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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  June 5, 2018 6:00am-8:31am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and louise minchin. controversial plans for a third runway at heathrow airport are to be given the go—ahead by ministers. after years of delay, the government is expected to push ahead with the expansion plan, but it faces fierce opposition. good morning, it's tuesday the fifth of june. also this morning: the moment a massive volcanic eruption hit guatemala killing at least 62. the search continues for many more still missing. the cost of petrol has risen at its fastest rate for 18 years. prices at the pump went up by nearly 6p a litre in may. in sport, an extraordinary revelation about the liverpool keeper loris karius. doctors confirm he was concussed during
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the champions league final where he made two very costly mistakes. we're in cardiff to look at a pioneering move to tackle plastic waste on the welsh coastline. this is the scene there this morning. and carol has the weather. good morning. a cloudy start to the day, thick enough for drizzle here and there but brightening up from the north with sunshine developing. still a few showers in north—west scotla nd still a few showers in north—west scotland and northern ireland. more inis scotland and northern ireland. more in 15 minutes. thanks, carol. good morning. first, our main story: controversial plans for a third runway at heathrow airport are expected to be approved by ministers today. the expansion has faced fierce opposition from campaigners who say it will breach the uk's legal limits on air pollution. mps could be asked to vote on the issue within weeks. jon donnison reports. heathrow is already one of the
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world's busiest airports. the debate over whether it should be even bigger, with a third runway, has been going on for decades. its long divided opinion, notjust amongst the public, but also within the cabinet. we believe a third runway for heathrow is a best option for oui’ for heathrow is a best option for our future, it's the for heathrow is a best option for ourfuture, it's the best for heathrow is a best option for our future, it's the best for the whole country to create better connectivity to the different regions of the united kingdom and to provide the best trade links to the world. but that's a far cry from the foreign secretary, boris johnson, who once offered this pledge to heathrow expansion protesters.” will lie down with you in front of those bulldozers and stop the building, stop the construction of that third runway. heathrow‘s owners say a third runway would cost around £14 billion, but would cost around £14 billion, but would increase capacity from 85 million to 130 million passengers a year. the plans are expected to get cabinet approval today. the government then faces the
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trickier task of getting them through parliament. and even if they do, heathrow expansion could still be challenged in the courts. jon donnison, bbc news. let's get more analysis from our political correspondent, eleanor garnier, who is in westminster for us this morning. we got a sense from that report of how long this process, this argument, has been going on, what's going to happen now? i think it's going to be an extremely tough week for chris grayling, the transport secretary, with this decades long debate over airports in britain back again. really inside cabinet it's only borisjohnson really inside cabinet it's only boris johnson that really inside cabinet it's only borisjohnson that has big doubts about another runway at heathrow, but there are plenty of tory mps who have long held objections to the plans. i think we can be sure they will be making themselves heard loudly and clearly over the next few weeks. remember, the government doesn't have a majority in the commons and it wants to get this group by the end of this month. i
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think it probably can pretty hopeful —— this through. labour does support airport expansion but it does have a series of conditions it wants to be met on environment and economic sectors, so that needs to be sorted, but the snp does support it in principle too. but, as chris grayling knows from the train timetable debacle, policy in theory can be very different to policy in practice and we saw him take an absolute pummelling in the commons yesterday from all sides in the chamber over the rail fiasco, there was real angerfrom chamber over the rail fiasco, there was real anger from lots chamber over the rail fiasco, there was real angerfrom lots of mps, conservative and labour, and i think it's going to be a real tough time for chris grayling. he said he was going to be staying put despite calls from labour for him to going to be staying put despite calls from labourfor him to resign. i think it was just another bumpy ride in thisjourney i think it was just another bumpy ride in this journey for the government. eleanor, thank you. at least 62 people are now known to have died in the most violent volcanic eruption to hit guatemala in more than a century.
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the country's disaster agency said rescuers had recovered more bodies from villages on the slopes below the fuego volcano, but dozens of people remain missing. 0ur correspondent, aleem maqbool, reports from the scene. as spectacular and dramatic as it was destructive and deadly. in its most violent eruption in decades, the volcan de fuego, volcano of fire, exploded in a massive shower of molten rock and ash. the plumes rose several miles into the air. in one village, fascination with what was going on quickly turned to terror as hot ash shot towards onlookers. fast—moving rivers of burning mud and debris spread chaos. in the panic, family members were split up, children separated from their parents, and many are still missing. translation: i only managed to find two children alive last night. my two daughters, grandson
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and my son are missing, together with my entire family. and entire villages were blanketed in a suffocating layer of hot ash. it's clear many stood little chance of getting away. recovery workers continue to look for survivors or for more bodies, but they do that in the shadow of a volcano that could erupt again at any time. many rescuers reported their shoes melted into the ground as they worked. this was always known to be an active volcano, but an eruption as big as this that has claimed so many lives was beyond living memory. now a new generation knows the horrors of what the volcano of fire can bring. aleem maqbool, bbc news, in guatemala. the average price of petrol saw its biggest rise in 18 years last month while diesel costs continued to climb, that's according to figures released by the rac. in what it called a hellish
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month for drivers in the uk. the average price of diesel increased by more than 6p a litre from april. petrol almost hit £1.30 a litre, the biggest monthly increase since 2000. the hike at the pumps mean a 55—litre family car now costs around £3.30 more to fill up than it did last month. the cause of this has been as a result of a double wham effectively. we've seen the cost of a barrel of oil go above $80 in may. what we've also seen is the weakening of the pound, and that double wham, as oil has traded in dollars, means the wholesale costs has increased, which has translated into higher prices at the pumps for drivers. mps will hold an emergency debate today on whether to allow abortions to take place in northern ireland. the move, backed by a cross—party group of mps, follows a referendum in the republic of ireland last month which voted
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to lift the ban. calling for the talks, labour mp stella creasy told the commons it's wrong that northern ireland is out of step with the rest of the uk. the life of a woman with terminal breast cancer has been saved by a pioneering new therapy, according to researchers in america. judy perkins was given just three months to live but two years later there is no sign of the disease in her body. the treatment involved using her own tumour to grow 90 billion immune cells which were then pumped into her body. more than 50 countries are taking action to reduce plastic pollution, that's according to a report from the united nations. the authors say policies are improving but more needs to be done to reduce the blight on rivers and oceans. here's our environment analyst, roger harrabin. another heartbreaking plastics story. this pilot whale in southern thailand swallowed more than 80 plastic bags weighing more than 8kg. another victim of our throwaway society. southeast asia is afflicted
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by plastic pollution. this is indonesia, where the army has been brought in to clear great matts of plastic waste clogging up rivers. it's in the early stages of tackling the plastic scourge. india is more advanced. mass cleanups have been arranged for beaches, although the problem keeps recurring because there's no system for collecting waste in many of the slums. its leaders say things will change. several african nations have led the way on tackling plastic pollution. here in kenya there are now big fines for using plastic bags. the un report said good policies in some nations are undermined, though, bye weak enforcement of laws. every minute there's a garbage truck full of plastic waste dumped into the ocean, and over the years, this is accumulating, and the problem is it never goes away. just a few decades of careless living has caused this devastation.
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a start‘s been made towards limiting the flow of plastics into the sea, but this problem will take hundreds of years to solve. roger harrabin, bbc news. we will be talking about that throughout the programme. the comedian michael mcintyre has been robbed by thieves on a moped as he waited to collect his children from a school in north london. according to reports, the men smashed his car windows before taking his watch and speeding off. police said no injuries were reported and no arrests have been made. today is no ordinary tuesday, it's the day redheads around the world have been patiently waiting for. today is the day emojis with ginger hair have finally become available. there they are, look! plans were put in motion after more than 21,000 people signed a petition calling for new redhead emoticons last year. there'll also be new symbols for those with bald heads, curly hair and even some for the silver foxes out there too. we didn't get as far as that.|j
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we didn't get as far as that. i was looking forward to the silver foxes! there you go, sally, now you know!” like silver foxes, i could use that quite regularly on text! good morning! astonishing revelations this morning about... anyone who watched the champions league final, which liverpool lost to real madrid, would look at loris karius, their goalkeeper, and think you've had a nightmare, but what was going on? it turns out he was concussed during the final. he suffered an injury to his head during the final and hospital checks suggest he was actually properly concussed. he made actually properly concussed. he made a couple of mistakes, that is the understatement of the season, which handed real madrid two goals in their 3—1 handed real madrid two goals in their3—1win overon handed real madrid two goals in their 3—1 win over on the night. just before that he collided with a real player, and doctors
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in america say it's possible that injury would have affected his performace. the government's going to look again at it's stance on safe standing at football grounds. it's currently banned in the premier league and championship, but some clubs and lots of fans want the law to be changed. the former manchester city midfielder yaya toure says pep guardiola often has problems with africans. toure says his former boss was cruel to him. city have declined to comment. and injury has forced serena williams out of the french 0pen. she withdrew yesterday before herfourth round match with maria sharapova, but hopes to be fit for wimbledon next month. that was a shame. really disappointing. you were really looking forward to watching that.” had a snooze in the day and i set my alarm for the match. i woke up, normally i'm confused when i wake up, even normally i'm confused when i wake up, even more normally i'm confused when i wake up, even more confused when it wasn't happening. the announcement wasn't happening. the announcement
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was only 15 minutes before the match. she simply said she couldn't serve because her shoulder was hurting and she couldn't play. she was devastated. pirtek coral muscle. that's right that her pectoral muscle. we will talk about the papers ina muscle. we will talk about the papers in a moment. -- her pectoral muscle. here is carol with a look at this morning's weather. she is out and about this morning. i wouldn't mind being confused with sally, a huge compliment, iwish! good morning, wales was warm yesterday, in porthmadog, it was almost 27, not as high as that today, not anywhere. what we have is a cloudy start to the day, generally dry and bright inning up from the north through the day with sunshine developing. at the moment although the satellite doesn't show it, there isa the satellite doesn't show it, there is a lot of cloud across the uk —— brightening. you can see this distinctive white band, this is a weather front, which is
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distinctive white band, this is a weatherfront, which is producing showers, very close at the moment to the channel islands. high pressure once again is dominating. we've got a north—easterly breeze coming around it, the strongest of which will be the northern isles and channel islands, an inland, not much ofa channel islands, an inland, not much of a breeze. if you're on a boat crossing the channel, keep that in mind. cloudy start, thick enough for a bit of brazil here and there, but see how the cloud breaks from the north through the day —— drizzle. the sun will come out into scotland, northern england, east anglia and northern england, east anglia and north wales. sunny spells in northern ireland but here we could see sharp showers developing and we could see showers in north—west scotla nd could see showers in north—west scotland and the channel islands too. temperatures down on where they we re too. temperatures down on where they were yesterday and a lot of cloud in southern counties. as we head on through the evening and overnight period, once again we start with clear skies. but, like period, once again we start with clearskies. but, like many period, once again we start with clear skies. but, like many recent nights, more cloud coming in from the north sea. wherever we've got cloud coming in from the north sea
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it will be that bit cooler. also more cloud in the south—west of england and also across parts of northern ireland, northern and western scotland but look at the temperatures. compared to how they have been of late, some are down to single figures, much more co mforta ble single figures, much more comfortable for sleeping. as we go through the course of tomorrow, we hang onto this cloud in southern scotland, all the way down to the midlands. 0n either side of that there will be some sunshine around, and again, this cloud could well be thick enough for some drizzle. also we'll see showers developing in the channel islands through the day and temperatures up in the south, today it will be cloudy, temperatures lower, but back in the sunshine, we're looking at 22. more of a risk of showers in southern areas and also wales during thursday. still the cloud coming in from the north sea in northern england, but for the rest of the uk, we're looking at sunny skies and the temperatures responding accordingly and in the sunshine it will feel nice, highs of
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around 23. we will have a look at the papers. starting with the front pages, the images being used this morning, of course, following on from the g re nfell tower course, following on from the grenfell tower enquiry, which yesterday started looking at the causes and hearing some of the evidence. this was one of the images that was released yesterday. you can read here, this is 1:26am on the morning of the fire, 27 minutes after fire crews first arrived, and in amongst the lot of the evidence which emerged yesterday, these questions about whether, had people being given the right advice at the right time, not to stay in their flats, had they been advised to leave, many more possibly could have been saved. and that seems to be one of the main questions being asked yesterday. and they also talked yesterday, looking at the inside page of the times, and they have
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done a sort of timeline of what was going on at what time, and they were talking very much yesterday about the design and so many flaws in various bits of the design, that the blaze was all but inevitable, and this picture was shown yesterday, as well, of where the fire actually started. and they are still talking about this advice, stay put is still the advice from safety experts. and on the front page of the times, you are probably not, charlie, but i am addicted to my smartphone in various different ways, and apple, for example, are saying that their phones will actually help you kick any kind of addiction. they will give you new do not disturb settings for your phone. i often mean those on, but sometimes forget. so they are trying to encourage you to buy a new phone... no, sorry, you can do
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this if you have one of their phones. the other front—page story is michael mcintyre, who is a victim ofa is michael mcintyre, who is a victim of a car—jacking yesterday. it is on quite a few of the papers as well. 0n the back page of the guardian, a fantastic picture yesterday of serena williams just so devastated about that withdrawal from the french open yesterday, just 15 minutes before the grudge match was due to start, between her and maria sharapova. she had a pectoral injury, and she simply couldn't serve. a great image showing her anguish. she said what she was mostly disappointed about was she had spent so much time away from her baby daughter training to get ready for that match, and that's why she was devastated to have the pullout. an interesting story in the times about the 2021 lions tour, which is expected to be five weeks long and will finish just expected to be five weeks long and will finishjust a expected to be five weeks long and will finish just a week before the
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regular season starts. they are basically saying they are cramming too much into a short space of time and it will lead to injuries and player fatigue. the 1888 lions tour 22 man squad went away for 249 days to tour new zealand and australia. it did involve sailing, though. to tour new zealand and australia. it did involve sailing, thoughm did, soa it did involve sailing, thoughm did, so a little bit different. and in the daily mail, if you could hold the other side of this, here we go. all of the stats about world cup players were released, height, weight, all that kind of thing released by fifa. ijust want to tell you how happy they think harry kane is. 15 stone, eight pounds. have you ever seen him? he is not that size, he has a private chef and he doesn't drink alcohol. they have basically got all the numbers wrong. they have made him rather heavier than he actually is. there are quite a few players they mention who are
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five foot six. the shortest player, five foot six. the shortest player, five foot six. maybe they have that wrong as well. lots of very tall goalkeepers, unsurprisingly. we were talking about aidan turner, the star of poldark, talking about his favourite actor in the piece, his horse, seamus. he was going to go with a bigger horse called jonny wilkinson, in fact, and that is beside the point. but the trainer said, actually, you probably want to choose seamus because he is smaller so choose seamus because he is smaller so he makes you look bigger. makes perfect sense, doesn't it? rule one of filming, choose a small horse. he also admitted that his co—star is a much better rider, so all of those scenes where he goes to rescue her, actually... does he have a stunt rider? i talked to him at length
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about seamus. he says he actually sometimes has a little snooze in between takes on seamus, as well. far too much information about seamus. the rugged beauty of the welsh coastal path has attracted generations of walkers. from today, there is another reason to visit. the welsh government is ensuring thirsty walkers can refill their water bottles forfree, and in turn reduce plastic pollution. breakfast‘s john maguire is in cardiff bay to tell us more. good morning to you. good morning, louise, from a very overcast cardiff bay, but nonetheless a spectacular vista this morning. you can see the welsh assembly, the senate behind me in the distance. you can see the lifeboat there. they are very keen in this part of the world to take a lead on tackling the issue of ocean plastics. we heard about it in the news a few minutes ago with roger harradine, and walking around here, i haven't planted this, i promise,
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this is one of those q-tip ‘s i haven't planted this, i promise, this is one of those q—tip ‘s that you see, the plastic ones you often see on beaches. they are a real problem around the coastline. so what the welsh government is saying as it wants to be the first refill nation in the world. leave these at home and instead use these, and that regular points along the coast path, people are able to fill their water bottles up. of course, the objective is to minimise the number of these that are out and about in our environment. the coast path is an 890 mile long jewel in the welsh crown. on a day like today it is essential to keep hydrated. but plastic drink bottles thrown away on the path can be a serious blight on beaches and in the sea. as we go along our walks, the amount of bottles we see discarded along the side is quite disheartening, really. and us walkers, across in the summer, you do need lots of liquids, so the fact
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that we can usually fill up a boof dominik bottle, fill up at a cafe, that would be great, that would be a lot better. the welsh government wa nts wales lot better. the welsh government wants wales to be the world's first refill nation, and the coast path is to pioneer the scheme. would it be 0k few to pioneer the scheme. would it be 0kfew can to pioneer the scheme. would it be 0k few can feel my water bottle? that's fine, yes. thank you. businesses and local communities on the route will become refill points where locals can have their water bottles refilled free of charge. the objective is to cut the number of plastic bottles, used once and discarded. we have a lot more coming in and getting us to their bottles instead of buying it. so you don't mind? we don't mind. sell a few ice creams in between. yes. for locals it isa creams in between. yes. for locals it is a win—win, helping to keep the par—3 of bottles, and it also means they won't have to do carry a full
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day's supply of water. sometimes they can go hours between village and village. if there are points where they can fill up their water using their reusable bottles, it would mean they can go walking out for longer, they wouldn't have to carry so for longer, they wouldn't have to carry so much in their backpack or taking a camel pack, that kind of stuff. it will be perfect for them. shall we can shoot the other guys 7 __ shall we can shoot the other guys shelly shall we can shoot the other guys up? —— shelly catch the other guys 7 up? —— shelly catch the other guys f up? —— shelly catch the other guys up? if local communities embrace this idea, it will bejust up? if local communities embrace this idea, it will be just one way to help strike that delicate balance between encouraging people to visit these locations while minimising any impact on their pristine natural beauty. at the moment, cardiff is also hosting the latest stage of the volvo round the world ocean race. you may be able to just pick out some of the masts of the boats in the distance. and there will be a big ocean summit today in cardiff. good morning to you from volvo ocean race. you have been very much thinking about plastics in the
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ocean. you have thinking about plastics in the ocean. you have some new thinking about plastics in the ocean. you have some new data, i think, and some new research. what have your crew spent finding? we have your crew spent finding? we have a group of votes with sensors to better understand the concentration of micro— plastic, and on the 53 spots that we have created the samples, only two of them had no plastic concentration. so that is quite shocking, to see that everywhere around the world there is plastic pollution. and is this the first time you have done this? do you have any sense it is getting worse? it is the first time we had done this on this edition of the volvo 0 cea n done this on this edition of the volvo ocean race, thanks to partners helping us, volvo cars mainly, and we are thinking it is going to get worse simply because of the numbers. the increased propagation, increased number of goods, so we need to rethink the way we consume plastics. you will be addressing this summit today, what sorts of things will you be saying to them? how can we tackle this issue? we have created a series of seven ocean summit across the
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world, and the idea is not to be too doom and gloom about the subject, because everyone has a role to play, and these summits are gathering the influences, the private sectors, government and private sector, to showcase information and really inspire action. and you are looking to communities, governments, businesses, orders everybody need a sta ke businesses, orders everybody need a stake in it? well, everybody has a role to play, even the kids. we have launched an education programme for kids, and at school they have a role to play. the subject is for everyone but it is a platform for innovation and creativity and how you rethink your life, in fact. thank you very much indeed, good luck for later on today. it is a major issue, and we have been talking about this on brea kfast for have been talking about this on breakfast for a long time now, but good to hear there are some solutions, people trying to make a real difference, again, as i say, to try and really crack this very difficult issue. and in a moment we will speak to the head of ocean programmes at the un. thank you very much. london's victorian sewage system
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is getting an overhaul. steph is finding out how drilling a tunnel will ensure the thames is the cleanest it has been for more than 200 years. good morning to you. good morning to you, good morning everyone. have a look at this. this is a tunnel boring machine. it is huge, isn't it? it is called ursula, so this machine here will be dropped 60 foot underground through a big hole down the other end. i will show you that a little bit later on. it will be used to help them basically build a huge tunnel which will help the sewerage huge tunnel which will help the sewerage syste m huge tunnel which will help the sewerage system in the uk, so of course, as charlie was just saying, this is all about trying to make things clear in the thames, because there is a problem as time has gone on and our sewerage system in london is from victorian times. they want to improve things. i will be showing you the massive hole over the other side and just explaining a bit about how on earth they are going to do this. it will be 25 kilometres, this
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tunnel, underneath london. so this machine is a big part of that. it is certainly a big machine. first let's get the news, travel and weather where you are this morning. good morning from bbc london news. a woman awoman and a woman and a one—year—old boy have been stabbed in west london. police we re been stabbed in west london. police were called to springfield close by concerned neighbours. the baby boy is in concerned neighbours. the baby boy isina concerned neighbours. the baby boy is in a critical condition while the woman's injuries are not thought to be life—threatening. no arrests have yet been made. it is claimed vulnerable girls are being forgotten in the debate about youth violence in london. a report by the centre for socialjustice, which lobbies the government on policy, warned gang life was blighting the lives and futures are too many girls, but community workers say women are still invisible victims. we focus a lot around the boys, but what about the
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girls? the girls to play a part in it in the sense of being used to carry weapons and storing drugs, but also the vulnerability for them, where young girls are gang raped as pa rt where young girls are gang raped as part of initiations or to pay off debts, but we are not homing in on the importance of action helping these young girls. the home office said it supports initiatives to work directly with gang affected girls and this year launched a fund to help those at risk of exploitation. we have heard a lot about the church of england being in decline, but one anglican church in london has had to find a new building because it has grown so find a new building because it has grown so dramatically. since opening in 2010, the congregation at king's cross church has gone from 40 to 500, with the average age of workers just 28. let's ta ke let's take a look at the travel situation now. on the tubes there are severe delays on the bakerloo line as well is on the overground. on the railway that our cancellations on thameslink and great northern, and that is because a timetable changes. turning to the
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roads, if we look at the camera now it is the usual delays only a 13 from back the barking. on the m25 clockwise there has been a breakdown between junction 26 clockwise there has been a breakdown betweenjunction 26 and clockwise there has been a breakdown between junction 26 and junction clockwise there has been a breakdown betweenjunction 26 and junction 27. for the m11, one lane is close there. and the north circular has one lane closed. let's ta ke let's take a look at the weather now. good morning, it is quite a grey, damp and drizzly start this morning. there is quite a lot of low cloud around, a little bit misty, and feeling that little bit cooler as well. and that trend is going to continue as we head to the day. now, there are some outbreaks of light drizzle. nothing to spectacular. it will gradually dry out during the day. but we will still see this cloud, perhaps feeling a little this afternoon. the further north you north you go you may see a little bit of sunshine. temperatures, if you get that sun breaking through, could get up to 20 celsius so it is feeling a touch cooler. now, it will be clear at first overnight but then the cloud will roll back in from the
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east. a minimum temperature a touch cooler, perhaps, but last night, between seven and 10 celsius. so another quite cloudy start tomorrow but that cloud will start to break up but that cloud will start to break up and we will get some spells of sunshine. quite a pleasant afternoon, actually. temperatures back up 22, maybe 23 celsius. never too far away from the shower this week. still got some dry weather around, some sunny week. still got some dry weather around, some sunny spells, and then things turning a little bit more u nsettled things turning a little bit more unsettled the weekend. iam back i am back with the latest from bbc london in half an hour. now, though, it is back to charlie and louise. have a lovely morning. hello, this is breakfast with louise minchin and charlie stayt. coming up: petrol prices rose by 6p a litre last month, the biggest monthly increase since records began 18 years ago. we'll assess why people are feeling the pinch at the pumps. got permanently excluded around year 8, had to leave school and by year 9 i had to go to prison.
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we'll speak to jack and the filmmaker who spent a year following him and other white working class men struggling due to poorjobs and high crime. love island is back. we'll guide you through the must—watch show of the summer as a new batch of boys and girls enter the villa looking for their perfect match. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. controversial plans for a third runway at heathrow airport are expected to be approved by ministers today after years of argument and delay. in a matter of weeks mps could be asked to vote on the expansion which has faced fierece opposition from campaigners who say it will breach the uk's legal limits on air pollution as well as dividing parties across the political spectrum. rescue teams in guatemala are continuing to search for dozens of missing people after the country's most violent volcanic eruption in more than a century. hot rock, ash and mud flung from the fuego volcano have engulfed surrounding villages, forcing thousands from their homes. at least 69 people have died. the average price of petrol
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saw its biggest rise in 18 years last month while diesel costs continued to climb, that's according to figures released by the rac. in what it called a hellish month for drivers in the uk. the average price of diesel increased by more than six pence a litre from april. petrol almost hit £1.30 a litre, the biggest monthly increase since 2000. the hike at the pumps means a 55—litre family car now costs around £3.30 more to fill up than it did last month. mps will hold an emergency debate today on whether to allow abortions to take place in northern ireland. the move, backed by a cross—party group of mps, follows a referendum in the republic of ireland last month which voted to lift the ban. calling for the talks, labour mp stella creasy told the commons it's wrong that northern ireland is out of step with the rest of the uk.
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the life of a woman with terminal breast cancer has been saved by a pioneering new therapy, according to researchers in america. judy perkins was given just three months to live but two years later there is no sign of the disease in her body. the treatment involved using her own tumour to grow 90 billion immune cells which were then pumped into her body. more than 50 countries are taking action to reduce plastic pollution but much more needs to be done, that's according to a report from the united nations. the report says five trillion plastic bags are used each year and less than ten per cent of plastic is recycled, with china the biggest source of packaging waste and america producing the most waste per head of population. regional newspapers in the north have joined forces to demand action taken over the disruption caused by northern rail‘s timetable change.
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three of the largest newspaper groups, including the manchester evening news, the yorkshire evening post and the bradford telegraph and argus, are calling for the prime minister to lead a review of rail franchising and the promise to prioritise a high—speed trans—pennine service over crossrail two. the comedian, michael mcintyre, has been robbed by thieves on a moped, as he waited to collect his children from a school in north london. according to reports, the men smashed his car windows before taking his watch and speeding off. police said no injuries were reported and no arrests have been made. an almost complete dinosaur skeleton believed to be around 150 million yea rs old believed to be around 150 million years old has been sold at an auction in paris for almost £1.6 million. nine metres long apparently and it was found several years ago on private land in wyoming and experts believe it's likely to be a new
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species dating from the late jurassic period. it sold to a private collector and has drawn criticism from some who believe these rare finds should go to scientists for examination instead of being locked up in someone's private collection. it sounds like something from jurassic park, someone something from jurassic park, someone buying it to put in their house... do you think it is jeff goldberg, jeff goldblum? what is his name? it could be but i doubt it. a big house, nine metres long! then they will need to make it into another one! a new species! our main story is splitting people, laurie loris karius, the goalkeeper from liverpool's calamitous champions league final, he made two big mistakes on the night and liverpool lost the game —— loris karius. people said this morning they heard he was concussed but for they heard he was concussed but for
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the first goal, people are saying that explains a lot, and others are saying why was he assessed in america, where the owners are based, why was he not taken off, why didn't people notice he had concussion? well, karius has been assessed by doctors in america, who say it's likely that the german felt the effects of concussion immediately after it happened, and that it's possible the injury would affect performance. you might remember that karius clashed with the real captain sergio ramosjust before his first mistake, but doctors haven't pinpoiinted the exact moment he was injured. the former manchester city midfielder yaya toure says pep guardiola often has "problems with africans." there's loads of pretty astonishing quotes from toure in an interview he's given to france football magazine. he says guardiola was cruel to him, that he was jealous. toure left city this summer after eight years with the club. city have declined to comment. there's been a big change in the government's stance on safe
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standing at football grounds. they're going to look again at the law which requires all premier league and championship grounds to be all—seater. only last month ministers rejected an application for safe standing at west bromich albion, so this is a pretty big change in stance, driven by fan and club demand. england head to russia for the world cup in just seven days time, and we've now been given a pretty good idea as to who'll start in goal. everton keeperjordan pickford has been given the number one shirt for the tournament having started the last two games for england. so it looks like the 24—year—old will be england's number one just seven months after his debut. but one man who won't be in russia is manchester city's leroy sane. the pfa young player of the year has been left out of germany's squad, prompting a last—minute change to the outside of the german football museum in dortmund. that's his poster being taken down. he was in it but he is out? what
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they do is they put everybody up, they do is they put everybody up, they reduce the squad to the final number. he wasn't the only one to be taken down number. he wasn't the only one to be ta ken down but number. he wasn't the only one to be taken down but it's pretty brutal. your face isn't taken down but it's pretty brutal. yourface isn't on taken down but it's pretty brutal. your face isn't on the side, you didn't make the team? anyway! meanwhile, lucy bronze will captain england's women side in the up—coming world cup qualifier against russia. it's because regular captain steph houghton is having knee surgery later today. manager phil neville says getting fit for an england return isn't houghton's only concern. it's a big summerfor her. she's getting married i think in a couple of weeks' time, so i think a lot of the girls are going to the wedding. it's important that that didn't have anything to do with her having the operation, but we hope she's obviously off the crutches by the time she's walking down the aisle. i think a few of the girls did send her a picture of someone going down the aisle on crutches, i'm not sure it went down too well! serena williams is out of the french open, having pulled out of her fourth
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round tie with maria sharapova because of injury. so her focus now turns to wimbledon which starts next month, and serena says the's confident that she'll be ready. i had such a wonderful performance in my first grand slam back. ijust feel like it's only going to do better. i'm coming up on hopefully surfaces that are my absolute favourite to play on, and that i do best on. hopefully i can, you know, continue to heal and be able to play those events. really emotional. she was devastated, we were all devastated, looking forward to that match against sharapova but she's still coming back from maternity leave after having a baby a few months ago it. in lots of ways you could say she started to come back to early, so she started to come back to early, so this is going to happen, she mightfind
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so this is going to happen, she might find she gets an injury and she has to pace herself a bit. frustrating, though! thanks very much. every minute, enough plastic waste to fill a rubbish truck is dumped into the world's oceans. that's the message from a united nations report, published to mark world environment day, it says that while many countries are trying to tackle the problem, much more needs to be done. lisa svensson is the head of oceans at un environment and joins us from our london newsroom. let's talk about the positives, some countries are trying to make a difference. what are the best examples? what we can do as a government is we can refuse single—use plastic, plastic that's unnecessary that we get when we buy groceries, the single—use plastic, straws for example. things we don't really need and we can put a ban on it and refuse it as consumers. that's been proved effective. it's not enough and we need to do much more
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obviously. where would you like the big difference to be made? in the short term, as consumers, we can use demand but we need to work with the private sector so we can reuse material and the material is reused in our society. the way that we are wasting our garbage and the way that we use the plastic can come back to our societies, that will have a tremendous effect because then the market will also need to change. of course, the government could put either a ban or legislative actions, that takes some time to adhere to the market and change behaviour. let's talk about businesses, is there enough pressure on business to change the way they package things? that is coming more, the pressure, both from consumers, the public. we've seen this tremendous picture and no one wants to be part of this, eve ryo ne and no one wants to be part of this, everyone wants to be part of the solution so the pressure comes from the public but also government, moving ahead with some of these
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legislative actions. it is a threat but we also have business that's moving ahead. taking a jump step to ta ke moving ahead. taking a jump step to take the lead and really wanting to change the way that we use and consume those products. we are working with those leaders and with those leaders, both in the private sector and the leaders in the government, the politicians, who really wa nt government, the politicians, who really want to be part of the change. we're driving this collective force and today is world environment day and we're focusing on this massive plastic pollution problem and what we can do together to solve this problem. we've been talking about this on brea kfast a we've been talking about this on breakfast a lot, your head of ocean programmes so breakfast a lot, your head of ocean programmes so give us breakfast a lot, your head of ocean programmes so give us your assessment... we can see pictures of plastics in the oceans, give us an assessment of the impact it's having on the environment, especially the oceans? in the ocean the plastic never goes away, it breaks down into small pieces, microplastics, and that ends up in the food chain. when we eat fish we are having some
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microplastics and we don't know yet what that does to our bodies. not only that, it stays in the ecosystems in the ocean. we've seen turtles getting strangled, we've seen turtles getting strangled, we've seen fishing, the wales having eaten plastic bags. obviously it's devastating to our marine ecosystems. what's happening in the ocean ecosystems. what's happening in the 0 cea n stays ecosystems. what's happening in the ocean stays in the ocean so we need to solve this problem because it comes back to us. it seems... looking at the pictures now it seems so distressing in so many ways to see what's going on, do you think we can turn this around? we have the solutions, we know what to do. it's more about getting the political will, getting the business leaders to act, the civil society and all of us as a consumer, we can do something and this is why we need... we're so happy the media is paying attention to this because it rolls out this massive problem. together we can solve it, we need to
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stay positive and we know what to do. doctor spence, head of ocean programmes at the un, thank you. here is carol with a look at this morning's weather. good morning to you. this morning we are starting off in a fairly cloudy note. the cloud of thickener for some drizzle. there are some patchy mist and fog around but it will brighten up for many of us from the north, but not all of us. the other thing to bear in mind if you are just stepping out is the pollen levels. higher across much of england away from the far north, moderate across northern ireland, and for the rest of the uk it is low. once again high pressure is dominating our weather. we have a breeze coming in from the north—east, the strongest of which will be across the northern isles and the channel islands, and a weather front not too far away from the channel islands could produce some showers. it is a cloudy start. again through the morning we will see that break up from the north so sun will come out across scotland,
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northern england, east anglia, wales and northern ireland. it will be a pleasa nt and northern ireland. it will be a pleasant afternoon. you could catch the odd shower across north—west scotla nd the odd shower across north—west scotland and north—western parts of northern ireland, where there could be sharp. the cloud as in previous days retreating back to the east coast. there will be a fair bit of cloud across central and southern england and the south—west, and temperatures as a result down on yesterday. somewhere in north—west wales or north—west scotland could hit 20 or 21. now, as we head on through the course of the evening and overnight, what you will find is we start off with some clearer skies. as in previous nights we will pull in more cloud from the north sea. so that could be higher depending on which end of the country you are in. across parts of wales in south—west england, but not all, and the other thing you will notice is temperatures are slipping. more comfortable for sleeping where we have the single figures, not particularly special where we hang on to the double figures. we start
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tomorrow on that note, and from southern scotland down towards the midlands we will hang on to this cloud. as a result, temperatures will be that bit lower and the cloud will be that bit lower and the cloud will be that bit lower and the cloud will be thick enough here and therefore the odd spot of drizzle. move away from there and we are looking some sunshine, a brighter, sunny day across southern england and south wales. sunshine also across northern ireland and much of scotland, temperatures picking up as a result. by the time we get to thursday we are more at risk of picking up a shower across the channel islands and southern parts of england and south wales. we still have this cloud coming in from the north sea but on either side of that we are looking at some sunshine, and by then temperatures are creeping up. we are looking at 21 in glasgow, 22 or 23 has become further south. don't forget, today, if you have an allergy to pollen, levels are high across much of england and wales. thank you very much. see you later on. it is the biggest overhaul to london's sewer system since victorian times.
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today, the next phase of creating a super sewer tunnel gets underway. steph is at the site where it is being built, to find out why it is needed. ami am i right in thinking that is the drill which will create the sewer? yes, this is a tunnel boring machine, it is absolutely huge. this will be one of the machines. this one is called ursula, it will be ranked 60 underground, and —— it will be going 60 feet underground and will be used to create a tunnel which will go right across london. 25 kilometres, in fact, so there is something like 4000 people across 24 sites who will be working on this project, to get our sewer system in london better, and last time we had
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it created was in victorian times. it is all about improving the sewer system. the man who can tell us all about it is the chief executive in charge of this project. just explain a little bit about how this is going to work. it is quite a huge project, isn't it? ok, so this is a really exciting day for us. the first about tunnelling machines to be put in the ground. as you can see, ursula is that the strands and all of the equipment ready to go. if all goes according to plan she will be lowered down the shaft, followed by her sister, millicent, who is outside. that is the first two of five machines we will put in the ground to create the big long tunnel under the thames. and what difference will it make? in a typical year tens of millions of tons of raw sewage is being discharged into the river thames, and what this will do is effectively stop that and make the river cleaner thanit stop that and make the river cleaner than it has been for hundreds of
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yea rs. than it has been for hundreds of years. it is a project which is worth something like £4 billion, isn't it? how is it being paid for? it is paid for by thames water bill payers, the same as any other works to the sewer network. it is paid by them over a very long period of time. and when will it be working? well, by 2022 we should be commissioning, and after we have had the right number of rainstorms of different types, we will be able to say that works. but from the moment we start commissioning, the river is being protected, and it is our intention from the moment we start but that continues. thank you for letting us have a look. i want to ta ke letting us have a look. i want to take you outside as well. one of the things and the was talking about, is it is about trying to get —— andy was talking about is trying to get the river cleaner. tell us why this is so important. well, i am not sure
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what andy was saying, but as you are saying, we need to make the thames cleaner. every time it rains in london we get untreated sewage going into the river thames. when it rains. so when it is dry, it is not a problem, but when it rains. this is one solution. this is like saying, 0k, is one solution. this is like saying, ok, the rainwater is the solution. this is classic what we call end of pipe solution. but we should also be looking at front of pipe solutions. let's start not even putting the rainwater into the combined sewers. and there are options to do that. we can what we call the couple rainwater down pipes from the sewage system —— decouple. so instead of running water into drains, we could stop that and put them into things called rain gardens, which arejust them into things called rain gardens, which are just gardens, planted areas, which are happy to accept rainfall when it falls. we could do that. rainwater is a good
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resource, so could do that. rainwater is a good resource, so what sometimes happens is we say it is a problem, let's get it away. it causes a problem when it is in the sewers, we mix it with foul water and it becomes dirty and we have to clean it again. we could be using it before we put it into the sewers. so there are lots of different ways to look at this. i know you will be talking to us later on as well. behind us is millicent, the sister to ursula, the other tunnel boring machine. it looks a bit smaller, from the perspective that i am stood, it is far away over there. at this huge machine is going to be helping to make the sewer system in london better, and i will be showing you that massive hole a little bit later on. thank you very much. i am fascinated by all that stuff that goes on underground. are you fascinated by our next guest? they are guests, really, they? they are the slippery pests every gardener dreads, so how do you stop slugs and snails muching away at your plants?
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the answer could be home remedies. researchers are investigating whether the likes of eggshells and copper actually do keep them away. hayleyjones from the royal horticultural societyjoins us now. ferry good morning to you. thank you for bringing me send —— very good morning to you. what kinds of damage they do? they can do a lot of damage, especially if you grow soft things like lettuce. vegetables is when it is really annoying, when you wa nt when it is really annoying, when you want to eat it and they did it instead. and you want to do an experiment, because there are various things that people think might work. these other things i am testing my current experiment, things which are commonly recommended to put around your plans to protect them from slugs and
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snails. we have bark mulch, so the idea of that, for most of these, is that it idea of that, for most of these, is thatitis idea of that, for most of these, is that it is rough and the slugs and snails will not like to cross it because of how it feels. that is the idea. so with the eggshells, you crunch them up and put them around and it is supposed to be all those sharp edges which are unpleasant, and that at the front is the gravel, and that at the front is the gravel, and that at the front is the gravel, and that one in the back, that is wool pellets, so when you put it around the plants, when it gets wet it forms a mat which is displeasing on their foot. what about this copperfencing? on their foot. what about this copper fencing? what you do is you stick it to the pot, and this is the only one which has some scientific evidence already. they don't like to cross copper. we don't know why, if it is an electrical charge. so that isa it is an electrical charge. so that is a bright, but you can lay it
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down. yes, in this form you stick it ina down. yes, in this form you stick it in a circle around the pot, so it is like a complete barrier. they go up the side of the pot and encounter that. in the ground, you can get this kind of solid copper. have you seen a this kind of solid copper. have you seen a slug approach copper and then back away from the copper? two i have seen that, but i have also seen them slime straight over it. there is some evidence for it working, but it is definitely not 100%. we would like to know how well it works. please send in your personal favourites for trying to keep slugs and snails off their food. gardeners will want to know which of these work, so when will you know?” will want to know which of these work, so when will you know? i am measuring them in a couple of weeks' time and the actual result should be out in the autumn or winter, on the royal horticultural society website.
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things i didn't know, slugs have shelves. yes, so slugs, they all have shelves, slugs have evolved to not have shelves, but they always have a tiny bit left. slugs have a tiny shell on the outside.” have a tiny bit left. slugs have a tiny shell on the outside. i feel we could talk to you for a lot longer, but you back later. if anyone has suggestions, please send them into us. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm tolu adeoye. a woman and a baby are being treated in hospital after being stabbed in west london. police were called to swinfield close in hanworth yesterday evening by neighbours. the one—year—old boy is in a critical condition, while the woman's injuries are not life—threatening. police are looking for a man who lived at the same address. it is claimed vulnerable girls are being forgotten in the debate around youth violence in london. four years ago, a report by the centre for socialjustice, which lobbies the government
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on policy, warned gang life was blighting the lives and futures of thousands of girls. but community workers say women are still invisible victims. we're concerned about knife crime, especially. we focus a lot around the boys, but what about the girls? the girls do play a part in it, in the sense of being used to carry weapons and storing drugs. but also the vulnerability to them, where young girls are gang—raped as part of initiations, or to pay off debts. but we're not homing in on the importance of actually helping these young girls. well, the home office told us it supports initiatives that work directly with gang—affected girls, and this year launched a £13 million fund to help those at risk of exploitation. we have heard a lot about the church of england being in decline, but one anglican church in london has had to find a new building because it has grown so dramatically. since opening in 2010, the congregation at kings cross church has gone from 40 forty to 500, with the average age
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of worshippers 28. let's have a look at the travel situation now. on the tubes, there are severe delays on the bakerloo line, as well as on the overground. on the railway, there are cancellations on thameslink and great northern because of the timetable changes. turning to the roads, if we look at the camera, it is the usual delays on a13 from dagenham to barking. on the m25 clockwise, there has been a breakdown between junction 26 and junction 27 for the m11. one lane is closed there. and finally, the north circular has a lane closed westbound at henly‘s corner, in hendon, for roadworks. let's have a check on the weather now, with kate kinsella. good morning. it's quite a grey, damp and drizzly start this morning. there's quite a lot of low cloud around, a little bit misty, and it's feeling that little bit cooler, as well. and that trend is going to continue as we head through the day. now, there's some outbreaks of light drizzle, nothing too spectacular. it will gradually dry out
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during the day. but we will still see this cloud, perhaps feeling a little cooler this afternoon. the further north you go, you may see a little bit of sunshine. temperatures, if you get that sun breaking through, could get up to 20 celsius so it is feeling a touch cooler. now, it'll be clear at first overnight, but then the cloud will roll back in from the east. so minimum temperature a touch cooler, perhaps, than last night — between seven and 10 celsius. so another quite cloudy start tomorrow, but that cloud will start to break up, and we'll get some spells of sunshine. quite a pleasant afternoon, actually. temperatures back up at 22, maybe 23 celsius. never too far away from a shower this week. still got some dry weather around, some sunny spells, and then things turning a little more unsettled into the weekend. i'm back with the latest from bbc london in half an hour. now, though, it is back to charlie and louise. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and louise minchin. controversial plans for a third runway at heathrow airport are expected to be given the go—ahead by ministers. after years of delay, the government is set to push ahead with the expansion plan,
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but it faces fierce opposition. good morning, it's tuesday the fifth of june. also this morning: the moment a massive volcanic eruption hit guatemala killing at least 69. the search continues for many more still missing. the cost of petrol has risen at its fastest rate for 18 years. prices at the pump went up by nearly 6p a litre in may. good morning. a super sewer is being built underneath london where i am, this huge tunnel boring machine behind me will be helping to do that. it's a sewer system we haven't had changed much since victorian
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times, so i'll be looking at why it's so important. in sport, an extraordinary revelation about the liverpool doctors confirm he was concussed during the champions league final where he made two very costly mistakes. we're in cardiff to look at a pioneering move to tackle plastic waste on the welsh coastline. this is the scene there this morning. looking lovely. what about the rest of the weather? and carol has the weather. a cloudy start to the day for many parts with some mist patches and drizzle, but it will brighten up from the north with sunny spells developing. not everywhere, though, and there are a few showers in the forecast. i'll tell you all about that in 15 minutes. thanks, carol. good morning. first, our main story. controversial plans for a third runway at heathrow airport are expected to be approved by ministers today after years of argument and delays. the expansion has faced fierece opposition from campaigners who say it will breach the uk's legal limits on air pollution as well as dividing parties across the political spectrum.
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mps could now be asked to vote on the proposals witin weeks. jon donnison reports. heathrow is already one of the world's busiest airports. the debate over whether it should be even bigger, with a third runway, has been going on for decades. it's long divided opinion, not just amongst the public, but also within the cabinet. we believe a third runway for heathrow is the best option for ourfuture, it's the best for the whole country to create better connectivity to the different regions of the united kingdom, and to provide the best trade links to the world. but that's a far cry from the foreign secretary, boris johnson, who once offered this pledge to heathrow expansion protesters. i will lie down with you in front of those bulldozers and stop the building, stop the construction of that third runway. heathrow‘s owners say a third runway would cost around £14 billion, but would increase capacity from 85 million to 130 million passengers a year.
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the plans are expected to get cabinet approval today. the government then faces the trickier task of getting them through parliament. and even if they do, heathrow expansion could still be challenged in the courts. jon donnison, bbc news. let's get more analysis from our political correspondent, eleanor garnier, who is in westminster for us this morning. this conversation has been going on for so long, hasn't it? what's likely to happen? it has. this decades long debate about airports in britain is back again and! about airports in britain is back again and i think it's going to speu again and i think it's going to spell for a difficult week for chris grayling, the transport secretary. inside cabinet it's only boris johnson who has big doubts about another runway at heathrow but there area another runway at heathrow but there are a group of tory mps who have long held objections to the plans
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andi long held objections to the plans and i think they will be making their views heard loudly in the weeks to come. remember, the government doesn't have a majority ina government doesn't have a majority in a house of commons, it wants to get this through within about a month. i think it probably can be pretty hopeful because labour does support the idea of airport expansion, but it has a set of conditions it wants to be met before it fully backs it on environment and economic issues, for example. we know the snp supports the idea in principle, but chris grayling will know, as we've seen with the rail debacle, that policy and theory can be very different when it comes to pushing it into practice. we saw anger across the house of commons yesterday over the delays and cancellations when it comes to that new train timetable —— putting it into practice. another very bumpy ride for the government, which is facing a tough time at the moment. eleanor, thank you very much. and in a few minutes we'll be speaking to the former transport secretary,
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theresa villiers, about this. that's at 7:10am. also touching on some of the problems with the rail networks, northern rail in particular, so we will talk about that in just a moment. at least 69 people are now known to have died in the most violent volcanic eruption to hit guatemala in more than a century. the country's disaster agency said rescuers had recovered more bodies from villages on the slopes below the fuego volcano, but dozens of people remain missing. our correspondent, aleem maqbool, reports. as spectacular and dramatic as it was destructive and deadly. the first funerals tell of just how cruel the eruptions, corruption was and the victims it took. here they carried the coffin of three—year—old gennifer ainge ella mirallas. six other members of her family were killed too. the volcano remains shrouded in smoke but gives away little of the sudden catastrophic violence it wrought. the land tells a different tale, scarred and
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suffocated by lava and ash. more eyewitness footage has urged the eruption. this was taken several hours after main explosion, yet laver and gas still spew out. thousands of people from the area around the volcano have been displaced and they‘ re around the volcano have been displaced and they're coming to churches and government buildings and schools for refuge. many of them have no idea when they'll be allowed back home and what's left of their possessions. and it's clear speaking to people of the area who have already suffered so the area who have already suffered so much that they are now still fea rful of so much that they are now still fearful of more eruptions to come. lee mcculloch, bbc news, in guatemala. —— aleem maqbool. mps will hold an emergency debate today, that's on whether to allow abortions to take place in northern ireland. the move, backed by a cross—party group of mps, follows a referendum in the republic of ireland last month which voted to lift the ban.
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labour mp stella creasy told the commons it's wrong that northern ireland is out of step with the rest of the uk. no 10 says the issue should be dealt with by stormont once devolution is restored. the life of a woman with terminal breast cancer has been saved by a pioneering new therapy, according to researchers in america. judy perkins was given just three months to live but two years later there is no sign of the disease in her body. the treatment involved using her own tumour to grow 90 billion immune cells which were then pumped into her body. more than 50 countries are taking action to reduce plastic pollution, that's according to a report from the united nations. the authors say policies are improving but more needs to be done to reduce the blight on rivers and oceans. here's our environment analyst, roger harrabin. another heartbreaking plastics story. this pilot whale in southern thailand swallowed more than 80 plastic bags weighing more than 8kg. another victim of our throwaway society. southeast asia is afflicted
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by plastic pollution. this is indonesia, where the army has been brought in to clear great matts of plastic waste clogging up rivers. it's in the early stages of tackling the plastic scourge. india is more advanced. mass cleanups have been arranged for beaches, although the problem keeps recurring because there's no system for collecting waste in many of the slums. its leaders say things will change. several african nations have led the way on tackling plastic pollution. here in kenya, there are now big fines for using plastic bags. the un report says good policies in some nations are undermined, though, by weak enforcement of laws. every minute there's a garbage truck full of plastic waste dumped into the ocean, and over the years, this is accumulating, and the problem is it never goes away. just a few decades of careless living has
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caused this devastation. a start‘s been made towards limiting the flow of plastics into the sea, but this problem will take hundreds of years to solve. roger harrabin, bbc news. the comedian michael mcintyre has been robbed by thieves on a moped as he waited to collect his children from a school in north london. according to reports, the men smashed his car windows before taking his watch and speeding off. police said no injuries were reported and no arrests have been made. today is no ordinary tuesday, it's the day redheads around the world have been patiently waiting for. today is the day emojis with ginger hair have finally become available. plans were put in motion after more than 21,000 people signed a petition calling for new redhead emoticons last year. there'll also be new symbols for those with bald heads, curly hair and even some for the silver foxes out there too. those are this morning's main stories. we never saw the silver fox but
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a p pa re ntly we never saw the silver fox but apparently they exist! the weather and the sport coming up later. let's go to our tops the. —— let's go to our top story. the transport secretary, chris grayling, had a tough day at the office yesterday as he was criticised by both sides of the commons over his handling of the disruption on the railways. and today brings another challenging issue, the expansion of heathrow airport. mr grayling will meet senior ministers this morning to approve planning permission for a third runway. in a moment we will speak to lisa nandy, the labour mp for wigan, whose constituents are suffering as a result of the northern rail chaos. theresa villiers is a former transport secretary, who has many constituents affected by the rail disruption. she joins us now from westminster. thank you for your time, chris grayling, a man under pressure and our lead story this morning, we will come onto the railway in a moment, is about heathrow. we are told it's about to be given the go—ahead by
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ministers for the expansion of heathrow airport, a third runway, what do you make of that? well, it's probably going to be another quite difficult day for the transport secretary. opinions remain very divided on heathrow. the test will be the government persist with this, can they demonstrate they will be able to tackle the very serious environmental consequences that a third runway could potentially have? cost against benefit, how do you weigh those things up and the environmental damage, those are the three elements, i suppose. i think so. it's notjust the huge noise impact. a third runway would have a very real impact on air quality and we are subject to legally binding obligations on air quality. i'm sure as and when christ does come to the commons to announce the decision the government is going to make, many people will be questioning him about that —— chris. it's also worth bearing in mind if
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the government decides to go ahead, evenif the government decides to go ahead, even if they win their vote in parliament, this is just even if they win their vote in parliament, this isjust one even if they win their vote in parliament, this is just one stage ina very parliament, this is just one stage in a very long process in terms of the planning system and the courts. we still won't know with any certainty for some time to come whether a third runway will be built at heathrow. teresa bilious, you're a former transport secretary yourself, you possibly understand more than many the pressure chris grayling was under yesterday in the commons from all sides, it was a reflection of the angerfrom all sides, it was a reflection of the anger from people about the chaos on certain parts of the ra i lwa ys chaos on certain parts of the railways at the moment —— cilliers. what do you make of his performance and what people are having to endure? peep, chris is tackling the situation, i welcome the investigation he has announced —— chris is. it's hugely frustrating late provision of the timetable by network rail and lack of preparedness by the train companies has meant my constituents in barnet and others across the north of
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england have had to put up with these completely unacceptable delays in cancellations. what we pressed chris on, when mps met him earlier and in the chamber, is these problems have to be resolved quickly and he's pretty confident we will get a normalisation of service relatively soon. i was told by gdr that services in my constituency wouldn't be back to anything like normal untiljuly, that's wouldn't be back to anything like normal until july, that's completely unacceptable and the transport secretary also recognises that is unacceptable and a resolution has to come far more quickly because people can't be subject to this misery for weeks on end, it's completely unacceptable. it seems lots of people are saying it's unacceptable without coming up with a resolution. we spoke to the boss of northern rail yesterday morning. they are literally doing this on a day by day basis, cancelling trains here and there, to try to cope with the situation that in itself they tried to establish to cope with the problem. it seems to
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be compounding if anything. the situation is still really difficult on gdr and northern rail, in both cases the current situation is unacceptable. the emergency timetables that are being introduced should improve reliability. they obviously mean some loss of services, but it's also important we get the full service back as soon as possible. absolutely, though, the pressure will be maintained, i'll be keeping up that pressure on network railand on keeping up that pressure on network rail and on the train companies and, of course, parliament will keep pressing the government to make sure they bang heads together and this situation gets resolved, because my constituents shouldn't be subjected to this, they need a reliable train service and it's unacceptable they don't have one at the moment. lisa nandy, your constituents have been affected by this, you are the mp for wigan. let's talk about the future and what's happening today. what is happening today, what are they
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telling you? already this morning on day two of the emergency timetable, which is cancelling more trains basically, constituents have been telling me they are trying to get to work and are finding it impossible. i met with chris grayling yesterday to discuss this, we had the statement in the chamber and i met him directly afterwards, and the truth is he couldn't offer very little comfort to most of my constituents who are struggling to get to work today, unlike the message he gave to teresa vill years, he told me and other mps it would take some time to resolve this. he's commissioned an enquiry but that won't report until the end of the year and we need action sooner of the year and we need action sooner than that. we did try and speak to the boss of northern, and also this offer of compensation, how important is that? it is critical and it was right for the transport secretary to say that
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northern commuters are at as important as southern commuters. but that will be no comfort to those who have been travelling on dirty, old, overcrowded trains for a long time, who have seen their mps, like me, warning the transport secretary for almost two years since this franchise was awarded, that there we re franchise was awarded, that there were problems coming with the new timetable, and finding very little response from the department for transport. and now we have been saying to him you have got to step in and get a grip of this, you ought to strip this company of its franchise and ta ken to strip this company of its franchise and taken into public hands, and we have heard very little from him about taking real action to deal with it. it is worth saying we did ask chris grayling to speak to us today, but he chose not to. on that issue, a lot of the criticism about chris grayling is it is as if he is dealing with something he wasn't warned about. it is a significant point, isn't it? many
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people on these trains are saying they saw it coming, it is almost like the only person who didn't was the transport secretary. it seems that the rail industry didn't see it coming either. they clearly assured chris grayling that they were ready and that the timetable would go ahead with only minor glitches. and that was my own experience. i had many discussions with gtr in the run—up to the new timetable and they said they were ready. i can understand the sense of frustration people feel, and that's why we need an investigation, to find out why the rail industry got it so massively wrong. not only the lack of planning incompetence in delivering the new timetable, but not seeing the risks ahead. it wouldn't have been impossible just postponed or scale down the implementation of the timetable and avoid these problems. we needed an early warning system from the rail industry and we didn't get it. we do have to have this kind of enquiry to make sure this kind of catastrophe doesn't happen again in the future. thank you for your time this
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morning. and keep in touch with us about what is going on and how it is affecting you, as you have over the last few weeks or so. not wearing a hard hat in relation to this particular announcement, thatis to this particular announcement, that is related to sewage, amongst other things. i think they were hard hats needed in the financial crisis, which is where the story started. in the midst of a real financial crisis in the uk and across the world, rbs was bailed out to the tune of £45 billion. that gave the government of about 80% in the business, so they became the majority shareholders. since then there has been lots of talk about when it is going to go fully back into private hands. in 2015 the government sold off a chunk in the business and it took them
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down to about 71%, at a loss, so there was lots of talk at the time about that being a loss, and today they have now reduced that stake from over 70% to just over 62%. now, back when they bailed it out, in 2008, they paid around five a share. today we know they have sold the shares at £2.71, so you can see that it is quite a loss there, so although the government is bringing in £2.5 billion from this sale of that chunk, they have lost about £2 billion from it when you compare how the share price has changed. some people will say it is great, we need to get it back into private hands, it is good the government is selling off the business even if it is at a loss. others would say, like shadow chancellorjohn mcdonnell, loss. others would say, like shadow chancellor john mcdonnell, this loss. others would say, like shadow chancellorjohn mcdonnell, this has no economicjustification, chancellorjohn mcdonnell, this has no economic justification, and chancellorjohn mcdonnell, this has no economicjustification, and in fa ct no economicjustification, and in fact the government shouldn't be selling this off and rushing back into private hands. but that has
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just been announced this morning on rbs, and as you rightly point out, i am infull on rbs, and as you rightly point out, i am in full on hive is gear, doing my first breakfast after a few weeks off doing other stuff. and they have me in hive is. obviously this is the way thisjob me in hive is. obviously this is the way this job roles. me in hive is. obviously this is the way thisjob roles. —— high—vis. me in hive is. obviously this is the way this job roles. -- high-vis. and i think it is a new colour combination for the high—vis. i think it is a new colour combination for the high-vis. back where she belongs, in the high—vis! here is carol with a look at this morning's weather. nobody rocks high—vis like our steph. the cloud is thick enough this morning to produce some drizzle. patchy mist and fog around as well. it will brighten up many parts of the uk from the north. not everywhere. the other thing to bear in mind if you have an allergy to pollen is these are our levels today. high across england and
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wales, away from the far north of england, where the levels are low. high pressure still very much in charge of our weather, an easterly breeze coming around it. the strongest breeze around the northern isles in the english channel and a weather front bringing showers in across the north of france, one or two of those affecting the channel islands as we go through the day. talking of through the day, you can see how it brightens up from the north, the cloud pushing up to the east coast where it will remain for much of the day. for you it will be cooler. the chance of a shower across north—west scotland, for north—west scotland and the northern ireland with the highest temperatures of 20 or 21 today. you could catch a sharp shower in northern ireland. for south wales, the midlands and southern counties, there will still be a lot of cloud around as we go through the day. still thick enough for the odd spot of drizzle but parts of east anglia, south—east, the midlands, away from the north sea coastline, seeing the lion ‘s share of the sunshine. temperatures down on yesterday,
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wales hit 26.6, and it will not be as high as that anywhere today. through the evening and overnight we will start with some clear spells, some pleasant early evening sunshine, but then more cloud romping in from the north sea and we will be left with clear spells across parts of wales and down towards hampshire and dorset. it will be a night for many, with singledigit temperatures, but as we look into the south, that is not the case. looking at a mild night between ten and 14 celsius. tomorrow, we start off with this cloud coming in overnight and it will remain grey along the midlands, the north sea coastline as well, so asa the north sea coastline as well, so as a result, temperatures he will be that bit lower. across southern areas there will be lots of sunshine, the risk of a shower in the channel islands, and the chance ofa the channel islands, and the chance of a shower across northern ireland and southern scotland. top temperatures up to about 21. and on thursday, still some cloud coming in
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across the north sea overnight which will hang around through the course of the day. but further south we will see a weak weather front coming our way, producing a bit more cloud on the risk of a shower. in between we are looking at sunshine. we are also looking at sunshine across northern ireland, and we're also seeing sunshine across scotland. temperature—wise, in glasgow, up to about 21. in edinburgh we are looking at around 22, as we are in london, that is 72 fahrenheit in old muggy. sojust a quick reminder, if you have an allergy to pollen, the levels today are high or very high across levels today are high or very high a cross m ost levels today are high or very high across most of england and also wales. they are lower cost england and scotland, and a lot of people are suffering from that. thank you very much, carol, thank you. if you fill up your car today, you may well wince at the cost. petrol prices rose by 6p a litre in may, the biggest monthly increase since the rac began recording prices 18 years ago. in what it called a hellish month for drivers in the uk, the average price of diesel
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increased by more than 6p a litre from april. petrol almost hit £1.30 a litre, the biggest monthly increase since 2000. the hike at the pumps mean a 55—litre family car now costs around £3.30 more to fill up than it did last month. james spencer is the managing director at portland fuel, and hejoins us now. good morning to you. you had better explain, just so people understand where you are coming from, what do you do? so we are fuel traders, we tend to supply commercial users, so the truck and bus industry, and the heating oil side of the business, and generally fuel for industry. we don't supply the petrol side of things, although of course they are interrelated. can you give us a snapshot of why the prices have risen so quickly? yes, so the backdrop is that since january people have been wincing every time they have been to the petrol
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station, since january the price of oil has been going up, that is mainly because of opec production cuts. they have successfully start markets of oil in a successful attempt to push up oil. at the same time, you can't overlook the fact that demand continues to grow. so last year the world consumed 95 million barrels per day of oil. that was more oil than the world has ever consumed in its history, and this year we will consume 97 million barrels a day. so demand continues to grow by about 3% this year, and supply is failing to keep up with that. so this has really been the backdrop, if you like, to what happened in may, which was largely on the back of president trump's announcement that sanctions on iranian oil would be reapplied. announcement that sanctions on iranian oilwould be reapplied. ok, so iranian oilwould be reapplied. ok, so let's look at the future. will it keep going up as much as this?” so let's look at the future. will it keep going up as much as this? i get asked that question a lot, and if i knew that answer i would be on my
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own career be an island drinking expensive champagne. —— caribbean island. the best thing you can do is way up the factors which push it up versus the factors which will bring it down. it is possible, for example, that demand slows up. basic economic theory says that if prices of goods are very high, people will buy less of them. it doesn't really work with commodities, and if it does, it is quite a slow affect. so the best hope for prices coming down at the moment is that opec, who are meeting in a couple of weeks, will decide to ease up on the production cuts. so this is all bad news when you go to fill up your car. it is definitely bad news, and as i said at the beginning of this interview, prices have been going up since january. may was turbocharged, so it was very january. may was turbocharged, so it was very noticeable. the uk consumes about 50 billion litres of petrol and diesel, and for every 1p increase, that is £500 million added to the fuel bill. if you take the
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prices of six to 8p per litre, you are talking about the uk spending about £3 billion to £4 billion more on fuel than last year. periodically we have these rises and it becomes a big story for a moment. can people shop around? can you mitigate the cost of filling up your tank at all? is that sort of mythology? you can shop around, and there are always people cheaper than others, there is the cheapest service station in your local area, but you can't get away from the wholesale price. all fuel is based on the wholesale price and it will never be lower than that. our business does a lot of fixing of prices, so we give people prices for 12 months or two years so they can hold their prices, but that is not really available to the consumer, u nfortu nately. really available to the consumer, unfortunately. thank you for getting in touch, as well. people suggesting you use supermarket fuel, driving the prices down by going to
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supermarkets. more on that coming up a little later on. time to get the news, the travel and the weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm tolu adeoye. a woman and a baby are being treated in hospital after being stabbed in west london. police were called to swinfield close in hanworth yesterday evening by neighbours. the one—year—old boy is in a critical condition, while the woman's injuries are not life—threatening. police are looking for a man who lived at the same address. it is claimed vulnerable girls are being forgotten in the debate around youth violence in london. four years ago a report by the centre for socialjustice, which lobbies the government on policy, warned gang life was blighting the lives and futures of too many young girls. but community workers say women are still invisible victims. we're concerned about knife crime, especially. we focus a lot around the boys, but what about the girls? the girls do play a part in it, in the sense of being used to carry weapons and storing drugs.
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but also the vulnerability to them, where young girls are gang—raped as part of initiations, or to pay off debts. but we're not homing in on the importance of actually helping these young girls. well, the home office told us it supports initiatives that work directly with gang—affected girls, and this year launched a £13 million fund to help those at risk of exploitation. we've heard a lot about the church of england being in decline, but one anglican church in london needs a bigger building because it has grown so dramatically. since opening in 2010, the congregation at kings cross church has gone from 40 to 500, with the average age of worshippersjust 28. let's have a look at the travel situation now. on the tubes, there are minor delays on the bakerloo line, as well as on the overground. on the railway, there are cancellations on thameslink and great northern because of the timetable changes. the m25 has one lane closed clockwise betweenjunction 26
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and junction 27, because of a breakdown. let's have a check on the weather now, with kate kinsella. good morning. it's quite a grey, damp and drizzly start this morning. there's quite a lot of low cloud around, a little bit misty, and it's feeling that little bit cooler, as well. and that trend is going to continue as we head through the day. now, there's some outbreaks of light drizzle, nothing too spectacular on the rain front, and it will gradually dry out during the day. but we will still see this cloud, perhaps feeling a little cooler this afternoon. the further north you go, you may see a little bit of sunshine. temperatures, if you get that sun breaking through, could get up to 20 celsius so it is feeling a touch cooler. now, it'll be clear at first overnight, but then the cloud will roll back in from the east. so minimum temperature a touch cooler, perhaps,
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than last night — between seven and 10 celsius. so another quite cloudy start tomorrow, but that cloud will start to break up, and we'll get some spells of sunshine. quite a pleasant afternoon, actually. temperatures back up at 22, maybe 23 celsius. never too far away from a shower this week. still got some dry weather around, some sunny spells, and then things turning a little more unsettled into the weekend. i'm back with the latest from bbc london in half an hour. now, though, it is back to charlie and louise. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with louise minchin and charlie stayt. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. controversial plans for a third runway at heathrow airport are expected to be approved by ministers today after years of argument and delays. the expansion has faced fierce opposition from campaigners who say it will breach the uk's legal limits on air pollution as well as dividing parties across the political spectrum. mps could now be asked to vote on the proposals within weeks. evenif
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even if the government decides to go ahead, even if they win their vote in parliament, this isjust one stage in a very long process in terms of the planning system and the courts, so we still won't know with any certainty for some time to come whether a third runway will be built at heathrow. rescue teams in guatemala are continuing to search for dozens of missing people, after the country's most violent volcanic eruption in more than a century. hot rock, ash and mud flung from the fuego volcano have engulfed surrounding villages, forcing thousands from their homes. at least 69 people have died. you can see some of the images of the rescue operation under way in the rescue operation under way in the most devastating of conditions. we know the first funerals have been taking place of those caught up in
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the problem is. more details as they emerge through the programme this morning —— problems. the government has said it will unload some of its stake in royal bank of scotland, it has sold 8%, raising £2.5 billion for the treasury. the bank had to be bailed out by the government ten years ago when the share price was much higher, meaning the government has made a loss ofjust over £2 billion. mps will hold an emergency debate today on whether to allow abortions to take place in northern ireland. the move, backed by a cross—party group of mps, follows a referendum in the republic of ireland last month which voted to lift the ban. labour mp stella creasy told the commons it's wrong that northern ireland is out of step with the rest of the uk. no 10 says the issue should be dealt with by stormont once devolution is restored. this is an amazing story. the life of a woman with terminal breast cancer has been saved by a pioneering new therapy, according to researchers in america. judy perkins was given just three
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months to live but two years later there is no sign of the disease in her body. the treatment involved using her own tumour to grow 90 billion immune cells which were then pumped into her body. i had gone downhill quite a bit and i was i had gone downhill quite a bit and iwas ina i had gone downhill quite a bit and i was in a lot of pain and i was really, kind of, starting to get ready to throw in the towel and trying to figure out how i was going to die. i had some hope it would work for me, wasn't completely without hope. i was kind of sitting on the couch and not doing a lot, i thought i might as well do the trial and it could help someone else even if it didn't help me. pretty much by may all of my tumours had disappeared. more than 50 countries are taking action to reduce plastic pollution but much more needs to be done, that's according to a report from the united nations. the report says five trillion plastic bags are used each year and less than ten per cent
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of plastic is recycled, with china the biggest source of packaging waste and america producing the most waste per head of population. the comedian michael mcintyre has been robbed by thieves on a moped as he waited to collect his children from a school in north london. according to reports, the men smashed his car windows before taking his watch and speeding off. police said no injuries were reported and no arrests have been made. an almost—complete dinosaur skeleton, believed to be around 150 million years old, has been sold at auction in paris for almost £1.6 million. the nine—metre long specimen was found several years ago on private land in wyoming, and experts believe it's likely to be a new species,dating from the latejurassic period. it's sale to a private collector has drawn criticism from some, who believe these rare finds should go to scientists for examination instead. the weather with carol in a moment
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but now we have the sport. a very interesting story, concussion protocols, which you would think should always take place during a match, which may have answered a few questions in relation to a certain game. and if you look behind you, that picture may be says it all, loris karius, the liverpool goalkeeper, during the champions league final, which they lost against real madrid, he made a couple of howling mistakes and it now turns out he was suffering a concussion. we know this because he has travelled to america and was assessed by doctors over their. —— there. you might remember that karius clashed with the real captain sergio ramosjust before his first mistake, but doctors haven't pinpointed the exact moment he was injured. there's been lots of speculation
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about his health and because of that he has agreed that the hospital in massachusetts should be allowed to put out this statement. it's a bit wordy, so bear with me. we are going to focus on the fourth paragraph down. it says, "at the time of our evaluation, mr karius's principal residual symptoms and objective signs suggested that visual spatial dysfunction existed and likely occurred immediately following the event. it could be possible that such deficits would affect performance." he was concussed. the question is why was he still on the pitch? we've seen why was he still on the pitch? we've seen lots of work with concussion in by seen lots of work with concussion in rugby were when a player has been concussed, they aren't the best judge of how they're feeling because you get this massive surge of adrenaline, you think you are fine and can carry on, someone adrenaline, you think you are fine and can carry on, someone else needs to step in and say there's a problem here and we need to replace the player but it didn't happen with him. interesting, it all happened
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very quickly. and it didn't necessarily get seen by everybody. incredible story. the former manchester city midfielder yaya toure has been speaking about his final days at the club and has been hugely critical of boss pep guardiola, suggesting he often has problems with africans. there's loads of pretty astonishing quotes from toure in an interview he's given to france football magazine. he says guardiola was cruel to him, that he was jealous. toure left city this summer after eight years with the club. city have declined to comment. there's been a big change in the government's stance on safe standing at football grounds. they're going to look again at the law which requires all premier league and championship grounds to be all—seater. only last month ministers rejected an application for safe standing at west bromich albion, so this is a pretty big change in stance, driven by fan and club demand. england head to russia for the world cup in just seven days time, and we've now been given a pretty good idea as to who'll start in goal. everton keeperjordan pickford has been given the number one shirt for the tournament having started the last two games for england. so it looks like the 24 year old will be england's number one
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just seven months after his debut. but one man who won't be in russia is manchester city's leroy sane. the pfa young player of the year has been left out of germany's squad, prompting a last minute change to the outside of the german football museum in dortmund. isn't that brutal? lots of people yesterday suggesting, could we not find an english relative, an english grandparent oran find an english relative, an english grandparent or an english pet? because he's a great player! lucy bronze will captain england's women side in the up—coming world cup qualifier against russia. it's because regular captain steph houghton is having knee surgery later today. manager phil neville says getting fit for an england return isn't houghton's only concern. it's a big summerfor her. she's getting married i think in a couple of weeks' time, so i think a lot of the girls are going to the wedding. it's important that that didn't have anything to do with her having the operation, but we hope she's obviously off the crutches by the time she's walking down the aisle.
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i think a few of the girls did send her a picture of someone going down the aisle on crutches, i'm not sure it went down too well! serena williams is out of the french open, having pulled out of her fourth round tie with maria sharapova because of injury. so her focus now turns to wimbledon which starts next month, and serena says the's confident that she'll be ready. i had such a wonderful performance in my first grand slam back. i just feel like it's only going to do better. i'm coming up on hopefully surfaces that are my absolute favourite to play on, and that i do best on. hopefully i can, you know, continue to heal and be able to play those events. she was so upset. we were all excited about that match, the needle match between her and sharapova,
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they don't get on, they're not the best of friends, sharapova wrote a lot about serena williams in her autobiography. there's 100 lot about serena williams in her autobiography. there's100 mentions of her in the book so that would have been a corker but it didn't happen. she said she was optimistic but this is a new injury, it is her serving shoulder, it is a worry, isn't it? she is laughing at my silence me is. you didn't notice, three orfour? silence me is. you didn't notice, three or four? three in a row. inaudible but visible! you didn't see it. i didn't see it at all! i'm going to stick with my thing. a new injury, often they have things over the years that get... exacerbated. it must be a real worry. the years that get... exacerbated. it must be a realworry. her the years that get... exacerbated. it must be a real worry. her baby is only a few months old, she's coming back from maternity leave and she is pushing herself, she isn't someone to hold back. you have to look at her, physically she has to take her timea her, physically she has to take her time a little bit. she wouldn't have
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given up lightly. absolutely not. have you recovered, another one on the way? i was trying not to distract anyone! the rugged beauty of the welsh coastal path has attracted generations of walkers. from today, there is another reason to visit. the welsh government is ensuring thirsty walkers can refill their water bottles forfree, and in turn reduce plastic pollution. breakfast‘s john maguire is in cardiff bay to tell us more. good morning, louise. you can see the bristol channel just behind good morning, louise. you can see the bristol channeljust behind us, the bristol channeljust behind us, the tide is coming in, avonmouth docks on the english side of the channel over their. when you're on these rocks and you look at them you can see lots of plastic that would have washed up over the years —— channel over there. we've been talking over the last year or so, maybe even longer, and a great deal this morning about the blight of ocean plastics getting into our seed, getting into the food chain, affecting animals, we heard about
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the pilot whale earlier —— sea. they wa nt to the pilot whale earlier —— sea. they want to get rid of these and replaced them with these to try to tackle this major issue. the coast path is an 870—mile—long jewel in the welsh crown. on a day like today, it's essential to keep hydrated. but plastic drink bottles thrown away on the path can be a serious blight on beaches and in the sea. as we go along our walks, the amount of bottles we see discarded along the side is quite disheartening, really. and us walkers — of course, in the summer, you do need lots of liquids. so the fact that we can usually fill up a bottle, fill up at a cafe, that would be great, that would be a lot better. the welsh government wants wales to be the world's first refill nation, and the coast path is to pioneer the scheme. would it be ok if you can fill my water bottle? that's fine, yes. thank you. businesses and local communities on the route will become refill points where walkers can have their water bottles refilled
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free of charge. the objective is to cut the number of plastic bottles used once and discarded. it's good, you should recycle, there's too much plastic on the beaches. we have a lot more coming in and getting us to refill their bottles instead of buying it. so you don't mind? we don't mind. sell a few ice creams in between. yes. for keen walkers, it's a win—win, helping to keep the path free of empty bottles, and it also means they won't have to carry a full day's supply of water. sometimes they can go hours between village to village. if there are points where they can fill up their water, using their reusable bottles, it would mean they can go walking out for longer, they wouldn't have to carry so much in their backpack or taking a camelbak, that kind of stuff. it will be perfect for them. shall we catch the other guys up? yeah, absolutely. before they get to
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snowdonia! if local communities embrace this idea, it will be just one way to help strike that delicate balance between encouraging people to visit these locations, while minimising any impact on their pristine natural beauty. not such a beautiful day, but not too bad. i want to introduce you to the welsh environment minister. good morning to you. this scheme, how confident are you? it is a very long stretch of coastline, lots of villages, towns and businesses to get involved. how will you encourage, especially, the businesses, to make sure theyjoin in? we know there is a lot of enthusiasm around this already, every town wants to be the first to bea every town wants to be the first to be a refill community, but it is relatively straightforward for businesses, whether it is a cafe, a pub, to get involved. all they need
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to do is sign up and then they can work with the city and the refill rand, and they can get a poster in the window, and they can signup to the window, and they can signup to the app as well, so walkers can actually planned where they can stop off to rehyd rate actually planned where they can stop off to rehydrate and refill their water bottles. we spoke with you a couple of months ago in aber forced about the progress being made by communities. i asked you the question then. it is about carrot and stick. what is the government making —— doing to make sure that councils and other entities are doing the right thing? councils and other entities are doing the right thing7m councils and other entities are doing the right thing? if you want to tackle the waste that we create, it has a responsibility for governments, communities and businesses. in wales, we are very good at separating our wasteful collection at the household level, so we collection at the household level, so we will be consulting to bring in regulations later this year in terms of making sure that visitors and public bodies separate their waste
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in the way we already do at home. so you will force them to do that? that will become statutory? any businesses and organisations already do, but it will be working with them in terms of the quality of our waste, which is why we are launching a circular economy fund to work with producers and manufacturers of plastic in wales so that we look at how they dispose of it, how we process and use more recycled plastic in the products we create as well. thank you very much indeed. it is that holistic approach, really, making sure we get everybody on board. it is world environment day to day and there will be an ocean summit taking place later on, hearing from all of the different stakeholders. it is the volvo ocean race in cardiff, the last two legs of that round the world race, and they have been taking samples in the water, 53 samples around the world,
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only to back didn't have ocean plastics. that is the size of the problem these folks will try to address. it gives you a sense of scale, doesn't it? you are watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: the cabinet is expected to approve controversial plans for a third runway at heathrow when it meets at downing street later. at least 69 people have died in the most violent volcanic eruption to hit guatemala in more than a century. here is carol with a look at this morning's weather. good morning all. this morning it is a fairly cloudy, grey start to the day across many parts of the uk. that cloud thick enough for some drizzle and some pockets of missed as well. but it will brighten up for many of us as we go through the day, but not all of us. high pressure is firmly in charge of our weather. we
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have a north—easterly breeze coming around it, the strongest of which will be in the northern isles in the english channel, and look at all these thunderstorms across france and spain. that will produce some showers coming our way into the channel islands. through the morning it will continue to brighten up across northern scotland, but still across northern scotland, but still afair bit across northern scotland, but still a fair bit of cloud around. still cloudy, grey start across northern ireland and northern england. much of england and wales is cloudy, with some pockets of drizzle and some showers very close to the channel islands. through the day, much of this cloud across england will push back towards the north sea coastline, but it will hug the coastline, but it will hug the coastline, and will feel cooler. you can see where it rains across southern england and the south—west and also south wales. north of that, we are looking at a lot of sunshine. lengthy spells of sunshine, bright spells in northern ireland, the cloud could produce some sharp showers, we could equally see some across north—west scotland, but north—west scotland and northern parts of northern ireland could hit 20 celsius today, maybe 21. if you
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are stuck under the cloud along the east coast or in the south, temperatures will be lower than they we re temperatures will be lower than they were yesterday. through this evening and overnight we start off with some pleasa nt and overnight we start off with some pleasant early evening sunshine, but then more cloud romps in from the north sea. we hang on to the cloud across the channel islands, south—west england and south wales for a south—west england and south wales fora time, and more south—west england and south wales for a time, and more cloud across parts of the west. temperatures lower than they were last night across many parts of the uk. now, we start tomorrow once again with all this cloud extending from southern scotla nd this cloud extending from southern scotland all the way down towards the midlands and norfolk. you will hang onto it for much of the day, and once again that will depress the temperatures. south of that we are back into the sunshine. a sunny day thanit back into the sunshine. a sunny day than it will be today, so temperatures will be higher than today, sunny spells developing across northern ireland and from the central lowlands northwards across the highlands and grampians, we are looking again at some sunshine. that ta kes looking again at some sunshine. that takes us into thursday. still this low cloud coming in across the north sea and plaguing parts of northern
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england, especially the north sea coastline. we have a weak weather front coming in from the near continent introducing cloud into the south. we have a high risk of showers and as you move north of all of that we hang on to the sunshine. by of that we hang on to the sunshine. by thursday temperatures up to about 22. thank you very much. we will take you sort of underground, but not quite. steph has been looking at the sewer system, which is about to change with the help of some extreme machinery. good morning, everyone. this is the place for extreme machinery. that is millicent in the background, a tunnel boring machine, a tbm, as they call them, and it will be used to help improve the sewerage system
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in london. the super sewer should be finished by 2023, but it is a big project and a big day for it, because they will be using these warring machines to put them underground, and this is a process which is all starting today. let me explain to you why we need this, because it is all about improving the sewerage system. every time it rains in london, for example today, all the extra run—off means the victorian drains flood and raw sewage gets sent directly to the thames from the sewer. they designed it to overflow just a few times a year but now it happens about once a week. the tunnel will take the overspill, drop it down a shaft and send it to treatment plants, meaning it won't be in the river, and when finished, the sewer will reduce 10,000 tons of sewage that goes into the thames every year by about 90%. you can see from that graphic the system of how it is going from old to new, and this is a close—up of
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one of those tunnel boring machines here. this is a sheila. not long now before it will be dropped down a 16 foot hole to start the whole process again —— ursula. around 4000 people have been working on this, bianca is one of them. what is your role in all of this? i am a civil engineering apprentice, i have been on the project for two years, there are so on the project for two years, there are so much to learn and it is such are so much to learn and it is such a massive project, so hopefully i have a good few years left. we work with the construction team and focus on this site on the site down the road, focusing on health and safety, scheduling, that sort of thing. and we have the chief executive with you, as well. so this is a huge project, isn't it? it is, yes. 4000 people, and we have been going to buy five years to get to this point, the special day when we lower our first machines into the ground. we
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have about 2.5 years of tunnelling, and then commissioning, so hopefully by 2022 we will be up and running and the river will be protected. and how is this being paid for? it is a lot of money, over £4 billion. how is this being paid for? it is a lot of money, over £4 billionm how is this being paid for? it is a lot of money, over £4 billion. it is paid for in the same way as any water and sewerage works, paid for by the bill payer over a very long period of time. so ultimately thames water bill payers are paying for this as they do any other sewerage works. and you are an independent environmental consultant. explain the importance of improving the sewerage system. it is hugely important. every time it rains in london, any amount of rain, rain water in the combined sewer is mixes with foul water, with the sewerage, and the sewer system can't cope, so thatis and the sewer system can't cope, so that is discharged into the thames. the super sewer or the tideway tunnel will prevent that happening
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in most situations. and how does this compare with what is going on in other countries? all countries around the world, where they have a combined system, have this same issue when it rains. but there are other solutions that we can also look at, as well as putting in a massive, great big tunnel at the end. and that is looking at stopping the rainwater getting into the sewers in the first place, and other countries around the world are embracing that idea, sustainable drainage solutions, more than currently i feel that the uk is doing. so there is more they could be doing. i will leave you with a view of this huge tunnel boring machine. it is fascinating if you think it won't be long before that huge front of the machine will be rotating, and basically making massive holes in the ground, but for an important reason. absolutely, thank you very much indeed. it has
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been fascinating. i do find it genuinely interesting. you are watching breakfast. still to come: love island returned to our screens last night, with a new set of boys and girls looking for their perfect partner. we will find outjust what made it the must—watch show of last summer, and who's who ahead of this season's sun—soa ked action. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm tolu adeoye. a woman and a baby are being treated in hospital after being stabbed in west london. police were called to swinfield close in hanworth yesterday evening by neighbours. the one—year—old boy is in a critical condition, while the woman's injuries are not thought to be life—threatening. police are looking for a man who lived at the same address. it is claimed vulnerable girls are being forgotten in the debate
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around youth violence in london. four years ago a report by the centre for socialjustice, which lobbies the government on policy, warned gang life was blighting the lives and futures of too many young girls. but community workers say women are still invisible victims. we're concerned about knife crime, especially. we focus a lot around the boys, but what about the girls? the girls do play a part in it, in the sense of being used to carry weapons and storing drugs. but also the vulnerability to them, where young girls are gang—raped as part of initiations, or to pay off debts. but we're not homing in on the importance of actually helping these young girls. well, the home office has told us it supports initiatives that work directly with gang—affected girls, and this year launched a £13 million fund to help those at risk of exploitation. we have heard a lot about the church of england being in decline, but one anglican church in london needs a bigger building because it has grown so dramatically. since opening in 2010, the congregation at kings cross church has gone from 40 to 500,
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with the average age of worshippersjust 28. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there are minor delays on the overground. otherwise, it's a good service. on the railway, there are cancellations on thameslink and great northern. that is because of the timetable changes. turning to the roads, if we look at the camera, the a40 is slow towards the target roundabout after an accident earlier. let's have a check on the weather now, with kate kinsella. good morning. it's quite a grey, damp and drizzly start this morning. there's quite a lot of low cloud around, a little bit misty, and it's feeling that little bit cooler, as well. and that trend is going to continue as we head through the day. now, there's some outbreaks of light drizzle, nothing too spectacular on the rain front, and it will gradually dry out during the day.
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but we will still see this cloud, perhaps thinning a little this afternoon. the further north you go, you may see a little bit of sunshine. temperatures, if you get that sun breaking through, could get up to 20 celsius so it is feeling a touch cooler. now, it'll be clear at first overnight, but then the cloud will roll back in from the east. so minimum temperature a touch cooler, perhaps, than last night — between seven and 10 celsius. so another quite cloudy start tomorrow, but that cloud will start to break up, and we'll get some spells of sunshine. quite a pleasant afternoon, actually. temperatures back up at 22, maybe 23 celsius. never too far away from a shower this week. still got some dry weather around, some sunny spells, and then things turning a little more unsettled into the weekend. i'm back with the latest from bbc london in half an hour. bye for now. hello. this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and louise minchin. controversial plans for a third runway at heathrow airport are expected to be given the go—ahead by ministers.
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after years of delay, the government is set to push ahead with the expansion plan but it faces fierce opposition. good morning. it's tuesday 5th june. also this morning... the moment a massive volcanic eruption hit guatemala killing at least 69, the search continues for many more still missing. the cost of petrol has risen at its fastest rate for 18 years. prices at the pump went up by nearly 6p a litre in may. good morning from the site where a new super good morning from the site where a new super seal has been built, that isa new super seal has been built, that is a tunnel boring machine over there. it is a machine that will be helping to build tunnels across
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london city to improve the sewerage system. i will explain how that will work ina system. i will explain how that will work in a bit. in sport, an extraordinary revelation about the liverpool ‘keeper loris karius. doctors confirm he was concussed during the champions league final, where he made two very costly mistakes. these pictures live from cardiff bay this morning. it looks very beautiful and tranquil. they are trying to tackle plastic waste. and carol has the weather. it will brighten up in the north but some areas will hang on to the cloud andi some areas will hang on to the cloud and i will tell you where in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. controversial plans for a third runway at heathrow airport are expected to be approved by ministers today after years of argument and delays. the expansion has faced fierce opposition from campaigners who say it will breach the uk's legal limits on air pollution as well as dividing parties
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across the political spectrum. mps could now be asked to vote on the proposals within weeks. jon donnison reports. heathrow is already one of the world's busiest airports. the debate over whether it should be even bigger, with a third runway, has been going on for decades. it's long divided opinion, not just amongst the public, but also within the cabinet. we believe a third runway for heathrow is the best option for ourfuture, it's the best for the whole country to create better connectivity to the different regions of the united kingdom, and to provide the best trade links to the world. but that's a far cry from the foreign secretary, boris johnson, who once offered this pledge to heathrow expansion protesters. i will lie down with you in front of those bulldozers and stop the building, stop the construction of that third runway. heathrow‘s owners say a third runway would cost around £14 billion, but would increase capacity from 85 million to 130 million
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passengers a year. the plans are expected to get cabinet approval today. the government then faces the trickier task of getting them through parliament. and even if they do, heathrow expansion could still be challenged in the courts. jon donnison, bbc news. let's get more analysis from our political correspondent, eleanor garnier who is in westminster for us this morning. chris grayling is a transport secretary under pressure for all sorts of reasons right now. this plan for heathrow will be another headache going into the future. plan for heathrow will be another headache going into the futurem will be. i think he is having a tough week already and it is only tuesday. it looks like it will get even tougher with this decades long debate over airports in britain back against... really inside cabinet it is only boris johnson against... really inside cabinet it is only borisjohnson he has big doubts about an extra runway at heathrow but there is a group of
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tory mps who long held objections to the plans and they will be making their views made very clearly this week and in the coming weeks. remember that government does not have a majority in the house of commons but it wants to get this through within about a month or so. i think it probably can be hopeful with enough support from labour mps, the snp, and others, that it will be able to get it through. as chris grayling knows from the train timetable debacle, policy and theory can be very different to policy and practice. we saw chris grayling taking an absolute pummelling yesterday in the house of commons over delays and cancellations on the trains. that was from tory mps as well as labour, who called on him to resign. he said he was not going anywhere and would be sorting this out. i think it was another bumpy journey for a government fighting on many fronts. thank you. at least 69 people are now known to have died in the most
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violent volcanic eruption to hit guatemala in more than a century. the country's disaster agency said rescuers had recovered more bodies from villages on the slopes below the fuego volcano, but dozens of people remain missing. our correspondent aleem maqbool reports. the first funerals tell of just how cruel the eruption was and the victims it took. here they carry the coffin of three—year—old jenifer andrea morales. six other members of her family were killed too. the volcano remains shrouded in smoke, but gives away little of the sudden catastrophic violence it wrought. the land tells a different tale, scarred and suffocated by lava and ash. more eyewitness footage has emerged since the eruption. this was taken several hours after main explosion, yet lava and gas still spew out. thousands of people from the area around the volcano have been
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displaced and they're coming to churches and government buildings and schools for refuge. many of them have no idea when they'll be allowed back home and what's left of their possessions. and it's clear, speaking to people of the area who have already suffered so much, that they are now still fearful of more eruptions to come. aleem maqbool, bbc news, in guatemala. the average price of petrol saw its biggest rise in 18 years last month while diesel costs continued to climb, that's according to figures released by the rac in what it called a "hellish" month for drivers in the uk. the average price of diesel increased by more than six pence a litre from april. petrol almost hit £1.30 a litre — the biggest monthly increase since 2000. the hike at the pumps means a 55—litre family car now costs around £3.30 more to fill up than it did last month. the cause of this has been as a result of a double—whammy
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effectively. we've seen the cost of a barrel of oil go above $80 in may. what we've also seen is the weakening of the pound, and that double—whammy, as oil is traded in dollars, means the wholesale costs have increased, which has translated into higher prices at the pumps for drivers. the singer, ariana grande, says she doesn't think she'll ever be able to talk about the manchester arena bombing without crying. in an interview with british vogue, she revealed she's coping with the symptoms of post—traumatic stress disorder following last year's attack. the pop star had just finished performing on stage in may last year when that bomb exploded, killing 22 people. mps will hold an emergency debate today, on whether to allow abortions to take place in northern ireland. the move — backed by a cross—party group of mps — follows a referendum in the republic
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of ireland last month which voted to lift the ban. labour mp stella creasy told the commons it's wrong that northern ireland is out of step with the rest of the uk. number 10 says the issue should be dealt with by stormont once devolution is restored. and we'll speak to stella creasy about this just after 8:30am this morning. the comedian, michael mcintyre, has been robbed by thieves on a moped, as he waited to collect his children from a school in north london. according to reports, the men smashed his car windows before taking his watch and speeding off. police said no injuries were reported and no arrests have been made. in the last hour, the government has announced that it's offloading part of it's stake in the royal bank of scotland. let's get more detail now from steph, who is in south london for us this morning. what details have you got? good
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morning. you will excuse the gear. i would explain that later. big news this morning. about a decade ago we we re this morning. about a decade ago we were in the midst of a financial crisis and the government had to bail out rbs, £45 billion was spent on doing that. that gave them a chunk of the business, about 80% of rbs. since then there has been lots of talk about when that will go back into private hands, the big chunks .mac slowly it is being sold off. a couple of years ago back in 2015, they sold a 10% stake which took it down below 70%. now they have reduced that stake even more grit they have sold enough to bring it down to 62%. for that chunk they sold they got around £2.5 billion. what is interesting is whether that was a good idea or not because the £2.5 billion in shares they sold is a lot less than when they put in the
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money back in 2008. they have lost about £2 billion when you comes out —— when you compare share prices. now the government has sold this for £2 70 p. there is a loss. there has been lots of debate. getting it back into private hands and getting money back for the government. the shadow chancellorjohn mcdonnell says this does not have economicjustification than they should keep hold of it and try to get more money from it in the future. lots of discussion around that. the reason i'm here in this gate is, doing the business news in brea kfast gate is, doing the business news in breakfast is key to high viz, but we are talking about the new super seal which is occurring where i am. —— sewer. i will be showing you the kick to put in all the tunnels in a bit. dashes —— the kit.
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those are this morning's main stories. evidence presented to the grenfell inquiry has revealed how a series of catastrophic failures in safety standards, allowed the fire to spread through the entire building. these are the first pictures released of the flat in which the fire started. investigators say they still can't be sure what exactly caused it. the flats were originally designed to contain fires and stop them spreading. but a refurbishment of the building in 2016 saw the introduction of cladding, new plastic window frames and fire doors — all of which played a significant part in the flames spreading. the inquiry has also heard that the fire service advice to residents to "stay put" in their flats had "effectively failed" within around half an hour of the blaze starting. 72 people died. in a statement to the inquiry, london fire brigade's commissioner said she'd never witnessed anything like it. attiq malik is a solicitor representing some of the survivors. good morning to you. thank you for
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joining us. it must be so painful for them to a this evidence. let's talk about the catalogue of safety problems. we know many had highlighted the problems before. what is it like for them to hear those being talked about now?m what is it like for them to hear those being talked about now? it is absolutely tragic in that the issues that were raised were raised months, if not years, at least a couple of yea rs if not years, at least a couple of years prior to this incident happening. with all residents but when they raised this issue, the response they had was basically of ignoring their concerns and not really responding properly to them at all. to the extent that some of the residents even said to the local authority that you are only going to listen to us when one of us dies. u nfortu nately, listen to us when one of us dies. unfortunately, that is precisely what has happened. many have died. now we are almost a year on, june 14 is the anniversary of this u nfortu nate is the anniversary of this unfortunate incident, and all of
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these people are having to really is those tragedy —— this tragedy all over again with a public enquiry thatis over again with a public enquiry that is going on also. let's talk about some things that came out yesterday including the advice residents were given to stay in their flat. it had effectively failed within half an hour of the blaze starting. with the advice that was given, i would be very cautious about criticising the emergency services because we do know they are operating in a very difficult climate, as it is. verifies would have been based on the assumption that the building was in a fit state and there was pursuant to fire regulations. the problem is the building was not, it appears, and the whole thing just went up like a match being linked with a cladding. just tell it as well, you talked about the anniversary. this has had about the anniversary. this has had a deep impact on so many people. our big hoping ahead of that
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anniversary? when the incident happened, we met people with such strong personalities and characters. this incident had really knocked them for six. after many months, some of them were recovering and coming out of their shells. what we've found is, with the inquiry starting, they were having to relive the horror all over again a year on. it is extremely traumatising. some people had shut themselves off all over again because we just cannot cope. when the hearings were going on, there was a report from a lady that she passed out because when she saw the video it was too much for her. this event was so horrific, it really is a living nightmare for them. we know that this enquiry will go on for several months. how important is it to get to the bottom of every single thing that went wrong? extremely important. the
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public enquiry is a giant fact—finding mechanism. phase one is running out. phase one is about what happened on that night. phase two is due to start sometime in december onwards and will examine what happened in the lead up to the fire in the 12 to 18 months prior, between the local authority and the te na nts. between the local authority and the tenants. the reason why it is important the public enquiry u ncove rs important the public enquiry uncovers as much as possible is because it is not legally binding. the information that has come out of it can be used at any subsequent civil or criminal proceedings. for eve ryo ne civil or criminal proceedings. for everyone on the ground, what they ultimately want is justice. that sta rts ultimately want is justice. that starts with the answers to what happened and why it happened. those responsible for this tragic incident have to be punished and the victims have to be punished and the victims have to be recompensed. sorry to interrupt you. are you looking at what might be future action in that
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case? that will only take place once the criminal investigation has completed. at the moment that is still under way. we're looking at how the public enquiry pans out and also looking at the civil proceedings as to what falls into that arena. really, what price can you put on the loss of life and the destruction of lives that has taken place? i do not understand really what can be done. i want to ask one last question about the state put and vice. is that still the case? -- stay put advice. that is based on a building being in accordance with fire regulations. the problem you have is, when a building is not in accordance with fire regulations, how do you make... have a margin of errorfor how do you make... have a margin of error for that? how do you make... have a margin of errorfor that? we how do you make... have a margin of error for that? we can only wait for
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fire experts to come back about that. thank you very much your time this morning. the sport coming up in a little while. right now, carol has all the details of the weather. weather watchers have sent us in some lovely pictures. this one is from the isle of wight, shanklin. it looks very cloudy. back is the case in many parts of the british isles. a little bit of patchy mist. it will brighten up bit of patchy mist. it will brighten up from the north, but not for all of us. high—pressure still very much in charge of the weather. there is a westerly breeze in the northern isles and the english channel. the weather front has produced a lot of showers across both france and spain. we are seeing some of those across the channel isles this morning. the cloud is starting to break up across the far north of scotland. a lot of thick cloud
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across england and wales. some of this is low cloud producing the drizzle but there are showers in the channel islands. through the day, some of this cloud will push back to the north sea coastline as it has donein the north sea coastline as it has done in previous days. here it will feel cooler as a result. the sum will come out in scotland and northern england heading down across east anglia and northern wales and there will be sunny spells in northern ireland. we hang on to the thicker cloud in southern ireland and south wales. we could catch a shower in western ireland and western scotland. this is where we could have highest temperatures. we could have highest temperatures. we could hit 20, possibly locally 21. cooler as we come further south. in porthmadog in wales, it was 26.6 celsius. nothing like that anywhere today. this evening and they overnight we will see some sunshine
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but there will be cloud coming in from the north sea. very cloudy across northern ireland and parts of western scotland. temperatures down a touch on the night that has just gone. tomorrow we start off with this cloud across southern scotland and northern england, down towards the north midlands and norfolk, and we will hang onto that. quite the grey day view and it will feel cooler. in comparison to today, seven england and south wales seeing more sunshine, sit averages will be higher. across northern scotland and central scotland there will be sunshine and sunny spells. by thursday it is more likely we will catch a shower in the south because we have a weather front coming our way. that will introduce thicker cloud. these are showers, so not all of us will catch one. we will have some of the cloud coming in from the north sea across northern england. there is a slice across east anglia, the midlands and wales where there
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is sunshine. in their very far north—west of england and also scotland. by the time you get to friday, it still will be very cloudy. still all this cloud coming in from the north sea. they'll be rain across the south—west of england and a lot of dry weather on friday nonetheless. temperatures will range from 15 in the north to 22,23, will range from 15 in the north to 22, 23, as we come further south. we have been paying attention but there has been a snail break—out. we have been talking that slugs and snails and the damage they do to your garden. this one here has shot off its position and is making a breakfor the off its position and is making a break for the edge of the table. hayleyjones from the royal horticultural society joins us now.
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the reason we are talking about this is because you are trying to discover whether the cure is that people have, gardeners have, actually work, aren't you? you like snails and slugs. i find them interesting. tell us a bit about your experiment. i am growing lettu ces a nd your experiment. i am growing lettuces and testing different barriers are supposed to stop the slugs are spells get to the lesser — — lettu ces slugs are spells get to the lesser —— lettuces and eating them. these are all things that people already use and recommend. we do not necessarily have proper scientific evidence for how well they work, if they even work at all. they are eggshells. lots people talk about that. that is supposed to be a sharp edge that slugs and snails do not like to cross. bark mulch, again a
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rough surface, and gravel, again a rough surface, and gravel, again a rough surface. and then the wall pellets, which people might not have seen. pellets, which people might not have seen. they come in the form of pellets but when you put them around the plants and water them they froze up the plants and water them they froze up intoa the plants and water them they froze up into a mat that the slugs and snails apparently do not like to cross. can we see the copper here? the piece of copper here. in theory, the idea is that the slugs and snails do not like copper. is that right? they're already have been studies to show that slugs and snails do not like to cross copper but not many studies in practice in a garden setting. shall we do some signs on the programme?m a garden setting. shall we do some signs on the programme? it does not harm them. we do not know how it works. so we have a snail on the break—out, heading fast towards your crop of lettuce, for examples. the
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reflections a re crop of lettuce, for examples. the reflections are a little bit confusing but if i put the copper in front, like that, i will put it there and see how it reacts. we are going to watch this. or are you seen? it does not care. the snails seems to be going straight over the copper. you have spent years waiting for this moment. you can often see videos on youtube and things can sharing it does not work. but there isa sharing it does not work. but there is a bit of evidence. so far copper is a bit of evidence. so far copper is the one with the best evidence for it. a lot of people get very upset when their letters patch is being eaten by slugs and snails. —— letters. there are 46 species of slugs and only nine of those are definitely pests. most of them would prefer
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definitely pests. most of them would p refer to definitely pests. most of them would prefer to eat rotting material or algae of funky. could you provide them with that material instead? -- fungi. if you have a lot of leaf litter, gardeners say it is not so much of a problem. if it is untidy, others say then you have populations and they overflow into a vegetable bed. it is hard to say what will work and what will not. when will you find the results, so that gardeners will know? mike sperrin and is running at the moment. i will be harvesting it in a couple of weeks and measuring the lettuce leaves in detail, how much damage there is. i think he has earned his freedom. after this i will go over to chatsworth flower shows. i am not sure they would appreciate it if i released back into their garden. you'd think they'd do not move very
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fast but they do motor along a bit, don't they? their mucus, their slime, helps them get up to speed. half the ones you brought on the plate are off and they are loose in the studio. please take them all home with you. i used to eat my brea kfast home with you. i used to eat my breakfast around here but not any more. london's victorian sewage system is getting an overhaul. steph is finding out how drilling a tunnel will ensure the thames is the cleanest it has been for more than 200 years. good morning. if you can see behind me here, back is a tunnel boring machine. that machine there will be lowered into the ground and then it will be used to drill some massive tunnel so that there can be a superb sewer tunnel so that there can be a superb sewer that can run like a cross
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london. if you do not like heights this is probably a moment where you might want to look away. underneath me isa 60 might want to look away. underneath me is a 60 foot drop, which is where the machine will go. you might be able to make our right at the bottom there at a few people down there. it reminds me of frankel rock, do around that programme? —— do you remember? this machine will be dropped very slowly. that will be used to build tunnels which will run for around 25 kilometres across this city. it is all about improving the sewer city. it is all about improving the sewer system. there are 4000 people working on this with a cost of around £4 billion. i will be talking to the chief executive of this company about how it will all work. first, the news, travel and weather where you are. hello. many of us waking up to grey
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and cloudy skies first thing this morning, but as we move through the day it is brightening up from the north, sunny spells spreading southwards. we have high pressure in the north, low pressure in the south, dragging in that north north lethally feed which is bringing environmental cloud from the north sea coasts. —— north north—easterly feed. lingering fog the coastal areas, bright spells from the north and the cloud lingering for parts of the south—west, said in south west england, central and southern england. a little bit cloudierfor northern ireland with the chance of one or two sharp showers. temperatures at a maximum of 20, feeling cooler in the south—west,
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where there was more sunshine yesterday. this evening and overnight, we will tend to see the show is dying out, clear spells but more low cloud, mr and murk pushing back from the north sea. a cooler night than over the past few, temperatures largely in single figures. wednesday starts on a cooler note than today, plenty of sunshine around, some cloud having spilt in from the north sea coast. temperatures responding to more in the way of sunshine tomorrow, a maximum of around 23 celsius. an improved day for northern ireland. high—pressure largely in control, there could be some heavy, thundery showers. some bright and sunny weather the further north you are, showers have the potential to be quite heavy, possibly even thundery. some uncertainty as to where they will form, stay tuned to the
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forecast, we will keep you up to date. staying warm with highs of 24 celsius. this is business live from bbc news, with sally bundock and ben thompson. take—off for a third runway at heathrow. london's biggest airport is set to get the go—ahead today after years of controversy, protests and delays. live from london, that's our top story on tuesday 5th june. but it's divisive — supporters say it's the best way to expand this key international hub and boost the economy, while critics warn the plan is expensive, complex and bad for the environment. also in the programme... will britain's borders work for business after brexit?
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