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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  June 4, 2018 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 2. experts tell the grenfell tower inquiry that advice to "stay put" had effectively failed within around half an hour of the blaze starting. the fundamental question lying at the heart of our work is how, in london, in 2017, a domestic fire developed so quickly and so catastrophically. and the inquiry hears the first 999 call from the burning tower block. the fire brigade are on their way, are you outside? yes, i'm outside. the fire engines are on their way, family floors have you got? —— how many. i'm on the fourth floor. quick, quick, quick. greater manchester mayor, andy burnham, says northern rail should be stripped of its franchise, if it can't end the chaos caused by new timetables. they should not be allowed to
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inflict their miserable substandard services on the public of the north on an ongoing basis. m15 is to share more information on uk terror suspects, in a new strategy unveiled by the home secretary. at least 25 people are dead after a volcano erupts violently near the capital of guatamala. coming up on afternoon live all the sport with hugh. we'll be talking about the world cup — many are surprised that germany have left out manchester city's leroy sane, and serena williams prepares to do battle with maria sharapova at the french open. more at half past. thanks. and the weather forecast? good afternoon. the weather is changing very slowly in the next few days, sunshine and extra cloud and a few showers. more disturbed weather in other parts of europe. thanks.
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also coming up — the black and white photographs discovered hidden in an attic — that for one woman revealed that her father — who died more than 30 years ago — had a secret life. hello everyone — this is afternoon live. stay in your flats — it was the advice which was meant to save lives during the grenfell fire disaster. but it was advice that an expert report has found had ‘effectively failed' within half an hour of the blaze starting. at the opening of its fact—finding stage the grenfell inquiry was told that total evacuation of the tower should have happened within 46 minutes of the first 999 call. the inquiry was also told the materials used in the cladding system and by windows didn't comply with recommended safety standards. daniela relph‘s report contains images viewers may find distressing. the anguish and emotion
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of the bereaved families remain at the heart of this inquiry, but in this next stage, it is now examining the technical detail of what happened onjune the 14th last year. the fundamental question which lies at the heart of our work is how, in london, in 2017, a domestic fire developed so quickly and so catastrophically that an entire high—rise block was engulfed, and how it was that 71 people lost their lives in a matter of hours, leaving families and friends in shock, grief and bewilderment. to help the inquiry, five expert technical reports have been published today. 0ne examined the fire protection measures. it found multiple failures. the report looks at the fire service advice to stay in your flat. it says, the stay put strategy
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effectively failed by 1:26am, around half an hour after the fire started, and there was an early need for total evacuation. the stairwell was quickly smoke clogged, it was the main escape route. the author also says, flat doors didn't meet fire regulations, doors going to the stairs did not appear to have been upgraded since 1972, fire lifts couldn't be used properly, and the water supply system meant firefighters couldn't get adequate amounts of water to the upper levels. the author also says that at one point a body was used to hold open a fire door to a stairwell. a number of the reports highlight the failure of the cladding to meet fire safety standards. 0ne says the main reason for the rapid spread was the polyethylene in the cladding. as it burned, that material dripped and flowed downwards, sideways and upwards. another document looked at the cause
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and spread of the fire. it confirms that the blaze started in the kitchen of flat 16 on the fourth floor of the tower and, more likely than not, in or around a fridge freezer. the events that unfolded at grenfell tower... other expert analysis provided to the inquiry describe inadequate fire testing methods. it says the complex material now used in construction and cladding makes some fire safety procedures totally insufficient. this is an inquiry that wants to provide answers. what did the professionals know and do in respect of the cladding and the active and passive fire safety systems more generally in the building? how did so many people sign this building off as safe? was saving money put before saving lives? next week, around the first anniversary of the fire,
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the inquiry won't be sitting, to allow families to remember those they lost. this public inquiry aims to proceed as quickly as possible, to minimise any future risk to public safety. daniela relph, bbc news. 0ur correspondent, tom burridge, is at the inquiry in central london. some very damning evidence in these reports. very much. what we have an idea of, if grenfell tower, the building originally constructed in 1970, had not been renovated, and there was a fire in one of the flats, the buyer would have been contained and the advice to residents to stay put —— the fire would have been contained. but there was this renovation and a layer of flammable cladding was wrapped around the building and we have learnt of the catalogue of errors essentially in terms of the design
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of the building and the refurbishment. we heard from now the experts commissioned by the inquiry to carry out a report, that there was a culture of noncompliance, and there was no evidence that those who renovated the building, all of the companies involved, in conjunction with the local borough council, had any understanding of how the cladding system, the installation, and the other materials, would perform in a fire. she said the materials were not appropriate for a building that height and she talks about multiple catastrophic fires spread roots in the building, unprotected openings, surrounded by combustible materials, and she said there was no evidence the fire barriers in the building were tested in conjunction with the type of cladding used, she said the doors to the flats were not up to scratch in terms of fire safety and the smoke ventilation system did not work and
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neither did the lift when the fire crews we re neither did the lift when the fire crews were trying to use them. we have a catalogue of mistakes, it is damning stuff, and we have all also heard a very powerful 99 call, the emergency call from a man who lived in flat 16 on the fourth floor. where the fire started. hello, there is a fire, that 16, 6 re nfell tower. hello, there is a fire, that 16, gre nfell tower. — — hello, there is a fire, that 16, grenfell tower. —— flat. hello, there is a fire, that 16, grenfell tower. -- flat. but 16, what is the postcode? w11, one tg. i what is the postcode? w11, one tg. , quick, please. i have to get the address. grenfell tower. the fire brigade on their way. are you outside? yes, i am. you fire engines are outside, family floors have you got? the fourth floor. quick, quick,
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quick. it's burning. they are on their way. i know it's burning. as long as you're 0k. their way. i know it's burning. as long as you're ok. you wait outside. i'm outside. 0k. the fire engines are on theirway i'm outside. 0k. the fire engines are on their way and they will be their soon, 0k. are on their way and they will be their soon, ok. you have onlyjust called us so it will take a minute for them to get there. 0k. can i let you go? inaudible cani inaudible can i let you go? you are outside? 0k, bye. the voice of the man who alerted the
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fire crews that there was a fire in his flat that night. the stay put advice was described as inappropriate. doctor barbara lane said the advice was essentially ineffective, 30 minutes after the fire started, because the stairwell, the only escape route, had become smoke clogged. but the advice to stay in your flat remained in place for another hour and 20 minutes and she simply could not understand why that happened. thanks forjoining us. if you want to find out more about the grenfell tower inquiry, eddie mair is presenting a podcast every day the inquiry sits — which looks in detail at what's been said and heard each day. you can download it from the bbc iplayer radio app, itunes or your podcast provider. the mayor of greater manchester, andy burnham, has said northern rail should be stripped of its franchise, if it can't end the chaos
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caused by new timetables. about 2,000 services have been cancelled since new schedules were introduced just over a fortnight ago. northern has now published a new emergency timetable, with fewer services — but today has seen more frustration for passengers. downing street says the disruption is "totally u na cce pta ble". charlotte gallagher reports. a new emergency timetable, the same old problems. it has been two long weeks of misery for rail travellers across england. thousands of last—minute cancellations, long delays, and the dreaded rail replacement buses. and commuters today aren't impressed by the efforts to fix the crisis. it's just been horrendous, so cancellations all the time, you are just waiting on the platform, probably for like 30 minutes, then all of a sudden theyjust cancel it. hoping to get to work at eight o'clock in the morning, i work in manchester, the 7:07am hasjust been cancelled. now i will probably get in at 8:30, 8:40am. just a disaster, don't know what to do with it.
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i'm supposed to be starting a placement today. my train has been cancelled, so i was supposed to start work at 7:30am, but i'm not going to get there until eight now. mps, whose constituencies are affected, are meeting the transport secretary chris grayling later today to express their frustration. because most of the people making decisions about transport in the north never ever travel on those networks, never use them, don't understand the human cost of the decisions they are making, we have ended up in this mess, and now the government has to show that it understands the frustration and the anger in the north and is prepared to act. there are now calls for the companies to be stripped of their franchises. people are saying they are on warnings at work because they are late so often, or not being able to pick up their kids or having to pay for extra childcare, or getting taxis or hotels. they shouldn't be allowed to inflict their miserable substandard services on the public of the north on an ongoing basis. today, northern rail
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and govia thameslink introduced new reduced timetables in a bid to deal with what has been described as a total shambles. but more than 100 trains have still been cancelled at the last minute or delayed. it is really tough, and it's really tough for our customers. since the new timetables was introduced on may 20th, the service just hasn't been good enough, and we are really sorry about that, and we are now putting in place an interim timetable to help sort this out. commuters are being warned that services could get worse before they get better. stretching people's already frayed patience to the absolute limit. charlotte gallagher reporting there. sir michael fallonjoins us now from central london — he's the mp for sevenoaks, one of the areas hit hard by the changes. you wrote a letter tojojohnson the
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minister recently and it was an angry letter? this is the third week and this is becoming a scandal, my constituents can't get to work in london and their children can't get trains to school and we are now into more cancellations even with the emergency timetable. nvidia is time that ministers got a grip of this —— it really is time. and forced thameslink to run a good service, if necessary borrowing drivers from other companies who know the roots, they say there aren't enough trying labours, but why not? this timetable has been a year in preparation —— there are enough train drivers. has been a year in preparation —— there are enough train driverslj don't there are enough train drivers.” don't know if you are hoping to have a meeting with chris grayling and jo johnson but there has been a statement, saying that he's three busy, and you might have to show a —— there's a statement, saying that he's three busy. i will be meeting chris grayling at three o'clock i
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will be leaving him in no doubt as to the anger of my constituents, this was supposed to be an improvement, that was the point of the new timetable, and it has turned out to be a disaster. he will then be answering questions later in parliament and i will have another chance to put on the record the frustration of those who are having to put up with this on a daily basis. there's a feeling of deja vu, have been through this before, passengers will have the world—weary attitude that they are now so fed up, that this is part of life, but what are you going to say to chris grayling that you think will suddenly magic a solution?” grayling that you think will suddenly magic a solution? i met passengers on the line this morning who had come south to get a better train back to london. they are not passive about, they are very angry, their lives have been disrupted, they are running into trouble by being late for work and their children are getting penalised for being late for school, so this is not acceptable and the secretary of
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state is in charge and he has got to find a solution to this. more train drivers, trained drivers, from other companies, borrowed freight train drivers, if necessary, and above all thameslink being told they have got to sort out a problem that they should have addressed properly. the passengers you were should have addressed properly. the passengers you were talking to, what was their message to chris grayling? their message is this has to be sorted out and it is no use people blaming each other and one operator saying it is responsible for this and the other that, the secretary of state is in charge and they are very clear that government in the end has to intervene and sort this out. clear that government in the end has to intervene and sort this outm that doesn't happen, i don't what time limit you are putting on this, but the buck stops with the transport secretary, how long does he have before hisjob is in question? there are many questions out a hat —— as to how this happened
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in the first place, and i will be pressing him on how much longer be thameslink franchise has to run and whether it is feasible to take the franchise away or with that simply make the situation even worse. dashwood that. clearly the transport sector has to demonstrate that he has this situation on—board and that he is ready to use all of his powers to start putting things right. or what? commuter patience is running very low, and this has got to be addressed. myself and my colleagues, and there are 60 mps who are scheduled to meet chris grayling this afternoon in different meetings, 60 us will not let this go until we get the service we were promised. michael fallon, thanks for joining us. some breaking news. safaa boular, 18, of vauxhall,
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south west london, has been found guilty of two offences of preparation of terrorism acts. she was accused of plotting a massacre after she was prevented from travelling to syria to join her jihadi fiance. she plotted an attack on the british museum initially. this was when armed officers moved in on the uk's first all—female terror cell, firing cs gas canisters into an upstairs flat. in the mayhem one of the women was shot by police
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and she was given medical treatment on the pavement. she was laying down with police officers on top of her because she was putting up a horrendous struggle and she was screaming, saying she was in pain and did not want to be helped. she had been hours away from causing carnage on the streets of london. and for weeks police and the security service m15 had been tracking the suspects. she recovered from her injuries and her younger sister was already in custody and also arrested was their mother nina. we believe they were going to attack members of the public at random at using knives with a view to inflicting injury or killing individuals. we intervene at an early stage with a view to frustrating the terrorist plot. nina with her daughters when the girls we re with her daughters when the girls were growing up, and at the front is her younger sister safaa boular, and by the time she was 16 safaa boular
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on the left was wearing a full islamic state ‘s as she had become more religious. all three then embraced violent extremism. in the same month that safaa boular got her gcse results she was trying to marry an is fight over the internet, she never met him, it was an online relationship and he was in his 30s. when he was killed she was distraught. the couple had talked about how safaa boular could carry out an attack here in the area around the british museum in central london and they discussed an ambush involving guns or grenades and using a carand a involving guns or grenades and using a car and a knife. safaa boular was arrested but she then encouraged her sister to carry out her own attack. during her trial in which she will western clothing, the jury heard recordings of prison phone conversations when she and her
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sister discussed the new plot. her sister discussed the new plot. her sister spoke of her plans to have a mad hatters tea party which the prosecution said was code for a terror attack. safaa boular disappointed that she couldn'tjoin in. safaa boular disappointed that she couldn't join in. the safaa boular disappointed that she couldn'tjoin in. the following evening her sister was being driven around westminster by their mother ona around westminster by their mother on a reconnaissance mission scouting targets. the women had bought a knife from sainsbury‘s and it was her sister who was going to be the killer. this man was at school with her and is perplexed at the path chosen by his former friend. she was a very outgoing person, lovely to talk to, always smiling. she became quite heavily into islam. i'm not
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sure what caused it. it was a very sudden thing and she started wearing the hijab. it is strange to hear that she became such a monster in her adult life. in the hours before her adult life. in the hours before her address she had been —— before her address she had been —— before her arrest she had been practising wielding a knife and the police said they shot her because they believed she posed a risk to their lives. they have pleaded guilty to terrorism charges for the her sister has been convicted by a jury for planning a separate attack. the family are now facing long terms in prison. june kelly, bbc news. we are hearing that the judge has said that will be sentenced in about six weeks' time. she has been found guilty of planning a terror attack in britain, the first all—female cell in britain. the breaking news
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from the old bailey that she has been convicted on two charges, and more on that later on from us. the home secretary sajid javid has said the security services must change their approach to fighting terrorism, and learn the lessons of last year's attacks in london and manchester in which 36 people died. in a speech in london, he said they were currently involved in more than 500 investigations involving 3,000 potential suspects. 0ur security correspondent frank gardner reports. britain, we are told, faces at least two more years of a severe terrorist threat from both jihadis and right—wing extremists. in response, the government is announcing today a revised counterterrorism strategy. we know that the way that terrorists‘ attacks are now planned and conducted has changed. people are increasingly being radicalised via their computers and smartphones. they are using everyday objects, such as knives and cars, as weapons. and the length of time between radicalisation and the attack is getting shorter. the threats are evolving —
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we must evolve too. the security service, m15, is to declassify its secret intelligence on some of the 20,000 suspects on its database, then share this more widely with police forces and even local government. last year's manchester bombing that killed 22 people was an intelligence failure. the bomber, salman abedi, was one of 20,000 people listed on m15's database as a former subject of interest. if more people knew about such potential terrorists, the theory goes, the better the chances of stopping them. but this strategy carries its own risks. there is a concern that some innocent people end up getting caught up in it, but the bigger concern is more around information leaking out, information leaking out from security services identifying an individual as a potential concern, that information being shared with the local council,
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then getting into the public domain. the westminster bridge attacker, who drove a hired van last year into pedestrians, was another name on m15's database. now greater efforts are to be made to quickly detect and act on any suspicious transactions by suspects, including right—wing extremists. but there is an underlying problem — police officers say that budget cuts have left them under—resourced at a community level. you are pouring money into counterterrorism policing and intelligence, but at the same time community policing is being starved of funds. isn't there a risk that we end up being like brussels, where community policing simply doesn't have the on—the—street intelligence to inform about terrorist attacks? since 2015, we have protected police funding over what we might call communities policing, and in fact, in the last year, in this particular financial year, we have increased the total amount of cash available by some £160 million, one of the biggest
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increases that we have seen. so we do recognise that there is a need for more resources. starting this summer, counterterrorism officers will be deployed to multi—agency centres in london, manchester and the west midlands, to put the new strategy into action. the aim is to deny terrorists any safe space and avoid a repeat of the terrible attacks of 2017. frank gardner, bbc news. a comedian who has cerebral palsy and uses a voice synthesiser to speak has won the final of the itv show britain's got talent. lee ridley — who's known as lost voice guy — will receive a £250,000 prize and a spot at the royal variety performance. he said that — when performing — he felt as if he'd finally found his voice. i started off in a disabled steps
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tribute band, we were called ramps. it is voice guy! cheering and applause congratulations, lee. well done. with me is comedian, tim renkow. he also has cerebral palsy. great result? yes, that is amazing. what does it say that someone with that condition can go on to a programme and winner whenjust condition can go on to a programme and winner when just years ago cerebral palsy was something that was not much discussed?” cerebral palsy was something that was not much discussed? i think it just shows how much people have
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grown in knowledge towards cerebral palsy and all disabilities. the thing about disability, i've always found, once people know you they forget about the disability. pretty quickly. humour is a wonderful way of dealing with what was a taboo subject until recently, and that is what you do, i know. yes. you look at other people's attitudes? i'm more interested in other people's attitudes which range from over helpfulness to attacking. every range. you get every range of
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emotion as a disabled person. but lee winning, that will be so nice for the integrity of disability. nice, as well, because he's a nice quy- nice, as well, because he's a nice guy. he's a very nice guy. and i think that comes across in his set. really well. just how nice he is. he doesn't have a voice, and yet the humour shines through! how does that work? you would have to ask him. he does a lot with his face. even though he is just... does a lot with his face. even
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though he isjust... even though he is typing into a machine, he's very expressive. the opening line presumably when you go on stage for the first time, nobody has any preconceptions of you, the opening line has got to be a good one, what is yours? mine is... not appropriate for tv. ok! is yours? mine is... not appropriate for tv. 0k! laughter give me one that would be appropriate. i go on, oh, i know some of you are uncomfortable, if you are uncomfortable don't think of me as disabled, just think of me as every white man trying to dance. laughter that works. that works. stand-up
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comedy is really interesting. with people's attitudes towards disability. because they get super uncomfortable when you get on stage and then it takes about three jokes, and then it takes about three jokes, and once they know you are funny they stop caring. theyjust and once they know you are funny they stop caring. they just want you to be funny. which is good. it's great to talk to you. we celebrate the britain's got talent from last night. thanks for joining the britain's got talent from last night. thanks forjoining us. nice to see you. the un estimate that globally we throw away one trillion dollars worth of food every year. a lot of that waste comes from large catering operations, the kind you find in hotels, or cruise ships. but now a smart bin
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is trying to change that, as dougal shaw reports. this commercial kitchen in central london prepares 1500 meals a day. it provides catering for a museum and a conference centre. kitchens like these typically throw away 20% of these typically throw away 20% of the ingredients they buy. some are thrown away as trimmings, even though they are edible and sometimes food ends up in the bin simply because it is not needed after all. to stop this happening, this kitchen has been using a new piece of technology which can simply be connected to a normal in on scales. this is what's known as a smart bin. kitchen staff use it like a supermarket self checkout, the idea is to keep an accurate digital record of the food being thrown out. this helps vhf make more informed decisions. lots is saved by using this. by keeping tabs on what kind of rudeness —— food is being thrown
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out, the chef can adjust his ingredients but also create new menus on what was previously being thrown away. in an operation where you make a significant amount of food in advance, you can cut food waste in half stop like two people have time on top of everything else to catalogue the stuff as they are putting it into the bin? they do. to start with it takes a little while to get used to be bin system. it's about familiarising yourself with where the buttons are. you are watching afternoon live. let's catch up watching afternoon live. let's catch up with the weather, ben rich has the details. just about all of us should see some blue sky. we close on a cloudy note but as they go through the night, thatis but as they go through the night, that is where we will have the best of the clear spells. that cloud continuing to roll into central and eastern areas. quite misty and murky impacts the odd spot of drizzle. not particularly cold night. temperatures around 8—14. into
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tomorrow, we start off on a grey and cloudy note with some misty nest and pattern drizzle but from the north cloud should break up and we should see some spells of sunshine developing. always the risk of one or two showers or storms pushing up from the near continent towards the channel islands. temperatures up to 20-21 but channel islands. temperatures up to 20—21 but a little cooler towards the north sea coasts. looking ahead to the end of the week, southern areas have the risk of one or two showers and thunderstorms, elsewhere dry weather and feeling fairly warm. this is bbc news — our latest headlines:
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experts have told the grenfell tower inquiry that advice to "stay put" effectively failed within around half an hour of the blaze starting. the hearing also heard that materials used in the cladding system and around windows didn't comply with recommended safety sta nda rds. the fundamental question which lies at the heart of our work is how, in london, in 2017, a domestic fire developed so quickly and so catastrophically? the next stage of the inquiry also heard today the first 999 call from the tower block as the fire took hold. 16 grenfell tower... the fire brigade are on their way. are you outside? yeah, yeah, i'm outside. yeah, well the fire engines are on their way. just tell me how many flaws you've got there? it's the fourth floor. quick, quick, quick, quick! they're on their way. a teenage girl has been found guilty of plotting a terror attack on the british museum in london. 18—year—old safaa boular was found
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guilty of two offences of preparing terrorism acts. greater manchester mayor, andy burnham, has said northern rail should be stripped of its franchise, if it can't end the chaos caused by new timetables. emergency timetables introduced by rail companies today have reduced the number of trains in an attempt to stem disruption. they shouldn't be allowed to inflict their miserable substandard services on the public of the north on an ongoing basis. sport now on afternoon live with hugh. a great match to be expected between serena williams on maria sharapova, not least because they don't get on very well? yes, but we have some breaking news. in the last few minutes, serena williams has pulled out of that last 16 match against maria sharapova at roland garros. she went into the press conference in paris but we believe it is due to
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an arm injury. that probably less than half an hour before they were due to start on court. much was being made going into this match about friction between the pair. they have met many times, including at the wimbledon final in 200a. that was won by maria sharapova. that friction came due to an autobiography in 2007 dean whare sharapova said after that match she had heard williams in floods of tea rs had heard williams in floods of tears in the changing rooms afterwards. serena expressing she wasn't too pleased with that, especially after giving sharapova some public support following her failed drugs test, which led to a 15 month ban. they were due on court after the match between rafa nadal. the ten time champion, rafa nadal, two set up on that. the big news, maria sharapova will not be facing serena williams in the last 16 today. the number one simona halep
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is through to the quarterfinals, making very light work of elise mertens, dropping only three games along the way. they were on court for less than one hour. simona halep has twice been a finalist at roland garros and still looking for her grand slam title. she will take on angelique kerber all caroline garcia next. but as i say, the big news, that record 19 wins the serena williams, just two for sharapova, won't be changing any time soon. we think it is due to an arm injury and they will not be meeting on the fourth round. more details to come. ten days to go on the world cup. not everybody has a ticket? no. they will be devastated today. manchester city's leroy sane has been left out of the world cup squad announced by germany today, didn't make the 23 man squad for the tournament that sta rts man squad for the tournament that starts in russia last week, despite having a superb season. city won the premier league title and the league
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cup but leroy sane chipped in the premier league with ten goals and 15 assists which led to him being awarded the pfa's young player of the season award. but a number of players preferred ahead of him. his manager also picking their captain manuel neuer, ulla zirne played one time since mid—september. vincent kompany, he has been given more time to recover to prove his fitness as he attempts to get back from a groin injury. the belgian bossman roberto martinez said he needed his captain's leadership. christian benteke has been left out after a poor season with crystal palace. belgium in theirgroup, poor season with crystal palace. belgium in their group, they will meet on the 28th ofjune. mohamed salah at a wonderful season in the premier league and has been named in egypt's squad today but won't be meeting up with his team—mates until saturday. he is continuing to recover from that shoulder injury, you might remember he was forced off during liverpool's champions league final defeat just over a
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during liverpool's champions league final defeatjust over a week ago. egypt's opening game is against uruguay on the 15th ofjune. imbula pa rolo uruguay on the 15th ofjune. imbula parolo chris woakes has been ruled out of sunday's one—day international against tottenham. he took four wickets in their test win over pakistan. he has picked up a thigh strain and joined ben stokes macro on the injury list. that is all the sport for now. serena williams in a press conference in the moment, hopefully hearfrom her in the next half an hour. studio: thank you. the home secretary, sajid javid, has said the security services must change their approach to fighting terrorism and learn the lessons of last year's attacks in london and manchester in which 36 people died. in a speech in london, he said they were currently involved in more than 500 investigations involving 3000 potential suspects. mrjavid explained that as threats evolve, uk counter—terror policy should do so too. dlouhy terrorist attacks are planned
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and carried out a change. people are being radicalised by death computers and smartphones and using everyday objects such as knives and cars as weapons on the length of time between radicalisation and the attack is getting shorter. the threats are evolving. we must evolve as well. in our revised counterterrorism strategy, known as contest, i'm outlining today how eve ryo ne contest, i'm outlining today how everyone can help. contest incorporates lessons learned from the attacks in 2017 and now responds to it. it has been formed by research by intelligence. 0ur approach is injuring there are no safe s pa ces approach is injuring there are no safe spaces for terrace, no safe spaces internationally in which terrorist ideology can develop on from where attacks can be launched. no safe spaces in the uk for terrorists to spread their vile
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views all for them to plan and carry out attacks. and no safe spaces online for terrorist propaganda and technical expertise to be shared and for people to be radicalised injust a matter of weeks. let's talk now to simon blackburn, who is chair of the local government association's safer and stronger communities board. do you welcome what he had to say this morning? i think broadly, yes. the devil is always in the detail with these things. but we will work through that detail. ijust came from a meeting with home office officials and we'll be talking to the security minister later today. we need to try and make this work. the detail in terms of who contacts who with what sort of information, do you know who won the council it would be? most likely the chief executive but we have various frameworks for information sharing on local authorities anyway because we share a lot of information with the police are now day—to—day operations. there are frameworks and processes in place we can build on.
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the sense one gets is in the absence, because of various cuts, of neighbourhood policing, the councils may be the next closest thing to knowing what people are doing on a regular basis in away the police and mi5 regular basis in away the police and m15 cannot. we won't get into the security industry. what we are being asked to do is share relevant information with relevant people from the police and security services. but we won't be encroaching on the police's territory or that of m15. what sort of relevant information, what is it you will now be providing that you haven't hitherto? just by way of example we know that for somebody to trip over from extremism example we know that for somebody to trip overfrom extremism into carrying out an act of violence, there is generally a major life event. that might be something like being evicted from their house or losing theirjob or their children being taken into care. if we became aware of such an incident arising, we would be in a position to inform
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the police that would inform what action they took later on. i'm wondering what's different, the assumption is that is going on anyway? i think it goes on to a degree. what we're talking about is putting a formal framework about and the government declassified what is currently classified information. so the information they are talking about sharing with us in future, which is currently classified, will be handled in a way. thank you very much forjoining us. at least 25 people have died, including children, and hundreds have been injured, after one of latin america's most active volcanos erupted suddenly. at least one village near the fuego volcano has been buried in ash and lava, and the main airport in guatemala city, 25 miles away, has been closed. a state of emergency has been called in much of the country. will grant sent this report. volcan de fuego's awesome power is well—known in guatemala. it is one of the most active volcanoes in latin america, with local people used to living
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in its shadow. however, moments of this magnitude are rare. eyewitnesses described a river of fire spewing down the mountainside. the victims and many of the injured were caught in its path, unable to react before their simple homes were swept away by the lava. translation: not everyone escaped, i think they were buried. we saw the lava pouring through the cornfields, and we ran towards the hill. ash has fallen across a wide area, even reaching the capital, guatemala city, some aokm away. meanwhile, falling molten rock remains a real threat to villages in the vicinity. evacuations are under way, the emergency services doing what they can amid the treacherous conditions, the recent rains complicating their rescue efforts. the president has called a state of emergency. translation: we are considering the need to call for a state of emergency. we have to see, according
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to our legislation, what can help us to do this. we think, until now, that there is a state of devastation in at least three areas. the international airport in guatemala city has been closed through poor visibility, and roads have been cut off in several departments of the country. the last time locals remember seeing fuego was so active was in the mid 1970s. with the number of dead steadily rising, and emergency services in the impoverished nation stretched, it is now a race to ensure communities in the affected area are safe. will grant, bbc news. in a moment the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. experts tell the grenfell tower inquiry that advice to "stay put" had effectively failed within around half an hour of the blaze starting. britain's youngest female terror plotter has been found guilty of preparing an attack on london with the first all—woman islamic state cell. the home secretary, sajid javid, has said the security
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services must change their approach to fighting terrorism, and learn the lessons of last year's attacks in london and manchester. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. mothercare could have to backtrack on a proposal to close more than a third of its stores in the uk. it thought last week that it had got enough votes from its creditors to go ahead. but after reviewing the minutes, it found the proposal relating to the children's world part of the business, which has 21 mothercare stores, did not actually get the 75% of votes needed to proceed. mothercare is considering what to do next. rail passengers are still facing cancellations despite changes to deal with major disruption caused by new timetables introduced last month. northern rail has introduced a temporary timetable that removes 165 train services a day until the end ofjuly. on monday, more than 100 trains were still cancelled or severely
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delayed affecting passengers in manchester, lancashire and the lake district. profits for the world's biggest airlines will be hit by rising fuel and labour costs this year, according to the industry's trade body. the international air transport association — or iata for short — has cut its profit forecast for 2018 by 12% to £25 billion. iata also said rising interest rates and trade tensions could hit profits. finance ministers had a rather tetchy mating over the weekend and the fallout continues? indeed, a bit ofa the fallout continues? indeed, a bit of a six against one scenario. the others around the us trade secretary telling him that they were angry and disappointed by these moves by the
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us on the aluminium and steel ta riffs us on the aluminium and steel tariffs we were talking about extensively last week. he said he would then take that message back to president trump, which he did. the heads of state, the world leaders will be gathering at the g7 later this week. so there could be some even further tetchy exchanges, or terse exchanges. tetchy plies two way. trump could say, there you go. his view is the us is down on international trade. it is buying more than its selling, so in his view, you can't lose if you are in that position, which is kind of giving him the impetus to potentially dig his heels on over this. let's find out more from paul blake, our business reporter in our new york bureau. a rather tense exchange as simon and i were saying, not between us but between the g7 finance ministers at the weekend?m was certainly an awkward weekend for steven mnuchin. he was in canada for
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the g7 steven mnuchin. he was in canada for the 67 finance ministers meeting. you saw the other finance ministers come out and unanimously condemn the trade tariffs and you saw them urge steven mnuchin to take their concerns to the white house. you even saw the french finance minister go so faras even saw the french finance minister go so far as to say the us had days to divert a trade war. for his part, steven mnuchin said at the conclusion of the meeting he had already ta ken conclusion of the meeting he had already taken some of their concerns to donald trump iphone over the weekend and he would continue to do so once weekend and he would continue to do so once he got back to washington. but the president is taking a tougher line. he was tweeting throughout the weekend, including this morning, saying big trade barriers against us farmers and other businesses will finally be broken. massive trade deficit is no longer. a tough line from the president. looking ahead to the leaders meeting at the g7, a hint from downing street here that the uk prime minister theresa may plans to speak to president trump about all of this? that is right. donald trump
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is scheduled to go to the g7 leaders summit in quebec this weekend, where most people expect him to receive the same sort of reception, a frosty reception from leaders there. theresa may has already said she will bring up the topic with the us president. you have seen tough talk from other leaders already also to donald trump about the tariffs. justin trudeau and donald trump have been exchanging barbs over the last few days, taking exception that these tariffs are being implemented under the guise of national security, that the us needs to provide for itself and it can't count on others. certainly looking ahead to see if there might be some sort of frosty reception similar to what steven mnuchin got in canada la st what steven mnuchin got in canada last weekend. ok, now let'sjust talk about mothercare. a bit of a problem. have they made a mistake? that is one way to put it, bit a
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blunder. packed away to look at their sums again. all to do with mothercare's plan to close about a third of its stores. 0n mothercare's plan to close about a third of its stores. on friday it said it had the backing of its lenders to go ahead with the proposal. but mothercare now says it realises plans for one division had not been approved by the nessus 375% majority. right, so what else is going on? that relates to one division. in terms of the impact it has on the whole plan, this division is the children's world division. it relates to 21 stores that come under that bit of the business. so that bit, closing those 21 stores cannot go ahead for now. the overall plan is to close 50 out of 152 stores across the whole business. it is being, under protest known as company being, under protest known as com pa ny volu nta ry being, under protest known as company voluntary arrangement. being, under protest known as company voluntary arrangementm allows companies to shut loss—making shops and reduce rents but they have to get 75% or more of creditors, people they owe money to, to agree.
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in the children's world division, they fell short of that. the plan relating to the other bits of the business can go ahead but mothercare is now as far as the children's world bit, that is weighing up its options and considering what to do next applied ago, a quick look the markets. there they are. the ftse100 is up in common with the other main european benchmark indexes. delia smith, packaging company, it is in talks to expand and buy up another european business that does similar. you might not have heard of them but they provide packaging for a source, amazon, next and given the growth in online shopping, they have benefited from that. financial stocks also benefiting because of talks of a merger between uni credit, and society general in france, that filtering through to other bank shares and keeping the mood of optimism, despite all the trade ta riffs stu b optimism, despite all the trade tariffs stub we were talking about earlier. ok, i will talk tariffs stub we were talking about
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earlier. ok, iwill talk to tariffs stub we were talking about earlier. ok, i will talk to you again later. have you sorted out your screen? let's leave my computer issues. people will be wondering... i tried to help. you made it worse! thank you. you are watching afternoon light. the university of cambridge says it needs the help of parents and schools if it is to improve the diversity of potential students. (tx 00v) it comes as new figures showed that some of its colleges had admitted very few or no black applicants over a five year period. it comes as new figures showed that some of its colleges had admitted very few or no black applicants over a five year period. the details, released under the freedom of information act, revealed six of 29 colleges accepted fewer than 10 black british students or those with mixed african—caribbean backgrounds. more than 5.5 million people in the uk are members of a trade union. but that number has been falling steadily since its peak at the end of the 1970s. it's a challenge for the tuc — the voice of the unions — which this month is celebrating its 150th anniversary. it has launched a campaign to attract younger members, currently at its lowest level since 2001. joe lynam has more. many of britain's cafes,
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bars and restaurants tend to employ young people under the age of 30 without trade union representation and the tuc is worried young people are working in increasingly precarious jobs with zero—hours contracts and no job security. the problem is many of their employersm especially in the private sector, make it hard for us to organise them so if you think about where young people are working, in hospitality or retail or the care industry, often on temporary or zero—hours contracts, often in franchise organisations that are hard to organise, the model that we have isn't working for them so we've got to fix it. the tuc has launched a worksmart programme to encourage young people to organise their work better in the digital age, part of the tuc‘s150th anniversary. when the trades union congress was first established in 1868, there were 118,000 trade union members. by 1979, it peaked at 13 million but today, it's at 5.5 million with the biggest drop in membership among the young.
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0nly16% of under—30s are in a trade union and in the private sector, only 9%. and the gap between what older people earn compared to the under—30s is also getting wider. the tuc says the pace at which wages are growing for young people has slowed dramatically in recent years. joe lynam, bbc news. time for a look at the weather... here's ben rich. good afternoon. nothing is going to be changing very quickly without whether through this week. there will be some scenes like this, beautiful blue skies and sunshine for this weather watcher in hampshire early on, however a couple of flies in the ointment. these showers and thunderstorms always trying to drift up from the south. around this area of high pressure, a north or north—easterly wind trying to feed on a lot of cloud from the north sea. a lot of us have those cloudy conditions to take us through the rest of the afternoon. what we
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will also see as one or two showers breaking out in south—west scotland and northern ireland. a met office warning in force here for the potential of a bit of disruption from these intense thunderstorms. 0ne from these intense thunderstorms. one or two from these intense thunderstorms. 0ne ortwo and from these intense thunderstorms. one or two and wales in south—west england about creeping up from the near continent into the channel islands as well. away from these areas, best of the brightness towards the south and west, more clout further north and east and feeling cool if you keep that cloud all afternoon long. as we go through this evening and overnight, the cloud will try to roll its way in from the north sea, turning quite misty and murky in places. if you clear spells out west and temperatures not dropping far under the blanket of cloud, maybe 8 degrees in newcastle but those places holding up in double digits. we'd start tomorrow on a cloudy note once again. could be one or two showers or thunderstorms fringing in our the channel islands but as we go through the day, things brightening up through the day, things brightening up from the north. some drier air pushing its way in, tending to break
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up pushing its way in, tending to break up the cloud, more in the way of sunshine. still with the north—easterly breeze, not feeling especially warm close to the north sea coast. get yourself into the sunshine,— sea coast. get yourself into the sunshine, — 20—21. sea coast. get yourself into the sunshine,— 20—21. might see a bit more cloud forming again towards the eastern coast on wednesday but essentially unlicensed looking dates. spells of sunshine. those temperatures perhaps nudging upwards 2221120 three. as we head towards the end of the week, it does look increasingly likely we will see some showers and thunderstorms trying to push up from the south. in southern areas at the end of the week, bringing the potential for some showers, perhaps the odd thunderstorm but not raining all the time, some dry weather as well. further north, closer to an area of high pressure, staying fine and right, some spells of sunshine but also some extra cloud close to the north sea coast. hello, you're watching afternoon live. today at 3pm. experts tell the grenfell tower inquiry that advice to "stay put" had effectively failed —
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within around half an hour of the blaze starting. the fundamental question lying at the heart of our work is how, in london, in 2017, a domestic fire developed so quickly and so catastrophically. and the inquiry hears the first 999 call from the burning tower block. the fire brigade are on their way, are you outside? yeah, i'm outside. the fire engines are on their way, how many floors have you got? it's the fourth floor. quick, quick, quick. a teenager is found guilty of plotting a terror attack on london with britain's first all—female islamic state cell. greater manchester mayor, andy burnham, says northern rail should be stripped of its franchise, if it can't end the chaos caused by new timetables. at least 25 people are dead after a volcano erupts violently
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near the capital of guatamala. coming up on afternoon live all the sport with hugh. and there's bad news for serena williams at the french open. yes indeed. serena williams has pulled out of her last 16 match against maria sharapova at the french open because of a chest muscle injury. williams says she very disappointed. —— she is. thanks. and the weather forecast. there will be long spells of sunshine and a few showers at times, and i will have the full details just before half—past. also coming up — the black and white photographs discovered hidden in an attic — that for one woman revealed that her father — who died more than 30 years ago —
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had a secret life. this hello everyone — this is afternoon live. stay in your flats — the advice that was meant to save lives in the event of a fire at grenfell tower. but it was advice that an expert report has found had ‘effectively failed‘. at the opening of its fact—finding stage, the grenfell inquiry has also heard evidence that the materials used in the cladding system and by windows didn‘t comply with recommended safety standards. the fire service had to pump its own water into g re nfell tower because the building‘s system was "non—compliant". and the smoke control system did not operate correctly, reducing the ability to vent smoke from the lobbies on each floor of the building. let‘s hear from our correspondent daniela relph. and a warning, her report contains images viewers may find distressing. the anguish and emotion of the bereaved families remain at the heart of this inquiry, but in this next stage, it is now examining the technical
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detail of what happened onjune the 14th last year. the fundamental question which lies at the heart of our work is how, in london, in 2017, a domestic fire developed so quickly and so catastrophically that an entire high—rise block was engulfed, and how it was that 71 people lost their lives in a matter of hours, leaving families and friends in shock, grief and bewilderment. to help the inquiry, five expert technical reports have been published today. 0ne examined the fire protection measures. it found multiple failures. the report looks at the fire service advice to stay in your flat. it says, the stay put strategy effectively failed by 1:26am, around half an hour after the fire started, and there was an early need for total evacuation. the stairwell was quickly smoke clogged, it was
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the main escape route. the author also says, flat doors didn‘t meet fire regulations, doors going to the stairs did not appear to have been upgraded since 1972, fire lifts couldn‘t be used properly, and the water supply system meant firefighters couldn‘t get adequate amounts of water to the upper levels. the author also says that at one point a body was used to hold open a fire door to a stairwell. a number of the reports highlight the failure of the cladding to meet fire safety standards. 0ne says the main reason for the rapid spread was the polyethylene in the cladding. as it burned, that material dripped and flowed downwards, sideways and upwards. another document looked at the cause and spread of the fire. it confirms that the blaze started in the kitchen of flat 16 on the fourth floor of the tower and, more likely than not, in or around a fridge freezer.
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the events that unfolded at grenfell tower... other expert analysis provided to the inquiry describe inadequate fire testing methods. it says the complex material now used in construction and cladding makes some fire safety procedures totally insufficient. this is an inquiry that wants to provide answers. what did the professionals know and do in respect of the cladding and the active and passive fire safety systems more generally in the building? how did so many people sign this building off as safe? was saving money put before saving lives? next week, around the first anniversary of the fire, the inquiry won‘t be sitting, to allow families to remember those they lost. this public inquiry aims to proceed
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as quickly as possible, to minimise any future risk to public safety. daniela relph, bbc news. 0ur correspondent, tom burridge, is at the inquiry in central london. some very some very difficult evidence for the relatives to hear. very difficult. what is interesting is to step back and look at the original design of g re nfell tower and look at the original design of grenfell tower in the 70s, it was designed in a way which would have contained a fire in any flat but the refurbishment in the years after the fire destroyed that. the cladding had the combustible core and there we re had the combustible core and there were gaps to the sides of the windows where they were repositioned and there were other flammable materials in the cavities. we have heard from these expert reports a culture of noncompliance, no evidence that those who refurbish the building had ever really fully understood how resistant the
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planning system as a whole would have been to a fire. there were multiple catastrophic fire spread roots said... relying on no evidence that the barriers put into the building to stop the fire spreading from flat to fight were actually tested —— said doctor barbara lane. we have also heard a nine iron call from the occupant of fat 16 on the fourth floor —— we have also heard a 999 call from the occupant of the flat 16 on the fourth floor. hello, there is a fire. flat 16, grenfell tower. flat 16, what is the postcode? wii, itg. quick, please. i have to get the address. flat 16, grenfell tower. w1! itg. the fire brigade on their way. are you outside? yes, yes, i am.
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fire engines are on their way. how many floors have you got there? it's fourth floor. quick, quick, quick. it's burning. yes, i know it's burning. but they are on their way. i know it's burning. as long as you're 0k. pardon? you wait outside. i'm outside. 0k. the fire engines are on their way and they will be there soon, 0k. 0k. you've onlyjust called us so it will take a minute for them to get there. 0k. can i let you go? inaudible hello? can i let you go? you're outside, yeah?
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i'm outside. 0k, bye. given the fact the building was built with such inappropriate materials it is incredible that the stapled advice were implemented on the night, described as wholly inappropriate —— the state put advice. 0ne expert says it was ineffective 30 minutes after the fire began, but people were still being told to stay in their flats after another one hour and 20 minutes and it is not clear why. thanks forjoining us. richard hull is a fire safety expert and joins us live from preston. when we hear phrases like a culture of noncompliance, that is something you have heard before, but the red relations themselves need looking at —— regulations. relations themselves need looking at -- regulations. the building
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regulations are quite clear, they say the implementation of those who approved documents is a nightmare, this came out after the lakanal house fire where the coroner said the document was woefully difficult to read and that it couldn‘t be understood by any normal person. i‘ve tried to understand it and it is extremely difficult. have to take cross refe re nces is extremely difficult. have to take cross references and forth. the implementation of the building regulations is extremely difficult to follow. but essentially it is quite clear combustible stuff has been allowed on the side of the high—rise building since 2006 and the compartmentalisation and strategy where you take the fire and where the state put policy makes
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sense, doesn‘t make sense of dogma because you hear —— doesn‘t make sense at all, because here you had it spreading very quickly within 15 minutes. 0ne expert noticed the aluminium composite material contributed to the fire spread but he did not seem to have taken cognizance of the fact that because as well as the aluminium composite material, you also had combustible foam, and both of those contributed to the fire being so aggressive that it then penetrate the building and went into just about every flat in the whole of the tower. it introduced the other threat of toxicity? i'm lost for words, this is the installation foam, it is five times more toxic than the other phone which was also used on g re nfell tower. phone which was also used on grenfell tower. —— foam. if you use
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noncombustible installation that will not generate large amounts of toxic gases but essentially you have a material that produces enough hydrogen outside every window of the flat so it causes incapacitation and death of people within the flats if the smoke is blown into the flats as it certainly was in some of the photographs. given what we have heard today, it would appear that at the heart of this is a referral which meant that created the difficulties and the vulnerabilities, and technically the five —— fire brigade advice would have been fine if followed. it was safer before then after? it was. it had been saved for the 30 years beforehand, it is unfortunate that the makeover was mostly superficial
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-- it had the makeover was mostly superficial —— it had been safer. it looks nicer from the outside but had tragic consequences for people on the inside. what can we do? the combination of the government response in the review, to say that we really need to make massive changes to our building regulations. we are out of step with europe in allowing combustible materials on the outside of buildings and we have seen the outside of buildings and we have seen the consequence of that and we have an obligation and a duty to the people who died to make sure this can never happen again. professor, thanks forjoining us. if you want to find out more about the grenfell tower inquiry, eddie mair is presenting a podcast every day the inquiry sits — which looks in detail at what‘s been said and heard each day. you can download it from the bbc iplayer radio app, itunes or your podcast provider. a teenagerfrom london who became the youngest female in the country to be charged
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with is—related terror offences has been convicted at the old bailey of planning an attack in the uk. safaa boular, who is now 18, was 16 when she was first investigated by the police. she is part of an all—female family terror cell. her sister was shot by police when she was arrested. the women were planning two separate attacks. june kelly reports. gunshots this was when armed officers moved in on the uk‘s first all—female terror cell, firing cs gas canisters into an upstairs flat. in the mayhem one of the women, rizlaine boular, was shot by police and she was given medical treatment on the pavement. she was laying down with police officers on top of her because she was putting up a horrendous struggle and she was screaming,
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in pain, and did not want to be helped. rizlaine boular had been hours away from causing carnage on the streets of london. for weeks police and the security service m15 had been tracking their suspects. rizlaine boular recovered from her injuries. her younger sister was already in custody and also arrested was their mother mina dich. we believe they were going to attack members of the public at random using knives with a view to inflicting injury or killing individuals. we intervened at an early stage with a view to frustrating that terrorist plot. mina dich with her daughters when the girls were growing up. at the front is rizlaine boular‘s younger sister safaa. by the time she was 16 safaa, on the left, was wearing full islamic dress as like her mother and sister she had become more religious.
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all three then embraced violent extremism. in the same month that safaa boular got her gcse results she was trying to marry an is fighter in syria, naweed hussain, over the internet. she never met him — it was an online relationship — and he was in his 30s. when he was killed she was distraught. the couple had talked about how safaa boular could carry out an attack here in the area around the british museum in central london and they discussed an ambush involving guns or grenades and using a car and a knife. safaa boular was arrested but she then encouraged her sister to carry out her own attack. during safaa‘s trial, in which she wore western clothing, the jury heard recordings of prison phone conversations when she and her sister discussed the new plot. rizlaine spoke of her plans to hold a mad hatter‘s tea party, which the prosecution said was code for a terror attack.
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safaa boular disappointed that she couldn‘tjoin in. the following evening rizlaine was being driven around westminster by their mother on a reconnaissance mission scouting targets. the women had bought a knife from sainsbury‘s and it was rizlaine who was going to be the killer. this man was at school with her and is perplexed at the path chosen by his formerfriend. rizlaine was a very outgoing person, lovely to talk to, always smiling. she became quite heavily into islam. i‘m not sure what caused it. it was a very sudden thing and she started wearing the hijab. it‘s strange to hear that she became such a monster in her adult life. in the hours before her
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arrest rizlaine had been practising wielding a knife. the police said they shot her because they believed she posed a risk to their lives. rizlaine boular and her mother have pleaded guilty to terrorism charges. her sister safaa has been convicted by a jury for planning a separate attack. the family are now facing long terms in prison. june kelly, bbc news. our home affairs correspondent, dominic casciani is at the old bailey. when can we spec the sentencing? —— expect. in about six weeks because thejudge said this expect. in about six weeks because the judge said this is a complex case and very unusual family circumcised is, he needs nature —— very unusual family circumstances and he needs to hear expert reports into the family
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dynamic. this is a very complex trial, some things i had not heard before, we had a girl who was 16 at the start of the investigation who is leading a very isolated lives in south—west london, controlled by her mother, not about to go out, —— not allowed to go out, and she has to be fully veiled, and it is not clear what the religious doctrine is behind that, just seems to be a controlling thing from her mother. she is banned from social media and talking to boys online but then the paris attacks happen and she becomes interested in what is going on in the middle east. reaches out to is supporters to find out what is going on in syria and in her view is sucked into this world where she effectively falls in love with a fighter in syria, man from coventry who left his own wife on his route to going out to fight, this and man out in syria tries to attract safaa
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boular to join out in syria tries to attract safaa boular tojoin him out in syria tries to attract safaa boular to join him and out in syria tries to attract safaa boular tojoin him and when that becomes impossible in carriages her to carry out an attack in the uk which prosecutors said she willingly agreed to —— in carriages her. there was as a gesture and she is groomed bya man was as a gesture and she is groomed by a man twice her age and also suggestions that her mother was chaotic and violent and vindictive and this led to a unstable family background, but the jury were clear that safaa boular took the steps herself that led to her being in the dock. 0ne herself that led to her being in the dock. one of the clear things is the transformation of safaa boular, when she was first arrested she was fully veiled up and not showing herself to the world, but throughout the case she appeared as your average 18—year—old student wearing ordinary clothes, her hair was slightly died, being very polite and easy—going with thejudge being very polite and easy—going with the judge and she presented herself as changed but that was not
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good enough for the jury and they believed she was still guilty of these acts are preparing for acts of terrorism and she is now facing a very substantial prison sentence. thanks forjoining us. you‘re watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. experts tell the grenfell tower inquiry that advice to residents to "stay put" had effectively failed within around half an hour of the blaze starting. britain‘s youngest female terror plotter has been found guilty of preparing an attack on london with the first all—woman islamic state cell. the home secretary, sajid javid, has said the security services must change their approach to fighting terrorism — and learn the lessons of last year‘s attacks in london and manchester. after a ll after all the build—up serena williams has pulled out of her fourth—round match against ray french open with a sharapova at the french open with a chest muscle injury. —— maria sharapova. she said it was very painful in her doubles defeat yesterday. nadal is into the
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quarterfinals after a straight sets victory over his german opponent as he chases and 11 singles title at roland garros. —— an 11. leroy sane is excluded from the germany world cup squad, but manuel neuer is included despite missing most of the season with injury. more on those stories in about ten minutes. the mayor of greater manchester, andy burnham, has said northern rail should be stripped of its franchise, if it can‘t end the chaos caused by new timetables. about 2,000 services have been cancelled since new schedules were introduced just over a fortnight ago. northern has now published a new emergency timetable,with fewer services — but today has seen more frustration for passengers. downing street says the disruption is "totally u na cce pta ble". 0ur correspondent charlotte gallagher is in preston. you can tell as soon as you get to
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preston station that things are not back to normal, there is a line of where replacement buses outside, something every commuter dread stash rail replacement buses. commuters we re rail replacement buses. commuters were hoping the new emergency timetables would fix the crisis but people are still experiencing long delays and last—minute cancellations. a new emergency timetable, the same old problems. it has been two long weeks of misery for rail travellers across england. thousands of last—minute cancellations, long delays, and the dreaded rail replacement buses. and commuters today aren‘t impressed by the efforts to fix the crisis. it‘sjust been horrendous, so, cancellations all the time, you are just waiting on the platform, probably for like 30 minutes, then all of a sudden theyjust cancel it. hoping to get to work at eight o'clock in the morning, i work in manchester, the 7:07am hasjust been cancelled. now i will probably get in at 8:30, 8:40am.
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just a disaster, don't know what to do with it. i‘m supposed to be starting a placement today. my train has been cancelled, so i was supposed to start work at 7:30am, but i‘m not going to get there until eight now. mps whose constituencies are affected are meeting the transport secretary chris grayling later today to express their frustration. because most of the people making decisions about our transport in the north never ever travel on those networks, never use them, don‘t understand the human cost of the decisions they are making, we have ended up in this mess, and now the government has to show that it understands the frustration and the anger in the north and is prepared to act. there are now calls for the companies to be stripped of their franchises. people are saying they are on warnings at work because they are late so often, or not being able to pick up their kids or having to pay for extra childcare, or getting taxis or hotels. they shouldn't be allowed to inflict their miserable
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substandard services on the public of the north on an ongoing basis. today, northern rail and govia thameslink introduced new reduced timetables in a bid to deal with what has been described as a total shambles. but more than 100 trains have still been cancelled at the last minute or delayed. it‘s really tough, and it‘s really tough for our customers. since the new timetables was introduced on may 20th, the service just hasn‘t been good enough, and we are really sorry about that, and we are now putting in place an interim timetable to help sort this out. commuters are being warned that services could get worse before they get better. stretching people‘s already frayed patience to the absolute limit. people we have spoken to are understandably really fed up and they don‘t seem to have much faith that northern rail or govia can fix
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the crisis in time. thank you. we‘ve been keeping across twitter on afternoon live. the unions are not happy and this is what the rmt union has said on twitter. many people have actually got caught up many people have actually got caught up in this, voicing their displeasure. reflecting their the frustrations of
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thousands of people in the north and indeedin thousands of people in the north and indeed in the south as the emergency timetables come into effect. the tv presenter, christine lampa rd, has described tweets allegedly sent to her by a stalker as "sinister and dark". christof king pleaded guilty to stalking last week, but disputes the sending of the tweets. a court was told the tweets went "from dark to loving to incoherent". prosecutors say king had sent letters and turned up at her house on more than one occasion. 0ne tweet he is alleged to have sent said: "i am planning the words that will go on your gravestone." there‘ll be a new addition to the traffic on motorways from today — vehicles with l plates. learner drivers in england, scotland and wales will be given lessons in driving at speed if their instructor thinks they‘re ready. they can only take lessons with approved instructors, and in cars fitted with dual controls. but some say the way we learn to drive needs a full overhaul, as graham satchell reports.
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five o‘clock this morning and jonathan davies is heading onto the motorway. a slightly nerve—racking experience and a small piece of history. it‘s the first time learner drivers have been allowed on the motorway. i think it‘s brilliant, long overdue. i think once you have passed your test, before this, you were going on the motorway on your own for the first time, which would be daunting in any situation, so now having the chance to have a lesson or three or however many you want on the motorways, will be great. jonathan‘s instructor is teaching him how to get on and off the motorway and lane management, giving him the confidence to drive safely. things can always go wrong on the motorways. i've had a pupil phone me up three weeks after passing her test, they were on the motorway, made a mistake, they got scared, they were in tears. that's because she didn't phone back
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and have some motorway lessons. these days, i would give a lesson beforehand and she wouldn't have that fear or panic. motorways are the safest roads in the country, but a fifth of all fatalities on the roads in 2016 involved crashes with drivers under the age of 25. the hope is today‘s changes will improve safety. but there are a couple of caveats. only qualified driving instructors with dual control cars can take learners onto the motorway. you can‘t go on with your mum and dad. and the lessons will be voluntary. driving on the motorway will not become part of the test. do the changes go far enough? the road charity brake wants to see much more action. this is a step in the right direction, but sadly it is just a small step. young people are disproportionately at risk on our roads and we need a system to address this. that‘s why we are calling for graduated driver licensing. a system like that would ensure that when somebody passes the test they are competent and experienced in all road environments and that‘s for the safety of all road users. at highways england headquarters in birmingham they monitor 4,000 miles of road.
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here, they have welcomed today‘s changes. they say experienced drivers will have to get used to l plates on the motorway. we've all been learner drivers and when we do learn, we have to respect learner drivers, be a little bit more patient, give them a little bit more space. recognise that they are learning. but when they're on the motorways, they will be test ready, confident and experienced. we've got to work with them. back on the road, jonathan is finishing his lesson. with expert advice driving on the motorway shouldn‘t be a daunting or scary experience for him when he has passed his test. graham satchell, bbc news, birmingham. weather now with ben rich. good afternoon. just about all of us should get to see some blue sky and sunshine this week but not quite that simple. a lot of cloud feeding its way from the north—east. we closed today on a cloudy note in many central and eastern areas. best
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of clear spells in the west. the cloud continuing to roll into central and eastern areas, misty murky and the odd spot of drizzle as well. not particularly cold night, temperatures around 8—14. into tomorrow, we start tomorrow on a grey and cloudy note with some mist and merck and some drizzle but from the north the cloud should break up and we will see spells of sunshine starting to develop. always the risk ofa starting to develop. always the risk of a few showers pushing up from the near continent towards the channel islands. temperatures up to 20—21 but a little cooler close to north sea coasts. we look ahead to the end of the week, southern areas at the risk of a few showers and thunderstorms. elsewhere, a lot of dry weather and feeling fairly warm. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. experts have told the grenfell tower inquiry that advice to "stay put" effectively failed within around half an hour of the fire starting. the hearing also heard that materials used in the cladding system and around windows didn‘t comply with recommended
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safety sta nda rds. the fundamental question which lies at the heart of our work is how, in london, in 2017, a domestic fire developed so quickly and so catastrophically? the inquiry also heard today the first 999 call made from the blazing tower block. 16 grenfell tower... the fire brigade are on their way. are you outside? yeah, yeah, i‘m outside. yeah, well the fire engines are on their way. just tell me how many flaws you've got there? —— floors you have? it‘s the fourth floor. quick, quick, quick, quick! they're on their way. a teenage girl has been found guilty at the old bailey of plotting a terror attack on the british museum. 18—year—old safaa boular was found guilty of two offences of preparing terrorism acts. greater manchester mayor, andy burnham, has said northern rail should be stripped of its franchise if it can‘t end the chaos caused by new timetables.
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emergency timetables introduced by rail companies today have reduced the number of trains in an attempt to stem disruption. they shouldn‘t be allowed to inflict their miserable substandard services on the public of the north on an ongoing basis. sport now on afternoon live with hugh woozencroft. we are all talking about serena williams, who is suddenly out? we've been hoping for a fantastic match between two players who haven‘t a lwa ys between two players who haven‘t always seen eye to eye. we built it up always seen eye to eye. we built it up as always seen eye to eye. we built it upasa always seen eye to eye. we built it up as a bit of always seen eye to eye. we built it up asa bit ofa always seen eye to eye. we built it up as a bit of a grudge match in the media, serena williams ago sharapova, after williams expressed disappointment about sharapova‘s recent autobiography in which she claims williams was in tears following the wimbledon defeat in 2004. there was a lot of anticipation ahead of that match but
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it didn‘t materialise, due to a chest muscle problem, that is the reason williams has cited for pulling out of their fourth round match in the french open. she said she first felt it in her third round match on saturday but still decided to play in the doubles with her sister here yesterday. they were beaten and serena was moving rather gingerly in that match as well but she had only dropped one is set up to the last 16 in paris so it really isn‘t the ending she would have hoped for at roland garros this year. i'm beyond disappointed, you know... i gave up so much from time with my daughter to time with my family and i put everything on the court, all for this moment. so it's really difficult to be in this situation, but i always, for nine now in my life i try to think positive and
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just think of the bigger picture and hopefully the next event and the re st of hopefully the next event and the rest of the year. contrasting the motion today for sharapova, through to the quarterfinals where she will join the world number one is a simona halep. in the men‘s draw rafael nadal is comfortably through to the last eight. the ten times champion nadal made light work of germany‘s maxilmilian marterer winning in straight sets. nadal will play 11th seed diego schwartzman next. but the big news out of roland garros today, serena williams pulling out due to rate chest muscle injury. ok, let's look ahead to the world cup in russia, some ten days away. some rather surprising squad announcement? yes, really sad news for manchester city‘s leroy sane. reeva scored or assisted 33 goals in what was a sparkling season for him. that is more than any of germany‘s players in europe‘s top five leaks but not enough to get him on the
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plane to russia. he has been left out of their 23 man squad for that tournament that starts next week. he had a superb season. he helped manchester city due to the premier league title. sane had a superb season, helping city to the premier league title with 10 goals and 15 assists and was rewarded with the pfa young player of the season award. jochim loew has picked captain manuel neuer, who‘s only played once since mid september. sane‘s manchester city teammate vincent kompany has been given two weeks to prove his fitness as he attempts to recover from a groin injury. he is the belgian captain. belgium boss roberto martinez said his captain‘s leadership was crucial, but he has left out christian benteke. belgium are in england‘s group — they meet onjune the 28th. mohamed salah has been named in egypt‘s world cup squad but he won‘t be meeting up with his team—mates until saturday, as he continues his recovery from a shoulder injury.
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he was forced off during liverpool‘s champions league final defeatjust over a week ago. egypt‘s opening game is against uruguay on the 15th ofjune. england bowler chris woakes has been ruled out of sunday‘s one—day international against scotland. he took four wickets in the test win over pakistan but he also picked up a thigh strain and joins ben stokes on the injury list. surrey‘s tom curran comes in to replace him. uk sport have today launched a national consultation, to explore whether great britain should change the way it funds elite sport. the body invests £100 million of national lottery and government money each year and its medals—based ‘no—compromise‘ policy has been credited with the country‘s 0lympic and paralympic success. but over the last two years there has been criticism of its approach and a series of controversies over funding decisions and athlete welfare. uk sport arena creates success with
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0lympic camp are medals and we have done that brilliantly. we have had more success than ever before over the last few 0lympics come and paralympics, and that has been fantastic. it is now time to sort of pores and go, if this is still the way it needs to be and wants to be and what the public want and what eve ryo ne and what the public want and what everyone wants, great, it‘s working. but actually, there is almost a responsibility to say is that where the journey should take us? that is the journey should take us? that is the question for the public. that is all baseball for now, more in the next hour. studio: thank you very much. at least 25 people have died, including children, and hundreds have been injured, after one of latin america‘s most active volcanos erupted suddenly. at least one village near the fuego volcano has been buried in ash and lava, and the main airport in guatemala city, 25 miles away, has been closed. a state of emergency has been called in much of the country. will grant sent this report. volcan de fuego‘s awesome power is well—known in guatemala.
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it is one of the most active volcanoes in latin america, with local people used to living in its shadow. however, moments of this magnitude are rare. eyewitnesses described a river of fire spewing down the mountainside. the victims and many of the injured were caught in its path, unable to react before their simple homes were swept away by the lava. translation: not everyone escaped, i think they were buried. we saw the lava pouring through the cornfields, and we ran towards the hill. ash has fallen across a wide area, even reaching the capital, guatemala city, some 40km away. meanwhile, falling molten rock remains a real threat to villages in the vicinity. evacuations are under way, the emergency services doing what they can amid the treacherous conditions, the recent rains complicating their rescue efforts.
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the president has called a state of emergency. translation: we are considering the need to call for a state of emergency. we have to see, according to our legislation, what can help us to do this. we think, until now, that there is a state of devastation in at least three areas. the international airport in guatemala city has been closed through poor visibility, and roads have been cut off in several departments of the country. the last time locals remember seeing fuego was so active was in the mid 1970s. with the number of dead steadily rising, and emergency services in the impoverished nation stretched, it is now a race to ensure communities in the affected area are safe. will grant, bbc news. the home secretary sajid javid has said the security services must change their approach to fighting terrorism, and learn the lessons of last year‘s attacks in london and manchester in which 36 people died. in a speech in london, he said they were currently involved
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in more than 500 investigations involving 3000 potential suspects. 0ur security correspondent frank gardner reports. britain, we are told, faces at least two more years of a severe terrorist threat from both jihadis and right—wing extremists. in response, the government is announcing today a revised counterterrorism strategy. we know that the way that terrorists‘ attacks are now planned and conducted has changed. people are increasingly being radicalised via their computers and smartphones. they are using everyday objects, such as knives and cars, as weapons. and the length of time between radicalisation and the attack is getting shorter. the threats are evolving — we must evolve too. the security service, m15, is to declassify its secret intelligence on some of the 20,000 suspects on its database, then share this more widely with police forces
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and even local government. last year‘s manchester bombing that killed 22 people was an intelligence failure. the bomber, salman abedi, was one of 20,000 people listed on m15‘s database as a former subject of interest. if more people knew about such potential terrorists, the theory goes, the better the chances of stopping them. but this strategy carries its own risks. there is a concern that some innocent people end up getting caught up in it, but the bigger concern is more around information leaking out, information leaking out from security services identifying an individual as a potential concern, that information being shared with the local council, then getting into the public domain. the westminster bridge attacker, who drove a hired van last year into pedestrians, was another name on m15‘s database. now greater efforts are to be made to quickly detect and act on any suspicious transactions by suspects, including right—wing extremists.
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but there is an underlying problem — police officers say that budget cuts have left them under—resourced at a community level. you are pouring money into counterterrorism policing and intelligence, but at the same time community policing is being starved of funds. isn‘t there a risk that we end up being like brussels, where community policing simply doesn‘t have the on—the—street intelligence to inform about terrorist attacks? since 2015, we have protected police funding over what we might call communities policing, and in fact, in the last year, in this particular financial year, we have increased the total amount of cash available by some £460 million, one of the biggest increases that we have seen. so we do recognise that there is a need for more resources. starting this summer, counterterrorism officers will be deployed to multi—agency centres in london, manchester and the west midlands, to put the new strategy into action.
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the aim is to deny terrorists any safe space and avoid a repeat of the terrible attacks of 2017. frank gardner, bbc news. in a moment the business news with ben. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. experts tell the grenfell tower inquiry that advice to residents to "stay put" had effectively failed within around half an hour of the blaze starting. britain‘s youngest female terror plotter has been found guilty of preparing an attack on london with the first all—woman islamic state cell. the home secretary, sajid javid, has said the security services must change their approach to fighting terrorism and learn the lessons of last year‘s attacks in london and manchester. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. mothercare could have to backtrack on a proposal to close more than a third of its stores in the uk. it thought last week that it
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had got enough votes from its creditors to go ahead. but after reviewing the minutes, it found the proposal relating to the children‘s world part of the business — which has 21 mothercare stores — did not actually get the 75% of votes needed to proceed. mothercare is considering what to do next. rail passengers are still facing cancellations despite changes to deal with major disruption caused by new timetables introduced last month. northern rail has introduced a temporary timetable that removes 165 train services a day until the end ofjuly. on monday, more than 100 trains were still cancelled or severely delayed affecting passengers in manchester, lancashire and the lake district. profits for the world‘s biggest airlines will be hit by rising fuel and labour costs this year, according to the industry‘s trade body. the international air transport association — or iata for short — has cut its profit forecast for 2018 by 12% to £25 billion. iata also said rising interest rates and trade
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tensions could hit profits. so, the bid for virgin moneyjust got even sweeter did it? the owner of clydesdale bank have closed their bank and yorkshire bank has sweetened its offer. it wants to buy virgin money. it is now offering £1.6 billion. but under the new terms, shareholders would own 38% of the new merged business instead of the new merged business instead of the 36% that had been initially offered. they say that the two firms involved say this move would create the uk‘s first new banking competitor. it would create the uk‘s fifth—largest bank between them they would have 6 million personal and
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business customers and a balance sheet of £70 billion. get more on this. would this be in the interests of customers or not? it looks about 3 million virgin customers are set to merge with clydesdale. their concern would be interruption to the service, in the past have gone smoothly. virgin customers have been used a really good customer service and we would hope the merging of these two banks ultimately means they are sharing best practice and everyone benefits from far better service. although generally, if there are more players, does a nick gibb more options for customers and an incentive to provide better offers to compete? it is worth noting there are plenty of challenger banks and this isjust another example of two good ones
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coming together. there are two different types of camps, one that have a strong high—street presence and once with a online presence. the one with high—street presence of a fantastic customer services for those who still want to go into branches. for those who like the online experience, those banks are innovative on the experiences they offered through their apps and online is strong. so what it is causing is the other banks to really upped their game causing is the other banks to really upped theirgame and causing is the other banks to really upped their game and they are having to make changes and diversify their offerings. all in all the customers, this is a positive thing. do you have any concerns about it at all, anything you would like reassurance or not? as i said at the beginning, interruption to service will be the main thing and we are hoping they share best practices. two strong banks 0'dee hope is they are sharing best practice and ultimately customers get premium service. thank you very much indeed. you are really spoiling me, i can
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see! this makes a change. this is a business story, because if you cannot pay people in money you pay them in chocolate, obviously? you sweeten the deal, so to speak. you have heard of bombs but what about chocolate bombs? this is what hotel shocker that did. customers would lend the money and instead of getting an interest rate ora instead of getting an interest rate or a monetary return, they would get gift cards or boxes of chocolate from time to time. the chain says it is now repaying the bonds in full. use the money to invest in manufacturing in the uk, to open new stores. they say it has helped them create 600 jobs but has also helped them support cocoa growers in saint lucia and garner. they are now repaying the bonds in full. this does work obviously because people are happy with it but how? now the
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bonds have come to an end... a quick look at their numbers, hotel chocolat, the group, their share price was up around 1% a short while ago. they have reported a 15% rise in half—year sales to 17 point one million pounds but they had a bit of copycat trouble with waitrose. waitrose came out with a range of chocolate slabs that were similar to those by hotel chocolat. they sat down over a cup of cocoa, byblos is ironed it out and waitrose agreed to stop selling them but hotel chocolat said they can sell their existing stock so it doesn‘t go to waste. that is very magnanimous. suite. nice. markets? a quick look, the ftse100 in positive territory, helped by financial stocks. hsbc and ba rclays, helped by financial stocks. hsbc and barclays, the talk of the merger between clydesdale and yorkshire and
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virgin money and talks of a big italian and french bank. financial stocks across the board, they helped lift the ftse100. the packaging firm ds smith, growth in online shopping means they are doing well. perhaps looking at a merger and expansion which has helped their share price go up more than 2% this afternoon. ok, speak to you in an hour. would you like me to leave one for you? lead the plate! you are watching afternoon live. some breaking news from guatemala. the disaster agency says the death toll from the eruption of the volcano has risen to 38, after the volcano exploded. a number of people died in their homes, unprepared for what was a very violent eruption of the fuego volcano. 38 the death toll. you‘re watching afternoon live. keeping an eye on twitter and the number of
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newspapers certainly and news agencies reporting this letter that has been sent by the government chief whip, julian smith. you can‘t read that so i will read it to you. basically, it is saying from the chief whip, saying i hope you have an enjoyable recess and then this... 0n the 12th ofjune, this will be of great interest to many of you, i am able to confirm this will be the commons consideration of the lords amendments on the european union withdrawal bill. there will be a number of revisions that day, but basically this for some part of that day, a large part of that day, going back to the commons and will be the subject of, as we have already seen, considerable debate. that is the return of the lords amendments on the european union withdrawal bill, going back to the house of commons on the 12th ofjune. that is a letter from the government chief whip that appears to confirm that and we will bring you more details, talking to our political
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correspondent about that a little later on. how much do we really know about our parents? for one woman from deal in kent an old suitcase hidden in an attic has revealed that her father who died more than 30 years ago had a secret life. these are just a few of hundreds of photographs that have won plaudits, with plans now for a book and an exhibition. david sillito reports. john turner was a model of bowler—hatted 1950s respectability. that was the man that got on the 8:15 every morning and earned the money to look after us all. he worked as a property manager for a big firm of estate agents in london. but he had a secret passion. this suitcase was hidden in the attic, and its secrets have onlyjust been discovered by his daughter, liz, more than 30 years after his death. there are hundreds of photographs. quirky, candid, a window on a lost world. he had quite an eye for the fleeting moment. elephants in the centre of london. yes! shaftesbury avenue?
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i would think so. why? the circus is in town. there is a lot of comradeship in that picture. looks like they might have been on hard times, but supporting each other. here she is, style on legs, look at her. butterfly glasses. and the dog looking at her. the jumping polar bear. two women strolling down a road suddenly breaking into a nazi salute in 30s berlin. these precarious football fans. john turner didn‘t show these photos to anyone. his family knew nothing. however, now they have been made public, there‘s been quite a reaction. we‘ve got interest in producing a book, which would be wonderful. and hopefully an exhibition, we‘ve had some interest in that as well. but we‘re having offers arriving daily now, so we‘re just waiting to see which ones seem right when we‘ve had time to think about
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it and gather them all together. you are meeting a new father here, aren‘t you? yes, but one i always suspected might be there. the man in the bowler hat, he had a secret life. he did, yes, i‘m very glad to say. workmen pondering a piece of modern art. the collector for the pdsa. and this rather rakish self—portrait, with a cravat, thejohn turner before family and responsibilities. this is a suitcase with more than a few surprises. david sillito, bbc news. let‘s get an update, a picture of the weather with ben rich. good afternoon. nothing is going to be changing very quickly with our whether through this week. there will be some scenes like this, beautiful blue skies and sunshine for this weather watcher
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in hampshire earlier on, however a couple of flies in the ointment. these showers and thunderstorms always trying to drift up from the south. around this area of high pressure, a north or north—easterly wind trying to feed a lot of cloud in from the north sea. many of us do have those cloudy conditions to take us through the rest of the afternoon. what we will also see is one or two showers breaking out in south—west scotland and northern ireland. there is a met office warning in force here for the potential of a bit of disruption from these intense thunderstorms. one or two across western fringes of wales and the south—west england, about perhaps just creeping up from the near continent into the channel islands as well. away from these areas, best of the brightness down towards the south and west. always more cloud further north and east and feeling cool if you keep that cloud all afternoon long. as we go through this evening and overnight, that cloud will again try to roll its way in from the north sea. it will turn quite misty and murky in places. a few clear spells out west and temperatures not dropping very far, actually, underneath that blanket of cloud, maybe 8 degrees in newcastle but most places holding up in double digits.
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we start tomorrow on a cloudy note once again. could be one or two showers and thunderstorms still fringing in across the channel islands but as we go through the day, we will start to see things brightening up from the north. some slightly drier air pushing its way in, tending to break up the cloud, more in the way of sunshine. still with a bit of a north—easterly breeze, not going to feel especially warm close to those north sea coasts. get yourself into the sunshine, highs of 20—21. might see a bit more cloud forming again towards the eastern coasts on wednesday but essentially a nice looking day. spells of sunshine around, those temperatures perhaps nudging upwards to 22—23. but as we head towards the end of the week, it does look increasingly likely that we will see some showers and thunderstorms trying to push up from the south. in southern areas at the end of the week, bringing the potential for some showers, perhaps the odd thunderstorm but it won‘t be raining all the time, there‘ll be some dry weather as well.
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further north, closer to an area of high pressure, it‘s going to stay mainly fine and dry, some spells of sunshine but also some extra cloud close to those north sea coasts. hello, you‘re watching afternoon live — i‘m simon mccoy. today at 4. experts tell the grenfell tower inquiry that advice to "stay put" had effectively failed — within around half an hour of the blaze starting. the fundamental question lying at the heart of our work is how, in london, in 2017, a domestic fire developed so quickly and so catastrophically. and the inquiry hears the first 999 call from the burning tower block. the fire brigade are on their way, are you outside? yeah, i‘m outside. the fire engines are on their way, how many floors have you got? it‘s the fourth floor. quick, quick, quick. a teenager is found guilty of plotting a terror attack
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on london with britain‘s first all—female islamic state cell. greater manchester mayor, andy burnham, says northern rail should be stripped of its franchise, if it can‘t end the chaos caused by new timetables. at least 38 people are dead wth millions affected — after a volcano erupts violently near the capital of guatamala. coming up on afternoon live all the sport. shop views on serena williams. disappointment for her, at the french open, it should have been a highly anticipated match against maria sharapova but because of a chest muscle injury she has withdrawn, williams. more on that later. the weather forecast? things are changing very slowly this week, blue skies and sunshine and cloudy conditions at times, more on that and more unsettled weather in other parts of europe. thanks. also coming up — what does it mean
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to be "english" and do you feel different about it depending on where you live? we‘ll find out more in news nationwide. hello everyone — this is afternoon live. stay in your flats — the advice that was meant to save lives in the event of a fire at grenfell tower. but it was advice that an expert report has found had ‘effectively failed‘. at the opening of its fact—finding stage, the grenfell inquiry has also heard evidence that the materials used in the cladding system and by windows didn‘t comply with recommended safety standards. the fire service had to pump its own water into g re nfell tower because the building‘s system was "non—compliant". and the smoke control system did not operate correctly, reducing the ability to vent smoke
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from the lobbies on each floor of the building. let‘s hear from our correspondent daniela relph. and a warning, her report contains images viewers may find distressing. the anguish and emotion of the bereaved families remain at the heart of this inquiry, but in this next stage, it is now examining the technical detail of what happened onjune the 14th last year. the fundamental question which lies at the heart of our work is how, in london, in 2017, a domestic fire developed so quickly and so catastrophically that an entire high—rise block was engulfed, and how it was that 71 people lost their lives in a matter of hours, leaving families and friends in shock, grief and bewilderment. to help the inquiry, five expert technical reports have been published today. 0ne examined the fire protection measures.
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it found multiple failures. the report looks at the fire service advice to stay in your flat. it says, the stay put strategy effectively failed by 1:26am, around half an hour after the fire started, and there was an early need for total evacuation. the stairwell was quickly smoke clogged, it was the main escape route. the author also says, flat doors didn‘t meet fire regulations, doors going to the stairs did not appear to have been upgraded since 1972, fire lifts couldn‘t be used properly, and the water supply system meant firefighters couldn‘t get adequate amounts of water to the upper levels. the author also says that at one point a body was used to hold open a fire door to a stairwell. a number of the reports highlight the failure of the cladding to meet fire safety standards. 0ne says the main reason for the rapid spread was the polyethylene
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in the cladding. as it burned, that material dripped and flowed downwards, sideways and upwards. another document looked at the cause and spread of the fire. it confirms that the blaze started in the kitchen of flat 16 on the fourth floor of the tower and, more likely than not, in or around a fridge freezer. the events that unfolded at grenfell tower... other expert analysis provided to the inquiry describe inadequate fire testing methods. it says the complex material now used in construction and cladding makes some fire safety procedures totally insufficient. this is an inquiry that wants to provide answers. what did the professionals know and do in respect of the cladding and the active and passive fire safety systems more generally in the building? how did so many people sign this building off as safe?
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was saving money put before saving lives? next week, around the first anniversary of the fire, the inquiry won‘t be sitting, to allow families to remember those they lost. this public inquiry aims to proceed as quickly as possible, to minimise any future risk to public safety. daniela relph, bbc news. 0ur correspondent, tom burridge, is at the inquiry in central london. the reports suggesting grenfell tower was safer before the refurbishment? essentially, yes. it was designed in the 70s to keep a fire within a flat and that is why this policy was used on the night for people to stay in their flat. but when it was refurbished in the yea rs before but when it was refurbished in the years before the fire, there was a sheeting of cladding placed around
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the building, which had a plastic or which was flammable and described as a hazardous thing, essentially, and the fire spread rapidly through the gaps in the refurbished windows which were surrounded by combustible materials. we also heard about the ferocity at which the fire spread and speaking as the leading counsel to the inquiry, the qc quoted the commission of the london fire brigade. she explains, i have never seen a building where the whole of it was on fire, nobody has ever seen that, it was incredible, it was so alien to anything i had ever seen. that was the stated experience of all of the firefighters who attended the fire on the night, as evidence we will hear or read in the weeks to come. nobody doubts that the fire itself in terms of scale and spread
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was unprecedented and exceptional in the collective knowledge and experience of the london fire brigade and nationally. whether such a building and the fire was foreseeable in terms of type, in light of a growing body of evidence about previous cladding fires and what contingency plans might have been made for it by the lsp, they are different questions. —— the lfb. we also heard about the advice to residents to stay in their flats even though the fire was spreading rapidly through the building. it was in the words of one expert inappropriate so quickly on that night, because barbara layne, an expert in fire consultancy, she basically said that policy was
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ineffective 30 minutes after the fire started because the stairwell, the only escape route, was clogged with smoke. incredibly the advice to residents to stay in their flats remained in place for a further one hour and 20 minutes and it is still not clear why. we also heard the emergency call from the man who lived in flat 16 on the fourth floor where the fire broke out. hello, there is a fire. flat 16, grenfell tower. fire where? flat 16, grenfell tower. flat 16, what is the postcode? wii, itg. quick, please. i have to get the address. flat 16, grenfell tower. w1! itg. the fire brigade on their way. are you outside? yes, yes, i am.
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fire engines are on their way. how many floors have you got there? it's fourth floor. quick, quick, quick. it's burning. yes, i know it's burning. but they are on their way. i know it's burning. you have only just you have onlyjust called. as long as you're 0k. pardon? inaudible you wait outside. i'm outside. 0k. the fire engines are on their way and they will be there soon, 0k. 0k. you've onlyjust called us so it will take a minute for them to get there. 0k. can i let you go? inaudible hello? can i let you go? you're outside, yeah? yeah, i'm outside. 0k, bye. the man alerting the fire crews that
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there was a fire in his flat in g re nfell tower. there was a fire in his flat in grenfell tower. what we have learned, before the refurbishment, g re nfell tower learned, before the refurbishment, grenfell tower in general terms was safe in terms of fire safety but not only was a flammable combustible layer of cladding placed around the building but on the night the fire broke out so many other things and failures came to light. the doors on the entrance to the flats were not compliant in terms of fire safety and the smoke ventilation scheme in the stairwell simply did not work and be fire crews were not even able to use the lift in the tower block in the way they should have been able to. thanks forjoining us. if you want to find out more about the grenfell tower inquiry, eddie mair is presenting a podcast every day the inquiry sits — which looks in detail at what‘s been said and heard each day. you can download it from the bbc iplayer radio app, itunes or your podcast provider.
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it looks as though the eu withdrawal bill is returning to the house of commons on the 12th ofjune. following a letter from the government chief whip who writes to mps saying that it is coming back from the lord‘s, the lords amendments on the draw bell, and says it will be a number of divisions that day on the 12th of june —— on the withdrawal bill. there is the letter. it says you should expect frequent contact your whip in the coming days. it says it looks forward to giving back the withdrawal bill to the eu. that is a
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letter from the government chief whip to other tory mps. the 12th of june, and it will be a long sitting and plenty of debate in the house of commons. after those moments came back from the house of lords. —— after those amendments. a teenagerfrom london who became the youngest female in the country to be charged with is related terror offences has been convicted at the old bailey of planning an attack in the uk. safaa boular, who is now 18, was 16 when she was first investigated by the police. she is part of an all—female family terror cell. her sister was shot by police when she was arrested. the women were planning two separate attacks. june kelly reports. gunshots this was when armed officers moved in on the uk‘s first all—female terror cell, firing cs gas canisters into an upstairs flat. in the mayhem one of the women,
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rizlaine boular, was shot by police and she was given medical treatment on the pavement. she was laying down with police officers on top of her because she was putting up a horrendous struggle and she was screaming, in pain, and did not want to be helped. rizlaine boular had been hours away from causing carnage on the streets of london. for weeks police and the security service m15 had been tracking their suspects. rizlaine boular recovered from her injuries. her younger sister was already in custody and also arrested was their mother mina dich. we believe they were going to attack members of the public at random using knives with a view to inflicting injury or killing individuals. we intervened at an early stage with a view to frustrating that terrorist plot.
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mina dich with her daughters when the girls were growing up. rizlaine is at the back. at the front is rizlaine‘s younger sister safaa. by the time she was 16 safaa, on the left, was wearing full islamic dress as like her mother and sister she had become more religious. all three then embraced violent extremism. in the same month that safaa boular got her gcse results she was trying to marry an is fighter in syria, naweed hussain, over the internet. she never met him — theirs was an online relationship — and he was in his 30s. when he was killed she was distraught. the couple had talked about how safaa boular could carry out an attack here in the area around the british museum in central london and they discussed an ambush involving guns or grenades and using a car and a knife. safaa boular was arrested but she then encouraged her sister
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to carry out her own attack. during safaa‘s trial, in which she wore western clothing, the jury heard recordings of prison phone conversations where she and her sister discussed the new plot. rizlaine spoke of her plans to hold a mad hatter‘s tea party, which the prosecution said was code for a terror attack. safaa boular disappointed that she couldn‘tjoin in. the following evening rizlaine was being driven around westminster by their mother on a reconnaissance mission scouting targets. the women had bought a knife from sainsbury‘s and it was rizlaine who was going to be the killer. zac tye was at school with her and is perplexed at the path chosen by his formerfriend.
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rizlaine was a very outgoing person, lovely to talk to, always smiling. she became quite heavily into islam. i‘m not sure what caused it. it was a very sudden thing and she started wearing the hijab. it‘s strange to hear that she became such a monster in her adult life. in the hours before her arrest rizlaine had been practising wielding a knife. the police said they shot her because they believed she posed a risk to their lives. rizlaine boular and her mother have pleaded guilty to terrorism charges. her sister safaa has been convicted by a jury for planning a separate attack. the family are now facing long terms in prison. june kelly, bbc news. let‘s get more now on the government‘s plans to bring the main piece of
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brexit legislation — — the eu withdrawal bill — back to the house of commons for mps to debate and vote on. let‘s speak to our chief political correspondent vicki young at westminster. there will probably be about 15 votes, this is the withdrawal bill, supposed to make sure the laws are transferred over so you don‘t have this massive gap in the statute book. as the bill went to the house of lords 15 defeats were inflicted upon the government. they have to come back to the house of commons where there will be votes on probably at least some of them, the government may decide to accept some of them. they won‘t accept the idea that britain should stay in the european economic area or a customs union, which the government has ruled out. this could produce a
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massive headache for the prime minister depending on what her mps decide to do and depending on what labour decide to do, but there are conservative rebels, who at christmas when they voted on having a meaningful vote at the end of the process , a meaningful vote at the end of the process, about 11 conservative rebels, enough to defeat the government, so we will have to see how the numbers end up on the day but we are hearing there will be a 12 hour marathon session of the house of commons beginning at 1230 in the afternoon on the 12th of june. we have seen a letterfrom in the afternoon on the 12th of june. we have seen a letter from the conservative chief whip, who is in charge of making sure the government has the numbers it needs to get things through parliament, and that says to mps very clearly, i know you‘re very interested in this subject, and please make sure that you are working from the parliamentary estate at all times, so mps on standby for a big day. thanks forjoining us. let‘s cross live to the house of commons where the trade secretary liam fox
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is updating parliament. pointing out that the uk is responsible for 1% of us steel imports. the last time i addressed the house on this issue these unilateral trade measures have weak foundations indeed, in international law, and they are not consistent with the us department of defence‘s ownjudgment in with the us department of defence‘s own judgment in an investigation that was conducted on the basis of national security. we believe the uni macro should have been permanently and fully exempted from the measures on steel and aluminium —— the the measures on steel and aluminium -- the eu. the measures on steel and aluminium —— the eu. we will continue to make this case at the highest point concert with the eu and our priorities now are to defend the rules —based international trading system which supports growth and consumers and industry, to make sure this does not escalate and risk further undermining of world trade, and most importantly to protect the interests of british industry, and the use of national defence as the
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rationale for this action threatens to create a worrying global precedent. we are clear that these unjustified additional tariffs could harm consumers and hold back growth and ultimately damage industry by driving up the price of inputs and production and diminished global competitiveness, and we remain of the view that issues of global overca pacity the view that issues of global overcapacity in the steel market are best solved through international collaboration and not unilateral action. uk has worked hard to address the issue of overcapacity and the prime minister called for a forum of g20 members to tackle the issue and the uk will continue to work within the rules —based international trade system to tackle this problem through the g20 steel forum. but as the us has decided to impose these tariffs which will damage the steel and aluminium industries in europe, we must respond and as a member of the eu we will continue to work with the european commission and member
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states on the response, and that is focused on three areas. the european commission is preparing to introduce immediate duty is on the us ahead of a wto dispute and following a unanimous decision by member states the eu notified the wto of a potential list of product lines on the 18th of may and could trigger ta riffs the 18th of may and could trigger tariffs on this list from the 20th ofjune. the commission is required to seek member state approval, a second time, in order to have the countermeasures come into effect, specific timings are yet to be determined by the commission. second, the uni macro can apply safeguard measures to protect the steel and aluminium industries —— eu. to stop them from being damaged by imports to the eu are caused by the displacing affective us tariffs, and the eu are finalising an investigation into potential eu
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level safeguard measures to protect its own steel market from trade diversion resulting from us measures. provisional measures could be adopted as early as mid—july, and the eu has also introduced surveillance of aluminium imports to determine whether the safeguard investigation is justified determine whether the safeguard investigation isjustified into aluminium. we will support any safeguard measures required to deal with steel diversion as a result of these tariffs. third, the eu can pursue a dispute at the wto and it filed such a dispute challenging us steel and aluminium tariffs last friday. it is right to seek to defend our domestic industries from both the direct and indirect impact of these us tariffs and the response must be measured and proportionate and it is important that the uk and the eu work within the boundaries of the eu work within the boundaries of the rules —based international trading system. since the president
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asked the commerce department launched investigations into the national security impact of steel and aluminium imports last april, the government has made clear on repeated occasions to the administration that potentially damaging impact of tariffs on the uk and the eu steel and aluminium industries and the prime has also raised her concerns with president trump. i have spoken many times to the commerce secretary about the investigation, the director—general of the wto, and the eu trade commissioner, as was my colleagues in member states, and the government has worked closely with the eu as pa rt has worked closely with the eu as part of a unified response, and in addition i can assure the house that we will be in regular contact with the uk steel and aluminium industry throughout and the business secretary has convened a steel council which will take place very shortly. i have been in touch most recently at a meeting at westminster
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earlier today. we remain committed to robust the defending and protecting uk steel and aluminium industries and its employees, and the government will continue to press the us for the exemption for the eu for these unjustified tariffs, and in parallel uk suppliers will want to encourage their us customers to see product exemptions to the process being overseen by the us commerce department, and the department of business, energy and industrial strategy will be hosting a meeting with the industry tomorrow morning, to share information and advice on the product exemptions process. uk firms without a presence in the us can not apply directly for a product exemption and this means uk firms will need to work with the end users of their products in the us to apply for a product exemption to gather the relative data and justification for a product exemption. the government will support applications made on the half of uk industry with
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representations to the commonest apartment to process applications —— commerce department. my department published in information note on the procedure on the government website on friday, and the government is committed to free and fair trade and the international rules that underpin both, and we will seek to promote and protect those roles alongside the interests of british industry. i commend this statement to the house. i'm gratefulfor advance sight of his statement and the telephone call yesterday afternoon, the secretary of state is afternoon, the secretary of state is a very courteous man but no amount of courtesy can hide the fact that his government have a record of failure with the british steel industry. his government opposed stronger defence measures by the european union and passivity did a crisis for producers in the uk ——
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precipitated a crisis. this was not a civil service mistake, this was ministerial ideology, which has been confirmed by their refusal to accept the amendments we tabled to the customs bill and the trade bill precisely to strengthen the defence measures we could take against such illegal action map and last week his initial response was to say that he did not rule out countervailing measures with our european partners. did not rule out? he should have been demanding them. he says on the website begrudgingly, whilst we are members of the eu we must abide by eu trade decisions. that hardly sounds like a full throated and coordinated position with our eu trade partners and no wonder when the eu recently voted to modernise the eu recently voted to modernise the trade defence measures to protect our industries but our government was one of the only two kouachi voted against them. it is no
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use the secretary of state saying that we voted against the trade bill and customs bill which would have left us with no trade authority, we voted against the bill is precisely because they were so weak and ineffective on this matter and he knows it. 34,000 ukjobs in our steel industry and three and a half thousand more in the aluminium industry are at risk because president trump is imposing protectionist tariffs that the rest of the world believe are illegal, and we saw him use the same protectionist policies to attack bombardier in northern ireland but this time he has based the policy of a fundamental lie, pretending that these tariffs fall under section 232 of the 1962 act and are necessary for the united states national security, but they are not. the lie is to avoid the perfectly correct response that the eu is now making in taking this as a dispute to the wto because the wto is naturally relu cta nt wto because the wto is naturally reluctant to rule on what is and what is not there member states
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national security. all our steel producers want is a fair and level playing field on which to compete and they and we acknowledge that there is a real issue of global ove rca pacity there is a real issue of global overcapacity which brought our industry to crisis .3 years ago but it threatens to do so again now. that is why there are three issues on which we need absolute clarity from the secretary of state, will the uk get the required consent in order to trigger the countervailing measures and enable them to come into effect on the 20th ofjune? the greatest threat tojobs, into effect on the 20th ofjune? the greatest threat to jobs, is perhaps not directly from the loss of trade into the usa as a result of tariffs, they only account for 7% of our steel and 3% of the aluminium exports, the real danger is on the products diverted from other countries who can no longer export into the us in dumped here, and i first read the statement i believed
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he had made the commitment to strong safeguarding measures to protect against such an influx surge... that was barry gardner, we heard before that from liam fox, saying a response to the tariffs from the us must be measured, but we have heard that theresa may has had a conversation with donald trump by phone where they agreed they would discuss it at the upcoming g7 summit. more reaction later. two other news... the mayor of greater manchester, andy burnham, has said northern rail should be stripped of its franchise, if it can‘t end the chaos caused by new timetables. about 2,000 services have been cancelled since new schedules were introduced just over a fortnight ago. northern has now published a new emergency timetable,with fewer services, but today has seen more frustration for passengers. downing street says the disruption is "totally u na cce pta ble". 0ur correspondent charlotte gallagher is in preston. a lot of frustration. there are so
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many frustrated commuters here at preston station. they faced week ‘s of misery. services cancelled right at the last minute, long delays and the dreaded rail replacement bus. this emergency timetable introduced today by northern and thames link was meant to help solve this crisis. in fact, we are seeing more of the same problems. last—minute cancellations and delays. people here, they are getting to work late, missing important appointments and they have really lost faith in northern rail and go via tenzing. the mayor of greater manchester wa nts the mayor of greater manchester wants them to be stripped of their licence. he says northern rail are in the last chance saloon at this point and they have inflicted misery on travellers across the north of england. in london, the mayor of london siddique can —— sadiq khan
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says govia thameslink are hurting the economy because people can‘t travel in and out of london properly. we know chris grayling will meet him very frustrated mps whose constituencies have been affected. i think risk correct —— chris grayling and govia thameslink have a double challenge, they have to get the services back to normal and they have to restore public confidence that they can run proper services as they should be doing. charlotte, thank you very much for that. let‘s catch up with the weather, ben rich is here in the studio. that is not anywhere near here? no, our weather is relatively quiet site. i would take you to one part of europe where the weather is far from quite, that is romania, over the weekend. those were hailstones that fell, a covering of hail in many places, because they had building heat and that calls the thunder clouds to bubble up and the showers and storms cause significant
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disruption. you can see on this radar pictures, the way the storm have been blossoming to life over the last few days. quite a static weather pattern across europe with showers and storms continuing in the same sort of places day after day after day. it is notjust romania. let‘s spend the globe. here‘s another one. france have had more than theirfair share another one. france have had more than their fair share of storms. the ones we had here in the uk last week or came up ones we had here in the uk last week or came up from france and they have just been rumbling around once again. these are the kind of pictures we have been saying. that was the scene in the pyrenees. further north in brittany, very similar scenes. huge amounts of flooding across europe, because this static weather pattern has been keeping the storms in the same places. is it unusual, what have we got in the next few days? it is unusual to have things static for so long but at home, pretty slow changes as well. though showers and storms across france or is going to
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be trying to push their way in our direction and will succeed at times. what we also have trying to work in our direction is a lot of cloud. i pressure sitting here, wind round in a clockwise direction, dragging in cloud from the north sea. we have had showers and storms of our own, pretty well scattered. that was western scotland earlier on. as we go through the rest of the afternoon and the first part of the evening we will still see a scattering of showers and thunderstorms. not everywhere, far from it showers and thunderstorms. not everywhere, farfrom it back showers and thunderstorms. not everywhere, far from it back in south scotland, northern ireland, there are met office warnings in force for those severe heavy downpours, hit and miss as they will be. showers and storms in south—west wales already today. some across the south of england and into the channel islands. the channel islands closest to france, where we have already seen lots of showers and storms they will continue to bend their way in toward the channel islands as they go through the next couple days. this is how before car shaped up tonight, or be cloud in the north
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sea rolling westwards and once again turning drizzly. pretty mild, temperatures 8—14. tomorrow, quite a grey and cloudy start for many. could be the odd spot of drizzle but stick with it. watch the map from the north, the way the cloud peels away. sunshine developing in eastern scotla nd away. sunshine developing in eastern scotland and north east england, more than today. the cloud getting pushed towards the south—west. cloudy and cooler day here tomorrow. elsewhere, temperatures 18—20 but cooler close to the north sea coasts, where you keep that north—easterly breeze. the brief will bring more cloud from the east as they go into wednesday but most places seeing good spells of sunshine. temperatures climbing a little, 22-23 in sunshine. temperatures climbing a little, 22—23 in the south. remember, though showers and storms across france? thursday, an increasing chance they will try to fringe their way in across southern parts of the uk at lease. looking at some of our forecasts through to the
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weekend, you can see london, southampton, just the risk of some showers at times. not all the time, there will still be a lot of dry weather. further north, certainly looks dry as we had to the end of the week on the weekend, some spells of sunshine and temperatures very respectable, up in the 20s but cooler close to north sea coasts. that is all from me. bye for now. this is bbc news — our latest headlines: experts have told the grenfell tower inquiry that advice to "stay put" effectively failed within around half an hour of the fire starting. the hearing also heard that materials used in the cladding
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system and around windows didn‘t comply with recommended safety sta nda rds. the fundamental question which lies at the heart of our work is how, in london, in 2017, a domestic fire developed so quickly and so catastrophically? the inquiry also heard today the first 999 call made from the blazing tower block. 16 grenfell tower... the fire brigade are on their way. are you outside? yeah, yeah, i‘m outside. yeah, well the fire engines are on their way. just tell me how many floors you've got there? it‘s the fourth floor. quick, quick, quick, quick! they're on their way. an 18—year old from london has become the youngest woman in the uk to be convicted of planning a terror attack. safaa boular — who was 17 when she was arrested — was convicted at the old bailey of two counts of preparing an act of terrorism. the government‘s flagship brexit
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legislation will return to the commons a week tomorrow, it has been announced. the eu withdrawal bill will be debated by mps on tuesday 12thjune. sport now on afternoon live with hugh. all the anticipation of a tennis match with serena williams and she had to pull out? yes, exactly bad. we have been building it up. a matchup between williams and sharapova. williams won the last 18 ina row sharapova. williams won the last 18 in a row between the two so less than a rivalry than people thought but the relationship between the two meant there was some interest. williams expressing some disappointment that sharapova in her recent autobiography claimed she was in tears, having lost the wimbledon final back in 2004. that had built the anticipation but it never materialised. a pectoral injury and chest muscle problem is the reason
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williams pulled out. she pulled out less than an hour before the match would have started. she‘d first felt it in her 3rd round match on saturday but decided to play in the doubles with her sister venus yesterday where she was moving rather gingerly. she had only dropped one set to this point in paris so not the ending she‘d have hoped for. i'm beyond disappointed, you know... i gave up so much, from time with my daughter to time with my family and i put everything on the court, all for this moment. so it's really difficult to be in this situation, but i always, for now in my life i try to think positive and just think of the bigger picture and hopefully the next event and the rest of the year.
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so far easier day then maria sharapova thought she would have. so sharapova is through to the quarterfinals, where she‘lljoin world number one simona halep. in the men‘s draw rafael nadal is comfortably through to the last eight. the ten times champion nadal made light work of germany‘s maxilmilian marterer, winning in straight sets. nadal will play 11th seed diego schwartzman next. big news, serena williams not going through to the quarterfinals. the world cup in russia, the young captain nick —— young player of the year not going? manchester city‘s leroy sane, either scored or assisted 33 goals in a sparkling season, more than any german player in europe‘s top 5 leags but it wasn‘t enough — left out of the world cup holders 23 man squad for the tournament in russia which starts next week.
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he helped manchester city win the premier league title, scoring ten goals in 13 assists and rewarded with that pfa young player of the season award. but he hasn‘t made it through. it raised a lot of eyebrows and got reaction on social media. the germany captain manuel neuer was picked despite not playing since september. sane‘s manchester city teammate vincent kompany has been given two weeks to prove his fitness, as he attempts to recover from a groin injury. belgium boss roberto martinez said his captain‘s leadership was crucial. crystal palace striker christian benteke has missed out, belgium are in england‘s group — they meet onjune the 28th. mohamed salah pfa player of the year has been named in egypt‘s world cup squad he was forced off during liverpool‘s champions league final defeatjust over a week ago.
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looks to be recovering well. egypt‘s opening game is against uruguay on the 15th ofjune. that is all the sport from me for now. now on afternoon live, let‘s go nationwide and see what‘s happening around the country, in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. today on nationwide we‘re looking at one of the largest surveys on identity in england: the english question commissioned by the bbc, which looks at how proud people are to call themselves english. let‘s go to peter levy who‘s in hull, where parts of the region identity particularly strongly as english. we will hear why in just a moment. in 0xford... katharine de costa in a city on the opposite end of the scale, where less than half the population say they are proud to be english. but first to peter. the bbc surveyed around 20,000
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people about whether they identify with being english. across the country there is a big variation, to do with geography and age. 0ver country there is a big variation, to do with geography and age. over 65s, in that group 72% are proud to be english but only 45% of 18—24 year olds are. a link is in sharp, south holland, east lindsay and boston at the highest levels of people in the country who identified very strongly as english. they had the highest percentage of people who felt proud to be english. here are some views of some people in spalding. ifeel very english. i‘m very proud of my heritage, very proud of where i‘ve come from and what i‘ve done. definitely english and proud of it. english but born in india. how proud you to be english now? quite proud to be honest, yes. what does this tell us about lincolnshire and other areas? boston was right at the top
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of this survey is feeling english. boston, you will remember, was the area of the country that had the highest figure for people voting for brexit a couple of years ago. so the areas with the highest levels of english identity also high levels of support for brexit. also, older people, as i say, much more likely to identify as english rather than younger people. one of the lincolnshire mps, nick foles, an interesting quote from him. he believes the ruling classes are ashamed of englishness. he says the scots and welsh show clear pride. he wa nts to scots and welsh show clear pride. he wants to see the same sort of pride and st george‘s day. he says in london you hardly see any flags and st george‘s day. where ever you live, you can check out how people feel where you live by typing in your postcode. a quick figure for you, where you are in london, 43% said they are proud to be english.
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in hull where i am, it is 66%. interesting figures, thank you. thinks of england and spires but 0xford has a sense of englishness lower than the average, what is that about? interesting, 6496 in oxford felt strongly english compared to 8% nationally. it‘s most likely down to the make up of oxford city, a large student population so many people, those with degrees and a significant migrant population. it is thought these factors make it less likely to identified as english. worth noting that 0xford city voted to remain in the eu referendum. experts found those who identify with being english league and those who voted identified with britishness word remainers. it has made people realise. identity is subjective, our
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sense of the history of the country, our values and sporting interests and many other factors. our values and sporting interests and many otherfactors. younger people have been found to be less patriotic and that could be because older people are more interested in the country. they feel part of the history of the nation. perhaps this generation will see the pride and patriotism grow as they get older.” know you had the camera crews out, what have people been telling you? quite mixed between feeling english or british but younger people and those from ethnic minority backgrounds identified with being british, and here is what they said. mostly i would say british rather than english. why? i don't know why. i guess i feel myself broader than just english. it seems quite restricted. it's where i lived, was born and bred, everything i've done, everything i value is english.” born and bred, everything i've done, everything i value is english. i was born in the uk, but i guess... i identify myself as british because i‘m not white. identify myself as british because
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i'm not white. i was born in england and i'm proud to be english and i'm proud to be british. a lot of people are not, why do you think that is?” don't know, because the country is ina bit don't know, because the country is in a bit of don't know, because the country is ina bit ofa don't know, because the country is in a bit of a state but hopefully we are on the way up. that isjust a snapshot from oxford earlier. england begin their world cup bid in two weeks‘ time, that their success will determine the level of english pride for the rest of the summer. that is the kiss of death if i ever heard it! thank you both. and all this week on bbc news we‘ll be looking at questions of englishness, as well as identity across the uk. to see what those who live near you think, go to bbc.co.uk/englishquestion and type in your postcode. if you would like to see more on any
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of those stories, you can access them via the bbc iplayer. a reminder, we go nationwide every weekday afternoon at 4:30pm here and afternoon live. more than 5.5 million people in the uk are members of a trade union. but that number has been falling steadily since its peak at the end of the 1970s. it‘s a challenge for the tuc — the voice of the unions — which this month is celebrating its 150th anniversary. it has launched a campaign to attract younger members, currently at its lowest level since 2001. joe lynam has more. many of britain‘s cafes, bars and restaurants tend to employ young people under the age of 30 without trade union representation and the tuc is worried young people are working in increasingly precarious jobs with zero—hours contracts and no job security. the problem is many of their
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employersm especially in the private sector, make it hard for us to organise them so if you think about where young people are working, in hospitality or retail or the care industry, often on temporary or zero—hours contracts, often in franchise organisations that are hard to organise, the model that we have isn‘t working for them so we‘ve got to fix it. the tuc has launched a worksmart programme to encourage young people to organise their work better in the digital age, part of the tuc‘s150th anniversary. when the trades union congress was first established in 1868, there were 118,000 trade union members. by 1979, it peaked at 13 million but today, it‘s at 5.5 million with the biggest drop in membership among the young. 0nly16% of under—30s are in a trade union and in the private sector, only 9%. and the gap between what older people earn compared to the under—30s is also getting wider. the tuc says the pace at which wages are growing for young people has slowed dramatically in recent years.
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joe lynam, bbc news. in a moment the business news with ben. including some breaking news. first, a look at the headlines on afternoon live. experts tell the grenfell tower inquiry that advice to residents to "stay put" had effectively failed within around half an hour of the blaze starting. britain‘s youngest female terror plotter has been found guilty of preparing an attack on london with the first all—woman islamic state cell. the home secretary, sajid javid, has said the security services must change their approach to fighting terrorism, and learn the lessons of last year‘s attacks in london and manchester. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. mothercare might motherca re might have mothercare might have to backtrack
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ona mothercare might have to backtrack on a proposal to close more than a third of its stores in the uk. it bought last week it got enough votes from its creditors to go ahead but after looking at the minutes it found information relating to children‘s world did not get the 75% of votes needed to proceed. mothercare is now considering what to do next. rail passengers are still facing cancellations despite changes to deal with major disruption caused by new timetables introduced last month. northern rail has introduced a temporary timetable that removes 165 train services a day until the end ofjuly. on monday, more than 100 trains were still cancelled or severely delayed affecting passengers in manchester, lancashire and the lake district. profits for the world‘s biggest airlines will be hit by rising fuel and labour costs this year — according to the industry‘s trade body. the international air transport association — or iata for short — has cut its profit forecast for 2018 by 12% to £25 billion.
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iata also said rising interest rates and trade tensions could hit profits. leadbitter breaking news? just bits coming into us, confirmation from the government that it will resume the government that it will resume the sale of the stake the taxpayer holding the royal bank of scotland. the sale will reduce the stake from the current 70% to 62.4%. they are expecting us all —— this all to go through on the 7th ofjune. this announcement that the treasury plans to sell part of its stake in the royal bank of scotland later this week. the way they will determine the price of the shares as they sell them will be by what they call and accelerated book building process.
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but the main takeaway is that the shareholding that the taxpayer has an rbs, if and when the sale goes ahead, from 70.1% down to 62.4%. you remember, the government stepped in to bail the bank during the financial crisis and then kept hold of that stake in the bank. but that is the latest development we have had in the last few minutes. mothercare and a bit of a blunder, perhaps? that is one way of putting it. interesting, if it was maths so much they would be told to have another go. i was never sent home to have another go, just sent home! unsure. mothercare‘s plan to close some of its stores, it wants to close a third of its stores. 0n friday announced at the backing of its creditors, those owes money to to go ahead with the proposal. however today mothercare has said the plans for one division didn‘t get the requisite 75% approval from
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creditors, just short of that, something like 73% but it means the mothercare something like 73% but it means the motherca re stores something like 73% but it means the mothercare stores that come under the children‘s world part of the business, 22 stores, can be closed for the moment. the rest of it can go ahead. we can get more on this story from richard. let‘s kick off without one, mothercare. these company without one, mothercare. these com pa ny volu nta ry without one, mothercare. these company voluntary arrangement, we are seeing quite a few of them but this underlines they are not always as straightforward as the companies would like? indeed, we are seeing a lot of these at the moment and it is because the retail environment is quite tough, a lot of businesses are struggling with a lack of demand. they are struggling with large rent rolls, particularly as more people shop online and having a bricks and mortar store is difficult. what the mothercare news highlights is to get one of these cvas to work you need
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your creditors to agree. in this situation on a technicality, mothercare haven‘t quite met that 7596 mothercare haven‘t quite met that 75% requirement. mothercare haven‘t quite met that 7596 requirement. staying on the theme of company voluntary arrangements, house of fraser today, i suppose seeing what kind of message it can give out, even on a confused basis, having to deny that it is on the brink of collapse? yes. i suppose no one is probably to surprise to see the stores are struggling. we have seen lots of news from other companies. for example, when marks & spencer reported the other way, they were saying it was quite a tough environment and they were looking to reach french and reduce the number of stores. there is a tough environment out there in the retail world. ok, thank you, richard marwood. a quick look at the markets? no, we are told no markets, we were
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speaking too long about breaking news. who knows, we will talk about it in more detail to my. news. who knows, we will talk about it in more detailto my. thank you very much for that. at least 38 people have died and around 2 million are affected after one of latin america‘s most active volcanos erupted suddenly. at least one village near the fuego volcano in guatemala has been buried in ash and lava, and the main airport in guatemala city has been closed. el fuego is one of latin america‘s most active volcanoes, but sunday‘s eruption was the deadliest in more than a century. ash billowed thousands of metres into the sky. the explosion forced rivers of lava and mud down to the communities below. those that could fled for their lives. emergency workers urged everyone in these villages to evacuate. these people are used to living in the shadow of el fuego, but this was a close call. many in this village were injured and had to be taken to hospital. but for some it was already too
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late, their homes smothered in a thick layer of mud that had raced down the volcano at terrifying speed. it could be weeks before everyone buried here is found, their stories told by those who survived. translation: not everyone escaped, i think they were buried. we saw the lava pouring through the cornfields and we ran towards a hill. the search for survivors went on into the night and resumed this morning. many people are still unaccounted for, and the total number of dead is still unclear. rescue teams are stretched and hundreds, maybe thousands of those who escaped are now homeless. translation: we are considering the need to call for a state of emergency. we have to see, according to our legislation, what could help us to do this.
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we think until now that there is a state of devastation in at least three areas. the volcano was more peaceful today. the authorities say the main eruption is over but the mud and ash has left several villages in ruins. homes, property and lives destroyed. the rainy weather means more mudslides are still possible. and, of course, another eruption like the one at the weekend could come at any time. richard lister, bbc news. that‘s it from your afternoon live team for today. next the bbc news at five with huw. time for a look at the weather. here‘s ben rich. good afternoon. just about all others should get some sunshine and blue sky. a lot of cloud feeding on from the north—east, we closed on a cloudy note in many areas. as we go through the night, that is where we will have the best of the clear spells. cloud continuing to roll into
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central and eastern areas, quite misty erki erm the odd spot of drizzle. not a particular cold night, temperatures around 8—14. into tomorrow we start again on a grey and cloudy note with the odd spot of drizzle but from the north, the cloud should tend to break up and spells of sunshine starting to develop. always the risk of a few showers and storms pushing up from the near continent towards the channel islands. temperatures up to 21 degrees, but a little cooler close to its north sea coasts. towards the end of the week, southern areas have the risk of a few showers and thunderstorms, elsewhere a lot of dry weather and feeling fairly warm. today at five, the grenfell tower inquiry examines the causes
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of the fire and why it spread so quickly. experts tell the inquiry that combustible materials in the cladding led to multiple fires throughout the building. and more evidence on the cladding system suggests it didn‘t comply with recommended safety standards. the fundamental question which lies at the heart of our work is how, in london, in 2017, a domestic fire developed so quickly and so catastrophically. the inquiry also hears a recording of the first 999 call from the burning tower block. g re nfell tower.
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flat 16, and what's the postcode?
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