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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 3, 2018 10:00pm-10:31pm BST

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the london bridge terror attack remembered — one year on. today, a special service brought families, survivors and the emergency services together. brought families, survivors the eight people killed were aged between 21 and a5. 48 others were injured. were aged between 21 and a5. we'll be live at london bridge at the end of a day of remembrance. at the end of a day the genetic test that could help thousands of women with breast cancer avoid chemotherapy. thousands of women with breast the home secretary will consider raising the cap on skilled migrants entering the uk. raising the cap on skilled strikes on gaza — on what israel says are militant targets. and a journey in search of english identity. good evening.
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it was just after ten o'clock in the evening, one year ago, that the first emergency calls were received from the london bridge area. were received from the attack that was unfolding there involved three men with knives, who killed eight people and injured 48 others. today, one year on, the victims were remembered by theirfamilies, political leaders, emergency services, and members of the public. our correspondentjune kelly is at london bridge now. well, is at london bridge now. it was at 10:07pm that th first well, it was at 10:07pm that the first calls started coming in about what was happening on this bridge. a van was mowing into pedestrians. for the bereaved families, they've been forced to endure their private grief. this has been a day of public commemoration. on this first sunday
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of summer, hundreds gathered at southwark cathedral to reflect on a long night full of fear in london 12 months ago. on a long night full of fear leading the public figures was the prime minister. it's less than a fortnight since she and the labour leader jeremy corbyn were at a memorial service for the victims of the manchester bombing. service for the victims last year 36 people in the uk were murdered in terror attacks. eight lives were taken in the london bridge atrocity. 0ne victim, james mcmullan, was british. chrissy archibald was from canada. mcmullan, was british. ignacio echeverria from spain. mcmullan, was british. there were two australians, kirsty boden and sara zelenak, and three french victims, sebastien belanger, alexandre pigeard and xavier thomas. sebastien belanger, some were visiting london, others had made it their home. and at this interfaith service, from the bishop of southwark, a simple, strong message. from the bishop of southwark, for those of us who profess faith,
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the invocation of holy names by those perpetrating these acts was not only profoundly distressing, but needs to be rejected. was not only profoundly distressing, and there were the memories of local people. the attack happens in a place where we live, work and socialise. in a few minutes everything changes. where we live, work and socialise. though it will be hours before we'll know the true cost. shocked to the core of their own humanity, police and paramedics still did everything that they needed to do. they made sure that everyone still living stayed safe. the congregation then moved into the cathedral grounds and here the cameras were allowed to film the bereaved families for the first time. to film the bereaved they completed the planting of an olive tree, known as the tree of healing.
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of an olive tree, known later the families moved to the corner of london bridge, where there was a minute's silence. to the corner of london bridge, there were floral tributes from some of those injured including pc wayne marks, who was stabbed in the head and body as he took on the three attackers. who was stabbed in the head and body among those laying flowers, jermaine bernad, who was on the bridge that night and in the midst of the attack tended to one of the injured. and in the midst of the attack her name was regina, she was from germany. she came here on holiday and she was the first person who i saw got run over at the time, and yes, she will forever be in my heart and soul. and yes, she will forever be i hope that she's 0k. and yes, she will forever be this is one of the most vibrant quarters of london, but today, the pace slowed as people stopped and thought about what happened here a year ago, and all that was lost. and thought about what happened here a
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and thought about what happened here day of rem tomorrow a day of remembrance today, but tomorrow there will be announcement on counter extremism from the government? that's right. this was one of five terror attacks in the uk last year, and here, as in some of the others, the people responsible known to the authorities, so this led to a review of the way these people are managed and assessed. there are more than 20,000 people on mis's there are more than 20,000 people on mis‘s books and the security services' books and these are people who either in the past or currently are seen as having links to extremist groups. so when the government publishes its counter—terrorism strategy tomorrow it will be outlining how it plans to allow m15 to share information about some of these people with organisations like local councils will stop this is a very radical step. just coming back to what is happening here tonight, 12 months ago this was a bridge full of horror. tonight, as you can see,
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it's a place filled with flowers. june kelly at london bridge, thank you. two thirds of women with the most common form of breast cancer might be spared chemotherapy, after a new trial involving a genetic test already available on the nhs. doctors say using it to analyse early stage tumours could mean up to 3000 women a year in the uk treated with surgery and hormone therapy alone. treated with surgery anisa kadri reports. treated with surgery juliet fitzpatrick is now in recovery after a physical and emotional battle with breast cancer. she says the chemotherapy that followed her diagnosis turned her into a horrible person to live with. i think, for me, the worst thing about it was the emotional side. i got used to losing my hair and going around bald, but ijust felt so depressed and not wanting to talk to anybody, and really it was just that feeling of wanting to be away from the world, actually. of wanting to be away doctors say new research means thousands of women with the most common form of early—stage breast
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cancer could be spared chemotherapy. trials of a genetic test have found that the treatment can be safely avoided without affecting outcomes. that the treatment can be safely the test is carried out after surgery to see whether a tumour is likely to spread and people get a score out of 100. women who score 0—10 are considerable low risk. there is no benefit in having chemotherapy. at the other end of the scale, people who score over 26, there is a definite benefit, but there's a grey area for most patients who are in between. but there's a grey area for most the findings suggested that for those patients aged over 50, chemotherapy wasn't needed. for those patients aged over 50, it is estimated this could affect around 3,000 british women a year. there has always been this uncertainty about what the best recommendation was for the two—thirds of women who had a test in the mid—range. the two—thirds of women who had and this trial definitively addresses that very important question. addresses that very a leading breast cancer charity is calling for changes
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in cancer treatment. is calling for changes some clinicians will update their practice immediately because the results update their practice of this study are so significant, and that is why we want to see the clinical guidance updated, so that more patients can benefit across the nhs. so that more patients can the trial is another step in trying to provide more tailored treatment for breast cancer patients. to provide more tailored treatment anisa to provide more tailored treatment kadri, bbc nev the home secretary sajid javid has said it may be time to raise the cap on the number of skilled workers allowed to enter the uk. it would be part of an overall review of the government's immigration policy ahead of brexit. review of the government's businesses and parts of the public sector such as the nhs have been arguing they're struggling to recruit enough skilled workers. 0ur political correspondent chris mason has the details. parts of the nhs are in desperate need of more doctors, but the number of skilled non—eu workers granted uk visas is capped. today, the new home secretary acknowledged that policy
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should be re—examined. acknowledged that policy when the policy was put in place, there was a cap that was established, it's 20,700 a year of these highly skilled immigrants. it's 20,700 a year of these for years and years that cap wasn't hit. it's only in recent months that the cap has been hit. i see the problem with that. that the cap has been hit. it's something i'm taking a fresh look at. the pressure on ministers has been building. in spring, visas for 100 foreign doctors were refused. 35 nhs trusts said in a letter to the government the ban would affect patients and the decision was almost impossible to understand. and the decision was almost mrjavid also said today that he would look again at the inclusion of foreign students in the immigration figures, saying it had a perception problem. in the immigration figures, for almost a decade, the conservatives have been committed to cutting overall net migration to the tens of thousands a year, but he repeatedly refused to explicitly endorse that figure. but he repeatedly refused i'm committed to our manifesto,
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but what that means is that over the next few years, i will be working towards, rightly, reducing net migration and bringing it to lower sustainable levels. but you haven't yet said you're committed to the tens of thousands. i've said i'm committed to the manifesto. labour claimed the policy had been counter—productive. the mistake that the conservatives have always made on this is they said they would set an arbitrary target for their immigration figure, and they would then let the economy bear the consequences. and they would then let the economy we have said the sensible thing to do is to say, what does our economy need? thing to do is to say, let's make sure we have the skills to match those needs. sajid javid has been working here as home secretary forjust a month but he has shown again his willingness to do the job his own way. again his willingness to do chris mason, bbc news, at westminster. the bodies of 46 migrants have been recovered after their boat capsized off the coast of tunisia. recovered after their boat the tunisian defence ministry says 67 others were
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were rescued by coastguards. ministry says 67 others were elsewhere, another nine people died, after a speedboat carrying refugees sank off the southern coast of turkey. american and chinese negotiators have wrapped up their latest trade talks without a conclusion, with beijing warning washington that all their trade agreements will be void if it introduces new tariffs and other sanctions. void if it introduces new tariffs washington unilaterally imposed tariffs on steel and aluminium on the eu, canada and mexico three days ago. chris buckler is in washington for us. what washington for us. reaction has there been to the opposition what reaction has there been to the opposition from a number of countries to the moves on steel and aluminium? president trump is showing no signs of backing down at the moment. of course he's normally in his element talking about trade and how he will put america first, but this weekend's meeting of finance ministers from seven of the big economic countries left no doubt
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that a confrontation is coming. they say as far as they are concerned these tariffs are damaging. they say they are disappointed by america and just listen to the reaction of the canadian prime minister to president trump's claim that this is all about america's trump's claim that this is all about national securit idea america's national security. the idea that the canadian steel that is in military vehicles in the united states, the canadian long aluminium that makes your fighter jets states, the canadian long aluminium that makes your fighterjets is somehow now a threat, the idea that we are somehow a national security threat to the united states, is quite frankly insulting and an acceptable. and there are some in donald trump ‘s and republican party who are concerned about alienating allies and also the impact of retaliatory tariffs, but at the moment donald trump is continuing to talk and tweet about a trade war. he shows no signs of backing down, and he is due to meet the other g7 leaders at the end of the week in quebec. that could be quite a meeting. chris buckler in
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washington, thank you. a 17—year—old boy has been stabbed to death in ipswich, in what police believe was a targeted attack. witnesses said the teenager was walking back from the shops yesterday afternoon when he was attacked by two men who approached him on bicycles. when he was attacked by two men a 41—year—old man has been arrested. when he was attacked by two men israel has carried out strikes on what it said were militant targets in gaza, after it says rockets were fired on southern israel. after it says rockets the strikes came days into a ceasefire between hamas and israel, as paul adams reports from gaza. israeli jets in action over gaza last night, hitting hamas targets for the second time in less than a week. responding to rockets fired by palestinian militants, and, israel says, terror activities approved and orchestrated by hamas. approved the air raids came hours after one of the biggest funerals since the protests began. of the biggest funerals 21—year—old razan al najar borne aloft through the streets of her hometown. najar borne aloft through a furious outpouring of grief at the death of a dedicated young medic, now a national heroine. at the death of a dedicated young and was this the action that
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cost razan her life? these pictures appearing to show her team racing, arms aloft, to help an injured protester. to show her team racing, arms aloft, 100 yards from israel's borderfence. moments later, she was shot in the chest by an israeli soldier. razan al najar had become a familiar face, a volunteer at every protest since march. face, a volunteer at every in gaza's conservative society, she demanded the right to do the same work and take the same risks as her male colleagues. in gaza's conservative society, she told the new york times in a recent interview, she demanded the right to do the same work and take the same risks as her male colleagues. at the funeral, razan‘s mother held her daughter's bloodied medicaljacket. mother held her daughter's palestinians ask how someone dressed in this distinctive way could possibly have been regarded as a threat. israel says her death will be investigated. weeek after week, palestinian medics
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take enormous risks at the border, racing to get the injured to hospital, standing where tear gas and bullets are flying. to hospital, standing where tear gas razan was the second medic to die since the protests began in march. after ten weeks, more than 100 dead, since the protests began in march. and more than 13,000 casualties, there is no sign of the weekly protests ending. there is no sign of in fact, hamas are calling the people of gaza back to the border on tuesday, to mark another anniversary, israel's capture of the west bank and gaza strip in 1967. hamas, it seems, does not want this to let up. paul want this to let up. adams, bbc news, gaza. if you live in england, are you proud to call yourself english? it turns out that the answer to that question is influenced in part by your age, how you vote, and what you think about brexit. how you vote, and what the findings have come from one of the largest surveys on identity in england, "the english question", commissioned by the bbc.
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"the english question", tonight, our home editor mark easton goes in search of englishness, a journey that begins on a narrow boat in the east midlands. exploring the canals and backwaters of england's identities brings one to nottinghamshire, as english a county as you'll find. # st george in my heart, give me english... there's something defiant about the annual st george's day parade here. defiant about the annual a sense that despite england's size and influence within the united kingdom, the interests of the english people need to be asserted. the interests of the english people why, why, why are people ashamed to be english? i just don't understand it at all. ashamed to be english? you're not ashamed? ashamed to be english? certainly not. ashamed to be english? why do we get called racist when everybody else celebrates st andrew's day, st patrick's day? you admire the flag, you're proud of your country, you know? i'm not 100% english myself, i must say. oh, really? myself, i must say. no, a little bit of welsh in me, but other than that... only a little bit. but other than that... 0n nottingham's canals, reminders of lost industrial glory.
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england emerges as strangely wistful right now, and the more english people feel, the more likely they are to be nostalgic for times past. the more likely they are to be englishness is a variable quality. the more likely they are to be while almost three—quarters of the over—65s say they are proud to call themselves english, among the young, it's less than half. among the young, it's felt strongly among brexit supporters, much less so for those who voted to remain in the eu. supporters, much less so for those navigate 90 miles southeast to cambridgeshire and people's englishness is much more diluted. to cambridgeshire and people's 10% of young people and 10% of graduates say they are embarrassed to call themselves english, and in this city, there's plenty of both. themselves english, and in this 0n the river cam, tie up at the fort st george pub, where else, to meet students of english
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history to talk about what england means to them. history to talk about i think there are a million reasons to be proud to be english, just as there are a million reasons to be proud of being scottish or welsh or irish or any national identity within the british isles, but i think that when patriotism or nationalism becomes a code for prejudice, i think that is what becomes problematic. i think that is what richard the lionheart is a very poor icon or a very poor representation of what englishness is and could be be taken to be. of what englishness it's a supremacist view. of what englishness it's a violent look at the past. of what englishness you don't need to wave a st george's cross and have a pint of ale and say, "look at me, i'm english." you canjust say, "i'm english," as normal as that. people might say that is about as english as you can get. the final leg of our journey along the navigable arteries of england and we emerge into the rarefied atmosphere of planet london. when it comes to identity, the metropolis is just different. in some parts of the capital,
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like here in islington, only half of people say they feel strongly english. a similar proportion say they feel strongly european and a third of people here have a strong link with a country outside the uk. london is a truly international city where identities can be discarded, absorbed into lifestyle. where identities can be discarded, do you ever call yourself english? where identities can be discarded, see, this is the debate that i've had with some of my friends. i call myself british, british—indian, and they are like, "but you're english, british—indian, and they are like, because you live in england, you were born here," and i am like, "i don't know whether i'd call myself english." i'd call myself british—indian, i think. it's a very diverse, multicultural melting pot of communities that all come together, so you can be any country, if you like, in london. together, so you can be any country, being english, unlike being british, is seen as an exclusive identity, an honour bestowed only upon those eligible. that is its weakness
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and its strength. mark easton, bbc news, england. and its strength. all this week, we'll be looking at questions of englishness, as well as identity across the uk. at questions of englishness, to see what those who live near you think, go to bbc. co. uk/englishquestion and type in your postcode. with all the sport, here's 0llie foster at the bbc sport centre. here's 0llie foster england's cricketers beat pakistan by an innings and 55 runs at headingley, to draw their match series. their first test victory in nine months was wrapped up with two days to spare. months was wrapped up adam wild reports. months was wrapped up for too long there's been a cloud hanging over english test cricket. against pakistan a moment then to step out of those shadows. doing just that, jos buttler, showing everyone what's been missing. buttler, showing everyone his half century up
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another belligerent buttler blow and england's lead continued to grow. this took it past 180, praise from both sides. england on top, a welcome sight. praise from both sides. the clatter of wickets — there are few more welcome sounds. jimmy anderson making sure everyone at headingley heard. his second wicket soon followed. at headingley heard. dom bess's quite brilliant catch, the match firmly in england's grasp. bess is still feeling his way in test cricket. his first wicket then a very special moment. more a very special moment. would follow. beth was no' forcing more would follow. beth was now forcing the pakistan panic. if he is part of a new start for england it was left to the more established to bring about pakistan's end. stuart broad criticised of late, his and england's response was emphatic. of late, his and england's it's
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of late, his and england's important we don't pape the it's important we don't paper over the cracks. we got a lot of hard work to do but we do a step in the right direction. it's been some weight but for an england side so long under a cloud they at last have a test victory. adam wild, bbc news. the challenge cup holders hull fc have been knocked out by st helens in a thrilling quarterfinal. have been knocked out by st helens there were four tries apiece, but saints just edged it 25—22. catalans dragons now stand in the way of a first challenge cup final in ten years. in the way of a first warrington will play leeds in the other semifinal. scotland and northern ireland have been providing friendly opposition to two teams heading to the world cup. the scots lost to mexico 1—0 early this morning, and costa rica, who were world cup quarterfinalists four years ago, were far too strong for the northern irish earlier this evening. arsenal'sjoel campbell set up two goals and also scored in their 3—0 win in sanjose. goals and also scored novak djokovic is through to the quarterfinals at the french open. to the quarterfinals he beat fernando verdasco in straight sets. he was champion at roland garros two years ago, but has been hit by poor form and injuries for the past year. years ago, but has been hit by poor his 12th quarterfinal appearance in paris is a record,
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although rafael nadal will match that if he wins tomorrow. don't forget you can catch up with all the results from the french open and much more on the bbc sport website. a on the bbc sport website. first look at tomorrow rr newspapers a first look at tomorrow morning's newspapers is coming up on the bbc news channel, but that's it from me on bbc one. time now for the news where you are. good night. hello. this is bbc news with martine croxall. a dinosaurfossil found in the us is going on sale in paris tomorrow. the skeleton is worth millions of dollars, though experts are still uncertain of its identity — shuba krishnan reports. headed for auction. this dinosaur skeleton is expected to fetch up to $2.2 million. not bad for an unidentified species. translation: until all the bones were discovered, we all thought it was an allosaurus.
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it was in the laboratory that they realised, as they gradually removed the bones, that there were plenty of anatomical details that did not match up. experts believe it is from the carnivorous theropod group, which had hollow bones and three toed feet. the skeleton is almost nine metres long and is unusually complete, with 70% intact. it is a good sign for scientists, who are continuing to research its unique anatomy. they have already spotted several differences with other known species, such as more teeth and a substantial pelvis. 0rganisers are hoping this rare dinosaur will find a good home. translation: in terms of potential clients, there are quite a few. it is a large bracket. these past years, everyonewas thinking about a museum, but the problem is that museums do not have enough money at the moment.
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the current owner of the skeleton has asked for the money raised from the sale to go to conservation groups and further excavations. weather with darren bett. hello there. good evening. over the week ahead they will be fewer thundery showers. many places will be dry with some warm sunshine. a bit like today, really. no sign of any rain from that cloud there. we've had temperatures into the mid—20s or so, lots of blue skies, but not everywhere. we needed some artificial light for the test match at headingley in leeds but i'm sure julia, one of our weather watchers, had a great day out. had more cloud across the far north of england and southern scotland, storms to the north will gradually fade away. any showers to the south across england and wales will decay. instead we are looking out to the north sea where we are filling in with cloud and the misty and murky weather will filter inland overnight. clearer skies to the west, generally dry by the morning, quite warm, 11—14d.
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but this cloud could prove stubborn in south—east scotland, down the eastern side of england and towards the east midlands and east anglia. sunshine in the south—east but more especially to the western side of the uk. where we get a lift of the temperatures could lead to slow—moving and perhaps heavy thundery downpours. we are seeing a range of temperatures, much cooler than today, in many eastern parts of the uk. heading into the afternoon we pick out some storms across the south west of scotland, that will be the main area of wet weather on monday. not far away from northern ireland, south—east scotland much cooler and greyer, this time into the midlands and east anglia temperatures will be lower on monday. maybe the odd shower for wales and the south—west slow—moving, but equally some warm sunshine across southern parts of england. the really wet weather is not far away from the near continent. we are seeing some heavy rain moving northwards across france, high pressure to the north of the uk, easterly flow again as we have seen for the past couple of weeks or so. this time no two days are ever the same and we are introducing drier air
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from the north sea for tuesday. the low cloud, misty and murky weather pushed away towards the south—west so a cooler day here but the sunnier skies arriving in eastern scotland, warm and sunny conditions across northern england towards lincolnshire and east anglia. cooler in the south—west and a bit warmer in the sunshine further north and east. sunny spells and perhaps one or two showers for northern ireland. generally it will be dry on tuesday and into wednesday. we have an increasing chance of catching some showers on thursday but again most places will be dry with some warm sunshine.
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