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tv   The Papers  BBC News  June 3, 2018 10:30pm-10:46pm BST

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hello. this is bbc news with martine croxall. we'll be taking a look at tomorrow mornings papers in a moment — first the headlines. one year on from the london bridge attack — a special service takes place at southwark cathedral to remember the victims. eight people died and 48 others were injured after three attackers drove into pedestrians — then stabbed people in nearby borough market. doctors say new research means thousands of women with early stage breast cancer could be spared chemotherapy. the home secretary, sajid javid, says it may be time to raise the cap on the number of skilled workers allowed to enter the uk. on meet the author of this week guest is the colombian writerjon gabrielle vazquez with a novel about history and the truth being pitted against our never—ending fascination with conspiracy. with me are bonnie greer, playwright and writer for the new european, and the journalist, yasmin alibhai—brown.
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many of tomorrow's front pages are already in. the financial times reports two of europe's biggest banks could join forces as italy's unicredit plots to merge with french rival societe generale. the metro pictures today's service for the victims of the london bridge terror attack. the paper leads with details of a new anti—terror strategy to be unveiled by the home secretary sajid javid tomorrow in response to what he calls a ‘step change‘ in the threat posed by extremists. the daily express carries the warning from mps that britain may face a summer of knife crime unless ‘swift action‘ is taken to curb violence on the street. the daily telegraph claims theresa may is expected to lift the visa cap on foreign doctors within weeks after nhs warnings of staff shortages. the times says israel has secret files that show tehran‘s determination to build a bomb and is using them to put pressure on britain to abandon the nuclear deal with iran. and the breast cancer revolution — the mirror says the nhs will save millions as a breakthrough
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in breast cancer research could see up to 5,00 patients a year avoiding chemotherapy. many of the papers leading with those images of today‘s commemoration of the london bridge terror attack one year ago. very vivid memories we will all have, i was on air that night that unfolded here on the news channel. the independent is where we will start, london bridge victims remembered. the placards we see in this photograph making it clear it hasn‘t made a difference to how united people feel. exactly, and this is the heart and soul of london. you don‘t have to try. you don‘t have to arrange the togetherness. it is there. it was there in the dreadful early bomb which killed over 50 people, and it
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isa which killed over 50 people, and it is a very beautiful picture of interfaith people coming together. but one mustn‘t forget also that ever since, well, iwould but one mustn‘t forget also that ever since, well, i would say the last five, six years, a city which seemed so together is also becoming ripped apart by various... in what way? i find londoners... ripped apart by various... in what way? ifind londoners... i don't know, something has happened, which i used to take for granted. i don‘t know if bonnie agrees with me but there is a part of london which found a space for you because london, remember, was a city built by strangers, it never belongs to anybody so you could belong to it and now increasingly many of us, and i certainly get it, get out of here, you don‘t belong here, hadn‘t ever happened to me before. it is such a stark contrast to 2012 when the olympics was on and it was a citi open to the world, wasn‘t it? ——
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dummett if our leaders don‘t help us understand why we should come together, why we have two come together, why we have two come together, where we should come together. i live not far from the bbc and you can see people rushing through the streets and you can feel the tension, as you say, some people may say in some parts of london it's always been like this but the sense of london hasn't been like this. i don't even write the tube anymore. because of that feeling?” don't even write the tube anymore. because of that feeling? i am a former new yorker so i'm not afraid but you can feel the energy. interestingly enough, you know you stomach it happens when you open your mouth, i have friends who have remaining in accidents, to say you have just dropped your wallet or something, they don't speak. it begins at the top and this has to be tackled. i'm not the mayor and
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begins at the top and this has to be tackled. i'm not the mayorand i'm not the prime minister sol tackled. i'm not the mayorand i'm not the prime minister so i don't know what you do but this is where it begins. i am not denying that there is a real threat to this country from islamist terrorism and i speak as a muslim. i‘m never going to deny that what happens to wreck the fragile bonds is partly the responsibility of people who did what they did a year ago and so on. you mentioned the threat and those at the top and this is where we will go next with the metro, the politicians and the head of the metropolitan police were laying wreaths at the southwark needle and underneath that, major shift in war on terror. how different is the strategy going to be? what is the focus going to be this time? i'm trying to understand it, it is sajid javid's initiative and it seems to bea javid's initiative and it seems to be a focus on technology but the
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only thing i can say, they were not doing that before? that is where everything is. i don't know exactly what deeply different this is, other than he is saying it, but i find it alarming if m15 hasn't been doing this, what have they been doing?|j this, what have they been doing?” think this is now called contest, we had think this is now called contest, we ha d p reve nt think this is now called contest, we had prevent and we had something else before that, it is like every home secretary needs to name thing and do it. one of the things that worries me, and like i said i would never deny have a problem. british muslims have got to look at some of the things happening in the heads of their young and we‘re not doing that nearly enough. having said that, i don‘t want to live in a society which is like the ex—soviet union where everybody is watching everybody else and there is no trust between citizens. the way it has been described today seems to me kind of almost like romania under
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ceausescu. if sajid javid, the home office, m16 or m15, orwhoever, get in on this, i'm sure they know that the terrorists are three steps ahead of them. this is a way to do it. we should change people's minds, that's how we begin. the subheading is no safe s pa ces how we begin. the subheading is no safe spaces for fanatics and i wonder how much of that relates to the use of social media and apps like telegram used by the man trying to whip up support for an attack on prince george in a court case only last week where they are so well encrypted that you can‘t gain access to those messages. i think we need to those messages. i think we need to pay some respect to the police and to some of the intelligence services because they have thwarted, i think, a potential attack several times over the course of a single month. we don't hear about them, do
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we? we don't hear about them and this idea that sajid javid will come m, this idea that sajid javid will come in, and what seems to me, he wants teachers to cooperate with m15 to report on students. children and stu d e nts report on students. children and students say all kinds of things. you know? i fear that students say all kinds of things. you know? ifear that this is going to wreck the kind of trust we need to wreck the kind of trust we need to rebuild. i also think technologically, and i totally agree with you, technologically there must be some sort of respect, in the sense that, whatever he wants to call them, these people are way ahead and there has to be some understanding and dealing with them. all of a sudden this is all going to spring into life because they've decided they are going to tackle it. its way ahead and that has to be acknowledged. the guy they got last week who then turned his plea to guilty was a teacher in his 30s. i am very scared of them but i‘m equally scared of the state‘s response and it‘s very difficult to know what to do. and it's behind as
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well. the daily telegraph, visa cap 011 well. the daily telegraph, visa cap on foreign doctors to be lifted, nhs say they are struggling with staff shortages because of this cap. we know this has been happening and there is a response but here is what i think. i think this is an inevitable thing because we have a shortage of nurses and a shortage of all sorts of nhs staff and foreign doctors who were actually on their way to getting visas and then they we re way to getting visas and then they were stopped. it was inevitable and it had to happen and the press was backing them and so on. it will not change the wider culture and the wider picture of the keep them out 01’ wider picture of the keep them out or send them away culture. also, technically, what are they going to do after next march? if people are 110w do after next march? if people are now allowed to move what do they do to get them in here? what is going to get them in here? what is going to have to happen? that is not even discussed. how does it happen? you
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can't go to the eu and say, by the way, what we really want to do is make sure these doctors and nurses get in. it doesn't work like that. what are they going to do and why didn't they think about this before? this is a basic. and asjasmine ser before these foreign doctors and nurses make of a large part of the staff in the nhs and suddenly the tap is being turned off and they wa nt tap is being turned off and they want to turn it back on.” tap is being turned off and they want to turn it back on. i know four indian families where either the man 01’ indian families where either the man or the woman are doctors and they are all leaving, three have moved to malaysia and one of them has moved to... why is that? they feel insulted. india is an up and coming country. india is not the place that was ruled by the brits all those yea rs was ruled by the brits all those years ago and they are very proud. they say that we hate the discourse. you know, we‘re not going to stand by and be insulted day after day so they are off. we certainly don't wa nt they are off. we certainly don't want trump to send over a bunch of
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americans because he might do that. if they are qualified and we need them. genetic tests can spare breast cancer sufferers the trauma of chemotherapy, this idea that this test ca n chemotherapy, this idea that this test can find for whom chemotherapy will be beneficial. a great deal of women can go without it. first of all, if this exists that a wonderful thing. if this test exists and it can help. but this is a us clinical trial. how are we going to harvest everyone? that's the problem with the nhs on its knees. this is a wonderful thing but how do we harvest everyone? wonderful thing but how do we harvest everyone ? how wonderful thing but how do we harvest everyone? how do we get them together and find people? it is a genetic test. they have already done the trial of 10,000 patients. potentially there is something good. you have to get everyone together, that's the problem. how do you do it and under what kind of system? then
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it -- the genetic thing was quite confusing because they said a lot of women are not helped by the chemotherapy they‘re getting that might have been counter—productive. it is being able to divide bibilov who benefit from another kind of treatment. anything that makes a difference to these cancers —— divide women off. they talk about precision medicine, rather than a blanket approach, they are telling making it for people. that is the way should be ambassador great thing but the problem is it is a trial and we need to see how it's going to work and what it will do. but it is a good thing. cancer is bad. daily express, page two, learners are allowed to drive motorways. i know that you don‘t drive, bonnie and why is that? i don't have stomach like
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seeing people break the rules of the road. i don‘t need to be behind a wheel. you have finally got behind the wheel, yasmin alibhai—brown. wheel. you have finally got behind the wheel, yasmin alibhai-brown. do you know how many tests? do you really wa nt you know how many tests? do you really want to know? yes. eight! i think it‘s a great idea to have some lessons on the motorway. my problem isi lessons on the motorway. my problem is i have lived here half my life andl is i have lived here half my life and i still get in on the wrong side of the car. do you? you must get deported, you are not british enough!| deported, you are not british enough! i get in on the wrong side and so therefore i shouldn't be behind the wheel. i think it's an excellent idea because i remember being terrified being on a motorway for the first time thinking. for the first time i being terrified being on a motorway for the first time i can't imagine you being terrified of anything.
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