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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 6, 2018 1:30pm-2:01pm BST

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and so bringing a project like this to orkney makes sense because it will basically be powered by renewables. the data centre is headed ever so slowly to the bottom of the ocean. at the control room onshore they are getting ready to power it up. now microsoft will monitor it for up to five years. this could prove to be the future of data storage. or maybe just a tourist attraction for the fish. rory cellanjones, bbc news, orkney. time for a look at the weather. here's tomasz schafernaker. it is all quiet at the moment with nothing changing in the last couple of days. quite easy for us here in the weather centre with more or less the weather centre with more or less the same forecast for the next few days. but i would emphasise the strength of the sunshine, more on that in a second. we have this
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settled picture because of the jet strea m settled picture because of the jet stream looping around into greenland and over into scandinavia preventing any weather systems coming our way. that sunshine is very strong, high uv levels across parts of the country at the moment, about as high as they ever get in our latitudes. you might even burn through a thin t—shirt, that is how strong the sunshine is at the moment. in terms of the weather, a lot of quiet weather and sunshine around at the north sea coast in some areas has been pretty overcast. that is when you get cloud and a breeze coming from the north sea, a lot of temperature contrasts between the north coast and other areas. this morning temperatures dipped down to low single figures in some areas and another cold might to come tonight. then tomorrow, the big picture, you
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can see a lot of clear weather across the uk, stretching into scandinavia. so a spell of quiet weather right now. some showers and storms brewing pretty close across the near continent but it does not look as if they're heading our way. so the temperatures today getting up to around 2a degrees in london and still around 16 degrees along the north sea coast. that continues into friday as well so again little change at in some areas especially around the north we could have a fairamount of around the north we could have a fair amount of cloud. but brightening up during the day. temperature is a little bit lower on friday, actually bang on average for the time of year. a quick look at saturday, just the risk of some showers across some eastern areas but again after a cloudy morning in some areas the afternoon looking
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good. so the weekend at the moment looking relatively promising across most of the uk. a reminder of our main story this lunchtime. the grenfell inquiry hears that the man who lived in the flat where the fire began, was left terrified by threats of reprisals. that's all from the bbc news at one — so it's goodbye from me — and on bbc one we nowjoin the bbc‘s news teams where you are. have a good afternoon. good afternoon. i'm tim hague, it's 1.30pm and here's the latest sports news. the england full—back danny rose has told his family not to travel to watch him at this summer's world cup, because of fears over racism in russia. rose has told the london evening standard that he's numb to racial abuse, and has no faith in football's authorities to challenge it.
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rose is quoted as saying, "if i'm racially abused out there, nothing is going to change. it shouldn't be like that, but it is." big problems for this man, the aston villa chairman tony xia. the club say they'll settle an unpaid tax bill within the next 2a hours. villa reportedly owe the tax man around £4 million and could face a winding up order if they don't pay. mark regan reports on aston villa for bbc wm. two things happened yesterday that put the club in what seems like a desperate situation. they suspended the see you with immediate effect, and it emerged that aston villa were having problems with revenue and customs over unpaid tax. they say both those matters are unconnected
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but they add to a problem —— a club already in turmoil. tony xia said the club faces financial challenges having not secured promotion to the premier league. the owner is a chinese businessman and is restricted in the amount of money he can take out of china and put into the club. the challenges are still there for aston villa and problems seem to be getting bigger. yesterday their pre—season friendlies were just five weeks away and all these issues will have to be sorted out with their ceo suspended, a restriction on the money they can spend and a restriction on the owner over how much money he can invest. whichever way you shake it, you would think even administration is not out of the question for what is one of the most famous days in english football. these are dark
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days at villa park. andy murray says he hopes to be back from injury in time to play at wimbledon but has delayed his return to action for now. murray's been out for almost a year with a hip injury, and had planned to play in the netherlands next week, but has decided not to. our tennis correspondent russell fuller has more. murray says he isn't quite ready to return but is still aiming to play in the coming weeks, which doesn't give much away. the next event he could feature in is at queen's club in under two weeks, but does he have long enough to get in the shape required? he has not played on the tourfor required? he has not played on the tour for nearly a year. he had required? he has not played on the tourfor nearly a year. he had hip surgery injanuary, tourfor nearly a year. he had hip surgery in january, and tourfor nearly a year. he had hip surgery injanuary, and returned to the practice courts for three weeks in march but that her problem flared up in march but that her problem flared up again and it's only in the last few days that he got back on the practice courts, so it seems difficult to make a case for him being truly competitive this season,
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but perhaps of greater significance is hoped that it responds when he sta rts is hoped that it responds when he starts to play practice sets against other atp players. that might give a better indication of his prospects in the long term. couple of quarterfinal scores to bring you up to date with from roland garros. garbine mugaruza is 3—0 against maria sharapova, whilst world number one simona halep is 4—2 down against angelique kerber. and the cheltenham gold cup winning horse denman has died aged 18, having been put down due to failing health. he was known as the tank and enjoyed a famous race rivalry with stablemate kauto star, who he beat to claim the 2008 gold cup. trainer paul nicholls called denman a "superb" and "magic horse". trainer paul nicholls called denman a "superb" and "magic horse". that's all the sport for now.
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i will have more on that in the next art. the prime minister of norway is in london to meet the prime minister and discuss brexit and security. norway is a member of the european economic area. this group includes eu members and non—eu members like norway, iceland and liechtenstein. becoming a member would automatically give the uk full access to the single market but would also bind it to eu rules. erna solberg has been talking to my colleague christian fraser, who started by asking her if she was warming to the idea of britainjoining the european economic area. if britain would want to participate in the eea, i do not think we should say no but i have always said i do not think that is an option that is natural after the principles of why you left or you have brexit.
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because this is about, to us, the most important part is we will not change the eea agreement to accommodate entry for britain because for us, the four freedoms are vital and important, the fact we have this institution and the pillar making decisions outside the national countries to make sure we follow the same rules and regulations as the rest of the eu and the eu in fact decides on the directives so we are walking in the same at the same tempo. what do you make of labour's new position, they want britain to leave the single market and negotiate a bespoke british single market under which we would have full access but not be bound by the rules we do not like such as freedom of movement.
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how would an eea member feel about that? it is difficult to see how that is possible because if you want full access to the service market, for example, if you want to post workers in other countries, if you want your companies to deliver it knowledge based systems but you do not offer what other countries can get out of this. with a big brother like britain alongside you you might have clout in brussels because at the moment you are a rule taker. if britain was part of the eea then you might have more say. that would be one of the benefits for that. there are some cons. for example, it might also be more challenging because small countries with a different type of economic activity a free trade agreement with another
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country because we do not look as big into the economy as a britain. britain has to decide what they want, because that is what a lot of us are want, because that is what a lot of us are waiting for. tributes have been pouring in for the american designer kate spade, who has been found dead at her home in new york. the 55—year—old was best known for designing handbags and a range of accessories. the kate spade brand became a household name with stores around the world. jon donnison reports. kate spade splashed onto the fashion scene in the 1990s with her bright and colourful designs. outside her apartment, where her body was found, fans and the media gathered. police believe the 55—year—old took her own life. it appears at this point in time to be a tragic case of apparent suicide, but it is early in the investigation. there was a suicide note left at the scene. for many of her customers, the news came as a huge shock.
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kate spade was just somebody i always looked up to. keep life light and happy and fun, and when this kind of thing happens to someone like that, you just... you never know who's going through what. everywhere you go in paris, in madrid, she's famous, she's famous. it's so sad. she is only 55, and this isjust terrible. many celebrity fans paid tribute on social media. chelsea clinton said she got her first kate spade bag when she was in college. the us actress lena dunham said thank you, from one of the millions you made feel beautiful. in a statement, kate spade's family asked for privacy, saying they were devastated and would miss her terribly. kate spade, who died yesterday at
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the age of 55. we will have all the latest business news in a little while with ben, but first a reminder of the headlines. the grenfell inquiry hears that the man who lived in the flat where the fire began, was left terrified by threats of reprisal the boss of tsb will appear in front of mps for a second time later — as the financial regulator says it is investigating a computer failure that saw nearly two—million custo m e rs lose a ccess to online banking the shadow brexit secretary admits there are "very divided views" within labour about whether to remain in the european single market. i'm ben bland. in the business news... facebook is in hot water again, this time in china. the social media app has confirmed it had data—sharing partnerships with four chinese firms, including huawei.
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that's been flagged as a a security threat by us authorities. facebook has been blocked in china since 2009, but the company has been trying to find other ways to access the massive potential market. entrepeneur elon musk has survived an attempt to reform the management board at tesla. one investor wanted to strip the tesla founder and chief executive of his other role — as chairman. meanwhile the company also announced that its newest "gigafactory" — or giant lithium—ion battery plant — would be built in shanghai. the future of struggling discount retailer poundworld remember yesterday we talked about the boss of qatar airways — who said that a woman could not do hisjob? well, he's now said sorry. akbar al—ba ker has issued what he called "heartfelt apologies for any offence caused". in his earlier comments he'd said that the airline had to be led by a man "because it is a very challenging position".
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he later defended qatar airways' record on gender diversity, but that failed to quell growing criticism. joining us now is kate andrews, news editor at the institute of economic affairs. how much damage can comments like this do to a brand? they can do huge damage but a lot of that depends on our assumptions about the brand already, and his comments are in line with many accusations are ready against qatar airlines. there have been allegations that they discriminate against women and are extremely controlling of their employees, especially cabin crew when they go abroad, so this isn't especially new so it's hard to see how it will have an impact on qatar airways, if you
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are already flying with them you will know about the complaints, but it highlights to us in the uk what insta nces it highlights to us in the uk what instances of discrimination are in the workplace, and in the aviation sector there have been accusations against easyjet and ryanair since gender pay gap reporting measures came out and this highlights what is discrimination and what is a storm ina discrimination and what is a storm in a teacup. these sexes sexism within the airline industry any worse than any other sector? a few days ago we heard excuses for not having women on in big finance companies the city. i haven't seen proper evidence that there is more sexism in that industry than others. pay gap reporting suggested there we re pay gap reporting suggested there were huge gender pay gaps and there was suggestion this was to do with discrimination but the evidence
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wasn't there. easyjet was a company whose percentage of female pilot was double the percentage world wide, they have an initiative going years back to bring more women into that role, so it was obvious that the reason for this gender pay gap was that they were hiring a huge number of women as cabin crew, and they didn't want to discriminate against women in that role, so they had this gender pay gap. in the case of qatar, we see a country that doesn't respect human rights in the same way that the uk does, and i don't think we should be surprised. i don't think we should totally accept the apology. actions speak louder than words. thank you, kate andrews. a very brief look at the markets. that is how the ftse 100 is looking.
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that is how the ftse100 is looking. wh that is how the ftse100 is looking. w h smith reported an increase in like—for—like sales in the third quarter but its high—street business fell by 1%, but its share price doing more than ok. thank you, ben. we are going to talk now about brexit. the prime minister and labour leader have clashed in the commons over brexit. jeremy corbyn asked theresa may if she could say whether the brexit proposals would be published ahead of thejune eu summit. there was much more debate besides, so let's find out from norman smith, listening in the commons. so let's find out from norman smith, listening in the commonslj so let's find out from norman smith, listening in the commons. i had thought today might be dominated by the rail chaos with passengers in during misery all over the country, maybe donald trump's steel tariffs, but it was our old punchbag, brexit,
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with jeremy corbyn but it was our old punchbag, brexit, withjeremy corbyn challenging mrs may over the long lost white paper are not negotiating position. when will it emerge, he asked. we were told three weeks ago to a great deal of fa nfa re told three weeks ago to a great deal of fanfare that this white paper would set out the government's ambition for the uk's future relationship with the eu and their vision for a future role in the world. it is nowhere to be seen, no answer as to when it will be published. forwards ago the prime minister said the cabinet was looking at two options, a customs partnership model and a maximum facilitation option. can she tell us which of her subcommittees has met, what decisions they have made, when they will report to the cabinet and will we be told ? they will report to the cabinet and will we be told? journalist like
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myself were briefed in may when the white paper was announced that it would be released ahead of the eu summit but today mrs may was unwilling to give that assurance. the brexit secretary and i agree we wa nt the brexit secretary and i agree we want to publish white paper that goes the speeches... that goes beyond the speeches and the papers that have been published so far, that have been published so far, that goes into more details and ensures that when we publish that white paper, we are able to negotiate with our european union and european commission colleagues on that, on the basis that this is an ambitious offer from the uk for an ambitious offer from the uk for an ambitious offer from the uk for an ambitious trade deal and security partnership. let's get stuck into the punchbag. i am joined by caroline lucas and labour's nick cummins summons. does it matter that
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we don't have a white paper? we have learned that at the last moment to may tends to pull off these negotiations. it matters for businesses if not the negotiators themselves. businesses in brighton, themselves. businesses in brighton, the nhs and tourism industry, they are desperate to know what endgame we have, and it feeds into the shambles surrounding the government's handling of brexit. i was interested that jeremy corbyn we nt was interested that jeremy corbyn went on brexit, i think because he knew he couldn't be worse than she is, and this idea we will have 15 amendments to be discussed next week in12 amendments to be discussed next week in 12 hours amendments to be discussed next week in12 hours is amendments to be discussed next week in 12 hours is such a disservice to democracy, i think it is gone down as well as a cup of cold sick on both sides of the house. whatever side you were born in this debate, it surely has to be worrying that we
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are going into these negotiations without a plan. brexit negotiations are complex, it is a difficult club to leave. the question was simple, do you want to stay or leave, but actually carrying that out is complex, a twisted web and difficult to get to the bottom of, so i'm not surprised that there is a delay on this paper. it's desirable to have one and the takeaway for downing street should be that every time they go out and make a foreign speech or issue papers over the summer last year on some details, although people might not agree on every aspect, they are well received because they show the government has a plan and as theresa may said she will get them out there, the sooner the better. it is surprising jeremy corbyn went on this because he is in
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a mess over his approach to the single market, suggesting we can't negotiate all the advantages of the single market without oversight by the european court ofjustice or freedom of movement. the european court ofjustice or freedom of movementlj the european court ofjustice or freedom of movement. i don't accept that interpretation of our amendment. of course we want that access without impediment to the single market, which would be great for our businesses and trade unions, but what is interesting about our amendment is the fact it is set to idea of shared institutions and regulations, where one of the big issues has been theresa may's self—imposed red lines. by fleshing out our policy there will be alternative negotiation. how does your approach is different from that of borisjohnson, your approach is different from that of boris johnson, who your approach is different from that of borisjohnson, who seeks all the advantages without being prepared to accept that with them will come hard
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obligations in terms of freedom of movement and the european court of justice? i just movement and the european court of justice? ijust shut out movement and the european court of justice? i just shut out these shared institutions and regulations cani shared institutions and regulations can i don't know if borisjohnson has that position but it sets out clearly that we can get beyond those red lines and into a genuine negotiation which will give advantage butjobs negotiation which will give advantage but jobs first. it a fa nta sy advantage but jobs first. it a fantasy land and the tragedy is that ifjeremy fantasy land and the tragedy is that if jeremy corbyn fantasy land and the tragedy is that ifjeremy corbyn had got his members to support the amendment coming back from the house of lords to keep us in the single market, ifjeremy corbyn swung behind that, that could avoid the real devastation that are ha rd avoid the real devastation that are hard brexit will cause but instead he has put down this mealy—mouthed amendment that we know tory rebels will not support, so he has scuppered our best chance to keep as close as possible to the eu. scuppered our best chance to keep as close as possible to the eui
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scuppered our best chance to keep as close as possible to the eu. i think it's more fundamental than that. if jeremy corbyn had supported remain in the first place, rather than not being that enthusiastic, the referendum could have tipped the other way. caroline said you were saying we had these 15 moments to be donein saying we had these 15 moments to be done in one day. we spent a separate sessions in detail giving through every bit of the spill in order to come back from so i don't think we haven't had a chance to debate it. do you by and large accept the government is likely to be defeated on its own amendment?” government is likely to be defeated on its own amendment? i don't, i was a remain voter, i think we all work, but i come to the conclusion we are in dangerof but i come to the conclusion we are in danger of having the worst of all words, leaving but not having access or trying to leave on to some
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arrangement to get access but not having freedom, so it's better we leave properly than trying to sit in both camps. is jeremy corbyn sending out conflicting messages, confusing brexit supporting labour voters? no, we have been responding the results of the referendum, but i'm not sure the eea amendment would have commanded a majority in the commons that the problem is being on the single market as a real taker. let's go beyond this agreement designed for mcgrory and have something more ambitious that puts jobs first. brexit rumbles on. david davis is making a speech this afternoon. if you want to hear it, you can watch it on the news channel. let's look at the weather now. we have a fine
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weather across the uk right now, lots of sunshine to come in coming days but little changing. it's not sunny everywhere because closer see it has been cloudy, banks of cloud hugging the coast so it has been and great, coasts of newcastle down into lincolnshire. where the sun is out, it is strong and the uv levels are very high across this part of the world, as high as they get, very high across east anglia and the south—east and in northern ireland and that means if you work out for any lengthy period of time and haven't got any sunscreen, you are likely to burn and you might even burn through a thin t—shirt. lots of sunshine around, cloudy across northern england, it has been overcast and it still is and not eve ryo ne overcast and it still is and not everyone has the sunshine.
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tunnelling into tomorrow it turns chilly, temperatures will dip down to single figures and by sexy and we have showers in southern counties, so there might be a bit of rain across the south, but look at these thunderstorms across central and western parts and in the western mediterranean, they are getting downpours, we have relatively quiet weather but on thursday we are seeing showers in the afternoon across southern counties, anywhere from kent and sussex all the way to the tip of cornwall, maybe southern wales and one or two other parts but every little shower, it is a risk more than anything for the rest of us. high pressure extending across the uk into scandinavia, settled weather, light winds, more stormy weather, light winds, more stormy weather with thunderstorms close to the near constant. temperatures
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about average for the time of year, about average for the time of year, a little fresher than we would like on north sea coat because of that low—grade cloud brought on by a breeze on the north sea. the first half of the weekend, quite a bit of cloud, mostly in the morning, then in the afternoon the sun will be out so the weekend is looking pretty good for most of us were some strong sunshine. enjoy the rest of the day. hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 2... lawyers at the grenfell inquiry say the man who lived in the flat where the fire began was left terrified by threats of reprisals. whatever the precise cause or origin of the fire in his kitchen, it was accidental, and he bears no responsibility, directly or indirectly, for the fire. the prime minister and labour leader
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clash in the commons over brexit — theresa may is urged to publish her brexit proposals soon. it is nowhere to be seen, no answer as to when it will be published. when we published a white paper, we are able to negotiate with the european commission. tsb's boss faces mps — as the financial regulator

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