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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  June 8, 2018 9:00am-11:00am BST

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hello it's friday, it's 9 o'clock, i'm chloe tilley, welcome to the programme. the children who persistently hear voices that aren't there. i remember at age probably three years old sitting on my grandparents‘ stairs, and i heard the lion and the bear from teletubbies saying, "i'm coming to get you, i'm coming to get you," over and over again. it made me feel terrified of it. i thought it was normal, though, to hear these voices. now, new research suggests the reaction of adults can affect the voices they hear in future. we'll talk to children who say the voices make them feel "worthless". also ahead, fears for england fans travelling to russia for the world cup, as the government is accused of making vague reassurances about their safety. russia is a very difficult country in which to offer consular protection. the russian state is not like other countries. if fans are, for example, lgbt, or from an ethnic minority, then the russian state has more of a history of abusing them than supporting them. we'll ask how safe the tournament will be. and why 41 places where
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the suffragettes protested and sites they sabotaged are being officially recognised in a national heritage list. hello. welcome to the programme. we're live until 11 this morning. we'll keep you across the morning's developing stories as they happen, plus how many of you have bought cosmetics to make you look younger, or left your age off your social media profile because you don't want the world to know? well, you could be doing more harm than good. a report out today shows negative attitudes toward growing old are having a major impact on the public‘s health, and many think unhappiness goes hand—in—hand with ageing. be interested to hear what you think. and on all the stories we are talking about. use the hashtag victoria live and if you text,
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you will be charged at the standard network rate. our top story today, borisjohnson‘s in trouble again over brexit. the foreign secretary's been secretly recorded suggesting the negotiations with the european union could lead to a "meltdown", and the uk won't get the deal it wants. he's also been critical of the treasury, describing philip hammond's department as being "the heart" of the remain campaign. live now to chris mason. give us more details on what boris johnson, the foreign secretary, was saying, clearly, at an event where he was not expecting to be recorded. good morning. boris johnson he was not expecting to be recorded. good morning. borisjohnson finds various ways where his innermost thoughts trickle into the public domain, whether it be a rather long newspaper article or other interventions. this was a private dinner, or so he thought, on wednesday evening, at the conservative way forward group, he and his friends say they are
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disappointed the recording has ended up disappointed the recording has ended up in the hands of buzzfeed news but in terms of it being surprising, it is up there with bears choosing comfort breaks inwards and night following day, that this kind of thing should eventually emerge. he's talked about the treasury being the heart of remain, not exactly diplomatic language in the direction of philip hammond, the chancellor. what else does he say? there will be some short—term bumps in the road, the chance of some dislocation but it will be worth it in the medium and long—term. he's pretty dismissive of the whole row about the irish border that has gone on pretty much forever, suggesting it is the tail wagging the dog and there must be some kind of solution. he argues brexit is irreversible and it will happen but his fear is it won't be the brexit he would like, that the uk could remain within the orbit of the european union. and he also had some interesting stuff to say about president trump and imagining a world in which president
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trump was leading the brexit negotiations. so how is this going down in westminster this morning?m so how is this going down in westminster this morning? it is not entirely surprising in terms of the colourful language that boris johnson uses, even with a flourish ofa johnson uses, even with a flourish of a latin which he is rather keen on when he makes these kind of interventions, and broadly speaking the sentiments he articulates are not that surprising but we should put it in the context of the last 2a hours. all of that palaver yesterday involving the brexit secretary, david davis, the hokey cokie of in and out of the cabinet, he is still in as of six minutes past nine this morning, he effectively said to the prime minister, "it is my way or the stairway to the backbenches". there
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was one senior brexiteer flexing his muscles in public, undermining the authority of the prime minister and i spoke to liam fox the international trade secretary yesterday afternoon and he didn't delight that he'd also threatened to resign when he met the prime minister yesterday and to complete the trio, borisjohnson and the remarks on this dinner. —— he didn't deny that he'd also threatened. it gives you an idea of how bonkers politics is in 2018 that this all feels fairly normal. thank you for joining us. chris maize on, there. annita mcveigh is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the rest of the day's news. good morning. england fans travelling to russia for the world cup have been warned they are at serious risk of racist, homophobic and anti—british attacks. a history of hooliganism and the collapse of anglo—russian relations in the wake of the salisbury posisoning has left mps fearing for supporters' safety. the government has been accused of providing vague reassurances over their security. and we'll have much more on this storyjust after 9.30, talking to fans heading out to russia. the prime minister theresa may has arrived in canada
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ahead of this weekend's annual g7 summit, which brings together the leaders of the world's biggest economies. this year's meeting is expected to focus on themes including future growth, issues of equality and climate change. concerns surrounding international trade and the potential summit between the north korean leader kim jong un and president trump are also expected to dominate talks. canada has moved a step closer to legalising recreational cannabis. it would be the first g7 nation to do so. canadian senators passed the cannabis act after studying the landmark legislation for six months. prime ministerjustin trudeau has committed to making marijuana legal by this summer. the us secretary of state, mike pompeo, has said he's received a personal assurance from kim jong—un that north korea is prepared to dismantle its nuclear programme. donald trump is due to hold talks with the north korean leader in singapore next week. speaking at the white house, mike pompeo said kim had been clear
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about his intentions. facebook has warned a software bug may be responsible for millions of users unknowingly posting private information to the public. the company apologised and said the glitch had set users' posts to be shared to "everyone", even if they had previously chosen a more restricted option. the firm added that those affected would be notified on their news feeds. the telecoms giant bt has announced that its chief executive, gavin patterson, is to step down later this year. the company said the reaction to recent results showed there was a need for a change of leadership. bt announced last month that it was to cut more than one in ten of its workforce as part of a shake—up of the company. negative attitudes toward growing old are having a major impact on the public‘s health. that's according to a report out today which warns media cliches and anti—ageing cosmetics are doing more harm than good. richard lister reports. archive footage: here, in a finsbury workship near sadler's wells,
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70—year—old men and women have started work again to bring a new interest into the enforced leisure of their old age. in the 19505, old age was often portrayed as a long slide into irrelevance and decline. hands, which might otherwise have gone stiff, handle nimbly the work which business firms send to the workshop. instead of moping at home lonely, the old folk find it does them the world of good to come out. but today's report suggests those views may not have changed all that much. the rsph questioned 2,000 people and found ageism alive and well. is that a thing? i suppose the way society is structured, now, i probably am, yeah. nah, i mean, if you're too old, you're too old. in fact, the survey suggests that 40% of young adults believe dementia is inescapable as you age, and a quarter think it's normal for elderly people to be depressed and unhappy. across all age groups, two—thirds of us have no friends
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more than 30 years older or younger than we are. that's it — wiggle those hips! the report says facilities for older people and the very young should be housed under the same roof to bring generations together. it urges the media to treat ageism in the same way as racism or sexism, and it points to research which indicates a more positive view of old age can lead to a longer life. richard lister, bbc news. police investigating fraud offences linked to grenfell tower have charged three men. eight men and one woman were arrested on yesterday in a series of dawn raids by the metropolitan police. the three men have been charged with fraud by false representation, and a fourth with drug offences. the five others have been released on bail, pending investigations. louis walsh has decided to leave talent show the x factor after what he has described as 13 "fa ntastic" years. he's appeared on all but one series of the itv show since it began in 2004 but says he will remain
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a judge on ireland's got talent and continue to manage music acts. you probably know why the chicken crossed the road by now. but why did the cow cross the loch? well, this herd on the crom estate, in northern ireland, swims around 100 metres to an island on loch erne every year to feed on fresh pasture. they'll stay there for the summer before swimming back in october. looking at the headlines on story, we have got bovine breaststroke or cows on we have got bovine breaststroke or cows on the mooove, you decide which one you want. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 9.30. let's get some sport now with damian. let's talk about the england match last night against costa rica, a confident showing, marcus rashford played well. is he going to start 110w played well. is he going to start now when we get to the world cup?
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heeded his world cup prospects no harm. the match was played at elland road and leeds fans gave rashford some stick because he plays the lead historic rivals manchester united on the other side of the pennines. but the other side of the pennines. but the blues were silenced after the stunning first—half goal which caught stunning first—half goal which ca ug ht costa stunning first—half goal which caught costa rica's real madrid goalkeeper keylor navas completely by surprise and brought the stadium to its feet. 36,000 there, a great advert for taking international games on the road and away from wembley. arsenal's danny welbeck made the game safe with a diving headerfrom made the game safe with a diving header from dele alli's made the game safe with a diving headerfrom dele alli's ross. afterwards, the england boss praised rashford's bold approach to the match. i wanted iwanted him, i wanted him, like all the others, to be making mistakes because if they are making mistakes than they are trying things. for me, all of the players, if they want to try to be as good as they can be, they've got to try things that we have to acce pt got to try things that we have to accept it might mean the odd failure
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but what you then might get is the odd moments like he has produced a night. there's a bit to sort out but thatis night. there's a bit to sort out but that is great because we want a squad that are playing well and have the spirit of the lads have at the moment. the thoughts of gareth southgate. england's players fly out to the world cup next week. also, looking at it, there's been quite a different approach to the warm up to this tournament, we've had press conferences where all of the players will talk to the newspapers in one room and talk to the media. it seems to be quite a positive feeling amongst the england team but i guess we should not get ahead of ourselves in thinking it's necessarily bodes well! that's right, the time has been set by the manager, giving the players added responsibility and been pretty sure—footed himself when dealing with tricky like raheem sterling's gun tattoo couple of weeks ago and turning up late for training camp. there is a positive mood and the pressure is off, england going into the world cup
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with far less expectation than usual after that humiliating exit from the euros at the hands of lowly iceland last time out, two years ago. rashford himself thinks he is thriving in the more relaxed environment under gareth southgate. it is helped by the three forwards, we can play what we see but within the structure, we are not quite there yet but we're getting there and training is improving. you want to improve each day and still do better going into the tournament. england's opening world cup game against tunisia a week on monday. we are looking forward to that. that's all the sport for now. more sport throughout the morning. we are going to talk a bit later about ageism and whether we try and hide our age or whether cosmetics companies should remove the term anti—ageing because it makes us feel bad and not good for mental health. jenny has already got in touch in e—mail, "it's not my aid that
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bothers me, it's the way you're treated by the younger generation. people seem to think when you are older, you have lost your marbles. workmen give you quotes and rip you off, even more so when you are an olderfemale. off, even more so when you are an older female. what is the benefit of advertising your age?" thanks they're getting in touch, you can do they're getting in touch, you can do the same and we will continue to talk about this through the morning. one in 12 children is thought to persistently hear voices that in reality aren't there, and now new research suggest the reaction of adults can affect the voices they hear in the future. psychologists at manchester metropolitan university and the university of manchester have been looking at the experiences of young people that have auditory hallucinations, and their parents. but the study found that not all young people are upset by their voices. some even enjoy having them. we will be hearing from one of the people behind the study and two experts in voices in a few minutes. but first our reporter james melley has been speaking to two voice hearers about their experiences. my name's laura, and i hear voices.
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i'm tia, and i hearvoices. the i remember at age probably three years old sitting on my grandparents' stairs, and i heard the lion and the bear from teletubbies saying, "i'm coming to get you, i'm coming to get you," over and over again. it made me feel terrified of it. i thought it was normal, though, to hear these voices. laura is now 21 and studying at university. she's told many of her friends about her voices. it was actually quite nice that you told me. because it kind of made me understand more about you. but she didn't always find them easy to talk about. i went and spoke to my parents at seven or eight years old, talking about the voices, thinking it was a normal thing they would have.
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my parents who i told asked me, "what voices, laura?" they thought it was my imaginary best friend. which i don't blame them for thinking that. i felt lonely, i felt afraid. i used to hear my mum's voice quite a lot. and i used to...not hear my dad shouting, but someone shouting at me in the street. tia is 13, and asked not to be identified. she started hearing voices when she was seven. they sometimes got her in trouble at school. when one of my voices was just messing around with me, making me giggle too much, ijust went outside and then ijust told her to shut the f up or something, and then it stopped. this was in my head, i wasn't saying that out loud. and ijust shut my eyes and went, "shut up, i need to get on with my work, be quiet. you're not a two—year—old." and then i went back and did my work. it was saying, "oh, that paper
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looks really boring. " and it would make me doodle — not make me doodle, but it would make me doodle at the side of my book. and then i would bang the desk really hard because i'm so bored and zoned out. and it would say, like, "poke the computer screen and see what it does." and i did it, and it went all fuzzy, and i nearly broke it. but it was all right. i didn't get in trouble for it. tia's mum alice started noticing there might be something upsetting her daughter. the time came when you was in school one time, and you said that something was putting you down in school. that's what made me stop and i thought, now i can hear something that's really negative. because she used to come home and say, "but i'm just dumb." we'd say, "well, what's going on, why are you saying you're dumb?" she wasn't doing very well in school. and i think you said something one time that made me think, she said, "well, i think i'm dumb." i think i asked you a bit more about it, and you said sometimes you hear things in school,
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and that's why you put your head down, because there's something, or something saying that you're dumb. at first i thought she was talking about other people, but she never outright said to me, "i'm hearing voices." i kind of pieced it together, i think. when laura was a teenager, she started to feel overwhelmed by her voices. i would self harm, and it was a horrible moment for me. i was struggling because the voices were so loud, so intimidating and so abusive, that it was very scary, i couldn't cope with it. it's like being in a crowded room. all you can hear is all these multiple, different voices having a go at you. i only recognised one of the voices, but the only other sounds are male, female, children, and some of them sound like doctor who monsters a little bit. that gravelly kind of sound, voice, kind of thing. and theyjust tell me i'm useless, pretty much all the time. i decided to talk to my mum.
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it took a long time to try and talk to her, but i finally spoke to her and she asked me if i wanted to see a gp, which i agreed with. the gp was understanding and so, so supportive. she told me it was normal to hear voices, and i started to feel less lonely. all some children start hearing voices after they've suffered some kind of trauma. alice suffers from a chronic illness, and she thinks this affected tia. she's just been through so much, and this is how she is expressing it. that's what upset me the most, ithink. and all of this was kind of tied up with me getting ill, not being able to be there when she expected me to be there. and just feeling probably a bit lost, i think, with it all. you alice was part of the hearing voices network, which helps support people that hear voices. she decided to not take tia to see a doctor. so, i did speak to school, and what i said to school was that
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under no circumstances do you make any referrals to any mental health services. we are quite capable of speaking with and supporting her, and that's what we want to do as a family. we've got lots of support, there are lots of people in the hearing voices movement that she can speak to and we can speak to. that's the way we would have approached anything anyway, any particular difficulty, unless it became something where it was unmanageable. eventually, tia's voices went away. yeah, i remembera day where i wasjust, like, where's it gone? and i thought about it, and i was like, wait, there's nothing actually my head. no wonder's speaking to me. —— no one's speaking to me. i don't miss them, but i have other things in my life not to miss. but not all voices just go away on their own. laura takes medication to keep her voices under control. but they still sometimes become too much for her. she's developed her own ways of coping. i have a massive passion for music. and ever since i was a young girl, i would play music and it would drown out the sound of voices. and i'm very lucky to have music there.
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and when i play it, i just feel freedom. i feel it's a chance to really, you know, escape from the terror that's going on inside my head. with the help of medication, i feel a lot stronger and a lot better in myself. even though the voices are still there, they're not in control of me, i'm in control of it. let's talk to dr sarah parry from manchester metropolitan university, who was one of the people behind the research. also with us is paul baker from intervoice, which sets up support groups for people that hear voice, and dr natasha goakes who is a psychologist that works for the psychosis early intervention team in manchester. sarah, and the start with you. if
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your child comes the un says they hearing voices, parents will automatically worry. should they?” think it is important to take it seriously, listen to what the young person has to say. it is a delicate balance between not underplaying what they are telling you, but kind of not overreacting as overreacting as possible as well. of course it will provoke anxiety for parents, they will be a little worried because of some of the things we tend to hear about people who hear voices, but actually it is relatively common and certainly from oui’ relatively common and certainly from our research relatively common and certainly from oui’ research are relatively common and certainly from our research are a lot of young people we have heard from who hear voices are quite happy with their voices, they find them friendly, comforting, supportive, helpful. so i think it is important not to assume it is necessarily a bad thing. actually, lots of children we have heard from enjoy having their voices and feel a benefit. paul, many people listening to that would be quite surprised. the way we often hear about these situations, it is
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frightening, it is bad, but for some of these children it can be positive, and as sarah says almost reassuring experience? yes, i have been reflecting on this, and it is strange, hearing voices is generally stigmatised in society, but we are much more comfortable with things like imaginary friends, and a lot of children have experienced that thing, so what is the difference? in my experience, and our research, it shows not a lot, really. i would back up what sarah is saying. the main issue, if you are a parent or sibling of somebody hearing voices, don't panic. it is unusual, but it's not really, you know, it's something which a lot of people experience, and also we know the outcome is our positive two, up to 60% of people, after three years the voices go away. what we want people to really dial down the fear and anxiety which is generally felt because of this stigma about hearing voices we have in the community as a whole.
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natasha, would you agree? is it critical the way parents respond to what is probably going to be a worrying thing to hear from your child? yes, absolutely. ithink obviously, as a parent, you want your child to alwaysjust obviously, as a parent, you want your child to always just be obviously, as a parent, you want your child to alwaysjust be happy and healthy and never have any problems, so any kind of problem they come to you with, you will worry about, and hearing voices is something that i think it can sound really scary, and i understand that. before i worked in this field, i probably would have been quite uncertain about how to respond, but as the others have already said, it isa as the others have already said, it is a really common thing. and sometimes those voices can be incredibly positive. what i have often found, in my work with young people, they say that voices might start off quite positively, and it's only when they start to realise maybe that other people don't all hear voices, or when other people
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react to them in a negative or stigmatising way, that's when the voices sort of might become a little bit more negative and a bit more distressing for them. sol bit more negative and a bit more distressing for them. so i think having a kind of accepting and understanding response, even if you don't know what to do next, that's an amazing start. and your child probably will feel so much better to just feel accepted by you, regardless of what they are going through. sera, with this research did you find children can in some we control what the voices are saying to them —— sarah, with this research. a lot to struggle with the control element with voices. although they have told us all of the brilliant ways they find to help manage the voices, even if they can't control what is being said or when the voices appear. like music, mentioned in the video, big one. a lot of art and a lot of writing and a lot of ways of expressing how they are feeling and what they are thinking, without it necessarily a lwa ys thinking, without it necessarily always be in words. you know, the
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study has really made me reflect as a clinical psychologist on talking therapies, and actually, do we need to be much more creative and holistic in how we respond and work with children, using their old ways of coping, using what they know works for them? so there are lots of ways i think young people have found to manage the voices, even if they can't always control them. paul, people always have a preconceived idea that maybe it is a single voice they hear, wouldn't they? but actually, as laura said in ourfilm, she can often hear many voices and it can feel like she's in a crowded room. that must be incredibly draining, difficult to concentrate a school? yeah, absolutely. ithink one thing you do realise, there is a very diverse set of excuses people have, so you can't homage and i is the voices as one experience. some people have dancers, —— the voices as one experience. some people have dancers, -- you the voices as one experience. some people have dancers, —— you can't
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place the voices as one experience. we noticed something, some kind of adverse child experience, being bullied at school, being hospitalised, otherthings bullied at school, being hospitalised, other things may have occurred that are actually reflected in what the voices are saying to the person, and it may be the voices represent sometimes unresolved emotions about what happened. for there is particularly it is really quite useful, if you ask your child, has anything happened, in the last year, or six months before? and if something has happened, to try to change what has happened, if you can try to alter the circumstances for the child feeling the negative voices, this can be really important. also, what you said, sometimes the voices themselves reflect the situation, so if it is a crowd of voices we find it might well be bullying, indistinct. if they are negative voices, it could be this represents, someone talked about the very critical voices, putting you down, questioning your
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self—esteem, this may be a question you need to ask yourself about something going on in your life that you need to change. we think the bigger issue here is for us to change the way we help young people, and all people who hear voices, had to deal with them, and to really say, it is an important for parents and for mental health workers to be curious about the experience itself, you know, how many voices? do they have names? what do they see? when do you hear them, have names? what do they see? when do you hearthem, is have names? what do they see? when do you hear them, is it in certain situations? —— what do they see? that is something parents can do as well. natasha, what other treatments out there for young people hearing voices, and they are not positive, and they are struggling? clearly we saw that laura has medication, but other people have decided not to go down that route. so what are the options available? there are quite a lot of options, both within the nhs and more charitable organisations such as intervoice, or hearing voices network, that was mentioned in the film. i work in the nhs, and
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our service works with people who experience psychosis, and hearing voices is a part of that. medication is certainly one option. it can be particularly helpful. it doesn't always ta ke particularly helpful. it doesn't always take away the voices but it can kind of quieten them down a bit, help people to feel they have a bit more of a handle on things. as you have already pointed out, the whole host of voices is just have already pointed out, the whole host of voices isjust really distracting, disorientating, and you can't concentrate anything. but there are also talking therapies, which is my role in the team. the main focus of the talking therapy is to not so much control the voice, but to try to change a person's relationship with the voice, so we have already heard that voices can be positive, you know, at their best, or evenjust be positive, you know, at their best, or even just neutral. be positive, you know, at their best, or evenjust neutral. when i work with a young person kind of doing talking therapy, we might try to change the way they think about hearing a voice, or make it less scary, less frightening. we might
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try to help that person be kinder to themselves, or maybe kinder to the voice, because voices can often be critical so it is helpful to have someone on your side, even if it is you, against the voice. we also might try to block the voice, dialogue the voice, it is called —— talk to the voice. find out what it is therefore, what its purpose is, and see if we can shift that relationship to be a more positive one. you know, it is really hopeful kind of situation, as has been said already. a lot of people might go on to stop hearing voices, or at the very least they might have a better relationship with the voices. thank you so much for coming in today. very grateful to you. thanks much. still to come. 10,000 uk football fans are expected to travel to the world cup in russia, but there are fears of racist and homophobic intimidation. we'll be asking just how safe it is. and canada moves one step closer to legalising the recreational use of cannabis. we'll speak to a campaigner who welcomes the move. time for the latest news.
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here's annita mcveigh. the bbc news headlines this morning. the foreign secretary boris johnson has been secretly recorded suggesting the brexit negotiations with the european union could lead to a "meltdown", and the uk won't get the deal it wants. he's also been critical of the treasury, describing philip hammond's department as being "the heart" of the remain campaign. england fans travelling to russia for the world cup have been warned they are at serious risk of racist, homophobic and anti—british attacks. a history of hooliganism and the collapse of anglo—russian relations in the wake of the salisbury posisoning has left mps fearing for supporters' safety. the government has been accused of providing vague reassurances over their security. louis walsh has decided to leave the x factor after what he has described as 13 "fa ntastic" years. he's appeared on all but one series of the itv show since it began in 2004 but says he will remain a judge on ireland's got talent and continue to manage music acts. you probably know why
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the chicken crossed the road by now. but why did the cow cross the loch? well, this herd on the crom estate, in northern ireland, swims around 100 metres to an island on loch erne every year to feed on fresh pasture. they'll stay there for the summer before swimming back in october. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. i missed yourjoke, i wanted you to come up with one every half an hour. stay with us through the morning. here's some sport now with damian. the main headlines from us. england will head to the world cup with real confidence after beating costa rica in their final warm—up match. marcus rashford scored an absolute cracker in their 2—0 win. wales' women are now top of their world cup qualifying group thanks to kayleigh green's winner against bosnia and herzegovina. england can regain top spot when they take on russia later. scotland also won. rafael nadal is back on court at the french open this afternoon as his dominance on clay continues.
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juan martin del potro stands between him and a place in yet another paris final. dina asher—smith broke her own british 100 metres record at the diamond league meeting in oslo. she ran 10.92 seconds, taking 0.07 seconds off her old mark. it was the ideal preparation as she focuses on the european championships in august. that's all the sport for now. i want to read you one comment which are coming to us after the conversation we were having about young people hearing voices. jean has got in touch to say, "i always thought this must be pretty scary for adults or teenagers but it must be so much worse —— was the children, it seemed like a form of ocd x, children, it seemed like a form of 0cd x, one in four people will need help with mental health issues during a lifetime so don't be afraid to ask for help. the brain isjust pa rt to ask for help. the brain isjust part of our body. wishing anyone
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suffering or afraid that they get all the help they need". keep your thoughts coming in about the stories we are talking about this morning. with less than a week to go until the 2018 world cup officially kicks off in russia, fans heading out there will be hoping they'll be as safe as they can be. but a report by mps in the foreign affairs committee warns more needs to be done ahead of the tournament for lgbt and bame fans. with threats of violence in the press and across social media by far—right russian ultra thugs, the committee says the foreign 0ffice needs to do more to prepare fans for the dangers. the chair of the committee said the expulsion of 23 russian diplomats from the uk after the salisbury poisioning earlier this year has derailed the communication between the government and russian authorities on fan safety. tom tugendhat says certain groups of fans may also be at risk. what we should recognise is that a lot of work has gone in to making sure that fans have the right level of consular support in russia. we've also got to be aware that russia is a very
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difficult country in which to offer consular protection. the russian state is not like other countries. if fans are, for example, lgbt, or from an ethnic minority, then the russian state has more of a history of abusing them than supporting them. so we are dealing with a very different environment. let's talk now to joe white, who is pride in football's campaign leader. this is the first world cup he'll be travelling to. billy grant has been to 13 of england's tournaments. he only decided days ago that he would go to russia as he had been concerned about safety. di cunningham joins us from nottingham. she's an lgbt activist who had death threats after she announced on russian tv that she'd be going to the world cup. bob seely is a conservative mp and member of the foreign affairs committee who wrote the report. thank you forjoining us. di, i want
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to start with you because death threats that you received after you went on russian tv, tell us more about that? yeah, it was not russian tv, we were contacted by a number of russian journalists. we made tv, we were contacted by a number of russianjournalists. we made our intention to travel to the world cup as lgbt intention to travel to the world cup as lg bt fa ns intention to travel to the world cup as lgbt fans and maybe it was broadcast on tv, i'm not sure but certainly the message is going at globally that the number of lgbt fa ns wa nted globally that the number of lgbt fans wanted to go to russia and support england. we had the usual twittered roles, we were followed by russian bots as well and some facebook posts and we had some e—mails, too. some of those were really quite gruesome in their threats. so, yeah, we have... you kind of have to take them seriously but we all know about keyboard warriors so we are imagining that is primarily what these people were.
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warriors so we are imagining that is primarily what these people werem do you feel the foreign office and the government is doing enough to protect you and bands like billy and joe who will be heading to russia? —— and fans alike. joe who will be heading to russia? -- and fans alike. as tom tugendhat said, it is difficult, russia is a federation, there are different laws in different parts of the federation and different approaches to the lgbt community. we can't rely on the foreign office. what we have tried to do is to work with fifa to make sure that we have the protection afforded us by the world cup being in russia and by the eyes of the world being on russia. alexis matin, the for equality for the russian fa has said it will be fine to fly rainbow flags. we take that with a pinch of salt but that we are
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afforded a particular protection by the world cup being in russia in june and july and we should, we think we should take advantage of that if we can, to go to russia and show some solidarity with the russian lg bt show some solidarity with the russian lgbt community as well as obviously supporting england. stay with us because i want to bring in billy, because we reported yesterday that danny rose, the england player, had told his family not to go to russia because there would be so much racist abuse and he did not wa nt much racist abuse and he did not want them to be subjected to it. you must worry about that. you always worry about it. russia got the world cup and! worry about it. russia got the world cup and i must admit i was gutted and so were all my mates and it becomes difficult because if you've been toa becomes difficult because if you've been to a lot of england games, this will be my 13th tournament, you consider at what time you are going to step off. i was going to go to russia in 2007 in england and i was working for russian client and i asked him, i knew what had been said
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but i asked him what he reckoned and he said don't go and if anyone knows these give the game in 2007, the russian fans had a bit of appeal day of the england fans, not necessarily black england fans but a lot of england fans may cause trouble. i was in marseille, in the thick of the "action", when we were there, there were lots england fans causing absolutely no trouble. the russian fans did their military operation on them, picked on them and it was quite scary and it's interesting because i met a policeman in saint—etienne a few days afterwards when england played the final game andl when england played the final game and i was chatting to him and he askedif and i was chatting to him and he asked if i was in marseille and when isaid yes, asked if i was in marseille and when i said yes, he said the russians we re i said yes, he said the russians were cowards because they picked on the people who were not interested in trouble. he said it was really cowardly and i thought that was interesting because in the world, it has gone around that the russians, even though they think they are really tough, it is almost like playing monopoly and you have got all the money and all of the pieces and you are playing against someone who does not even know the rules. what is the point? those fans are
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not interested. you have picked quite a world cup for your first one. yeah, it is the first world cup i've ever really had the opportunity to go to in terms of both time and finances. every football fan wants to be able to say they've been to a world cup. it was definitely a decision that was very seriously taken decision that was very seriously ta ken about whether to decision that was very seriously taken about whether to go or whether to boycott the world cup. it was a conversation that a lot of members of pride in football have had. your family must be worried. they really, really don't want me to go! i've been made to set up a chat group that i will have to message their morning, noon and night to let them know i'm safe and friends as well are know i'm safe and friends as well a re really know i'm safe and friends as well are really concerned about my safety. i want to bring in bob sealey, the conservative mp, you have three fans here, each of whom have three fans here, each of whom have real concerns about going to russia but won't be put off going and supporting england. do you think the foreign office has really done
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enough to give information to fans and to make sure they are protected when they get to russia?” and to make sure they are protected when they get to russia? i think firstly danny is absolutely right, i was gutted when russia got the world cup and qatar because of their human rights record and i don't think either of those countries for different reasons are right to host the world cup. i think there are two threats that british bands face, the official threat, which is not going to happen because i think the russians, whether they like is not, officially, russia will be on its best behaviour. the problem is whether the police can control the ha rd whether the police can control the hard right extremists, the view into the anti—gay, anti—black people who occu py the anti—gay, anti—black people who occupy the fringes of russian football. —— occupy the fringes of russian football. — — the occupy the fringes of russian football. —— the virulent li anti—gay. in fact, they talked up by some members of parliament in russia as being somehow part of the honour of russia and some really stupid stuff. i think the fco has been a bit woolly, saying go but be a bit careful. 0k, bit woolly, saying go but be a bit careful. ok, that is an answer but
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you know, that is not a very responsible thing to say. if there is going to be a serious threat to black british people or gay british people going, you need to have a bit more clarity and honesty with people about what we can do. it didn't help that the diplomat who was sorting out these arrangements was one of those expelled over the sergei skripal affair. billy, you are going on your rome? for the first game because i only decided a few days ago to go to volgograd, i'm going there by myself although while —— i know a lot of england fans so we will meet out there and the third game in colin ingram and which eve ryo ne game in colin ingram and which everyone is going to, i got a big group of fans going, black, asian, white, men and women, so a big group, that is the easiest game to get to. the interesting thing... the thing i think that drove me to go is there's a couple of things. firstly, i went to kiev and i was really scared to go there because it's got
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similar problems to russia with far right football hooligans. but when i ended up going to kiev, i walked out and it was like disneyland, you walked out and it was unbelievable, really good tournament put together and the rumour was that the bigwigs, the people in government or whoever, basically went to the ultras and told them to go on holiday for a month, don't mess up the tournament. i was very surprised when i went out there. now i'm not condoning their behaviour because you know that kiev has still got problems and the same with russia, russia has got a massive problem with right—wing football fa ns massive problem with right—wing football fans at football matches. however, i've also had friends who have been to russia, been on basketball tours and so on, said they'd had a great time, really hospitable and people had taken them in. ithink hospitable and people had taken them in. i think the thoughts of some people are it may be a similar situation to kiev where the authorities have told the fans, apparently, i have spoken to russian journalists and apparently they've been going to the ultras, going to their parties and knocking on the
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doors, telling them they are watching them and the hope is they have told them to disappear for the tournament and then they can do what they want afterwards. this is not condoning russian behaviour because at the end of the day, it's disgusting and people in authority condone this activity. you know, when they went to marseille, they we re when they went to marseille, they were saying, "good on you, boys, you've done really well". but i have a thought and feeling that in russia, that will be put to one side toa russia, that will be put to one side to a certain extent and it might be a very positive thing but it does not condone the bigger picture, the really quite nasty picture in russia which needs to be sorted. another nasty picture of course, di, is the homophobia, which is in russia. i know the advice has been from the foreign office that although same—sex sexual activity has been decriminalised in russia since 1993, it is strongly understood and advised you don't publicly display your sexuality but this is up to the
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individual. does that worry you? i can see that you have got your three lions pride scarf on, is that what you will display out and about and do you worry about that?” you will display out and about and do you worry about that? i don't thinkjoe all right intends to be publicly gay! we have some protection... i was not suggesting public displays of affection, but more if you are going to wear certain things or take banners or whatever it is common to be who you are and represent do you. yeah, you're right, it's really important we do feel, that is the whole point of pride in football, the whole point of developing lgbt fan groups in the uk is that fans should label to be who they are unwelcome in football stadiums and i think we are going to be able to, it sounds like, fifa really want this to work it sounds like we will be able to be ourselves and make a statement about lg bt ourselves and make a statement about lgbt visibility in football, internationally come in the stadiums
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that england are playing in. whether we feel comfortable doing that outside the stadiums i think is a very different situation. there are vigilante groups and they are not all part of ultra—organised groups. u nfortu nately, all part of ultra—organised groups. unfortunately, i would like to think billy is right and all of those people will just do billy is right and all of those people willjust do not show up but thatis people willjust do not show up but that is a concern. you know, there are concerns about how people will relate to us in hotels and in restau ra nts a nd relate to us in hotels and in restaurants and in the street. i think actually, the safest place we are going to be is watching the football. what about you, joe? would you be visible, as it were? i completely agree with di that the safest place to be what —— will be in the stadium, and! to be what —— will be in the stadium, and i will be there, hopefully with di, with the three lions flag, the scarves, and hopefully the rainbow flag as well,
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and we hope the images of that are beamed across the world, to really show that football should and can be a place that is welcoming to lgbt foot ball a place that is welcoming to lgbt football fans, and that it is something that fifa, you know, say for everyone and it is inclusive, but they have the world cup in russia where there is an anti—propaganda law against lgbt relationships, they then got the next one in qatar where it is illegal to be gay, then you have potentially the one after that in morocco where it is also illegal to be gay, so how long can fifa be saying that football is inclusive when they keep having the main tournament in places where there are such horrible aspects to the human rights of that country? bob seely, what do you want to see the government do, the last few days, before the world cup begins, to make sure fans can be as safe as they can be going to russia. ? calmac there's very little they can do
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realistically now. they can continue to make the case is —— realistically now. they can continue to make the case is -- there is very little realistically they can do now. i am sure the overwhelming majority of russians will be super friendly because they are really nice people, but it is how the russian police behave, and also how they deal with the hooligans, and i very much hope what your other speakers have been saying about these hooligans, that they have been told to disappear for the next month, that is the best course of action for all concerned and i hope we have a really great world cup, and for all those people going, enjoy and be proud of who you are, but just be a enjoy and be proud of who you are, butjust be a little bit sensible because this place is not as friendly as it should be when it comes to dealing with hooligans. thank you all for coming in. very grateful to you. the foreign and commonwealth office has welcomed the committee's report — in a statement it said... the fco said it will now consider the report's
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other recommendations. today 41 sites across england, at the centre of suffragette protests — from mass meetings and smashed windows to prison hunger strikes and post box fires — will be officially recognised in the nation's heritage list. we've all heard of emmeline pankhurst and millicent fawcett as crucial campaigners in the suffragette movement, but as those 41 sites are recognized around the country, we're going to find out more about campaigners from communities who played a critical role in getting women in the uk the vote — but whose contributions may not have led to them becoming household names. let's hear from some of those incredible women. i know in those days i was extremely annoyed at the difference between the advantages men had, and boys had, and the ones girls had.
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i know when one grew up and saw the differences and the opportunities that boys had, and that men had, and those that women and girls had, well, of course, that just increased that feeling. no women solicitors allowed. that woman stood in a court alone, in a man's world, and she got man's sense of justice. i mean, if a woman went to work and her husband was out of work, he could come outside that factory, take her money as she earned it, go and spend it, and she couldn't do anything. they said it would ruin the country and give us a very bad standing with other nations.
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which was ridiculous. we lived like animals, to a degree, the poorer side. there were some people with money, but there was a very big gap. those that had, and those that really were like church mice, before the suffragettes started and the '14 war. that woke us up. until then, we were fast asleep. we're joined by peter barratt, the great—grandson of suffragette alice hawkins. she was a working—class shoe machinist jailed five times for her role leading the suffragette campaign in leicester in the early 20th century. also with us is diane atkinson, a historian and author of book rise up women! the remarkable lives of the suffragettes. and elizabeth crawford, a historical researcher and author of numerous books on the suffragette movement. thank you ever so much for coming
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peter barratt, you're the great—grandson of suffragette alice hawkins. she sounds like an incredible woman. she sounds like an incredible woman. she was a working—class lady. most people think of the suffragette movement is fairly middle—class ladies with time on their hands, but she was none of that, she was a left—wing radical socialist, and assure machinist. she campaigned on equal pay because women in the factories in leicester were looking to get half the rate that the men would get for the same work, so alice campaigned lawfully until it for thes, then in 1907 quite dramatically she becomes a suffragette after she is arrested outside parliament protesting with the other women —— until her maker for thes, then in 1907. she would have 1a days in jail generally, disorderly conduct, resisting police. twice in leicester present, and she went on hunger strike on the third occasion. diane, peter rightfully says a lot of people see
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the suffragettes as a very middle—class movement. how many working—class women like alice where there? we don't have the precise figures, but we do know from stories that have come to light all over the country that they were everywhere. wherever there was a middle—class group organising, the actively recruited working—class women into the organisation, so they were all over the country, all over scotland, ireland, wales, and certainly all over england. it was a mass movement, which included lots of working women. elisabeth, it is worth remembering as well there were huge sacrifices made by these suffragettes —— elizabeth. personal, shunned by families sometimes? indeed, it wasn't only going to prison. they could be derided in their local community, and some of their local community, and some of the working—class women particularly when they went to prison, it wasn't just that they were in prison, but the worry to much about what was happening to their families while they were away, who would look after
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they were away, who would look after the children, and so it did fall particularly ha rd the children, and so it did fall particularly hard on them. although all these middle—class suffragettes who went on hunger strike, they went through formidable experiences. it was obviously appalling. peter, there must be immense pride in your family about what your great—grandmother did. family about what your great-grandmother did. all the family are very proud of alice. i first learned of her over 50 years ago when i was a young boy, six or seven. i would go read my grandfather's house in the school holidays, and my grandfather would tell me about his mother, alice. the whole family supported her, so they would all go on the marchers. grandad would tell me first—hand accou nts grandad would tell me first—hand a ccou nts of grandad would tell me first—hand accounts of the marches, how she was heckled by men in the crowd, "get back to your family," they would shout at her. so i have been brought up shout at her. so i have been brought up with a history of alice hawkins. it is important that leicester recognises her now as well. yes, we have had tremendous lot. i was on a campaign with the labour councillor
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for leicester, the reza statue to alice, and about 18 months ago a businessman, local businessman, came forward , businessman, local businessman, came forward, and he said i will pay for the statue in full —— to raise a statue. just in february, centenary week, yes, he did, and we unveiled the bronze statue of alice hawkins, a lovely bronze statue, four metres high, in the marketplace. diane, do you get a sense the women involved in this movement at the time had an idea really of how we would look backin idea really of how we would look back in history at what they were doing? they were very focused on theircampaign, and they doing? they were very focused on their campaign, and they were always working for other women in the future, so they understood that they might not get the immediate rewards of women having the vote, whenever that came, but they were always looking to future generations, and they would be so thrilled to be remembered in this way. and they would be so happy that there is actually so much love in the room, everywhere you go, for the suffragettes. at the time they were the most vilified people in the country. so, you know, they
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understood what they were doing, and they were very positive about the future, but what they were doing at the time was really hard.” future, but what they were doing at the time was really hard. i wasjust going to say they really had an eye to the future as well, because after women got the vote, they put together a very comprehensive collection of their memoirs, so that their voices would speak down the us, and! their voices would speak down the us, and i mean a lot of research now is based on their own personal recollections. on what was the make—up of the women who were generally involved in the movement? was a particularly white middle—class women, some working—class women, was there a racial aspect? i would say it was pretty cross class. there were a numberof women of pretty cross class. there were a number of women of rank whose fathers were aristocrats, high board, a large number of middle—class women, and large numbers of working—class women. ——
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highborn. we don't have precise figures because a lot of women didn't come out as suffragettes, and for many it wasn't a coming out moment, so we don't have the figures, what is —— which is frustrating. but from the newspapers, from comments the women we re newspapers, from comments the women were making, we know thousands of women were involved in the struggle over the country. and they didn't come out forfear of over the country. and they didn't come out for fear of the litigation? yes. as far as race went, it has been one of the things that interested me in these many years —— of vilification. there were very few women of colour we can find, and it's not that they were barred or anything. theyjust it's not that they were barred or anything. they just weren't involved. the only ones really that are known about either high born, the princess who had a biography written offer, and who was a goddaughter of queen victoria, so she was quite a trophy for the suffragettes to parade, and she was also doing a partially indian, also
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german, of birth as well. apart from her there were german, of birth as well. apart from herthere were a german, of birth as well. apart from her there were a handful of other indian, again wellborn, women, whose names we do know. —— well born. we are hoping this year with all the attention perhaps more of the stories might come out. absolutely. and how imported, significant, is it that there will be these 41 places recognised for their historical significance today? i think it is marvellous, fantastic project. when these sites become well known, what these sites become well known, what the sites will do is bring the story of the suffragettes to people's doorsteps. they might not have been aware of what had happened in that building, they might have some sort of garbled idea of what had gone on, but the fact that these sites are there, and! but the fact that these sites are there, and i hope it will grow in them over the years, it will make people now stop and think about what the suffragettes endured so women can vote, and it is there in front of them on the doorstep, so i think it isa of them on the doorstep, so i think it is a terrific project. it is described... protest, but it is not
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just one of fires were set bombs we nt just one of fires were set bombs went off, but also ridiculously as one, in kensington, where a lot of the banners were made by the suffrage arts and crafts group, so it was that kind of protest as well thatis it was that kind of protest as well that is being commemorated. my late mother's memories of her granny alice was of her saying, you must use your vote, we suffered for it. and my mum said she always voted, andi and my mum said she always voted, and i think these sites around the uk will lose these young people to learn more about the suffragettes and what the campaign for, and i think it will hopefully enthuse young people to think about voting at their earliest occasion, and if so to me, it isjob done. at their earliest occasion, and if so to me, it is job done. and that you go into schools and talk to young people. it is important
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about people understanding what these women went through. if you're going to go and spoil your ballot paper, even if you don't like anyone on it, at least vote. since the unveiling of the statue on a volu nta ry unveiling of the statue on a voluntary basis i have been in the leicester area —— leicestershire area, the 20 primary schools, two o'clock in the morning, two o'clock in the afternoon, school dinners. the young children are absolutely up for it, they are so keen to learn about alice. i bring along sashes, they march around the playground, and again! they march around the playground, and again i think if we can enthuse children, young people, at that age, they will grow up to be the citizens we wa nt they will grow up to be the citizens we want in the country. still to come. ageism — prejudice or discrimination on the grounds of someone's age — is "thriving" in the uk according to a survey by the royal society for public health — we'll have reaction to that later in the programme. let's get the latest weather update — with alina jenkins. the weekend is not looking too bad. the weekend is not looking too bad. the morning of contrast, ashari read was parts of the midlands, wales and into yorkshire and we have had some mist and fog as well. already some sunshine this morning and a
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beautiful start to the day along the sussex coast. there will be further bright or sunny spells but showers around and some of those could be heavy and dundry particularly across northern ireland and western scotland. taking a look at the earlier satellite picture, it tells the story quite well, a zone of cloud stretching from wales up through the midlands, into yorkshire and the humberand through the midlands, into yorkshire and the humber and that has been bringing showreel rain this morning. already starting to fizzle out a bit but some showers in the in this area. to the north and south, spells sunshine coming through but as the day wears on, we are more likely to see thundery showers, particularly across western parts of scotland and northern ireland. the wind is very light is where we catch these, they will be very slow moving and give a lot of rain in a short amount of time. further east across scotland, dry but cool along the coast, inland, a high of 22. thundery showers across northern ireland and showers across northern ireland and showers for wales and the midlands and also for south west england but further south and east, east anglia
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and the south—east mainly dry with spells of sunshine and temperatures around 22. through this evening, clear spells and still a few showers, particularly across south—west england and western parts of scotland. they should fade across northern ireland and elsewhere mainly dry but clearer skies school only filling back in with mist and low cloud, temperatures between nine and 1a, lowest across northern england, scotland and parts of east anglia. this is how the weekend is shaping up. high pressure dominating the weather pattern but keeping an eye on what is happening over france and heavy, boundary showers, flirting at times with the south coast but they should miss us here. saturday fairly cloudy for many but slowly, the cloud will thin and break, lingering along the eastern coast with most of us seem warm sunshine but the potentialfor coast with most of us seem warm sunshine but the potential for heavy and thundery showers across parts of western scotland and maybe northern ireland. in the sun, temperatures getting up to 22 or 23. more in the way of sunshine on sunday. still the chance of some showers, yes, you've guessed it, across scotland and
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filtering down into northern parts of england, probably just filtering down into northern parts of england, probablyjust saying off the south coast and in the sunshine, temperatures up to 24. hello it's friday, it's 10 o'clock, i'm chloe tilley... borisjohnson is secretly recorded saying that there could be a brexit meltdown. he also referred to the treasury as the heart of the remain campaign. we'll be live in westminster with the latest. also, the children who persistently hear voices that aren't there. i remember at age probably three years old sitting on my grandparents' stairs, and i heard the lion and the bear from teletubbies saying, "i'm coming to get you, i'm coming to get you," over and over again. it made me feel terrified of it. i thought it was normal, though, to hear these voices. and claims that ageism
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is "thriving" in the uk. we'll ask why people are ashamed of being old. good morning. it is four minutes past ten. we will speak to our political correspondent chris mason to get the very latest on the comments made by boris johnson, the foreign secretary. 0bviously, these were secretly recorded but it's not really telling us anything that we don't think we knew about boris anyway. good morning. the sentiment is unsurprising but in classic boris johnson terms, the language is pretty fruity and there's even a bit of latin throne in which is a characteristic of borisjohnson in these verbal interjections. all of this recording of a conversation he had at a conservative dinner on wednesday has been leaked, on wednesday has been leaked, on wednesday night, and it was leaked
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to buzzfeed, the headline, there, describing it as it as em—boris—ing but i'm not sure it is that embarrassing because is embarrassment threshold is several thousand feet north of the summit of mount everest, and secondly, while he and his team say they are disappointed the remarks were late, i can't disappointed the remarks were late, ican‘t imagine disappointed the remarks were late, i can't imagine for a second they are that surprised they were. what did he say? brexit will happen, it is inevitable but he fears it won't be the brexit he would like, in other words, a clean andrew brexit, or hard brexit as some people describe it. he has a pop at the treasury, describing it as being at the heart of remain, not exactly diplomatic language from the country's chief diplomat describing a government department across the road in whitehall. he also talks about bumps in the road and how there would be summed this as far as there would be summed this as far as the process of delivering brexit was concerned. rather tricky pitch for a politician to say that things will be ok in the end but in the short term they might be a bit rough but
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of course, though he was in or select context than may have imagined, these remarks would end up. and as we had a second ago, borisjohnson also talked about president trump in a complimentary way, imagining him leading the brexit negotiations. what has the reaction been liked the comments? broadly speaking with borisjohnson, it comments? broadly speaking with boris johnson, it falls comments? broadly speaking with borisjohnson, it falls into the same category of the and interventions from john prescott that he is to make when he was deputy prime minister and people in the labour party will say, "john will be done", you often get the same response when you get these interventions from boris johnson, same response when you get these interventions from borisjohnson, a big personality willing to articulate his arguments in his own way, if you like, there's a parallel with the now lord prescott and a lot
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will say it is boris being boris. but in the context of yesterday and all of the shenanigans around david davis and the hokey koji, was the law out of the cabinet, still in by the end of the day but only by demanding his own way, you end up with a sequence of events in the last 24 hours where the three big brexiteer wicket is in the cabinet, liam fox, the international trade secretary, borisjohnson, the foreign secretary and david davis, the brexit secretary, all publicly spelling out what they want out of brexit, doing what you are not meant to do which is to forget collective responsibility and say what you really think. it is a reminder of how we ultimately the prime minister is asa how we ultimately the prime minister is as a result of the election last year, coupled with the big challenge of delivering brexit and also some concern amongst brexiteers that despite the prime minister's promise, they are not going to get the brexit they truly desire. chris mason speaking to us from westminster. thank you forjoining us. here's annita mcveigh in the bbc newsroom with a summary of today's news. england fans travelling
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to russia for the world cup have been warned they are at serious risk of racist, homophobic and anti—british attacks. a history of hooliganism and the collapse of anglo—russian relations in the wake of the salisbury posisoning has left mps fearing for supporters' safety. the government has been accused of providing vague reassurances over their security. the prime minister theresa may has arrived in canada ahead of this weekend's annual g7 summit which brings together the leaders of the world's biggest economies. this year's meeting is expected to focus on themes including future growth, issues of equality and climate change. concerns surrounding international trade and the potential summit between the north korean leader kim jong—un and president trump are also expected to dominate talks. negative attitudes toward growing old are having a major impact on the public‘s health. that's according to a report out today, which warns media cliches and anti—ageing cosmetics are doing more harm than good. a quarter of young adults surveyed by the royal society of public health associated old age
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with depression and unhappiness. louis walsh has decided to leave the x factor after what he has described as 13 "fa ntastic" years. he's appeared on all but one series of the itv show since it began in 2004 but says he will remain a judge on ireland's got talent and continue to manage music acts. you probably know why the chicken crossed the road by now. but why did the cow cross the loch? well, this herd on the crom estate, in northern ireland, swims around 100 metres to an island on loch erne every year to feed on fresh pasture. they'll stay there for the summer before swimming back in october. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 10.30. back to you and i don't have any more cowjokes, before you ask? i was impressed with the one at 9am. speak to you later. how many of you have bought cosmetics to make you look younger, or left your age off your social media profile because you don't
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want the world to know? well, you could be doing more harm than good. a report out today shows negative attitudes toward growing old are having a major impact on the public‘s health and many think unhappiness goes hand—in—hand with ageing. be interested to hear what you think about this. we will be talking about it later. get in touch with us using the hashtag victoria live and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. here's some sport now with damian. good morning. marcus rashford has given gareth southgate food for thought after berlin performed in the win over costa rica. so england start theirjourney to russia, with love — from fans and the media. they were totally dominant against costa rica, who had helped send england home early four years ago and who are also heading to russia themselves. marcus rashford made his case for a starting place with a stunning goal — and danny wellbeck got england's second near the end.
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i wanted him, like all the others, to be making mistakes because if they are making mistakes then they are trying things. for me, all of the players, if they want to try to be as good as they can be, they've got to try things and we have to accept it might mean the odd failure but what you then might get is the odd moments like he has produced tonight. there's a bit to sort out but that is great because we want a squad that are playing well and have the spirit that the lads have at the moment. it is helped by the three forwards, we can play what we see but within the structure. we are not quite there yet but we're getting there and training is improving. you want to improve each day and still do better going into the tournament. it turned from frustration to celebration for wales' women, who took a big step towards their world cup in france next year. after they'd missed a penalty, kayleigh green gave them victory over bosnia—herzegovina. wales are top of their group,
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but england can jump above them again tonight when they play russia in moscow. and erin cuthbert scored twice as scotland came from a goal down to beat belarus 2—1 and boost their chances of reaching the finals. they're three points behind group leaders switzerland with three games to play. on clay is the toughest challenge in sport, notjust tennis. it's been claimed that beating rafa nadal over five sets on clay is the toughest challenge in sport, notjust tennis. and the man they call the king of clay is going to take some beating this year at the french open. he already holds the record of ten titles and he's through to the semifinals after beating diego schwartzman. nadal faces juan martin del potro this afternoon. simona halep has another chance to end hergrand slamjinx. the world number one has lost three finals, including two at roland garros. and after she beat wimbledon champion garbine muguruza, sloane stephens now stands in her way.
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and gordon reid is bidding for his first major wheelchair singles title. he beat his doubles partner, world number 1 alfie hewett, in the quarterfinals. dina asher—smith said she was "over the moon" after breaking her own british 100—metres record at the diamond league meeting in oslo. with her university studies finished, she's now fully focused on athletics and it's going well — she took 0.075 off her old best time crossing the line in 10.92 seconds. she's looking good for the european championships in august. that's all the sport for now. more later. thanks. remember this? you're joking, you'rejoking, not you're joking, not another one? you'rejoking, notanother one? 0h, for gods sake, i can't, honestly, you'rejoking, notanother one? 0h, for gods sake, ican't, honestly, i can't stand this. there's too much politics going on at the moment. why does she need to do it? she says this will produce clarity and gets
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things out in the open and sort things out in the open and sort things out. i thought she said that initially when took over. so that was brenda in bristol's reaction when the election was called and today it's a year to the day since a snap general election saw the conservative party lose its majority in the commons. theresa may was able to hold onto power with the support of the northern irish democratic unionist party, but was dramatically weakened by the result. a year on, the defining issue of theresa may's premiership has of course been brexit. another turbulent day in westminster yesterday ended with the publication of so—called "backstop" proposal, setting out a plan for how the uk will trade with the eu after brexit if no other agreement can be reached. the proposal would see the uk match eu trade tariffs temporarily in order to avoid a hard irish border post—brexit. the uk voted to leave the eu in 2016, and is negotiating the terms on which it will leave the block. well, we'rejoined by two political insiders to look back on the political year,
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and help us understand where we're up to in negotiating britain's exit from the eu. from the financial times we have sebastian payne, and we can also speak to the former labour party adviser and political commentator, ayesha hazerika. thank you forjoining us. . first of all, borisjohnson, the foreign secretary's comments, which have been released overnight. either of you surprised by what he said? not in the slightest. what he said, as we all know, brexit not going the way he wants, he was rather —— what do men would rather it was going on a much tougher direction. he would probably rather we walked out of the box right now. he probably feels he should be the man in charge. about the treasury, how they are acting,
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that theresa may should be a bit more like donald trump, and boris johnson can probably see some of himself in that too. in normal circumstances, he would be sacked for that. i can't remember the amount of times in the past year boris has broken cabinet collective responsibility, and yet he is com pletely responsibility, and yet he is completely unsackable. and the reason for that is theresa may is so weak, completely fragile, has no power base, and she is really there because of brexit, because there is no contender for the conservative party who wants to come in right now when brexit is such a poisoned chalice. if we look back to her very misfortunate conference speech when she had that coughing fit, and somebody is sabotaged it, a disaster from start to finish, literally like something out of in the thick 0f from start to finish, literally like something out of in the thick of it, but boris, before that conference speech again, tried to go across her, tried to release what he would have done, and sebastian is absolutely right, it is operation
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boris, boris is on manoeuvres, and he knew exactly what he was doing. whether you are a special adviser or senior backbencher, definitely if you cabinet member, there is no such thing as of the record. when you go into a speaker even a private coffee with a journalist, you know that all your words can be leaked, so he knew exactly what he was doing. chris mason, are political correspondent, was saying earlier on his book the liam fox, the international trade secretary, and said he had threatened to threatened to resign to the trade minister —— he spoke to liam fox. and also that david davis had threatened to resign unless they both got their own way. how weak is theresa may at the moment? incredibly. the prime minister reminds me of a ping—pong ball on top of what fossett. she is there, but never quite goes away, but she could tip over any moment. 0ne but never quite goes away, but she could tip over any moment. one thing is that all these brexiters continue
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to threaten to resign and yet they are still there. borisjohnson, liam fox, david davis —— ping—pong ball on top of a water fossett. they never go away. every time theresa may can challenge these people, compromise, soften on brexit that little bit, and i think that is the lesson of the past 24 hours, that theresa may still has some authority to soften brexit and push towards getting a deal, and the hardliners, they always let her get away with it. that is the point. she is still there. she is, but why would you wa nt there. she is, but why would you want to comment right now when brexit is such an absolute mess? one of the problems the conservative party has, even though they have no love or affection for theresa may, they have not settled on who her successor would be. so there is a great battle when she goes, and i suspect she will go after we have some kind of deal on brexit. next
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summer, i think. yes, to give her successor taken summer, i think. yes, to give her successor ta ken to summer, i think. yes, to give her successor taken to bed in ahead of a general election against labour and jeremy corbyn, but the problem is that the conservative party, kind of like the labour party after ed miliband left, there will be a battle for the heart and the ideology of the conservative party, the modernisers, anna soubrys, nicky morgans, the more socially liberal conservatives, and the more traditional, fiscal, those conservatives, the jacob rees—moggs. well, there is a big showdown coming down in the conservative party, and sebastian is right, if they don't have a successor, the way they are talking now, they could have a general election that could deliver ajeremy general election that could deliver a jeremy corbyn lead government, which means they can noise off, but actually going over the edge is quite a big act, against notjust the conservative party but the country as well. what has been achieved in the last year? nothing. it has been totally wasted year.
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domestically, and brexit, this government has done absolutely nothing. the debates we are having now about the customs union, we knew all this last year, we this the day we left the eu. i think it is appalling how little has been done. domestic legislation, tell me what has been done. after the grenfell fire, what has been done? nothing. it is an absolute failure of leadership, on brexit and the things that matter to the country. theresa may is trying to stay on top of events but not actually pushed to do anything, or even make any decisions.” actually pushed to do anything, or even make any decisions. i would say we are in a brexistential crisis in this country right now. who is threatening to resign and everything, big unresolved questions, and i was at a conference
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this week with people from the science sector, nuclear, aviation, pharmaceutical, and these are not party political people, they are happy to go with whatever the government decide, but they are seeing the uncertainty is doing so much damage the business. they don't know what is happening in terms of what the plan for for their future businesses, they have an issue with skills, how to get the skilled workers. there are so many big unresolved questions, and meanwhile we have this ongoing crisis with the nhs, not enough gps, nurses, and i do feel britain is in a very big, deep crisis at the moment. brexit is sucking up all the bandwidth of political commentators, such as sebastian and myself, it is sucking up sebastian and myself, it is sucking up all the time of civil servants, special advisers, of government ministers, of the prime minister, and we are stuck, we're not moving one way or the other. politics is in stalemate right now.” one way or the other. politics is in stalemate right now. i think ayesha is right and one thing we have discovered about theresa may over the last year, her character is actually very strong. if you look at
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all of these challenges, these threats, she could have walked away at any moment. after that conference, which he described as the most painful moment of relief... and nobody would have blamed her. no, but she does stay. she does have a great public service ethic of saying, look, i have to get my party and my country through this very difficult period, but the problem is she just can't make decisions on these crucial questions about the nhs or what have you, it is fudging and fudging, and over and over again, to avoid confrontation, because she doesn't wa nt to confrontation, because she doesn't want to get her party over. now, it isa want to get her party over. now, it is a good survival strategy and has kept a party in place, but like you said, ayesha, it is really bad for the country. one thing coming up in july, the 70th anniversary of the nhs, a really big thing, and it could be an opportunity to say we are going to take this forward and give the nhs money it needs, or will she docket? we will find out. she should take the view... she is on borrowed time and if she wants her
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legacy to survive and be anything other than a complete disaster, she should do what is right for the national interests of the country, notjust thinking national interests of the country, not just thinking about her backbenchers. thank you both for coming in. very grateful to you. by the end of this summer, canada is expected to become the first g20 country to legalise cannabis for recreational use. following a vote last night to ratify the bill the drug could soon be found for sale in liquor stores and chemists. canada was one of the first to legalise medical cannabis — as far as back as 2001 with huge cannabis farms across the country. the cannabis that's been cultivated here is under ourfederal, medical, legal cannabis programme. all of this cannabis is currently being produced for patients. this is a very significant policy change.
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we will be one of the first countries in the world to be legalising recreational cannabis and we are well aware that the world is watching. really, the most important thing is the youth need access to evidence—based education so they can make informed decisions about consuming cannabis. and that doesn't happen in an environment of prohibition. jodie emery has been campaigning for legalisation of cannabis for almost 15 years and shejoins me now from toronto in canada. incredibly early in the morning, so
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i grateful for you speaking to us, jodie. are you happy with what has happened? unfortunately not delighted. 0n the one hand legalisation as a message is so important, that the world is watching, that we need to send this message, that any country can and should reform the cannabis laws, but when you get down to the actual details of the legislation, there area number of details of the legislation, there are a number of things that concern lawyers and civil liberties advocates. there are more penalties, tougher sentences, and in fact the whole game, to legalise, should be focused on protecting the civil liberties of individuals —— the whole aim. and reducing the harm of the criminal law, but there are some details in the act that introduce
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more punishment in more ways to get in trouble with the law, and it neglects the victims of prohibition and all of the people who suffered lack of access and criminal persecution. in reality, jodie, when will someone in canada be able to head down to the chemist, the liquor store, and by recreational cannabis? it will be a few months. we have this federal legislation, but that law does allow the provinces and territories to set up the retail sales themselves. in some areas, like 0ntario where i am, only the government can sell cannabis, and it is being controlled by the liquor distribution. all across canada the liquor boards are very deeply involved, but it means there are still questions about edibles for medical use. that is not illegal yet. there are questions about consumption loungers, like amsterdam, the oldest model in the world, and that is not yet available
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either —— consumption lounges. while it is exciting this is moving along, again the devil is in the details and we have a lot of work here to do in canada to keep challenging the unjust parts of this legislation.” was reading a little earlier on. it is still not clear whether you will be able to consume cannabis, whether as you see in food, or whether you decide to smoke, anywhere outside your own. it could just be inside your own. it could just be inside your home, where you are allowed to useit? your home, where you are allowed to use it? that is one of the biggest concerns. the rules say you own it. now there is this question of renters and people who don't want property, the poor, the young, the marginalised. —— question of renters and people who don't own property. and this issue of people getting tickets, $1000 fine if you're smoking outside. well, that targets the people who are already homeless,
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and in the end it results in people being evicted from their homes and becoming homeless, so for me as a legalisation advocate the number—1 thing to focus on is that law does more harm than cannabis ever has or will, that people suffering from the law, and that even if cannabis was dangerous, like alcohol which hurts people every day, having new top criminal laws doesn't make it safer and doesn't get rid of the criminal market. in fact, the government, creating criminal laws with respect to cannabis, in doing that they are literally creating the crime and criminal market, and that is why decriminalisation is so important, but it has been blocked by some of this big business focus the government is looking towards. jodie, is there a limit on the amount you can buy? is there any idea of the cost? some people say with a legalisation of recreational cannabis, the price goes up. well, legalisation should mean the price goes down. in fact, prohibition
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increases the risk reward, so there isa increases the risk reward, so there is a lot more trouble you can get into, then the risk goes up, but so as well does the reward, and that is what incentivises dangerous and unsavoury what incentivises dangerous and u nsavou ry ta kes to what incentivises dangerous and unsavoury takes to get involved when the risk is higher. but when legalisation happens, properly, cannabis is just a legalisation happens, properly, cannabis isjust a plan legalisation happens, properly, cannabis is just a plan that has grown for thousands of years. it is a weed. it doesn't need to be worth $10 pergram. a weed. it doesn't need to be worth $10 per gram. that is a prohibition price. sadly, in canada and around the world activists have convinced governments we should legalise this industry because it is worth so much, and now the governments think, mm, perhaps they can have that money for ourselves. it is wrong for governments to try to sell legal cannabis at illegal prohibition prices, but as you see the whole model being setup is flawed in many different ways, and when people want to use cannabis, they can already access it. unfortunately, it isjust criminals who are choosing to do so
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—— they are just seen as criminals for choosing to do so. jodie emery, thank you for speaking the us and thank you for speaking the us and thank you for getting up so early, jodie they from canada. —— there. time for the latest news — here's annita mcveigh. the bbc news headlines this morning: the foreign secretary boris johnson has been secretly recorded suggesting the brexit negotiations with the european union could lead to a "meltdown", and the uk won't get the deal it wants. he's also been critical of the treasury, describing philip hammond's department as being "the heart" of the remain campaign. england fans travelling to russia for the world cup have been warned they are at serious risk of racist, homophobic and anti—british attacks. a history of hooliganism and the collapse of anglo—russian relations in the wake of the salisbury poisoning has left mps fearing for supporters' safety. the government has been accused of providing vague reassurances over their security. the prime minister theresa may has arrived in canada ahead of this weekend's annual g7 summit, which brings together the leaders of the world's biggest economies. this year's meeting is expected to focus on themes including future growth, issues of equality and climate change.
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concerns surrounding international trade and the potential summit between the north korean leader kim jong—un and president trump are also expected to dominate talks. louis walsh has decided to leave the x factor after what he has described as 13 "fa ntastic" years. he's appeared on all but one series of the itv show since it began in 2004, but says he will remain a judge on ireland's got talent and continue to manage music acts. you probably know why the chicken crossed the road by now. but why did the cow cross the loch? well, this herd on the crom estate, in northern ireland, swims around one hundred metres to an island on loch erne every year to feed on fresh pasture. they'll stay there for the summer before swimming back in october. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. here's some sport now with damian. good morning. england head to the world cup next week with real confidence after beating costa rica in their final warm—up match.
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marcus rashford scored an absolute cracker in their 2—0 win. wales' women are now top of their world cup qualifying group after kayleigh green's winner against bosnia and herzegovina. england can regain top spot when they take on russia later. scotland also won. rafael nadal is back on court at the french open this afternoon as his dominance on clay continues. juan martin del potro stands between him and a place in yet another paris final. dina asher—smith broke her own british 100 metres record at the diamond league meeting in oslo. she ran 10.92 seconds, taking 0.07 seconds off her old mark. it was the ideal preparation as she focuses on the european championships in august. that's all the sport for now. a 90—year—old woman is seriously ill in hospital after being attacked in her bed in north—west london. iris warner was discovered by her son at her home in brent. let's get more from our correspondent in brent, simonjones. simon, what details do we have about
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the attack? iris warner was found in her house in this street by her son on monday lunchtime. she was drifting in and out of consciousness at the time. she was raised to hospital and her injuries were very, very severe and doctors feared at first that she might not make it. she has managed to pull through and what she has been able to tell medical staff and also the police is she woke up and there was a man standing over her when she was in bed. he then proceeded to strike her repeatedly on the head. after going to hospital, we are told she is going to need hospital treatment for some time to come but she was unable to say when exactly the attack took place. police believe it may have been sometime between saturday afternoon and monday afternoon when she was discovered. potentially she was lying in bed with these horrible
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injuries for quite a period of time. herfamily has injuries for quite a period of time. her family has taken the decision to release pictures of her in the hospital bed. her body is covered with bruises. she is black and blue. they want people to see what their mother went through and also, they wa nt mother went through and also, they want information from the public. they are saying this attack is sickening and shocking and they need to know who would have done this to their mother. simon, thank you for bringing us that update. simonjones in brent. the telecoms giant bt has announced that its chief executive, gavin patterson, is to step down later this year. bt announced last month that it was to cut more than one in ten of its workforce as part of a shake—up of the company. with me is our correspondent, susannah streeter. she has more detail on this. does it come as a surprise? not that much of a surprise given the pressure from shareholders that bt was under. they wa nted shareholders that bt was under. they wanted to see a change at the top and now the board have agreed, although it seems as though they
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liked the direction and backed gavin patterson's turnaround plan, they think someone else needs to see it through. as you say, shareholders we re through. as you say, shareholders were not impressed by the latest results which saw the job losses. it is not so much that, it is more the share price that we have seen plummet, really, since late 2015, by 16% where is the ftse100 of which it isa 16% where is the ftse100 of which it is a member has risen by 20% so that would test the patience of any fund manager. what are the problems? lots of problems, take—up of broadband is slowing down partly due to saturation of the market. also bt has been in a realfight with to saturation of the market. also bt has been in a real fight with the regulator. it wants regulation to be eased, for example, when it lays new fibre—optic cable, it wants not to have to leave copper cables still there which adds to it costs. it says by stripping that out, it can lower costs and it's also been criticised for spending too much money on becoming a major sports broadcaster. that is what i wanted
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to ask you about because they have sown “— to ask you about because they have sown —— throwing so much money at bt sport, looking at the setting, the former footballers, it sport, looking at the setting, the formerfootballers, it must sport, looking at the setting, the former footballers, it must be costing so much. rhodes yes and it's been criticised for spending so much money on that, the studios, the rights of the games, rather than perhaps increasing the speed of its broadband coverage. there are some very good things that have happened as far as results are concerned with bt under his stewardship, for example, the acquisition of the mobile phone operator ee which was good for the company and part of the plan to improve customer service led to them to close call centres overseas, like in the philippines and india and they are recruiting for call centres right across the uk, from plymouth to newcastle. but it seems as though the board thinks someone else should take on the ma ntle someone else should take on the mantle now and see this through. thank you forjoining us. one in 12 children is thought to persistently hear voices that in reality aren't there, and now new research suggest the reaction of adults can affect the voices they hear in the future.
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psychologists at manchester metropolitan university and the university of manchester have been looking at the experiences of young people that have auditory hallucinations and their parents. but the study found that not all young people are upset by their voices. some even enjoy having them. 0ur reporterjames melley has been speaking to two voice hearers about their experiences. my name's laura, and i hear voices. i'm tia, and i hearvoices. i remember at age probably three years old sitting on my grandparents' stairs, and i heard the lion and the bear from teletubbies saying, "i'm coming to get you, i'm coming to get you," over and over again. it made me feel terrified of it.
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i thought it was normal, though, to hear these voices. laura is now 21 and studying at university. she's told many of her friends about her voices. it was actually quite nice that you told me. because it kind of made me understand more about you. but she didn't always find them easy to talk about. i went and spoke to my parents at seven or eight years old, talking about the voices, thinking it was a normal thing they would have. my parents who i told asked me, "what voices, laura?" they thought it was my imaginary best friend. which i don't blame them for thinking that. i felt lonely, i felt afraid. i used to hear my mum's voice quite a lot. and i used to, not hear my dad shouting, but someone shouting at me in the street. tia is 13, and asked not to be identified. she started hearing voices when she was seven.
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they sometimes got her in trouble at school. when one of my voices was just messing around with me, making me giggle too much, ijust went outside and then ijust told her to shut the f up or something, and then it stopped. this was in my head, i wasn't saying that out loud. and ijust shut my eyes and went, "shut up, i need to get on with my work, be quiet. you're not a two—year—old." and then i went back and did my work. it was saying, "oh, that paper looks really boring. " and it would make me doodle, not make me doodle, but it would make me doodle at the side of my book. and then i would bang the desk really hard because i'm so bored and zoned out. and it would say, like, "poke the computer screen and see what it does." and i did it, and it went all fuzzy, and i nearly broke it. but it was all right. i didn't get in trouble for it. tia's mum alice started noticing there might be something upsetting her daughter. the time came when you was in school
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one time, and you said that something was putting you down in school. that's what made me stop and i thought, now i can hear something that's really negative. because she used to come home and say, "but i'm just dumb." we'd say, "what's going on, why are you saying you're dumb?" she wasn't doing very well in school. and i think you said something one time that made me think, she said, "well, i think i'm dumb." i think i asked you a bit more about it, and you said sometimes you hear things in school, and that's why you put your head down, because there's something, or something saying that you're dumb. at first i thought she was talking about other people, but she never outright said to me, "i'm hearing voices." i kind of pieced it together, i think. when laura was a teenager, she started to feel overwhelmed by her voices. i would self—harm, and it was a horrible moment for me. i was struggling because the voices were so loud, so intimidating and so abusive, that it was very scary, i couldn't cope with it. it's like being in a crowded room. all you can hear is all these multiple, different voices
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having a go at you. i only recognised one of the voices, but the only other sounds are male, female, children, and some of them sound like doctor who monsters a little bit. that gravelly kind of sound, voice, kind of thing. and theyjust tell me i'm useless, pretty much all the time. i decided to talk to my mum. it took a long time to try and talk to her, but i finally spoke to her and she asked me if i wanted to see a gp, which i agreed with. the gp was understanding and so, so supportive. she told me it was normal to hear voices, and i started to feel less lonely. some children start hearing voices after they've suffered some kind of trauma. alice suffers from a chronic illness, and she thinks this affected tia. she's been through so much, and this is how she is expressing it. that's what upset me the most, ithink. and all of this was kind of tied up
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with me getting ill, not being able to be there when she expected me to be there. and just feeling probably a bit lost, i think, with it all. alice was part of the hearing voices network, which helps support people that hear voices. she decided to not take tia to see a doctor. so, i did speak to school, and what i said to school was that under no circumstances do you make any referrals to any mental health services. we are quite capable of speaking with and supporting her, and that's what we want to do as a family. we've got lots of support, there are lots of people in the hearing voices movement that she can speak to and we can speak to. that's the way we would have approached anything anyway, any particular difficulty, unless it became something where it was unmanageable. eventually, tia's voices went away. yeah, i remembera day where i wasjust, like, where's it gone? and i thought about it, and i was like, wait, there's nothing actually my head. no one's speaking to me.
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i canjust hear what i'm thinking. i don't miss them, but i have other things in my life not to miss. but not all voices just go away on their own. laura takes medication to keep her voices under control. but they still sometimes become too much for her. she's developed her own ways of coping. i have a massive passion for music. and ever since i was a young girl, i would play music and it would drown out the sound of voices. and i'm very lucky to have music there. and when i play it, i just feel freedom. i feel it's a chance to really, you know, escape from the terror that's going on inside my head. with the help of medication, i feel a lot stronger and a lot better in myself. even though the voices are still there, they're not in control of me, i'm in control of it. two young people's experiences of
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hearing voices. if you're an x factor fan, you'll no doubt have clocked that louis walsh is leaving the talent show after what's he's described as 13 "fa ntastic" years. he was the longest—serving judge on the show and appeared on all but one edition since it began in 2004. let's get more from our entertainment correspondent colin paterson, who is in salford. good morning. was this his choice or is itx good morning. was this his choice or is it x factor‘s choice? good morning. was this his choice or is it x factor's choice? let's go back to last year's vinyl, the least watched in history, 4.4 million tuning in, down1 million on the previous year which was the previous least watched in history. this is a show that has needed to bring changes and that is what we are seeing. louis walsh is gone, nicole scherzinger is gone, sharon osbourne is not on the pre—recorded shows, just on the live finals and also consider strictly, it's big rival,
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going from strength to strength, getting around 10 million of them last year. i would very much say, especially when louis walsh last month was saying he's got a contract for this year and he'll be back, this was very much simon cowell‘s choice. but he has been a huge part ofa choice. but he has been a huge part of a brand of a programme that has been massive over, as he said, their teen years. to appear on a saturday night tv programmes are more than a decade is a huge achievement and don't take that away from louis. he came into the show is the man who had managed boyzone and westlife and johnny logan, for some of our older viewers! he was a huge part of the success story. he was on its 13 times. he only won it wants way back in the second series with shayne ward, that's my goal but he's been replaced before in 2007, briefly by brian friedman, the choreographer and there was a huge aboowa by that —— about that and he was backed by the end of the week but three years
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ago in 2015, they change the whole line—up, trying to refresh it, bringing in nick grimshaw and rita 0ra and it was not a success so they have gone back to the tried and tested the last two years. louis walsh was there but now simon cowell has decided something has to change. and thought about the problem the x factor has faced. can it run its course or canada reinvent itself? gelman it cannot keep losing 1 million viewers, year—on—year, that is just not sustainable —— million viewers, year—on—year, that isjust not sustainable -- well, it cannot keep losing a million viewers, year—on—year. but in the run—up to christmas that is when advertising revenues are their biggest, when thosejon lewis adverts will appear and get what they need, those huge audiences. so this maybe does feel like a bit of a last chance salunkhe smack the x factor, names like craig david, louis tomlinson from one direction
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being bandied about. if one member of one direction is not involved next year, i will be very surprised. we also have to talk about the comedian michael mcintyre. people are seeing here is what stolen, windows smashed in his car, waiting for his children outside school last week. he was back on stage, in dublin last night. he seemed quite happy and talked about it on stage as well? yes, the first of four magnates in dublin. there is nothing more painful than watching a man reading out someone else's jokes, but strapping, i'm going to do it, we can do it together! be fully addressed the issue on stage, and started off quite serious, saying it was touch and go whether he would do the show but said he wanted to do it. he confirmed his rolex had been stolen. then he said, "time as the healer. i
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have lost my watch. how is time going to heal? i have no idea what time it is." he also said it was not so much that fast and furious as stationery and panicking. i couldn't get my car started, it was fight or flight. get my car started, it was fight or flight. he said he could have done with the 9000 dubliners to help them out. he had to deal with them himself and it did not go well. welcomer your delivery was good! laughter thank you, our entertainment correspondent colin patterson. ageism is said to be thriving in the uk. even worse, it's affecting the health and wellbeing of everyone in society. that's according to survey of 2,000 people by the royal society for public health. it found 40% of young adults believe dementia is "inescapable" as you age. one in four think it's normal for elderly people to be depressed and unhappy. two—thirds of us have no friends more than 30 years older or younger than we are. earlier, shirley cramer — chief executive at the royal society for public health —
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spoke to the bbc about the study‘s findings. across all age groups there are very negative perceptions around ageing and ageing process, in the particular dimensions. so we ask questions based on research around loads of issues, 12 issues. but three came out as the most negative. appearance, and that won't be surprising — we talk about body image issues and problems with young people, but actually it's across the age groups. 50% of older women don't like their body, and 25% of men, in all age groups, don't — so it's notjust younger people. we founded in attitudes to activities, both physical and communal, and to memory loss. so these were the three areas. and we found that millennials, the 18—34—year—olds, had the most misperceptions, or the most difficulty, so thinking things like, oh, loneliness is inevitable. so that's what the research found, but that hardly reflects the lifestyle of these people.
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the best thing about getting older is, of course, retirement, enjoying family time, and being out with your friends on such a lovely day as today. more money in my pocket in actual fact, because my mortgage is paid. i can spend money where i want to. i've never been so busy in my whole life, and i'm really enjoying it. looking after grandchildren, going on holiday, going to the theatre. it's great. i'm quite happy in my own skin. i'm not as competitive. i don't have peer pressure. i don't have work pressure. i wear what i want. i've got more time to do the things i couldn't do when i used to work. you had very little time, so you can enjoy your grandchildren more, and go where you want, when you want. still being alive, basically! and being able to do what you want, when you want, really. let's talk to cathy austin —
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who amongst other things ran the london marathon, aged 69 — marion shoard, who is the author of how to handle later life, also cici baxter, who is 25, and james roadnight, who is 26. and we also have ian bell turner, who is 67. thank yourforjoining us. cici and james, are you worried about getting old ? us. cici and james, are you worried about getting old?” us. cici and james, are you worried about getting old? i wouldn't necessarily say i am worried about getting old, but i'm kind of... may be trying to think about what it means, trying to approach that and work out what it means for me. in what way? i think the old adage goes that age isjust what way? i think the old adage goes that age is just a what way? i think the old adage goes that age isjust a number, and i think you kind of have to deal with your wisdom as you get older and work out what that means, look back on the past and look forward to the
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future i'm kind of make the decisions that come to you, i guess. what about you ? decisions that come to you, i guess. what about you? definitely, i think it isa what about you? definitely, i think it is a mindset, and i personally have the opinion that i don't really know what will happen tomorrow, and really try to live mostly in the moment, and things are changing so rapidly, especially in technology and everything we see today, so i have no idea what the future will look like, so, yes, i can prepare today, but it may be completely different. on a surface level, do you worry about things like wrinkles, grey hair? wejoke about it, but it is an issue. look at the cosmetic companies, anti—ageing creams everywhere, and that is one of the recommendations of this report, that we dropped the term anti—ageing. report, that we dropped the term anti-ageing. do i worry about wrinkles? i'm particularly worried about going bald. bald men, less likely to have high—profile jobs, more likely to have depression etc,
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it definitely runs in my family, but i think it happens and you just have to be at peace with that. itjust happens in your life, it'sjust to be at peace with that. itjust happens in your life, it's just a different stage in yourjourney. marion, do you think you get treated differently when you are older?” do, and! differently when you are older?” do, and i think it is really interesting what cici and james are saying about appearance. very heartening james saying, if i go bald, tough, iwant heartening james saying, if i go bald, tough, i want to be as i actually am, because the report picks up that there are a lot of anxieties with people growing older, andi anxieties with people growing older, and i mean there is also concern amongst very much younger people about their age, and amongst very much younger people about theirage, and i amongst very much younger people about their age, and i think it is important that we all address this. 14—year—olds, a quarter of them, quarter of girls, are anxious, they have depression symptoms, and often it is caused by appearance anxiety, then they look to their elders like me, and a lot of older people are desperately trying to manipulate their appearance and not look old, andi their appearance and not look old, and i think it doesn't give a very
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good message to the young. we mustn't give that impression. james and i, we don't want to give the impression you have to see your body, appearance, as a sort of project, and manipulate it to look at what is considered beautiful or normal. that older people should look as old as they actually are, i think, and i think it is very important in the media that you get people, you know, you often get older women, for instance, on telly, but they don't look old. they make themselves look, you know, 1020 yea rs themselves look, you know, 1020 years younger. i want to bring in cathy and ian. cathy, do you think the word anti—ageing should be removed from the creams and lotions that millions of us seem to buy? calmac hello, thank you for inviting me, next tojoin calmac hello, thank you for inviting me, next to join you. calmac hello, thank you for inviting me, next tojoin you. ifeel we calmac hello, thank you for inviting me, next to join you. i feel we are kind of condition, aren't we? --
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yes, hello, thank you for inviting me. i don't get upset by the word anti—ageing. ifeel that me. i don't get upset by the word anti—ageing. i feel that is me. i don't get upset by the word anti—ageing. ifeel that is reality. i think, you anti—ageing. ifeel that is reality. ithink, you know, we anti—ageing. ifeel that is reality. i think, you know, we can kind of dress this up, can't we? but the reality is we will change, erskine will change. —— our skin will change. i feel i will change. —— our skin will change. ifeel i don't will change. —— our skin will change. i feel i don't necessarily wa nt to change. i feel i don't necessarily want to "look old", but as james and cici says, it's kind of a mindset, really. and i don't feel old, and that's kind of what worries me, really. i wish i did, then my mind would be more old... let me bring in ian, if you don't mind, cathy. i just wonder if men have a completely different approach to ageing the women. a very good morning. i've no idea what age is. i'm 67 years old, i'm busier now than ever. i'm
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bouncing along every morning, i wake up bouncing along every morning, i wake up every morning, i'm happy. do i worry about my appearance? not in the slightest. do i think things like ageing creams are good for people? not really, because i feel that whoever you are in the inside is how you reflect on the outside. 0ne is how you reflect on the outside. one thing! is how you reflect on the outside. one thing i wanted to do to you three here in the studio. if a man goes grey, he is seen as distinguished, but if a woman goes grey... gasps. it is this kind of letting yourself go. that is what society tells us. it is interesting at the moment because the leaders of both political parties are grey—haired, the queen doesn't die here. would we feel differently if she did? —— the queen doesn't dye her hair. it is very interesting, the media stereotype is that if you think about the people we are interviewing and you put them ten yea rs interviewing and you put them ten
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years later, and say they are in ca re years later, and say they are in care homes, you would be depicting them on telly as individuals. you look on the telly and at programmes on kerins, they arejust look on the telly and at programmes on kerins, they are just appeared crinkled hanh and we have to make them individuals, because otherwise they are kind of another species, which is wrong. -- programmes on telly. they are just crinkled hands. in this report it said people generally don't have friends there two years older. do either of you? not family, that doesn't count. i definitely don't, personally. family friends, maybe, but not necessarily, no. but you don't worry about getting old? it's not a massive issue for you.” don't think so, no. i wish i was as calm as you! it is just me worrying about other anti—ageing cream and everything. thank you so much for coming in and thank you also for joining us down the line. that is it for today. bbc newsroom live coming
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up for today. bbc newsroom live coming up next. thank you for your company today. have a good day. have a great weekend. hello. a morning of mixed fortunes so far. some spells of sunshine but also some showers, particularly through wales, parts of the midlands and in the yorkshire. that is how the rest of the day continues. spells of sunshine but also showers around. a great chance as the day wears on that some of those will turn heavy and thundery, particularly across western scotland and northern ireland. a few across south—west england as well. as on of clouds stretching from wales and yorkshire and the humber further east. the spells of sunshine will
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help temperatures up to 20, 20 two celsius. still a few showers do this evening particularly through western scotland, a few rumbling through south—west england. dry at first, but that cloud starts to move back in so much cloudier end to the night, lows between nine and 14. colour across northern england and in scotland the cloud thinning and breaking the most of us will see spells of sunshine. again, the chance of heavy thundery showers across north—western scotland. goodbye. this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at 11. borisjohnson warns of a brexit meltdown —
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in a secret recording made at a private dinner. ijust don't think i just don't think borisjohnson ijust don't think borisjohnson is someone who should be in the high officers stayed. i don't think how he conducts himself and the opportunistic way he puts his own interests constantly opportunistic way he puts his own interests co nsta ntly a head opportunistic way he puts his own interests constantly ahead of what is obviously the best interests of the country is behaviour befitting of someone in that office. theresa may arrives in canada for the g7 summit — which will focus on climate change and free trade concerns. a 90—year—old woman is seriously ill in hospital after being attacked

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