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tv   HAR Dtalk  BBC News  June 7, 2018 12:30am-1:01am BST

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of their security operation for next week's trump—kim summit. sentosa island, where the meeting will take place, is being sealed off with closures to main roads, shopping malls, a subway station and a bus depot in what's being called an ‘enhanced security special event.‘ president trump has granted clemency to a 63—year—old woman who has been serving life in prison for a non—violent drug offence. his intervention came after he was lobbied last week by the reality tv star kim kardashian west. and this video is trending on bbc.com: a luxury hotel in london's exclusive knightsbridge neighbourhood had to be evacuated after a fire broke out. the mandarin oriental hyde park had just undergone a huge refurbishment. no—one was injured. that's all from me now. stay with bbc world news. now on bbc news it's time for hardtalk with zeinab badawi. now on bbc news it's time for hardtalk.
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welcome to hardtalk with me, zeinab badawi. with brexit the main preoccupation for politicians in britain, here in parliament. and now the opposition labour party has announced a new proposal. it wants britain to have access to the eu single market while not actually being inside it. even that does not go far enough for some labour mps. my go far enough for some labour mps. my guess is that prominent pro—eu campaigner, chuka umunna. he wants britain to be a part of the european economic area, just like norway. but is he going against the spirit of brexit while also being disloyal to his own party leadership question mark ——7 chuka umunna, welcome. this
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new amendment would give britain full access to the single market. surely that is what you want, why not supported 7 i surely that is what you want, why not supported? i will be voting for the labour amendment as we call it here in britain but also voting for a cross—party amendment supported by a cross—party amendment supported by a number of parties in our house of commons which sought to keep us in what is called the european economic area. that is the only way you can have genuinely free access and be a pa rt have genuinely free access and be a part of the framework of standards that help consumers, the environment, employees. that is the only way to do it. the intention
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behind the amendment is not a bad one but you cannot actually achieve the jet unless you remain in the european economic area. lets clarify this. you say you will support this new amendment for britain to have access to the single market, as proposed by the labour party. access to the single market, as proposed by the labour partylj will. but it does not go far enough. in many respects it is a statement of government policy on government policy is insufficient. any country, any viewers watching this around the world, any of your countries can access the single market through a free—trade agreement with the european union. that that is not the same as being part of the european economic area which gives you full access and to participate in that framework. can you do both also? support the cross—party amendment tabled in the house of lords, one of those amendments coming before the
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house of commons to be debated next week which stipulates that britain should be part of the bt a european economic area. you want to support that as well as the new amendment? can you do both? they are different. different but not inconsistent. the objectives set out in the labour front bench amendment, the only way to achieve them are by means of the european economic area in the cross— party european economic area in the cross—party amendment. you can have both been. i don't want to bore your viewers with the intricacies. no, not too much process. basically. u nless not too much process. basically. unless you can put forward a piece of legislation or an amendment that command support on both sides of the house and notjust your position by government mps taking a different view to their government then you cannot get through. so the labour proposition does not go through because no conservative mp will support it. that is not the position of labour. the shadow brexit secretary says that your backing of
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the house of lords amendment of the britain being part of the european economic area will not work because it is the pretence that everyone in the parties in the place on a. he says that there are very strong and different views across the labour party on that particular amendment. he is saying to put that to one side and support owls. will you do that? just support the labour front bench amendment? it's not a question of whether i will vote for it. irony saidi whether i will vote for it. irony said i will. it is a question of whether conservative mps will do so. and they are clear they will not support the labour proposition but they will support the cross—party amendment, to keep us in the european economic area. such as the determination... do you know that for certain? over 260 labour mps.m a huge number. . amendment —— conservative members have put down an amendment for the trade bill today, indicating that this is what they want. there are some people, a
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small minority of people in the labour party, the parliamentary labour party, the parliamentary labour party, the parliamentary labour party who will not support this. that was the case in respect to other aspects where we managed to succeed. the bottom line is that there are sufficient numbers of conservative mps prepared to rebel and offset however many labour mps... and offset however many labour mps. .. to and offset however many labour mps... to back and offset however many labour mps. .. to back a and offset however many labour mps... to back a new and offset however many labour mps. .. to back a new labour amendment. surely this is bigger than party politics. if there is a chance of 260 labour mps plus the conservative rebels rebelling against their own government then surely you should be, as a prominent labourmp, be surely you should be, as a prominent labour mp, be saying that things have shifted now with this new proposal by labour. come on board. this is bigger than party. but it is not a new proposal. it is a restate m e nt not a new proposal. it is a restatement of existing policy and also exactly the same as the announced policy from the government which is full access to the internal market as theresa may set out in her
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manchester house speech earlier this year. it wants us to participate in eu agencies and have some involvement with their standards which is what the prime minister has said she wants as well. she has not said she wants as well. she has not said she wants the custom union and the customs union... they have said explicitly... the customs union... they have said explicitly. . . that the customs union... they have said explicitly... that is different... crosstalk . when it comes to conservative mps, a large number of them support the custom unions mentorship. a large number of them support the custom unions mentorshiplj a large number of them support the custom unions mentorship. i wish the conservative mps would support labour amendment. they have made clear they will not do so. it is a big thing to defy the government even bigger to vote on opposition amendment. across party amendment, not a party political thing, they would get better support. not a party political thing, they would get better supportlj not a party political thing, they would get better support. i do not control what they do. it is awkward that you are trying to do both. that you support both. lets look at what you support both. lets look at what you want, ve ea amendment —— the e a
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amendment often called the norwegian arrangements addicted to know what the norwegian leader says about that question what she has a direct message for british politicians who wa nt message for british politicians who want that continued membership. she says that britain would have to maintain free movement of people and continue to accept rules and laws made in brussels. why should you leave the eu if you are accepting that? she does have a good point in the sense of my own view is that of course it would be far better for the uk to stay in the european union. short of that, the best way of limiting the damage is to continue to participate in the eea and the customs union. she says that will not work. hang on a moment. she may have said these things but she is absolutely clear that her country would welcome the uk being part of the eea, not least she says it will
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increase bargaining power of the eea relative to the european union. increase bargaining power of the eea relative to the european unionm increase bargaining power of the eea relative to the european union. is a different question. i wasjust about to come to your question precisely. in regard to free movement, in fact, the phrase is misleading because it suggests that it is a free for all and there is not. you can better manage and impose a greater restrictions, if that is what you wish, to the way freedom of movement operates, as part of the eea and the european union. that the united kingdom chooses not to do so. for example, if somebody has been here for three months and has no prospect of work you can ask them to leave. we choose not to do that. you can actually address that issue within the eea. it is quite clear that the eea, as the norwegian prime minister has said, another quote from her, she says that as a politician would be very difficult for the british to go that way after the referendum. she means very welcome in that she says it is not possible because it
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goes against the spirit of brexit. says it is not possible because it goes against the spirit of brexitlj don't believe it does. the freedom of movement was something that is not... only answer that directly. the british people were asked in 2016 whether they wanted to leave or remain in the european union and whether they wanted us to the beginner process to withdraw from the european union. the result was that they wanted to start the process to leave and that is what parliament did. the big question is whether you are able to deliver brexit in the form that people thought they could get. or the benefits of european membership of being outside of it. that is not possible. in terms of how the british people want a lead, that was not on the battle —— ballot paper. i don't deny that immigration was not an issue but in terms of the balance in the way it that the british people choose to give to their concerns about immigration and their jobs... that was left to the politicians to decide. it was merely in or out. and your party under jeremy corbyn has said on numerous
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occasions, explicitly, that freedom of movement of people is not something they will accept. there is a question mark about movement of capital will be allowed on this amendment. freedom of movement of services and so on. financial services, we know that the freedom of movement of people is a nonstarter. under your suggestion that britain remained part of the eea, it would be. that is correct. we area eea, it would be. that is correct. we are a democratic party but the overwhelming majority of our members are the overwhelming majority of our voters support us continuing to be pa rt voters support us continuing to be part of the eea, the single market and the customs union.|j part of the eea, the single market and the customs union. i don't think... you don't know that, however. we do. there have been a number of polls and another one coming out this week putting the proposition. actually, ithink coming out this week putting the proposition. actually, i think one of the reasons we have not had a
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proper vote on this in the labour tidy is because people know what the results will be. there are plenty of mps, labourmps, not results will be. there are plenty of mps, labour mps, not to mention the party leader who said that freedom of movement is something we do not support because we know our constituents do not support it either. as i said, pure freedom of movement is not a requirement of the eea. at us be clear. i don't think people in my party wanted to see the british labour party e wing press releases from the british conservative party or, dare i say it, you ukip. you can match without impacting on your economy. we know from the government's own research that the areas that stand to be hit ha rd est, that the areas that stand to be hit hardest, to be hit hardest from us
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leaving the single market and custom unions are the labour areas we represent. you mentioned immigration and the difficulty of it in many ways. at the former conservative party leader iain duncan smith has spoken about his question of immigration and migration. and being pa rt immigration and migration. and being part of the eu, i quote, at present a white remaining jobseeker faces far fewer obstacles to come to britain then an indian engineer or brazilian dentist. by bricks at —— however brexit means venice all—round. so is there clearly a post—brexit migration policy could let more brown and black people into the uk? at present question mark it is not about race? that is a false prospectus being put forward by iain duncan smith as the conservatives
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have a policy of reducing migration to the tens of thousands. that is a change of course from the new british home secretary... what the new home secretary has said in the uk is that the hostile immigration policy announced by one of his predecessors, the prime minister, he will not press on with. that the requirement that immigration be reduced to the tens of thousands, not only requires a reduction in net emigration from the eu but also drastic reduction in immigration from non—eu countries such as india and nigeria. more immigration is coming to the uk from non—eu countries than eu countries did so u nless countries than eu countries did so unless iain duncan smith is advocating dropping this commitment to reducing immigration to the tens of thousands, he is misleading people. you a co-chair of the all party parliamentary committee on
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europe. you want a referendum on any brea ks europe. you want a referendum on any breaks a deal —— brexit deal that may emerge. what will the question on the ballot paper be? the reason for having a people's vote on the brexit deal is because with every week that passes, new fat to emerge. the viewers who may have been watching the impact of brexit on the good friday agreement in northern ireland will be scratching their heads and wondering what that has to do with brexit. all manner of things has turned out to be impacted by it that we did not know for. my own preference, and the campaign of which i am part of, as stipulated that question. it needs to be a yes 01’ no that question. it needs to be a yes or no question? of course. i suggest it would be leave with the prime minister or stay in and argue for reform as part of the european union. that is my personal preference. cani can ijust can i just ask you, that's what would be on offer except for a deal.
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it's going to be so complex. people are going to have to sit down and think, the prime minister's deal, what is it was about the customs union and free and capital. it is so complex. would got to be careful. that's not patronise people. i'm not... they are more than capable of understanding what this deal entails. really? there are people who say we got into trouble with a simple yes or no because you were trying to reduce to a simple answer something that was highly complex. the big difference is, and in many respects we are having the debate should of had a long time ago, but the big difference is you have to fix propositions. the truth of the matter is, when this kicked off, we we re matter is, when this kicked off, we were speculating, it was hypothetical, you had people like borisjohnson hypothetical, you had people like boris johnson saying hypothetical, you had people like borisjohnson saying because the french want to sell us brie, the
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germans, cars, and the italians, prosecco, they will give us every thing we want and have the benefits of the single market. and you have the actual fixed proposition of what out looks like, we didn't know, and we know what being a member of the european union looks like. that is the big difference. suppose that deal is that it clear is the best deal is that it clear is the best deal that the house of commons can come up with because david davis said in december that parliamentarians would play a major role in the brexit negotiations, that cannot be any doubt that parliament will be intimately involved at every stage. because government was forced into that by backbenchers. therefore, if there is that on the table, if there is this deal and it's a good one and you like it, what happens if the voters then rejected? like it, what happens if the voters then rejected ? if like it, what happens if the voters then rejected? if parliament? if the voters in the referendum reject the
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deal on offer even though arguably it isa deal on offer even though arguably it is a good one. that's been debated and agreed. if the people reject the deal, there is a bit of a contradiction in saying it's a good one because they will have concluded it's not good enough and not worth it. that may be something they've decided because they've not looked at the ins and outs of it. so you would accept it, it's a deal that you would go and... what would happen if britain would crash out of the eu? i don't think anybody would like to see that happen. in the end, if the british public determined that we should accept whatever deal the prime minister comes back with, notwithstanding whatever net negative impact there might be, we will leave the european union. my preferred question would be leave
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with the deal or remain. but remain is not an option because britain is floating the brexit. the government says there is no deal, it would crash out... it can't do that. i will tell you why. parliament has secured for itself a meaningful vote on the way we withdraw which covers all aspects. they would not be able to crash the uk out. the government is not able to legislative —— legislatively, a beast, crash out with parliament agreeing in the affirmative agreeing to leave without a deal. —— at least. when i speak to you —— eu foreign ministers and heads of government, people are getting that because of the parliamentary arithmetic in the uk, though you were negotiating with the uk government, they currently have a negotiating position for which they don't know they have supported our parliament and that makes it
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difficult for your rock. he said we don't crash out, you accept the deal 01’ don't crash out, you accept the deal or remain. isn't that the crux of the issue? you just want to stop brexit. i've been absolutely honest about that. i would love to stop brexit. but he voted for article 50 which triggered the process...|j really which triggered the process...” really clear. people think this is some revelation. of course i want to stop brexit. i don't get to decide. it's not a dictatorship. it's about the people and the people determine that they don't want to accept this deal but they'd rather change our country, that is up to them. you are the grandson of a high courtjudge, either to educate. city lawyer. are you not part of the metropolitan elite which is out of touch?” simply represent my content is —— constituency. i was born in the south london constituency of
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streatham. we are one of the most deprived local authority areas of england. one in four people lives in poverty, half of our residents cannot afford to buy their own home and we have some of the biggest social problems in britain and yet we scored the highest remain vote and it's not because my constituents are out of touch elite that it's because we have many problems which we don't believe will be solved by leaving. my grandfather fought this country, he served our country, prosecuted the nazis in nuremberg, was part of our intelligence services. he would not want us to become an isolationist go it alone country that lacks con glints on the world stage. isolationist and go it alone. is that the visionjeremy corbyn has for britain? i'm not sure precisely what is vision is for us, these are the europe. i think the
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views of many on the left in the uk towards europe are not accurate, they are slightly anachronistic. it is seen as a neoliberal list capital ‘s club. pedro sanchez, the new prime minister in spain, are swedish social democratic sister party and in greece, they would have something to say. he was state subsidies, he has the wrong visions. we were talking about the rail lines. you have a student politics issue. the labour party leadership briefed against you, you said, and policies
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to ban unpaid internships, not student placements. why didn't the labour party leadership briefed against you? you would have to ask them. i think there is, traditionally speaking in the uk, you got a first past the post electoral system. i would rather have proportional representation which is more democratic and fair. with this system, it is a 2—party system rigged in favour of two parties and that necessitates those parties and that necessitates those parties being called coalitions of where they sit on the spectrum and there is an open debate, in both the parties, whether they continue being broad coalitions, social democrats, centrists. .. people who would come from a marxist tradition. i don't have a problem with that but some do. including jeremy corbyn. some of
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those around him and some of our membership, many of them, with a huge influx of members since he became the leader which is a good thing but some don't think that people who sit in my social democratic place have a place in the labour party. sticking with the labour party. sticking with the labour party, you flirted with three days with running as leader, you changed your mind. some people thought that was flaky of view but would you stand as leader? you've been talked about is the black tony blair -- been talked about is the black tony blair —— tony blair, britain's a nswer to blair —— tony blair, britain's answer to barack obama. there is no va ca ncy answer to barack obama. there is no vacancy in the labour party leadership and nor will there be or should there be. would you like jeremy corbyn to stand as the leader in the next election? i've been very clear that he should. i'm certainly not arguing for anything different and it's highly unlikely i should become the leader of the labour party a ny become the leader of the labour party any time soon. you could
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stand. it's not about me really. i've tried to change the country and change the world and if you're not in politics for that reason, get out. chuka umunna, they keep it coming on. thank you very much having me, lovely. hello there. good morning. the weather looks very sluggish over the next few days into the weekend as well. so it is going to be difficult to get the detail right. wednesday, most places had a warm, summer's day. not much cloud around at all. over the next couple of days, in the south, there will be more cloud around. maybe one or two heavy and thundery showers. on the whole, most places will be dry. a fair bit of cloud across eastern areas on wednesday but this is the cloud coming in from the near continent that threatens a few heavy and thundery showers,
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notjust overnight — perhaps into thursday as well into the southern parts of england as well — not many of them, most places will be dry. more cloud will fill humid southern areas and around the coast there could be patches of cloud on the cooler side but generally temperatures into the low 20s as they were on wednesday. we could scrape an isolated sharp shower across western scotland and western northern ireland, if those fall they will fade overnight, still one or two showers into the south—west of england and south wales. for eastern areas, turning misty and more areas of low clouds and patchy fog too. it'll improve through the day on friday and again we have the risk of a few showers here and there. same sort of areas around southern england and wales and clipping the far north—west of the uk, but large parts will be fine and dry and it will feel warm in the sunshine again. always cooler around those north sea coasts because we have an onshore
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breeze, once again high pressure to the north of the uk and lower pressure to the south and it's around that that we are seeing storms, heavy rain, maybe over the continent through the english channel and the threat of one or two heading into england and wales on saturday. risk is still there, the most western side of ireland, cooler along the north sea coast. the second half of the weekend, this area of low pressure is close and the weather front too, it threatens to bring with it heavy rain. could be a few sharp showers across scotland and the chance of one or two for northern ireland but again some spells of sunshine and temperatures into the low 20s. looking into monday and tuesday, again, most places will be dry. briefly we may see some high—pressure arriving on tuesday, but on the site wind after that. maybe a change. i'm rico hizon in singapore. the headlines. the korea summit fortress — police reveal the scale of the shutdowns for tuesday's big event. the summit has been declared as a high security special event
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from june 10 untiljune1li. during this period the public can expect heightened security measures. the view from japan where fear of missile attacks from north korea has led to these air raid drills. i'm babita sharma in london. also in the programme: the death toll from guatemala's volcanic eruption
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