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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  June 3, 2018 8:00am-9:01am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with rogerjohnson and babita sharma. remembered, one year on. a special service will be held for the victims of the terrorist attack at london bridge and borough market. eight people died and 48 others were injured, today a minute's silence will be held across the country. good morning, it's sunday the 3rd ofjune. also this morning. the government warns of an ongoing threat from islamist and right—wing extremists as it announces a major review of counter—terrorism strategy. warnings of a trade war within days, as g7 ministers criticise us tariffs. in sport, england show promise ahead of the world cup in russia as captain harry kane fires them to a win against nigeria at wembley. former british soldier adnan sarwar will tell us why he's decided to go back to iraq, 15 years after he was there
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to fight saddam hussein. and matt has the weather. good morning. still a few heavy downpours around today, particularly in scotland. for the vast majority, it's a dry, and for quite a few of you, sunny sunday. all the details coming up. good morning. first, our main story. a special service will be held at southwark cathedral this afternoon, to remember those killed and injured in the terrorist attack on london bridge and borough market a year ago today. eight people died and 48 others were hurt. simon clemison reports. borough market, ten o'clock. how a saturday night should be. the more you think about it, the more you let it impact your life, the more they've won. sojust carry on. let's get rid of the barriers, let's carry on with our day—to—day lives.
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i feel pretty safe now, because the government, the police, is taking care of it. this city knows how to live past difficulties. it has done that many, many times through way more difficult experiences. so really, i think people look on. sirens. police were prepared for a new style of attack, where individuals or groups go on the rampage, sometimes turning cars and vans into weapons. but this was not the first of its kind in 2017 and it wasn't the last. after people were knocked down on london bridge, the attackers ran towards the market, stabbing those they passed before being shot dead by armed officers. with the manchester arena bomb, there were five attacks in the uk last year. but there are those who are keen that each one is not forgotten. today's service at southwark cathedral will also honour the work of the emergency services. we have a long history of serving the people, the residents of this parish. but this has seen a new level of strength. and that is very encouraging,
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because it could have destroyed. that is what the intention was. but actually, it has built something that is rather beautiful. solidarity and defiance are words often used. but here it is about actions, too. it is saturday night, and they are enjoying it. and simonjoins us now from southwark cathedral, what can we expect from today's service? a very poignant day today. you may be able to hear borough market clearing up after last night, and assign it was a good night. interesting to be out on a saturday, very close to the anniversary. it reminded me of being at finsbury park in the aftermath of a very similar attack, very close to the mosque. people came together from
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across london to pray together in solidarity. you can see how close we are to southwark cathedral, this is where at 3pm this afternoon relatives of those who died a few steps away will come and light candles at 3pm. there will there be a short procession to london bridge a short procession to london bridge a short procession to london bridge a short distance away, where they will hold a minute's silence at liz30pm. people across the country are encouraged tojoin in liz30pm. people across the country are encouraged to join in with that. then it is very much about it a few more moments to commemorate. there will be a tree planted here. it's an olive tree and it's meant to be a healing tree. then the hashtag london united will appear on london bridge. it sums up the sentiments of the people i been speaking to hear in the last hours. in a couple of minutes we are going to speak to a
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couple of the nhs staff involved in treating some of the injured. the government is warning that the threat from islamist terrorism will remain for at least the next two years, and that the threat from extreme right—wing groups is growing. let's talk to our political correspondent mark lobel. sajid javid the home secretary is going to make an announcement tomorrow officially, mark. he's likely to say more here on bbc one soon. that's right, in just over an hour's time. he is going to talk about a security review which was prompted by those attacks across britain last year. from which the government wants to do more to catch and also to punish terrorists. they wa nt to and also to punish terrorists. they want to be able to better assess those people who had links to known terrorist organisations and they wa nt to terrorist organisations and they want to do it in three ways. they wa nt to want to do it in three ways. they want to share information more widely, they want mi5 to declassify information that they have from
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looking into investigating 3000 people of interest and an extra 20,000 people who were of interest, and might pose a threat in the future. they want that information to filter down to local government agencies such as the social services and neighbourhood policing so they can manage risks on a local level. they also want to increase potential prison terms the terrorists and monitor people who have been put into prison the terrorism more closely when they come out. they wa nt to closely when they come out. they want to do more to spot terrorism online by working with tech companies. the government is likely to outline the progress it has made. it has foiled four plots since march involving right—wing extremist groups and i2 plots involving islamist terrorists. the plans will be outlined in full on monday although we expect to get an early indication of more of the details from sajid javid in one hour on bbc one. thank you. a 17—year—old boy has been stabbed to death in ipswich, in what was police believe was a targeted attack. witnesses said the teenager
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was leaving a shop in the town centre yesterday afternoon when he was attacked by two men. he was found with life—threatening injuries and died later in hospital. a 41—year—old man has been arrested. finance ministers from the rest of the g7 have urged their american counterpart to tell donald trump how disappointed they are about new us tariffs on steel and aluminium imports. they warned washington there were only days left to avoid a trade war. this report from lebo diseko. as family photos go, this looked pretty awkward for one member. us treasury secretary steve mnuchin, facing his counterparts from some of america's closest allies, united in their frustration at the us' latest tariffs. the americans have decided, in our mind, to take an action that is not at all constructive. it is actually destructive to our ability to get things done around tariffs on steel and aluminium. mr mnuchin played down
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talk of us isolation, saying his country believes in the g7. i think our leadership on the economy, which is one of president trump's major objectives, that national security, is not only good for the united states, but is good for growth around the world. signing in measures against cheap steel and aluminium imports was a key campaign promise foertrump. he said china was a key offender, but now america's allies have been hit too. the tariffs on the europe, canada and mexico have led to a heated response. canada is imposing dollarfor dollar countermeasures and the eu says it is taking the matter to the world trade organisation. the message from six of these finance ministers is that there could be a trade war within days. so, if this meeting has been tense, next week's summit of g7 heads of state could be even more difficult. the government has confirmed that it
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intends to launch a free website for schools in england to advertise teacher vacancies later this year. the department for education says it hopes the measure will help schools to save money, as andy moore reports. it is estimated english schools spend about £75 million every year recruiting staff. later this year the government hopes to roll out a service that will be free to schools. it will advertise part—time jobs and job shares, as well as full—time vacancies. another issue for schools is the cost of supply teachers. every time there is a hole in the teaching roster, they have to find someone to fill in, and with the number of holes increasing all the time, the bill for supply teachers is also going up. from september, supply agencies will have to clearly disclose their fees. there will also be a list of agencies which don't charge fees when staff are taken on permanently.
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the association of school and and college leaders said any move to reduce employment costs was welcomed, but its general secretary, geoff barton, said the bigger problem was an ongoing crisis in teacher recruitment and retention. coronation street and hollyoaks have dominated this year's british soap awards. eastenders took home three prizes, with rudolph walker, who plays patrick truman, being recognised with the outstanding achievement award. hollyoaks picked up four awards. coronation street took six, including best british soap. i've got 30 seconds to say thank you to all of you for voting for coronation street!
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cheering and to thank everybody involved, and a special tribute to kate oate, who is leaving us, for her dedication and passion to coronation street. applause safe to say they were quite pleased to pick up that award! coronation street, is about 100 metres that way. they've built a new set. if you've been struggling to sleep through a muggy night you might fancy a refreshing dip this morning. but maybe not if it involves a 90 foot dive. this is the world diving series championship at possum kingdom lake in texas. divers are falling at around 50
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miles per hour by the time they hit the water. the event was won by kris kolanus from poland with britain's blake aldridge in third. blake aldridge you know. he used to be in the team gb diving squad. he's an olympian with a fairly good track record. 50 miles an hour! that's extraordinary. good morning, you're watching brea kfast. there will be a one minute silence this afternoon, to mark the first anniversary of the london bridge terror attack. at around ten o'clock on the night ofjune the 3rd last year, eight people were killed when three attackers drove a van into pedestrians and launched a knife attack in borough market. the bbc‘s hollyjones was on her way to meet friends when it happened. i've never felt fear like it.
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it was kind of like... when you hear the phrase "your life flashes before your eyes", i can understand that now, what that means. i was kind of frozen to the spot, and i remember seeing it coming directly towards me, and there was a couple that were behind me. and something in the back of my mind just said "get out of the way", and i couldn't tell you how it happened. i remember looking directly in the eyes of the van driver, and i managed to get out of the way, but unfortunately the van then hit the couple that were behind me also. the things i saw that night, as i say, you see things on the tv and you become desensitised towards that. but when you see it in real life, it's not so much the images, it's the sounds. it's the sounds that you've never... you can't contemplate them, theyjust don't make sense to you. those are things that i'm never going to forget. that was hollyjones. we are hearing
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from people on social media remembering where they were this time last year. that service taking place today in southwark cathedral. the national minute's silence is at az30pm. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. it's a sunny start but for others grey and misty. this was the scene in northern scotland earlier on. that cloud also producing some rain. in southern scotla nd producing some rain. in southern scotland we've seen some bursts of rain. rain also moving towards fife at the moment. we've also got some showers pushing out of the channel islands towards devon and cornwall. drying out into the afternoon. away from that, lots of sunshine across central england and wales. clearing
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up central england and wales. clearing up back down to the coast. sunny spells in northern ireland and the far north of scotland. highs of 26, 27 towards the south—east corner. for some of you it will be a bit wet. let's focus on where you likely to see some rain through the afternoon. thunderstorms kicking off again in parts of scotland. nowhere near as many as yesterday. staying damp in the southern uplands. a few showers in northern england. hopefully staying clear of the leeds area for the test match, and there will be a few showers in the south. the vast majority will stay dry. as we go into night, the showers will clear away. mist and low cloud will become the big feature to take us into monday morning. it will be a night of double—figure temperatures once again for the vast majority. a mug you start on monday. for monday most will be dry. because we've got the wind coming in off the north sea, low cloud. forsome
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the wind coming in off the north sea, low cloud. for some staying grey all day long. they'll be breaks in the cloud here and there especially in the south and west. we'll see temperatures cooler than it has been for the last few days and distinctly cooler on the eastern coasts. continuing on tuesday. they pressured to the south and high pressured to the south and high pressured to the north. with that different wind direction, temperatures a bit low but compared with monday bringing in some clear air. more sunshine developing across scotla nd air. more sunshine developing across scotland during the day. also into northern england, the midlands and potentially into east anglia. a few heavy showers in northern ireland on tuesday but for the vast majority it will be dry. temperatures around levels they should be this time of year. a fine weekend store with some sunny spells. one or two showers and thunderstorms but nowhere near as many as we saw last week. it is the first anniversary today of
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the london bridge terror attack. let's talk to consultant doctor tasneem pirani and critical care matron lucy flood, who were both working at kings college hospital that night. theyjoin us from southwark cathedral, where there'll be a remembrance service this afternoon. good morning and thank you for being with us. good morning. dr pirani, you with us. good morning. dr pirani, you were with us. good morning. dr pirani, you were running the critical care ward on the night of the attack. talk me through what that involved and what you saw. i'm sorry, say that again? talk me through what you saw the night you were running the critical care ward last year. yes. the way it works is that i received a phone call, i had just arrived home, from lucy saying that a major incident had been declared in london
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and that our hospital major incident policy had been activated. what that requires is an immediate first response team arriving at the hospital in order to provision for the victims of the attack. i arrived at the hospital and with the help of lucy, our role was predominantly coordinating and supporting the teams around the hospital. the coordination from a critical care standpoint is creating care capacity, bed capacity. we have no idea how many victims will come through the door. it's important we have enough beds so their outcomes are not impaired by a lack of beds on the unit. in addition, it's working very, very closely with the emergency department, theatres, and the nurses to make sure we've got the nurses to make sure we've got the right equipment, the right staffing. not just for the right equipment, the right staffing. notjust for that the right equipment, the right staffing. not just for that night but resilience building for the coming days to make sure we've got
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adequate staffing for the coming days. i know this is something you both have been trained for, these scenarios a lot of the emergency services in london have been involved in in terms of what happens when a terror attack occurs. bc, when a terror attack occurs. bc, when you get that phone call and have to make another phone call to put the action place, talk me through the emotion because your heart must have been pounding. yes, obviously you can't. .. heart must have been pounding. yes, obviously you can't... i can't really remember everything that happened in those few moments when i took the call. what i do remember is you had to completely shut off from any... from your own emotions about what was going on in london and obviously london being our community, and completely switch off from the media and anything that was happening around the incident and just concentrate and focus on the job at hand. the team that came
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together that night, we had to coordinate bringing in multiple members of staff in order to staff the units effectively, having no idea how many and it would be coming to kings, taking continuous calls which would give us more updates. the willingness of the staff to come m, the willingness of the staff to come in, we even had one of our admin staff come in to coordinate the admin side of things. and the generosity from everyone, it was an amazing team aspect of that. over and overagain, amazing team aspect of that. over and over again, the sense of community and people dedicated to thejob to community and people dedicated to the job to make sure everybody was 0k. the job to make sure everybody was ok. i'm sure there was a personal impact. tasneem, can you explain how you felt when you finally went home and took stock of what happened? absolutely. exactly what lucy says, we are used to looking after
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patients, life and death situations. when you're at work you almost switch. the minute i arrived home i had text messages from family and friends from all over the world asking if i was ok. i turned on the news and i watched the absolute horror of what had happened, around the corner from where i live. horror of what had happened, around the cornerfrom where i live. i can't explain how i felt. you feel so incredibly sad, you feel so worried, and in addition to that the stories of each of these individuals become more and more clear and you start realising this could have been anybody. it could've been your brother, your sister, your colleague, anybody. and that may be the physical scars will over time, but you worry about the emotional and psychological scars and how you wa nt to and psychological scars and how you want to be there for them through that journey to make want to be there for them through thatjourney to make sure that want to be there for them through that journey to make sure that they heal simultaneously. lucy, how do you deal with the personal impact of the things you've seen? sorry, i
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missed that. how do you deal with the personal impact of these scenarios you saw on that night and the people you met, and the trauma? it's like tas said, you have to switch off to what is going on outside. i was very aware when i first took the call how my reactions would affect other people that were working that day and having to support some very junior working that day and having to support some veryjunior nurses, and some who have come from other parts of the world and work at kings. obviously, london is now their home. obviously, london is now their home. obviously feeling shocked at what was happening in london, homesick some of them, and making sure everyone was focusing on the job which they did fantastically. it's the ongoing support for people through things like this, and we are very lucky we had lots of debrief around the incident. we are very
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lucky to know there are people out there just like yourselves, dedicating unconditionally to the service that you do. lucy flood and dr pirani, thank you. you're watching breakfast from bbc news, it's time now for a look at the newspapers. vicky gosling, former raf officer, now working with the invictus games is here to tell us what's caught her eye. good morning. i remember doing samuel taylor coleridge that a—level. kubla khan, i remember it all. a—level. kubla khan, i remember it au.pmup a—level. kubla khan, i remember it all. philip pullman says we should read this to children at bedtime. it's really interesting because you can't start early enough reading to
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children at bedtime. his point is that it's really important to read to youngsters, even if they don't understand it. he says is especially if they don't understand it. even if they are doing their a—levels!m says the best way to get children to have a good, hearty approach to language is to fill their lives with fairy tales and nursery rhymes. i think it's lovely. it's difficult reading to a child, but who hasn't got five minutes to read a poem? and the fact it doesn't really matter if you don't quite get the poem. who gets the nursery rhymes sometimes? i just thought that was really interesting because actually someone like me who's got a six—year—old, a poem you can kind of do and get past that. it's interesting, because a
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lot of the children's books are rhyming, so the kids get the words and get the pace and the rhythm and everything else of language. and they repeat it back. even if they don't quite get it, they do repeat it back to you. they like it, it's got that rhythm, it's got the musical element to it... there's also a philosophy that they are absorbing something as they are drifting off to sleep. in the sunday times, the labrador who can sniff out cancer. this is about a dog beating technology. it says they've got this golden labrador who is showing the queen how it can sniff out disease. it's effectively saying that the dog is trying to teach how you can actually sniff out cancer.
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while it can sniff out drugs and other things, it's detecting how it can smell cancer. they are teaching it to effectively... teach the machine to react like a dog. i think it's fascinating. i'm trying to work out how. it doesn't go into exactly how they are able to do that. they are how they are able to do that. they a re clearly how they are able to do that. they are clearly roaring on the sense of the dog, it's something innate in their ability to sense —— drawing on their ability to sense —— drawing on the senses of the dogs. they say they are using it effectively and it's a cheap, noninvasive test that saves lives. matt leblanc has announced he is going to leave top gear. if sue perkins throwing her hat into the ring? she would be great! she says it's time a woman
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was in the top gear driving seat. it's fascinating. we've now had our first female doctor who, i think she would be brilliant. we've seen how successful she has been and the fact that in bake off, she's been a big hit. with mel, as well? do we know what her driving skills are like? i'm sure she's pretty good. she comes across incredibly well.|j remember years ago when they relaunched it with richard hammond and everybody, they e—mailed to the whole of the bbc and said if anyone is interested. i wonder if they would do that again? it's more high profile. i think richard hammond was that radio york, and the rest is history. they also talked about jodie kidd last time, i think her name was bandied about, and why not?
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it's about time they had a female presenter. if you look at doctor who, it would be great to do it. she would attract viewers as well, because she's very good at what she does and very funny. final one, percy pigs in blanket ban. it's quite tragic. i would prefer to see the children running every morning than banning percy pigs because they are hugely popular. it's all in moderation. i get it, but at the same time! moderation. i get it, but at the same time i think everything in moderation. other suites are available, of course! they are quite moorish. they are addictive, actually. -- they are quite moreish. one of the country that has the highest levels of childhood obesity.
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yes, but i feel strongly about getting children to do exercise. if you teach them good habits early on in terms of health and running around a pitch every morning...” was reading about that, it comes full circle to the first story. stay with us, headlines coming up. hello, this is breakfast with rogerjohnson and babita sharma. it's 8.30, here's a summary of this morning's main news. a special service will be held at southwark cathedral this afternoon to remember those killed and injured in the terrorist attack on london bridge a year ago today. eight people died and 48 others were hurt when attackers drove a van into crowds, before launching a knife attack in borough market. bbcjournalist hollyjones was on her way to meet friends when it happened. the government is warning that the threat from islamist terrorism will remain for at least the next two years and that the threat from extreme right—wing groups is growing.
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the warning comes as the home secretary prepares to announce a major review of counter—terrorism strategy. it includes declassification of certain secret intelligence held by m15, to raise awareness about the threat posed by some individuals. a 17—year—old boy has been stabbed to death in ipswich in what was police believe was a targeted attack. witnesses said the teenager was leaving a shop in the nacton area of the town yesterday afternoon when he was attacked by two men. he was found with life—threatening injuries and died later in hospital. a 41—year—old man has been arrested. meanwhile, in london, two men have been taken to hospital following reports of a shooting near peckham. the men, in their twenties, were left with gunshot injuries. no arrests have been made. meanwhile, detectives are appealing for information after an attempted murder in shadwell. officers found a 22—year—old male with multiple stab wounds. one man has been arrested. finance ministers from the rest of the g7 have
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urged their american counterpart to tell donald trump how disappointed they are about new us tariffs on steel and aluminium imports. they warned washington there were only days left to avoid a trade war. the chancellor, philip hammond, said he hoped good progress would be made at the leaders' summit later this week. the government has confirmed that it intends to launch a free website for schools in england to advertise teacher vacancies later this year. the department for education says it hopes that the measure will help schools to save money. there will also be a list of supply agencies that do not charge high fees. those are the main stories this morning. it's just after half past eight on sunday morning. a busy sport of day coming up. yes and a great day yesterday, plenty to get through, england showing some signs... are we going to get excited about the world
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cup and talk about england as potential winners! they did look good though. i thought they looked all right. it's the time of year when we start to believe. it is the hope that kills you! england played their first of two world cup warm up matches at wembley and there were definite signs of promise from gareth southgate's side. a strong start saw them go 2—0 up in the first half against nigeria before they launched a comeback. our sports correspondant david ornstein was watching at wembley. happy and victorious. the task for england is to replicate their form in friendlies when it matters most. this squad is low on age and experience, an exception being gary cahill, and the defender used his 32—year—old head to full effect to bring the home side into an early lead. shortly before half—time it was two, harry kane leading by example. the captain, you sense, will prove key to england's ambitions. nigeria had been obliging opponents, but after the break they broke.
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alex iwobi on hand to give them hope, showing why the super eagles believe they can soar this summer. england had lost the momentum and raheem sterling his footing, after a week in which he made headlines for the wrong reasons. another moment for the forward to forget. ultimately, however, for gareth southgate and his tournament—bound team, it was a job well done. spirits are high, the training has been fantastic. everybody's at a very high level. we've had some great fitness over the last couple of weeks in training. everyone's just looking forward to getting out there, you know? a lot of competition for places and that always makes a good squad. a couple more weeks and we'll be there. england's attention now turns to their final warm—up game against costa rica on thursday. then it's the real thing, the true test of their credentials. world cup fever is building. england will be desperate to deliver. david ornstein bbc news, wembley.
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scotland meanwhile were beaten one—nil by mexico in their international friendly. the former spurs forward giovanni dos santos with the only goal of the game after 13 minutes in mexico city. england go into day three of the second test with pakistan with a lead of 128 after a mixed day at headingly. after a rain delay, they lost captain joe root just short of his half—century. a lot of players got decent starts. nightwatchman dom bess took full advantage of an extended spell in the middle, making his way to 49 before getting out. england losing five wickets in the day. dawid malan anotherfailing to build a big score as he went for 28. jos buttler and debutant sam curran are at the crease...curran
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with a late flourish. so with three wickets left, england will be hoping to build on that lead later today... british number one kyle edmund is out of the french open, losing in five sets to the italian 18th seed, fabio fognini. edmund was 2—1 up in sets, but the 23—year—old yorkshireman was broken in the 5th and final set to hand fognini the place in the last 16 at roland garros. it's been a good season so far for edmund though, reaching his first grand slam semi—final and breaking into the world's top 20 for the first time. just wasn't my day. yeah, for sure, had my chances and he had his chances, but he just got them today. it's just one of them where it's over now. just sort of reflect a bit and, you know, go again for the grass court season. well, a bad day for the brits in paris continued in the doubles. jamie murray is also out, along with his partner bruno soares. they were beaten in straight sets by maximo gonzalez and nicolas jarry in their second round match. heather watson is also out.
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she lost alongside tatiana maria, in the second round of the women's doubles. there are now no british players left in this year's french open. serena williams meanwhile continues her comeback. she's playing herfirst grand slam since giving birth and beat germany'sjulia goerges in straight sets to set up a fourth round tie against her old rival maria sharapova. that'll be played tomorrow, should be interesting. sharapova beat karolina pliskova in straight sets. and the top seed in the men's draw — rafael nadal — had a comfortable straight sets win over richard gasquet to reach the fourth round. after his win, the ten time french open champion made a ball boy's day, by warming down with him before leaving the court. great to see. on to rugby. wales began their summer tour of north and south america with a 22—20 win over south africa in washington dc. warren gatland is without any of his english—based players
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for the match as they were prevented from playing because of a row with the premiership. a mistake from south africa near the end allowed allowed ryan elias scored a late try to give wales the victory. they head to south america now to face argentina next weekend. warrington wolves are through to the semi—finals of rugby league's challenge cup after beating wigan warriors. warrington scored three first half tries and then declan patton rounded off the scoring for a 23—0 win. it's the first time warrington have beaten wigan at home in the competition since 1936. now to racing, and with the queen in attendance it was masar who came home in front to win the epsom derby. charlie appleby's colt denied the odds—on favourite saxon warrior for a first derby win for the godolphin stable. masar, ridden by william buick, finished strongly in the 239th running of the race to scoop the £920,000 in prize money.
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it is not surprising that the train and the owners looked pleased because he gets about 10% of that. he has been around for sometime, terrific to see an outsider winning. although not if you the favourite! he didn't. i backed masar. itjust shows that you have to listen to the interviews with the jockeys because they really know what the horse can do. i did listen to all the other jockeys and they also said that their horses had a good chance. i got 22—1 on him and he finished 16-1. an awful lot of sport to watch and write about. thank you for the sports news. now
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we are going to talk about washing, maybe on a day like today when it is sunny you might put the washing machine on. but putting your clothes on for a quick wash might not save you as much money, or be as green, as previously thought. that's according to the consumer group which? it is quite something, isn't it? it says the poorer cleaning, rinsing and spinning of shorter washes means we often need to wash our clothes again — or use tumble dryers for longer. it is harder to get all the tide marks out. let's talk to sarah benwell, who's a consumer affairs journalist and is in our london newsroom. good morning, sarah. thank you for joining us. . do you do a full wash? i tried to because as the consumer magazine says the quick washes are not that good at cleaning your clothes, ok for washing machine and that has only been one once or twice but anything with mud stains or any stains if you have kids, it won't get them close enough and if you use
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a tumble dryer, it is fine if you hang your washing out that if you use one, a quick wash spins far less time, you have to spend longer drying your clothes so it costs you money overall. doesn't everyone only where the shirt was twice? just joking! you don't know unless you have a clever meter how much it costs to run a full wash versus a short wash. a full wash is about 18p a load and a quick washes only half that amount so you are halving the cost but that is only true if you don't have to wash your clothes twice or have to tumble dry them afterwards because tumble dryers are expensive to run. they are the thing, aren't they, not everyone is lucky enough to have the space to hang clothes out in the house or whatever. does the same apply to dishwashers? with a dishwasher a lot of people were run half loads and it is an efficient way of doing it because a half load dishwasher uses
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as much energy as a full load so you are paying the same money but getting less stuff team. so you should always make sure the dishwasher is full before you put it on. and a lot of people instead of scraping the plate and washes it first and that isn't great either because you are using a lot of water to wash them and then a lot of energy to watch them again. just scrape the plate and pop it in and wait until you've got a full dishwasher and set it to go. that's the most cost—effective way. dishwasher and set it to go. that's the most cost-effective way. it is interesting because in our house we do runa interesting because in our house we do run a short wash in the washing machine. thinking that it is cheaper but perhaps ultimately not such a great idea, are all washing machine is the same? know and what you think about doing what you want to think about doing what you want to think about is getting the most energy efficient one, i'm not saying by anyone because that will cost you a
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lot but when you are replacing an appliance you want to pay attention to the energy rating, if it is rated a+ plus plus upgrade it, £320 a year, if you take it from a c or a d to an year, if you take it from a c or a d toana year, if you take it from a c or a d to an a plus plus plus, energy efficient appliances could be slightly more expensive but over time you'll save yourself a fortune. the boiler is very interesting, did you say £320 a year? that is no means a thing. exactly, that starts to look like a lot, and if you're boiler looks like ten years, nobody is going to replace the boiler if it
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works fine, it is more about when you come round to needing new things, what you look for in the fridge orfreezer, energy things, what you look for in the fridge or freezer, energy efficiency should be high up there. fairly interesting, thank you, sarah, sarah benwell, consumer affairs journalist. our dishwasher is always full so that is ok from what sarah says! it's the time of year when thousands of keen ramblers step out to enjoy the stunning scenery of the lake district — maybe that was what you were doing last weekend? it was a glorious day. but all that walking is taking its toll on the ground beneath their feet. volunteers have employed a traditional source of labour to help restore the routes that are more difficult to reach — fell ponies. dave guest explains. these fell ponies are on a mission —
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a mission to save the landscape from which they took their name. the fact is, each year at this time the lakeland fells prove an irresistible draw to thousands of walkers. but the relentless trudging of so many boots takes its toll on the footpaths. for more than a decade, volunteers from the organisation fix to keep the footpaths in good order. our usual method of building a path is to do what we call stone pitching, which is using large rocks with a nice flat surface to create a pitch causeway. but there are some environments where this method doesn't work. boggy ground presents particular challenges, challenges they have now met by using a wholly natural and readily available resource: sheep's wool. the idea with the fleece is that you dig a tray, bundle up the sheep's wool like this, and then put an aggregate surface on top.
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the wool spreads the weight and prevents it from sinking and because it's a very wet environment, it won't rot either. the fact is that the price of wool is now so low that it often costs farmers more to take it to market than they actually receive for it. so many are quite happy, presently, to give their wool to this project and see it put to good use. the purpose of today is to take this local herdwick fleeces up into the fells above langdale to use them to repair some parts up there which are on peat, and have been trampled and are damaged. but how do you transport masses of this stuff to remote mountain pathways well beyond the reach of even the best 4x4? answer: think back to the future and use four legs. we all feel that we should put something back. if we want to use routes we should be prepared to help with them too. and so, laden with the latest batch
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of supplies, ourfour—legged heroes plod onwards and upwards. this is a new experience for both of us. it's good fun. he's taken to it like a duck to water. this is what he was bred for. this is what the fell ponies were bred for. so they're using a wholly organic material conveyed by carbon neutral transport to fix the fells. what could be more environmentally friendly than that? dave guest, bbc news, great landale. beautiful landscape. we were talking about washing machines. nicky has sent a photo, you have got your work cut out! here's where roger leaves us to read the news for andrew marr. time for matt with a look at this morning's weather. his birthday today, people have been asking how old you are, i said 21. its 22, it is just that these early
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sta rts its 22, it is just that these early starts make me look older! what a day to celebrate my birthday. lovely day, this photograph came in from llanelli. scotland has had a damp start, outbreaks of rain becoming a writer through the day, bush again through devon and cornwall in the next hours, they wanted everyone and then they will move away. a lot of sunshine in england and wales, misty and grey in some eastern coasts and in the north of england but it will feel warm, good sunshine for more than england, and we will see sunshine once more across the highlands of scotland lifting temperatures into the low 20s, we could see afternoon stormzy, let's focus on whether there was doubly afternoon rain around, some storms which could be torrential in places but nowhere near as many in scotland
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as yesterday, damp in the southern uplands, an isolated shower in northern ireland, one of two showers dotted around, optimistically they should stay away from the leeds area for the cricket. no surprise of some isolated showers appear across england and wales but most will stay dry. must try to might as well with lots of low cloud developing northern and eastern scotland down through northern and eastern england, a cold start to the commute, fairly muggy in southern areas for some time but it should be fresh on monday with all that more than cloud coming down through eastern england. some of the cloud will break to sunshine coming through but the cloud could even extend to the midlands so southern, western parts of england, wales, northern ireland and west of scotla nd northern ireland and west of scotland where you are more likely to see sunshine. temperatures into the 20s againjust to see sunshine. temperatures into the 20s again just setting off some showers. temperatures in the teams, low pressure to the south, height to
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the north and we're bringing winds from more of a north easterly direction through monday and tuesday. at least by tuesday there should be a bigger gap in those clouds as they come in. across scotland, northern england and northern ireland some good sunny spells, some isolated heavy showers particularly in northern ireland and after a grey misty start to england and wales southern counties holding onto the cloud in the afternoon, and tebbit is close to where they should be for the time of year rather than the heat we saw during the week on —— temperatures close to where they should be. this coming week temperatures pleasant with a good deal of sunshine after that grey misty start but they should be a few showers here and there especially in the second half of the week but babita a lovely dry day as well. thank you, did we mention it was your birthday? have a great day! an army of churchgoers are being mobilised to try and beat criminals involved in the modern slave trade.
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the campaign, led by the church of england with the support of the catholic church, is raising concerns about the way workers are treated at some car washes, as jeremy ball reports. a clean car at a cheap price. but is that costing someone's freedom? thousands of hand carwashes have been set up in the last two years. but while many are legitimate, some are being exploited and abused and trapped by threats and debt. i was threatened he would kill me because i had not done something quite right. i had to work 11 hours per day non—stop. i had no breaks. the employer does not get me protective gloves and my skin is corroding. today, the church of england and the roman catholic church are asking congregations to help get rid of it. is there a boss controlling or intimidating...?
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they will have sermons and lessons on sunday schools about it. it is ourjob as christians to be concerned about the most vulnerable in our society. we have eyes and ears looking out for this. if you have that many people looking for signs of it, it can make a huge difference. the clever bit is the way they can use smartphone technology. if you get your car cleaned, you can use the app safe car wash. it will help you spot and report these signs to send it for analysis by experts at the university of nottingham to look at the scale of slavery. you can say if they have protective clothing and how much it costs. anything less than £6.70, they say,
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should raise suspicions. certainly people looked malnourished or dishevelled in any way, shape or form, without proper equipment, if the price is too good to be true, perhaps there is something which might set alarm bells ringing. the information will also be sent to police teams to investigate modern slavery. workers here were not mistreated but the victims have been rescued in other raids and controllers put behind bars for what has been described as an assault on human dignity. jeremy ball, bbc news. in 2003, adnan sarwar went to iraq as a british soldier, to free the country from the regime of saddam hussein. 15 years on he went back as a documentary maker, to see how the country is being rebuilt, and ask if the invasion was justified. let's take a look.
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iam high i am high in the mountains of northern iraq. in this town. do you know with a mosul gate is? go straight down. do you speak english? no. you do! where are you sending me, is this the muzzle gate? ok. cool me, is this the muzzle gate? ok. cool. this is the historic route into the land now called iraq. this gate was built in the 14th century. the sun represents life—giving energy and the snake ‘s protection from danger. over there is iran. behind me is turkey, over there is syria and here is the start of the whole of iraq. but a clip of what we
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will see tonight on bbc two. adnan, good morning. it seems strange to see you because last time we met we were tracking along the india— pakistan borderfor along the india— pakistan borderfor a documentary. it was amazing. why iraq this time? i wanted to go back and answer the questions i had, from when i was a soldier there, ijust wa nted when i was a soldier there, ijust wanted to fit it together and travelling the whole country gave me that. we talked about this before, about being a british muslim man from burnley, serving in the armed forces to your country, in iraq. you said it did not quite fit what the label should be. there'sjust so much controversy with the iraq war, a lot of people protested against it but the community and from solid as a waragainst but the community and from solid as a war against islam and they really protested about it so a lot of
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people asked why i was going there. but when you go to iraq a lot of muslims were fighting muslims. the shia muslim fighting the sunni muslims and stuff. it's very complicated. you went back 15 years later, you talk about the gaps, have they been filled? what is the journey meant, going back?” they been filled? what is the journey meant, going back? i have seen journey meant, going back? i have seen iraq and iraqis being resilient andi seen iraq and iraqis being resilient and i think they are going to fix that country and do it without us thank you very much. but is the feeling on the ground. there's real optimism as well. there are problems of course, we can't deny those. it's just that some of the people and met, i'm at 116—year—old girl who i think will be prime minister one day! —— and a 16—year—old girl. she was brilliant. she took me through the history of babylon. she was so proud of being an iraqi. when you meet people like that you think, it's going to be all right. the team
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who made this with you, october films, access was fantastic and you got to see parts of iraq, we as journalists we don't often talk about some places that you showed what you wanted to show, another side of it. i got to meet someone who was actually bombing me in 2006! idid not who was actually bombing me in 2006! i did not reveal to him that i had been a british soldier. we just tried to get anybody from that army and when he was talking about an operation, thought, i remember that. i was at home at christmas and my friends on that operation. so he was upset with british soldiers and i broke my leg just before i went out, i couldn't tell him because i couldn't they get! it was that side of iraq which is there as well, the other side of iraq, there's huge reconciliation going on between the sunni muslims and the shia muslims in tikrit where saddam hussein was
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from. i like your sense of optimism, it isa from. i like your sense of optimism, it is a troubled country and has some way to go. what is your feeling about perhaps how far they have to go? if you go to western mosul it is absolutely destroyed. they want to rebuild and because it's so historic, they can't forget it, it isn't just any other time, historic, they can't forget it, it isn'tjust any other time, it is sitting on ninevah. with god clip about the underground tunnels, let's look about. we have got clip. the doctor and the professor came to see the damage, not knowing if isis was still hiding here. they did not expect what they found. they are about to take me deep and the tomb ofjonah. this will be extraordinary, we will cease in true history. i feel very
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extraordinary, we will cease in true history. i feelvery proud extraordinary, we will cease in true history. i feel very proud of you, like a sister! well done. thank you so much adnan for talking to us about it today. journey into the danger zone will be on bbc two tonight. charlie will be back tomorrow, they'll be joined by cuba gooding junior. don't miss it. have a good day. this is bbc news. i'm ben brown. the headlines at 9:00. one year on from the the terror attack on london bridge and borough market, a special service will be held at southwark cathedral, to remember those killed and injured. a warning that the threat to britain from islamist terrorism could increase over the next two years. g7 finance ministers warn the us it only has days left to avoid a trade war after president trump's decision
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to impose tariffs on steel and aluminium imports. the church campaigns to clean up the exploitation of workers at car washes, who are trapped by threats and debts. and our sunday morning edition of the papers is at 9:35, this mornings reviewers are sian griffiths of the sunday times and ben chu from the the independent.
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