morning, mainly because of this cloud which had storms in northern germany and belgium and the
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netherlands yesterday, producing rain in east anglia and the east midlands and parts of yorkshire. it is this zone from shropshire where there was some minor flooding, up towards cheshire and across merseyside that it will fade away through the day. sunshine developing in the south, sunnis built in scotland, but the show and thunder clouds popping up later —— sunetra spells in scotland. this afternoon, we have inland areas of scotland having storms not much wind so they could sit on you for a while if they come along. the risk of some minor flooding and hail. isolated showers and storms in northern ireland, the same in northern england and east midlands toward east anglia. the thunderstorms were mainly in the west yesterday but more likely to be the east of the pennines today and it will be a close call for the test match. sunshine in the south and pleasant, temperatures in the 20s. still those values in scotland if you avoid the storms. they will fade away overnight but we will still
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have some rain in parts of northern and the far south of scotland and maybe northern ireland for the hu midnight in the north, not so much as it has in the south —— a humid night. sunday should be dry, a lot of sunshine in the south, a few showers in the far south—west, sharon was still possible in northern england and parts of scotla nd northern england and parts of scotland and maybe northern ireland but not as many as we will have today. most of us will avoid them —— showers still possible. low cloud developing on the coast but in the sunshine, temperatures up into the 20s. next week, high—pressure dominates in the north. it is to the north—west of us to stop a week and that will bring in winds from the north—east, bringing some missed the low cloud to central and eastern areas on monday morning. maybe a bit of drizzle. a few showers during the day but the vast majority will be dry, the cloud will break up into sunny spells and temperatures next week down on what we have seen but
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still pleasant away from the east coast, into the low 20s in many inland areas. in the short term, some more storms today in parts of the north and east in particular. thank you. it might be nice, it might not. that is the weather forecast most days! thank you. we have a lovely story now. it is a story of love and devotion. losing your eyesight brings with it a range of challenges. for mona manahan it meant the simple pleasure of putting on her makeup became near—impossible so her husband des stepped in to help. he has no experience of this. this simple gesture of love eventually found its way onto social media and went on to pull on heartstrings around the world. we've been to meet des and mona.
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we have been married now 56 years. we are just enjoying life. we are still married. as with any long—standing marriage, mona and des are a successful partnership and as her eyesight deteriorated, des found a special way to help. her left eye is bad, really bad. when she tries to do something with the right eye, the left eye doesn't see anything. it's very relaxing. best thing to do is to keep you awake. so i would be doing little corrections like that. this birthday party came up and mona decided "i'm going to get my face done up for the party". they enlisted a make—up artist. he was telling me this story that mona's eyesight was bad and she was losing her sight and that she wasn't able to hold things properly. she had a lot of shaking in her hands. des took the brushes from my hand and wanted to have a try.
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if you do see the way he holds the brushes, he's a natural. the story came to the attention of mario dedivanovic whose clients include katy perry, jennifer lopez and kim kardashian. he invited them to his show in london. mario was touched by the story and said to his manager "i want those two at my masterclass in london." he just, he just seemed to want to know us. he seemed to want to have us there. it is an effort for me even realise how big it is. make—up and mario and the kardashians, they were absolutely nothing in our lives until now. she hasn't changed a bit, really. i got a little bit make—up in my hair. i was trying to impress her with my attempts to sing like nat king cole. sings: they try to tell us we are too young.
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mona and i both agree on one thing and that is that less is more. and there is no way i want my lovely mona slapped up with stuff. he thinks i'm lovely as i am. i do. voila. we are done. every time i watch that, it is so beautiful and just an incredible story for the and loads of people have been talking about it on social media and they have become stars in their own right. thank you so much for sharing your story us. if you are sitting at home about but on your make—up, less is more!
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if you're contemplating a lazy saturday morning, our next guest will either inspire or intimidate you. last year extreme sportswoman fiona quinn walked and cycled the length of the uk. now she's set to complete a unique triathlon by travelling the length of the country on a stand—up paddleboard. fiona's journey will take her up the irish sea from lands end tojohn o'groats. she's currently six weeks and 160 miles into herjourney and joins us from arklow in county wicklow. good morning to you. how are you feeling this morning? a little bit tired! but in good spirits having crossed the irish sea this week. congratulations, i know it is still early days because you are doing a total of 900 miles for that we will talk about the journey in a moment,
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but why do this, this challenge?” do like to challenge myself and push myself and get out my comfort zone but also i want to encourage more women to get out and adventure a bit more. a lot of people you see on tv adventuring our men and it would be nice to see more women. there are a lot of women doing cool stuff so hopefully some will be inspired and ta ke hopefully some will be inspired and take on their own journey off the back of this. it is one thing taking ona back of this. it is one thing taking on a challenge that might be familiar but you have never paddle boarded before? i have done a little bit of paddle boarding but mainly on rivers and lakes. before i started, i'd only done it on the c three times so i was not experienced on the scene so it has been a big challenge —— on the sea. particularly as a bit scared of the sea! i tried a bit with the family and it was fun to drive for a bit but i'm not sure i could do it for 900 miles! to try. what has been the
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biggest challenge so far? the weather has been a huge challenge, it is so weather dependent. on lakes and rivers you can get away with most weather condition but if the swell is too big or the wind is too strong on the sea you just have to wait and that is frustrating. we are showing some of the pictures taken of your journey so far, some stunning shots. what is your favourite place you have been to so far? definitely lundy island down in devon, that was absolutely gorgeous and we had incredible weather and we had dolphins down there and it was amazing. it is a really special place, i know it well because i spent some time there filming but the waters are pretty rough around there? we were incredibly lucky. we paddled over and it was like glassy water and there was barely any wind. we have had some nice days even though a lot when we could not paddle also and you have encountered
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some interesting things along the way. not to mention some sea life. dolphins in particular. yes, it is amazing. i think we had ourfirst encounter a couple of weeks ago and they came for just a encounter a couple of weeks ago and they came forjust a few minutes and we have at two more encounters since then. crossing over the irish seed they came and played around the support boat and my board and it was amazing. seeing the footage of that is absolutely breathtaking. very quickly, when are you hoping to end? within the next month or two i should get up tojohn o'groats. within the next month or two i should get up to john o'groats. we wish you the best of luck, thank you so much. so what are you doing today? not paddle boarding! the headlines are coming up. hello this is breakfast, withjon kay and babita sharma. back online after hours of disruption, visa apologises and says its card payment service is back to normal. customers across europe were unable to pay for purchases, the company says a hardware failure was to blame. good morning, it's
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saturday the 2nd ofjune. also this morning.

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