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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  June 8, 2018 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at 11. borisjohnson warns of a brexit meltdown — in a secret recording made at a private dinner. ijust don't think i just don't think borisjohnson ijust don't think borisjohnson is someone ijust don't think borisjohnson is someone who should be in the high officers stayed. i don't think how he conducts himself and the opportunistic way he puts his own interests constantly opportunistic way he puts his own interests co nsta ntly a head opportunistic way he puts his own interests constantly ahead of what is obviously the best interests of the country is behaviour befitting of someone in that office. theresa may arrives in canada for the g7 summit — which will focus on climate change and free trade concerns. a 90—year—old woman is seriously ill in hospital after being attacked in her own bed in north west london. also... a warning to england fans travelling to russia for the world cup.
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they face the risk of racist and homophobic intimidation, as well as hooliganism and anti—british hostility — according to a group of mps. and laughing it off — comedian michael mcintyre returns to the stage saying he's "0k" after being mugged by two men on a moped in london. hello, a very good morning. it's friday the 8th ofjune. i'm annita mcveigh. welcome to bbc newsroom live. borisjohnson has told a private conservative gathering that the brexit talks could be approaching "meltdown", and warned there was a risk that leave supporters may not get the deal they expected. the foreign secretary's comments , secretly recorded at a tory dinner on wednesday,
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were leaked to several news organisations. he claimed the irish border issue — one of the main sticking points in talks with brussels — had been allowed to dictate "the whole of our agenda". and he was also critical of the treasury, describing philip hammond's department as "the heart" of the remain campaign. our political correspondent chris mason is in westminster. chris, we cannot just chris, we cannotjust say chris, we cannot just say that this is boris being boris, can we? we can, albeit in a context where, on the face of it, she didn't necessarily think it would reach a wider audience. his necessarily think it would reach a wideraudience. his friend necessarily think it would reach a wider audience. his friend saying this morning that it was a covert recording and they were disappointed that it saw the light of day but i do not think it is particularly surprising given that he was addressing an audience body of the same outlook on brexit as him. a campaign in high office, and hearing
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his authentic you would be of interest. —— authentic view. the language was colourful and the timing was devastating, after all of that hullabaloo yesterday surrounding david davis and whether he was staying in the cabinet or not, and him threatening to resign and liam fox, the international trade secretary, i spent him yesterday afternoon and he didn't deny that he threatened to resign over this business of a backstop and putting a date on the end of the backstop position around the customs i’ow. backstop position around the customs row. let's have a listen to this recording, courtesy of buzzfeed news. not the easiest thing to listen to, the mobile phone was down someone's trousers or something to record this. but break up an ear, here is one little nugget... so there is a nougat, nougat number
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one. he had some stuff to say surrounding the treasury, that it was the heart of remain, not very diplomatic language for an mp to use across the road from whitehall. he said it was inevitable, but his fear being the true heart brexit that people like him would like to see. there were also remarks about president trump, and the hypothesis of how things could look if president trump was in charge of the brexit negotiations. so, some live reaction coming from
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these remarks here on bbc news in a second, but to hoover up now we have heard already this morning, he is the first minister of scotland, the snp leader, in aberdeen at the spring conference. i don't think borisjohnson is someone spring conference. i don't think borisjohnson is someone who spring conference. i don't think boris johnson is someone who should be in one of the high offices of state. i don't think how he conducts himself or the opportunistic way he puts his own interest constantly ahead of what is obviously in the best interests of the country, his behaviour befitting of someone holding that office. and from a current leader to a former leader, former conservative leader lord howard. he is certainly right to say that we should not panic. i'm not as close to the negotiations as boris is, but what we have to do is focus on the essentials of this situation.
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that is that the european union wants a deal, and there is every prospect there that if we hold our nerve if we get a good deal, we get a good deal for them and us because it is in our mutual interests but that should happen. lord howard on the radio a couple of hours ago, this is rip up, who speaks on behalf of the britain campaign group, —— rupa huq. what do you make of boris johnson's intervention? it would be interesting, how he had a go at china, trump was the only one who came out of it well. he said it would be —— this would be amusing was it not for the fact that this was it not for the fact that this was our foreign secretary. the cat has been let out the back, this is what they really think when caught off guard. they are preparing to have a damaging brexit. they know we will get a bad deal but he has a nonchalant attitude. on business,
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there are people's lives and livelihoods that are already hurting. the trump tribute act, this isa hurting. the trump tribute act, this is a president on the verge of bringing the north korean leader to the table? let's get back to the brexit stuff which is rather alarming, this is a politician who originally wrote one article four and one article against. and take the calculation... he is only interested in his own career. that is the only think boris johnson interested in his own career. that is the only think borisjohnson is interested in, he plays to the gallery and he knows that this will be enormously damaging. look at the revised growth forecast, only today, by the cbi, the tuc, they know what they are talking about, warning against this relentless precipitation towards heart brexit, that the government is prepared to do to appease their own head—bangers in the party. and one of the points borisjohnson in the party. and one of the points boris johnson directly made, in the party. and one of the points borisjohnson directly made, his fear that if there is what one would
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describe as a soft brexit, that it adds up to all of the disadvantages of being outside with none of the advantages because we aren't at the table. we cannot pursue the true advantages, because we are still shackled to the eu? i take guidance for small businesses in my constituency, i will see one immediately after this. they want certainty. this rubbish we are getting about a customs partnership arrangement, whatever, things like that, there is not enough certainty that, there is not enough certainty that they can continue trading with what is our biggest market and nearest partners. that isn't an a nswer to nearest partners. that isn't an answer to my question. address the point that "soft brexit" is a good outcome, is that not to throw away some of the principal advantages of leaving the eu ? some of the principal advantages of leaving the eu? the advantage was taking back control, it sounds good in theory but when you look at the
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detail, things like what he said about northern ireland, the good friday agreement was hard—fought. he is prepared to dismiss that. he was very dismissive of a small country that nobody bothers about. i think it is really alarming that this is what they really think and it hasn't been thought through. even the government's own analysis, every single region in every scenario, i don't think it's too late to have a people's vote. a second referendum? a validation process of the deal. that's a second referendum?m a validation process of the deal. that's a second referendum? it can ta ke that's a second referendum? it can take different forms but i think people need to vote on what it is. so be it. if people liked the deal they can vote for it again. and excuse me they can vote for it again. and excuse me to they can vote for it again. and excuse me to come they can vote for it again. and excuse me to come back to the question i ask you, forgive me i don't think you answered it, make the case for the soft brexit, because critics including boris johnson make the argument that you are stepping away from the table because you are no longer around the eu table and you cannot pursue what
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they see as the principal advantage of brexit which is going and doing your own trade deals. how do you sell the idea of the soft brexit? that's your campaign's message. we are in an unprecedented situation here. we've got the chance to negotiate what ever deal it is. there's no prescription for what equals a software heart brexit but we equals a software heart brexit but we wa nt equals a software heart brexit but we want the least damaging brexit forfamilies we want the least damaging brexit for families and jobs. we already have the slowest growth in the g7 as it is and every scenario shows that. if we can build some of those features and some of those protections for employment and the environment that we have had within the eu that we can continue trading for the economy, and i think that is good. these labels are a bit meaningless. has heard of soft or ha rd meaningless. has heard of soft or hard brexit. we were told yes or no, in or out. it was a very blunt referendum, that's why we need a people's vote on the final deal. rupa huq, labourmp
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people's vote on the final deal. rupa huq, labour mp for people's vote on the final deal. rupa huq, labour mpforthe people's vote on the final deal. rupa huq, labour mp for the open britain campaign group, a flavour there but not for the first time, borisjohnson the centre of conversations here at westminster. breaking news, an announcement from health unions that nhs workers have voted overwhelmingly to accept a 6.5% three—year pay offer from the government. nhs staff should now get that money in theirjuly pay, backdated from april, we are talking here about hospital cleaners, nurses, security guards, physiotherapists, emergency call handlers, midwives, radiographers, other nhs staff across england getting this pay rise. 14 unions have been balloting their members, nhs staff, on whether they wanted to accept or reject the proposed deal. the only union to reject it was the
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gmb but the other 13 unions voted in favour. now they get this 6.5% three—year pay offer. one of the lead negotiators, the lead negotiator for the health unions, had been quoted as saying "it is not going to solve every problem in the nhs, but it will go a long way towards making dedicated health staff feel more valued, lift flagging morale, and help turn the tide on staffing problems". more now coming up with our health editor hugh pym shortly but now the prime minister has arrived in canada ahead of this weekend's annual g—7 summit, which brings together the leaders of the world's biggest economies. this year's meeting is expected to be dominated by the threat to international trade sparked by president trump's tariffs on steel and aluminium imports. our diplomatic correspondent james robbins reports. a chateau hotel in rural quebec, the most peaceful of settings for some of the world's most powerful leaders to meet. but this g—7 summit could get noisy.
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donald trump will be isolated, as traditional american allies denounce his trade measures aimed directly at them. the president says he imposed tariffs on imported metals to protect american jobs and national security. the american steel and aluminium industry has been ravaged by aggressive foreign trade practices. it's really an assault on our country. leaders heading to the summit are angry. president macron of france urged politeness but reminded donald trump sharply, no leader is forever. and canada's prime minister, the host, openly derides donald trump's reasoning. translation: it is laughable to say that canada, france, can represent a threat to america's national security, as we are in reality the best allies the united states has had for a long time. the canadian academic who has made
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studying the g7 part of his life's work urges caution. john curtin told me all is not lost in this public fight. he hasn't quite crossed the line where he has said donald, you are a rational, but has said your argument isa are a rational, but has said your argument is a rational. canada is looking for solid european support in this fight, welcoming theresa may, who made clear again on the flight here that the american tariffs were unjustified. the prime minister added, the uk would continue to be a great champion for free trade around the world. james robbins, bbc news, quebec. everything is now in place, including the parity puppets who pop up including the parity puppets who pop up at every g7. leaders will soon lock horns with donald trump as to who is the true threat to jobs and growth. the risk of prolonged trade conflict hangs heavy over this
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summit. james robbins, bbc news, quebec. those bring you more now on that breaking news. health unions have voted overwhelmingly to accept a 6.5% three—year pay offer for their staff in england, including a range of workers from hospital cleaners, to some nurses, emergency call handlers and so on. only one of the 14 handlers and so on. only one of the 1a unions who had been balloting, those members rejected the deal, that was the gmb. hugh pym is with me now. remind our viewers first of all about the background leading up to the acceptance of this offer? the background was considerable frustration and anger among many health workers that they had been held back by the pay cap, which was in existence. this had a 0% pay rise for a couple of years and 1%, along with other public sector workers, they have fallen well behind with they have fallen well behind with the cost of living and some nurses
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and other hospital workers were really struggling. that was leading to recruitment problems and retention problems. there was considerable pressure on the government or the chancellor to lift the cap, backed byjeremy hunt with the cap, backed byjeremy hunt with the health and social care secretary. back in march after several months of negotiation, it would lift the cap for these workers, they have agreed to the 6.5%. once the unions had accepted it it was looking fairly clear that members would vote in favour, which they have apart from the gmb. what will the gmb do? they will meet next week i gather they represent a large percentage of ambulance drivers and it is conceivable that they may want to ta ke it is conceivable that they may want to take their own way forward, possibly even considering their own action. it is premature to speculate about that. it is interesting that the union recommended rejection, and those members of the gmb
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overwhelmingly went along with that and rejected it. and having unions like the royal college of midwives and the royal college of nursing is. it's a possibility that the vast majority of health workers rang out in england —— in england have accepted the deal. and i quoted sarah gorton, saying it would not solve every problem in the nhs but it would help staff feel more valued. let's talk about the other big issue here, the pay settlement that the government is considering at the moment. we have heard all of the demands for the 5%, 5% improving what the nhs is doing, a lower percentage merely to stand still and so on. percentage merely to stand still and so on. where is that? where is that going? nhs leaders and jeremy hunt, the secretary of state wanted to deal with the pay issue because they felt it was important, they have seen it as being dealt with but now
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they want more money for the day—to—day running of the service and yes there is a big debate happening in whitehall still. the nhs leadership and jeremy hunt is very sympathetic, they won 4% in real terms, they have improvements, it's got to be [1%, with philip hammond, the chancellor, reluctant to go that far at this stage, they may even be holding out for 2.543%. they want this deal in time for the nhs's 70th birthday injuly but the talks, i gather, are still ongoing and are difficult right now to get a figure that everyone can agree to once the treasury will think it is affordable. you pym, our health editor. thank you. the headlines on bbc newsroom live... borisjohnson has warned of a brexit meltdown — in a secret recording made at a private dinner. more than one million nhs workers in england will receive a three—year pay deal worth 6.5% after union members voted
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to accept the deal. theresa may has arrived in canada for the g7 summit — which will focus on climate change and free trade concerns. england head to the world cup next week with real confidence after beating costa rica in theirfinal warm up match. marcus rashford scored a stunning opening goal in their 2—0 win. the welsh women top their world cup qualifying group after kayleigh green's win against bosnia and herzegovina. england can retain their top spot by beating russia, scotla nd their top spot by beating russia, scotland also won. dina asher—smith broke her own record at the diamond meeting in moscow. she ran10.92 moscow. she ran 10.92 seconds, the ideal preparation for the european championships in august. i'll be back with more on those stories at half past 11. join me then. a 90—year—old woman is seriously ill in hospital after being attacked in her bed in north west london.
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iris warner was discovered by her son at her home in brent. our correspondent simonjones is in brent. simon, it's beggars belief that someone could do this to an old woman in her bed, what have police told us so far about this attack? police are describing this attack is awful, and its words are echoed by iris's family, who say it is shocking and sickening. she was discovered with terrible injuries, at lunchtime on monday by her son. at that point she was drifting in and out of consciousness and had to be raced to hospital. at first doctors thought her injuries were so bad that she would not survive but she has made some recovery, she is like you go to be in hospitalfor some time. police say she's been able to tell them that she was in bed when she noticed a man standing
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over her, and he began to hit her repeatedly in the face. after that, she is not clear what happened but it appears that her room was ransacked. although officers do not yet know whether anything was stolen. what is not clear is exactly when the attack took place. she was found by her son at lunchtime on monday but police believe the attack could have happened any time from that monday up until the time before, it could have been the sunday before that it took place. a window of two days that they want information about. we have spoken to some neighbours in the area and they say they are concerned by what they have heard and have seen pictures released of her injuries. it is tragic, of course. i think we should have more police on the road. it has been happening quite a bit now on this road. trouble. yes, trouble. i would see her almost every other day. i'm just shocked. would see her almost every other
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day. i'mjust shocked. i'm absolutely... i'm horrified. we are scared. it should not have happened here, really. you have heard the level of concern there. in response police say they have stepped up patrols in this area and there is still a presence on the street. they have carried out searches to determine what has happened. the family making it difficult decision, releasing pictures of injuries that caven iris has received, she is in her hospital bed. they want any information, and anyone who knows anything to come forward and tell police what they know. thank you. a public health charity is calling for greater efforts to tackle ageism — which it claims is stigmatising many older people. the royal society for public health says ageism is the most common form of discrimination in the uk and the most likely to go unchallenged. one idea is for the beauty industry to stop using the phrase "anti—ageing" in advertising.
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richard lister reports. archive footage: here, in a finsbury workship near sadler's wells, 70—year—old men and women have started work again to bring a new interest into the enforced leisure of their old age. in the 1950s, old age was often portrayed as a long slide into irrelevance and decline. hands, which might otherwise have gone stiff, handle, numbly, the work which business firms send to the workshop. instead of moping at home lonely, the old folk find it does them the world of good to come out. but today's report suggests those views may not have changed all that much. the rsph questioned 2,000 people and found ageism alive and well. is that a thing? i suppose the way society is structured, now, i probably am, yeah. nah, i mean, if you're too old, you're too old. in fact, the survey suggests that 40% of young adults believe dementia is inescapable as you age, and a quarter think it's normal
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for elderly people to be depressed and unhappy. across all age groups, two—thirds of us have no friends more than 30 years older or younger than we are. that's it — wiggle those hips! the report says facilities for older people and the very young should be housed under the same roof to bring generations together. it urges the media to treat ageism in the same way as racism or sexism, and it points to research which indicates a more positive view of old age can lead to a longer life. richard lister, bbc news. we can cross now to cardiff and speak to claire o'shea from the campaign to end loneliness. thank you forjoining us today. the research in that report found that nine in ten people believe that loneliness in later life is inevitable. of course, it is not exclusive to older people but clearly there was a big gulf between
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the younger people surveyed and their perception of who is lonely? yes, it is very interesting to understand that younger people have these negative perceptions of old age. it is interesting from the perspective that there are many —isms appropriate but many of us build up these negative attitudes early in life as to where you will be in future. it's an interesting perspective. almost a self—fulfilling prophecy? perspective. almost a self-fulfilling prophecy? yes, but one that we should challenge. it's your attitude going into old age. your ability to build social connections and things that keep you feeling positive. and your mental well—being better, if you are servicing good relationships. and what is your practical experience in the campaign to end loan in is about? who are the people involved?
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—— the campaign to end loneliness. more younger people identify as lonely than older people. but we know that loneliness in old age is more difficult to challenge. it comes from bereavement, ill—health, and shrinking social circles. we know the challenges for loneliness in old age are more difficult to ove rco m e in old age are more difficult to overcome at times then the challenges for younger lonely people. we want to work on intergenerational movement that get younger people and old people building relationships with each other to challenge and counter loneliness in old age. so how will you be involved in taking the findings of this report, here you are, talking to me about it, and presumably doing lots of interviews about it today, how will you take this report forward and ensure it makes a difference and begins to change attitudes? we want to see intergenerational connection is being built, so more shared spaces for younger and older people to come together. we want communities to
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work on projects that bring younger and older people together... is any of that happening? there are a lot of that happening? there are a lot of positive things, people have seen children in care homes in these programmes, they build intergenerational relationships, there are a lot of projects out there are a lot of projects out there like doing it but we want to see there like doing it but we want to see it growing and it work more quickly to counter that kind of breakdown in intergenerational relationships. claire o'shea from the campaign to end loneliness, thank you. the comedian michael mcintyre has appeared for the first time since he was mugged by two men on a moped in london earlier this week. at the show in dublin he said he was "ok" and tweeted a picture of himself on the stage. mcintyre said it was "touch and go" whether he would perform after he was targeted near his children's school on monday. let's get more from our entertainment correspondent colin paterson who joins us from salford. at the. . in front of a buzz. the
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subject. people would want to hear that. that is a fake, fans. subjects include his routine. i know it is or is painful hearing someone read out someone else's they say time is the healer, i've lost my watch, how will time heal? he said it wasn't so much the fast and the furious but stationary and panicking. i could not get the car started, it was fight or flight. that was the one that really made me laugh, not so much the fast and furious one. it made me giggle. when
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we saw furious one. it made me giggle. when we saw that footage on monday, it was a vei’y serious we saw that footage on monday, it was a very serious incident. it was outside his children's school in golders green in north london, parked on a double yellow line. with his kids present, he was made to get out the cabaye two men on a scooter with a hammer. he was made to hand over his watch. —— get out of the car by two men. i remember seeing jimmy cardew stand up in the week it broke about tax avoidance. it is incidents happening in a performers live, it gets the crowd on your side. michael mcintyre did that last night in dublin. he is doing four nights there. it will be interesting to see if he comes up with more modelling related material like you did over the weekend. colin paterson, thank you. now let's take a look at the weather
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forecast. hello. there is an sunshine in the forecast, some of us will keep that rate through the weekend, but as we have seen the rotten showers around, some of which could be heavy and sunny, particularly for western scotla nd sunny, particularly for western scotland and northern ireland. we have had showers this morning, they are fizzling out. becca bisla showers in south—west england but watch out for heavy infantry ones in northern ireland and western scotland. temperatures getting up to around 22 in the sunshine but always cool on the north—east coast. showers lingering around in some areas, clear spells before the cloud rolled back in, loans of between nine and 1a. coolest for northern england and much of scotland. tomorrow starts fairly cloudy but it will thin and break, we will all see warm spells of sunshine. western
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scotla nd warm spells of sunshine. western scotland may be northern ireland could catch a heavy and sunny shower, but warm in the sunshine and temperatures up to 22 celsius. this is bbc news, our latest headlines... borisjohnson warns of a brexit meltdown in a secret recording made at a private dinner. more than 1 million nhs workers in england will receive a three—year pay deal worth 6.5% after union members vote to accept it. theresa may has arrived in canada for the g7 summit, which will focus on climate change and free trade concerns. now the sport with damianjohnson. good morning. manchester united striker marcus rashford is staking a determined claim for a place in england's world cup starting line up after a brilliant performance in the friendly win over costa rica. gareth southgate's squad set off for the finals in russia next week. they were totally dominant at elland road. costa rica helped send england home
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early four years ago. they're also heading to russia themselves. rashford gave southgate food for thought with a stunning opening goal — before danny wellbeck got england's second near the end. i wanted him to be like all the others, to be making mistakes, because of their making mistakes than they are trying things. and, for me, all of our players, if they wa nt to for me, all of our players, if they want to try to be as good as they can, had to try things, and we have to a cce pt can, had to try things, and we have to accept that might mean the odd failure. but what you then maybe get is the odd moment like he has produced tonight. there is a bid to sort out but it is great, we want a squad that are playing well and that have the spirit that these lads have at the moment. we are not quite there yet, but we
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are getting there. everyday we are trading and improving. you want improve each day. leicester city manager claude puel says he's signed a winner and a leader after completing a £3.5 million deal for the west bromwich albion defenderjonny evans. the west brom captain has agreed a three year contract at the king power stadium after his side were relegated at the end of the season. evans won the premier league title three times with his former club manchester united. it turned from frustration to celebration for wales' women, who took a big step towards their world cup in france next year. after they'd missed a penalty, kayleigh green gave them victory over bosnia—herzegovina. wales are top of their group, one point ahead of england. and they can retake top spot tonight by avoiding defeat to russia this evening — kick off in moscow is at five o'clock, and it's worth noting that england thrashed russia 6—0 back in september, not that the england coach is taking another win for granted.
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i think it will be a really good game. i think what i've been saying to my players to date is expected really tough game. it is a world cup qualifier, we saw the way that wales celebrated by getting a draw with us at southampton. that is the scalp, we are at southampton. that is the scalp, we are the number two team in the world and we are a big scalp for teams even two draw against us. we will have to play really well to get any kind of result. and there's full match coverage from moscow on the red button, as well as the bbc sport website and app. scotland also won last night, to boost their chances of reaching the finals — erin cuthbert scored twice as they came from a goal down to beat belarus 2—1. they're three points behind group leaders switzerland with three games to play. dina asher—smith said she was "over the moon" after breaking her own british 100 metres record at the diamond league meeting in oslo. with her university studies finished, she's now fully focused on athletics and it's going well — she took seven
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hundredths of a second off her old best time, crossing the line in 10.92. she's looking good for the european championships in august. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. thanks very much, see you then. the us secretary of state, mike pompeo, has said he's received a personal assurance from kim jong—un that north korea is prepared to dismantle its nuclear programme. donald trump is due to hold talks with mr kim in singapore next week. mr pompeo told reporters at the white house that the north korean leader had been clear about his intentions, as our north america correspondent peter bowes reports. the summit is almost certainly on, but the strategies of the two nations are far from clear. the us wants north korea to give up its nuclear weapons, but there's been no public indication that denuclearisation is on the agenda with kim jong—un. this is the closest we've been to any senior figure
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suggesting it could be. he has indicated to me personally that he's prepared to denuclearise, that he understands the current model doesn't work, that he's prepared to denuclearise and two, that he understands we can't do it the way we've done it before, this has to be big and bold. but what does big and bold mean and do the us and north korea agree on what a definition of denuclearisation? yes. reporter: can you describe that a bit? no. earlier it was all smiles as donald trump met the japanese prime minister, shinzo abe, for a last—minute head—to—head—on strategy. the president was upbeat. i think it's going to be a very fruitful meeting, an exciting meeting. i think we're going to get to know a lot of people that our country never got to know.
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a getting—to—know—you session rather than a high—stakes meeting. perhaps playing down expectations that they could be soon about to sign a deal. mr trump dismissed any suggestions he isn't prepared for whatever the talks might have in store. i don't think i have to prepare very much, it's about attitude, it's about willingness to get things done, but i think i've been preparing for this summit for a long time. announcer: ladies and gentlemen, the president of the united states and the prime minister ofjapan. shinzo abe has real concerns about a lack of attention to detail over north korea's future. he wants to ensure japan's interests are not overlooked as the us warms to kim jong—un‘s vision for his country. donald trump is bullish about his aspirations, talking of a possible invitation to the us for mr kim if it goes well in singapore. reporter: sir, if you do invite him to the united states, would it be here at the white house or mar—a—lago? maybe we'll start at the white house, what do you think? and that would be quite a photo—op. peter bowes, bbc news.
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england fans travelling to russia for the world cup have been warned they are at serious risk of racist, homophobic and anti—british attacks. a history of football violence and the collapse of relations with russia after the salisbury poisoning has left mps fearing for supporters' safety, as richard conway reports. the world cup is almost here, but this report from mps lays out in stark detail the issues british fans could face in the coming weeks if they travel to russia. mps say russia presents particular risks, due to a history of violence by football hooligans, intolerance towards the lgbt community, a history of racist abuse in and around football matches, the current heightened political tensions with britain, especially in light of the salisbury poisoning, and the threat of terrorist attacks. fans are being encouraged to sign up to online foreign office travel alerts,
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so they know about any developments. a lot of work has gone into making sure that fans have the right level of consular support in russia. we've also got to be aware that russia is a very difficult country in which to offer consular protection. the russian state is not like other countries. if fans are, for example, lgbt, or from an ethnic minority, then the russian state has more a history of abusing them than supporting them. while mps are reassured by the security measures and support in place in cities where england are due to play, there are particular concerns about the safety of fans away from these times and places. ultimately if the security situation deteriorates, mps say the government should be prepared to act fast and decisively and advise fans against travel or to issue specific directions on how to stay safe so everyone can enjoy the tournament. richard conway, bbc news. well, kaliningrad is the western—most city hosting
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the world cup in russia. it's wedged between lithuania and poland and its proximity to europe means it's easier to reach from the uk. and as sarah rainsford reports, kaliningrad locals are determined to welcome england fans. there is a little bit of england on this russian street. kaliningrad is almost ready to welcome the team here and crowds of fans. some locals are even taking them into their homes. nikolai shows me the space he's offered three england supporters for free. and from the decor, it's not hard to guess why. his visitors should feel quite at home with this bathroom. the flat could be a squeeze, with nikolai's girlfriend living here too. but on match night, nikolai tells me he doesn't think his guests will be sleeping much anyway. you wanted it for free because? because it's fun, it's not
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about money, it's about football, it's about friendship. we're not frightening! no, we don't have bears and guns in every room! kaliningrad was part of germany before world war two, and it still looks and feels quite european in parts. but this exclave is now part of russia, and some in britain still have concerns about fans' safety at the world cup. this official called fears of racism and homophobia here made up. translation: the main thing, of course, is to respect the customs and laws of the country you visit like any tourist. you don't act like you want, you follow the customs of the country. there are traces of this city's european past even here at the local football club. these columns come from a german church that was almost destroyed during world war two. in soviet times they became part of the grand entrance
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here at baltika fc. the club currently plays at the oldest ground in russia. in the 1930s nazi troops raided here but the swastikas have long since been removed. baltika will inherit this now after the world cup. kaliningrad's brand—new stadium. that's where nikolai's guests will watch england play. greg's already got his t—shirt. he tells me he's looking forward to his trip, although others were too worried to come to russia. there's a lot of fans here that have got fears maybe. obviously the main thing stems from the political events that have gone on certainly in the past few months. doesn't faze me one bit. i think the world cup is going to be great. he won't have far to go from his hosts' flat.
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the world cup will be right on the doorstep. sara green spread, bbc news, kaliningrad. —— sarah rainsford. let's look at some of today's other developing stories. canada has moved a step closer to legalising recreational cannabis. canadian senators passed the cannabis act after six months scrutinising the legislation. the prime ministerjustin trudeau has committed to making marijuana legal by this summer. facebook has warned a software bug may be responsible for millions of users unknowingly posting private information to the public. the company apologised and said the glitch had set users' posts to be shared to "everyone", even if they had previously chosen a more restricted option. the firm added that those affected would be notified on their newsfeeds. approximately 600 homes have been destroyed following the volcanic eruption on hawaii's big island. the latest estimate of property losses from kilauea,
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one of the world's most active volcanoes, comes more than a month after it began to erupt. millions of dollars in disaster relief have been pledged to the island by hawaii's governor. one in 12 children is thought to persistently hear voices that in reality aren't there, and now new research suggest the reaction of adults can affect the voices they hear in the future. psychologists in manchester have been looking at the experiences of young people that have auditory hallucinations and the reaction of their parents. surprisingly, the study found that not all young people are upset by their voices and some even enjoy having them. earlier, chloe tilley spoke to dr sarah parry from manchester metropolitan university, paul bakerfrom intervoice — which sets up support groups for people that hear voices — and clinical psychologist dr natasha goa kes. chloe first asked what parents should do if their child tells them they hear voices.
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i think it's important to take it seriously, listen to what the young person has to say. it is a delicate balance between not underplaying what they are telling you but not overreacting if possible as well. of course it will be anxiety provoking for pa rents course it will be anxiety provoking for parents and they will be a bit worried because of some of the things we tend to hear about people who hear voices, but actually it is relatively common and certainly from our research lots of the young people we have heard from who hear voices are quite happy with their voices, they find them friendly, comforting, supportive, helpful. it is important not to assume it is necessarily a bad thing. actually lots of children we have heard from enjoy having their voices and de la et enjoy having their voices and de laet benefit. paul, many people would be quite surprised listening to bob. the way we often hear about these kinds of situations is it is bad and frightening, but for some of
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these children it can be a positive and almost reassuring experience?” have been reflecting on this, it is strange because hearing voices is generally rather stigmatised in society but we are much more co mforta ble society but we are much more comfortable with things like imaginary friends, and lots of children experience that. so what is the difference between an imaginary friend and a voice? our research shows not a lot. i would back up what sarah is saying, the main issue if you are a parent or a sibling of somebody hearing voices is don't panic, it is unusual but it is something which lots of people experience. and we know the outcomes are vei’y experience. and we know the outcomes are very positive, up to 60% of young people, after three years the voices go away. we want people to really dial down the fear and the anxiety which is generally felt because of the stigma about hearing voices that we have in the
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community. natasha, would you agree? is it critical how parents respond to what will probably be a worrying thing to hear from your will probably be a worrying thing to hearfrom your child? will probably be a worrying thing to hear from your child? absolutely. obviously as a parent you want your child to alwaysjust obviously as a parent you want your child to always just be obviously as a parent you want your child to alwaysjust be happy obviously as a parent you want your child to always just be happy and healthy and never had any problems. so any problem they come to you, you will worry about. i think hearing voices is something that can sound really scary, and i understand that. before i worked in this field i probably would have been quite uncertain about how to respond. but as the others have said, it is a really common thing. sometimes those voices can be incredibly positive. what i have often found in my work with young people is they say that voices might start off quite positively and it is only when they start to realise maybe that other people don't all hear voices or other people react to them in a
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negative or stigmatising way, that is when the voices might become a little bit more negative under bit itioi'e little bit more negative under bit more distressing for them. sol think having unaccepted and an understanding response. even if you don't know what to do next, but that is an amazing start and your child will probably feel so much better to feel accepted by you regardless of what they are going through. those guests talking to chloe tilley earlier. in a moment a summary of the business news this hour, but first the headlines on bbc newsroom live... downing street says the prime minister has full confidence in boris johnson after he warned of a brexit meltdown in a secret recording made at a private dinner. more than one million nhs workers in england will receive a three—year pay deal worth 6.5% after union members voted to accept the deal. theresa may has arrived in canada for the g7 summit — which will focus on climate change and free trade concerns. hello, i'm susannah streeter. in the
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business news... the boss of tesco has blamed the collapse of some retailers partly on the expense of business rates. dave lewis said the charges that firms must pay on their buildings played a large part in sending some retailers to the wall. last year a revamp of business rates saw some bills rise, while others fell. he questioned whether raising business rates had resulted in an uneven playing field for some firms. a software bug meant millions of facebook users may have unknowingly posted private information to the public, the company has warned. the glitch set a user's post to be shared to everyone, even if a user had previously chosen a more restricted option, such as friends of friends. facebook says the fault has been rectified. users who may have been affected will be notified on the site's news feed. bt‘s chief executive, gavin patterson, is to step down after the company said a change of leadership was needed. the company said a poor reaction to its latest results, in which bt set out plans to cut 13,000 jobs, had prompted the move. bt said mr patterson, who has led the firm for five years,
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would remain in his post until a successor is chosen later this year. well, let's get more on that story about gavin williamson stepping down. —— about gavin patterson stepping down. it is understood he will not now receive the 2018 incentive share plan, worth £3.5 million. joining me now is james barford, telecoms analyst at enders analysis. it seems as though the board like mr paterson's turnaround plan but did not think he was the man to push it through. why, do you think?” not think he was the man to push it through. why, do you think? i think there has been a lot of pressure about relatively poor financial results and prospects of poor results and prospects of poor results for the next years and a lack of clarity on a couple of important areas. i think that is what has led to this. does that lack
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of clarity involve the broadband operations? bt has come under criticism for perhaps spending too much on becoming a global sports broadcaster and not enough on improving its broadband offering?” would agree with some of the criticisms of its sports strategy, but that is separate. it could do both or neither, it is not really a choice. the issue on broadband and investing in full fibre is a question that bt wants to have regulatory support and its investors wa nt to regulatory support and its investors want to have regulation so that they can makea want to have regulation so that they can make a reasonable return on that. it is a lot of negotiations, a bit of pr with the government involved. it has probably been felt that could have been handled better. dede think shareholders are saying you need to be tougher with the regulator and get a better deal? ——
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do you think? it is to do with the laying of new fibre—optic cables over existing ones, which makes it much more expensive? there is cost involved and there would have to be some regulatory changes to make their viable from a bt perspective across the vast majority of the country. the changes will not necessarily make it very much more expensive for end users, if at all, they are quite subtle changes in the regulation. it is not necessarily that genetic. but whether bt —— it is not necessarily that dramatic. but whether bt needs to beat up all more conciliatory with the regulations, different people have different opinions, people close to the matter tend to have different opinions. investorsjust the matter tend to have different opinions. investors just want a better result for bt. thank you for
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talking to us, james barford. leaders of the g7 group are gathering in canada for what could be one its most acrimonious summits in years. yesterday french and canadian leaders clashed with us president donald trump on the summit‘s key agenda — trade tariffs. mr trump, expected to be the last to arrive and first to leave, has imposed steel and aluminium tariffs that have sparked reprisals from trade partners. but the nations could also clash on the iran nuclear deal and climate change. suzanne spiers, a partner at volterra fietta which specialises in international public law, told us earlier why this meeting is likely to be very divisive. this is looking like a summit where it's going to be the g6 plus one, and it is significant in what it signifies in terms of the g7 not going forward as a united bloc, which has been the case over many years, and also represents a threat to the global a threat to the global rules—based system of trade and other international mechanisms. so it is a very significant development at a time
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when i think the g7 would most like to be presenting a united front, vis—a—vis china and russia and on many other issues. let's check in with the financial markets now. first of all let's check on the share price of bt. it has risen since the news that the boss was to step down, as we have explained. since late 2015 the share place has fallen by around 60%. the shrug of the share price. a little rise, significant, but still lots of ground to make up. 0ver rise, significant, but still lots of ground to make up. over the same period the ftse100 has risen by around 20%. the wider ftse has fallen following european shares in quite a broad sell—off. investors seem a bit spooked by the prospect of tightening of financial conditions after the european central bank indicated it could end ultra—loose monetary policy earlier than expected. also those stark divisions on trade ahead of a g7 leaders' summit have added to anxieties. standard life aberdeen
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shares dropped 3.5%, the worst faller on the ftse100 after lloyds banking sold its remaining stake in the asset manager. that's all the business news. much more coming up later in the afternoon. you probably know why the chicken crossed the road by now. but why did the cow cross the loch? well, this herd on the crom estate in northern ireland, swims around one hundred metres to an island on loch erne every year to feed on fresh pasture. they'll stay there for the summer before swimming back in october. rather lovely pictures. there they are, enjoying those fresh pastures. lovely images. the headlines are coming up on the bbc news channel. it will include the payoff of 6.5%
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over the next few years accepted by the majority of the unions who had asked members in the nhs to vote on it. in a moment we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. first we leave you with for a look at the weather with alina jenkins. some bright and sunny spells and the customs showers. showery rain across parts of england and wales and heavy and sunny showers for western scotla nd and sunny showers for western scotland and northern ireland. but at least when we get the showers it will dampen down pollen levels, which are high or very high fingering, wales and northern ireland, low for much of england and the —— much of scotland and the far north—east of england. we have a zone of cloud coming from wales into the midlands in yorkshire, bringing showery rain. the winds are quite
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liked so it is not going anywhere fast. it will fizzle out with time, keeping lots of clarity and showers never too far—away. to the north on the south, bright sunny spells, once again showers, particularly across western scotland, which could be heavy and sunny. mainly dry with sunny spells further north and east, but mist and low cloud of eastern coasts. i love the sunny showers across northern ireland and the soul of cloud through wales, the midlands and yorkshire bringing 12 showers through the afternoon. quite sharp in places across south—west england. for east anglia and south—east england it could be mainly dry, north—east area is hanging more cloud and a cooler feel. this evening and overnight, some showers lingering across south—west england and parts of western scotland. clear spells elsewhere before the cloud filter back—in, temperatures dropping to between nine and 1a, lowest across scotland and parts of east anglia. an area of high pressure across much
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of the country at the start of the weekend, but heavy, sunny showers in france which will flirt with the far south coast at times but probably stay in the channel and over france. a fairly cloudy start for many, cloud thinning and breaking, most of us cloud thinning and breaking, most of us bright and sunny spells for the far north—east coast. also heavy, thundery showers the western scotla nd thundery showers the western scotland and defuse the south—west england. in the sunshine, temperatures getting up to between 18 and 22 celsius. more sunshine around on sunday, the showers never too far—away from the south coast that they should stay in the channel over france. in the sunshine, temperatures up to 21: in the sunshine, temperatures up to 2a celsius. this is bbc news, and these are the top stories
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developing at midday: downing street says the prime minister has full confidence in borisjohnson after he warned of a brexit meltdown — in a secret recording made at a private dinner. ido i do not think the way he conducts himself, i do not think the opportunistic way he puts his own interests ahead of what is obviously the best interests of the country is behaviour befitting of someone holding that office. a 90—year—old woman is seriously ill in hospital after being attacked in her own bed in north west london. more than a million nhs workers in england vote to accept
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a three—year pay deal worth 6.5%. also... a warning to england fans travelling to russia for the world cup. they face the risk of racist and homophobic intimidation, as well as hooliganism and anti—british hostility — according to a group of mps. and laughing it off — comedian michael mcintyre returns to the stage saying he's "0k" after being mugged by two men on a moped in london. hello, a very good afternoon. it is friday the 8th ofjune. welcome to bbc newsroom live. downing street says the prime minister has full confidence in borisjohnson — after a secret recording emerged in which the foreign secretary suggested the government needed
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to show more "guts" in the brexit negotiations. mrjohnson is heard telling a private conservative gathering that the talks could be heading for a meltdown, and warning leave campaigners that they may not get what they had hoped for. he was also critical of the treasury, describing philip hammond's department as "the heart" of the remain campaign. 0ur political correspondent iain watson is in westminster. good afternoon. a spokesman for theresa may, who is in canada, as we know, saying that the pm believes her government is working hard to deliver the will of the people. borisjohnson deliver the will of the people. boris johnson says deliver the will of the people. borisjohnson says that may not be what happens. so where does this leave the government on brexit? that's right, the foreign secretary has suggested that it may not be the kind of brexit some long—standing lead supporters would want. asked on these comments, she came from this private della —— leave supporters. she made it clear that she has
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confidence in the foreign secretary but ina confidence in the foreign secretary but in a room full of political journalists at westminster, the cry went up, why? the answer was all ministers are working to deliver what the government wants. decide for yourself whether the government is united or not. the spokeswoman decided with robust debate going on, here is boris's contribution to the debate, raising fears over the kind of deal we could get... borisjohnson suggesting they may be locked into orbit, not properly leaving for some time. as you are suggesting, the prime minister is in
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canada for that meeting with industrial relations, she has had a lot of bilateral relations with the world's leaders, the french president and the german chancellor but not the us president. downing street said they have a close working relationship, boris johnson was in that meeting when these comments came to light. he seemed to think the us president himself could doa think the us president himself could do a betterjob than the prime minister and negotiating brexit. interesting, of course, as i was saying, the prime minister's spokeswoman said theresa may had confidence in boris johnson spokeswoman said theresa may had confidence in borisjohnson but that was not shared by the first minister of scotland, nicola sturgeon, who suggested perhaps the foreign secretary's time should be up. i just don't think borisjohnson is
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someone who should be in one of the high offices of state, i don't think how he conducts himself and the opportunistic way he puts his own interests ahead of what is the best interests ahead of what is the best interests of the country is behaviour befitting of someone holding that office. she also suggested that the prime minister wasn't delivering devolution when it came to brexit. and this morning, saying theresa may was disappointed that the scottish government was not backing the withdrawal bill from the eu but they would continue to talk and hopefully reach agreement. but one former prime minister came in to defend what was happening at westminster this morning, i should say former conservative leader, michael howard, now lord howard. he is certainly right to say we should not panic. i don't know about a meltdown. i'm not as close to the negotiations as boris is. but what
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we negotiations as boris is. but what we have to do is focus on the essentials of this situation. the essentials of this situation. the essentials are the european union wants a deal, and there is every prospect therefore if we hold our fiei’ve prospect therefore if we hold our nerve that we could get a good deal, a good deal for them and a good deal for us. because it is in our mutual interests but that should happen. that was from lord howard, the former conservative leader, making it clear there should be no panic at westminster. everyone hold your nerve during these three broad times. we will see what happens in due course but also on boris's comments, what was happening on the government's preferred approach to customs arrangements with the european union. of course, we have two working groups looking at that at the moment. she suggested they we i’e at the moment. she suggested they were going towards the summit at the eu, but the october summit instead. they may resolve among themselves where the government stance on
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future customs arrangements with the eu. iain watson, thank you.. the prime minister has arrived in canada ahead of this weekend's annual g7 summit which brings together the leaders of the world's biggest economies. this year's meeting is expected to be dominated by the threat to international trade sparked by president trump's tariffs on steel and aluminium imports. 0ur diplomatic correspondent james robbins reports. a chateau hotel in rural quebec, the most peaceful of settings for some of the world's most powerful leaders to meet. but this g7 summit could get noisy. donald trump will be isolated, as traditional american allies denounce his trade measures aimed directly at them. the president says he imposed tariffs on imported metals to protect american jobs and national security. the american steel and aluminium industry has been ravaged by aggressive foreign trade practices. it's really an assault on our country.
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leaders heading to the summit are angry. president macron of france urged politeness but reminded donald trump sharply, no leader is forever. and canada's prime minister, the host, openly derides donald trump's reasoning. translation: it is laughable to say that canada, france, can represent a threat to america's national security, as we are in reality the best allies the united states has had for a long time. a canadian academic who has made studying the g7 part of his life's work urges caution. john kirton told me all is not lost in this public fight. he hasn't quite crossed the line where he has said donald, you are irrational, but has said your argument is irrational. canada is looking for solid european support in this fight,
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welcoming theresa may, who made clear again on the flight here that the american tariffs were unjustified. the prime minister added the uk would continue to be a great champion for free trade around the world. everything is now in place, including the parody puppets who pop up at every g7. the real leaders will soon lock horns with donald trump as to who is the true threat to jobs and growth. the risk of prolonged trade conflict hangs heavy over this summit. james robbins, bbc news, quebec. 0ur correspondent gary 0'donoghue is in quebec... let's talk about the extraordinary prelude to the summit, the twitter face—off between donald trump on one side, and the rest of the g7 on the other? yes, they have been ratcheting up the argument, haven't
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they, on social media over the last few hours, really. emmanuel macron, the french president, and justin trudeau, the canadian prime minister, laying into donald trump. him responding, his officials privately suggesting that he may come to the summit and entered the negotiations swinging, as they put it. and we learned that donald trump may actually leave the summit early. you will not stay for the duration, it only lasts 36 hours or so but he will be leaving first thing saturday morning for that meeting in singapore and he will miss some of those key sessions on climate change and pollution in the oceans. there isa and pollution in the oceans. there is a real possibility that there will not be a unified statement, as you expect, out the g—7 summit every year. often stating principles and generalities, but if there was a split in the final statement, it would be a real landmark for the g7. it would really emphasise the gulf between donald trump and many of
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these other leaders on a range of issues. let's talk about international trade, the steel and aluminium tariffs. will there be any headway on that? there is no sign of any movement from either side on that one. donald trump has dumbed down on that one —— double down on that one. 10% on one, 10% on the other. it will hit canada, and has hit canada, very hard. they are promising dollarfor hit canada, very hard. they are promising dollar for dollar retaliation and the eu is promising not only retaliation but retaliation politically directed at some of those states in america that supported donald trump in the 2016 general election in the usa. it has become a victory optic and poisonous atmosphere on those terms. those countries are also taking donald trump to the world trade organisation. i do not think there
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is much spirit or atmosphere of compromise at this stage. and theresa may and donald trump, we understand there is no bilateral meeting planned but they are going to speak, aren't they? well, that is still to be decided. donald trump will meet the canadian prime minister. it is amazing if he doesn't have a one—to—one meeting with the host of the summit. he is expected to have a proper one—to—one with emmanuel macron, and we are told no official one—to—one with theresa may. diplomats have a phrase here, they talk about brush buys at the summits, it may be an informal momentary few minutes where they speak but the mood music in the run—up to the summit has meant that theresa may isn't necessarily donald trump's most favourite person at the moment. 0ne trump's most favourite person at the moment. one of the sources inside the white house say that he regarded
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her as a bit of a schoolmistress. and are there other leaders attending he will be having official bilateral s with him. and he only has two so far, they will be in the room when negotiations are happening. they have a big formal dinner tonight where they discuss formal affairs but it's another point of friction between the us and its allies because things like pulling out of the iran nuclear deal, that has upset the uk, france, germany in particular. and the question of the paris climate change agreement which he has pulled out of, it has upset a number of his key allies and moving the embassy in israel from tel aviv to jerusalem was not supported by many of his allies. there are a lot of things for them to argue about. studio: gary 0'donoghue in quebec, thank you. some trouble breaking news for you,
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a two—week premier league mid—season player break has been approved to start from the 2019—2020 season. it's just been announced by the football association. let me recap that for you. they say a two week premier league mid—season player break has been approved and that has been approved from the 2019—2020 season. those footballers work so ha rd season. those footballers work so hard they needed little break in the midwinter. that has been announced by the football association. a 90—year—old woman is seriously ill in hospital after being attacked in her bed in north west london. iris warner was discovered by her son at her home in brent. 0ur correspondent simonjones is in brent. is there any progress or leads that police say they are following in their efforts to catch whoever was responsible for this horrific
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attack? police this morning have continued to search iris warner's home to find any information as to who was responsible for this. we know that she was found by her son on monday. she was drifting in and out of consciousness. she was raised to hospital. doctors thought she may not survive as her injuries were so bad but she has pulled through and remains ina bad but she has pulled through and remains in a very serious condition. but what we are told is that she was able to tell officers that she woke up able to tell officers that she woke up to able to tell officers that she woke uptoa able to tell officers that she woke up to a man standing over her when she was in her bed. he proceeded to hit her repeatedly in the head and then after that she doesn't really remember what happened. she believes —— they believed that he went on to ransack her room. but they do not know if anything was taken. the family made it difficult decision to release some pictures of her in her hospital bed, where you see the full extent of bruising on herface hospital bed, where you see the full extent of bruising on her face and write down her body. they want
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people to see these images and see what she went through, and for anyone who has information, encourage them to come forward. neighbours have seen those pictures today and heard about the attack. many of them are extremely concerned. of course, it is tragic. i think we should have more police on the road. it has happened quite a bit now on this road. trouble? yes, trouble. i would see her almost every day. i am shocked. i am horrified. we are scared, it shouldn't have happened to her, really. neighbours here are extremely concerned. police are trying to stress to them that crimes of this nature, such violent crimes,
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i truly unusual. they have stepped up i truly unusual. they have stepped up patrols in the area. we have seen a lot of community support officers going up and down the street, talking to people and trying to reassure them. the search of the houseis reassure them. the search of the house is continuing. message from police is that people should not be alarmed but for some it is difficult to get that message through to them. simonjones there in brent, thank you for that update. the headlines on bbc newsroom live. downing street says the prime minister has full confidence in borisjohnson after he warned of a brexit meltdown — in a secret recording made at a private dinner. a 90—year—old woman is seriously ill in hospital after being attacked in her own bed in north west london. more than 1 million nhs workers in england will receive a three—year pay deal worth 6.5% after union members voted to accept the deal. time for a look at the sport now.
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fa announced a winter break... from the 2019—2020 season — and that is happening in debris. they will stagger it so that premier league matches are on both weekends of the fortnight break they are planning. the efl have decided they will not change their calendar, despite the fact that they were consulted beforehand. the fa cup fifth round will now move to a midweek time and replays will be scrapped. the premier league will have a winter break. much anticipated. plans have been put in place for it to happen from the 2019-2020 place for it to happen from the 2019—2020 season. 0ne place for it to happen from the 2019—2020 season. one of the reasons they asked for it is because it could help england win a world cup at some point in the future. gareth southgate says he'll have to sleep on a few selection dilemmas after england's win over costa rica in their final world cup warm—up friendly,
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with manchester united's marcus rashford staking a determined claim for a place in southgate's starting line—up, scoring one of the goals in a 2—0 victory. the squad set off for the finals in russia next week. i wanted iwanted him, i wanted him, like the others, to be making mistakes. if they make mistakes, they are trying things. for me, all of our players, if they wa nt to for me, all of our players, if they want to try and be as good as they can be, they've got to try things and we have to accept that could mean the failure but then you get moments like he produced tonight. a bit to sort out but it is great because we want a squad that are playing well and have the spirit that these lads have at moment. leicester city manager claude puel says he's signed "a winner and a leader" after completing a £3.5 million deal for the west bromwich albion defenderjonny evans. the northern ireland intenratinoal has agreed a three year contract at the king power stadium after leicester were relegated at the end of the season. evans won the premier league title three times with his former
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club manchester united. england's women can go back to the top of their world cup qualifying group this evening if they avoid defeat against russia. kick—off in moscow is at five o'clock, and it's worth noting that england thrashed russia 6—0 back in september. not that the coach is taking another win for granted. i think it will be a really good game. and i think what i've been saying to my players today is to expect a tough game. it's a world cup qualifier. we saw how wales celebrated with a draw against southampton. that is the scalp, with a number two ranked team in the world. we are a big scalp for teams to get a draw against us. we will have to play really well, to get any kind of result. and there's full match coverage from moscow on the red button, as well as the bbc sport website and app. world number one rafael nadal takes onjuan martin del potro this afternoon, as he bids to break his own record of ten french open titles. the first of the day's semifinals is already under way. it's between seventh seed dominic thiem and italy's marco cecchinato. thiem is ahead 2—1 in the first set. that's all the sport for now.
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nhs workers in england have voted to accept a new pay deal. more than 1 million nhs staff — including hospital cleaners, nurses, security guard and paramedics — will get a 6.5% pay rise over three years. 1a unions voted on the deal, with 13 accepting the offer and only the gmb rejecting it. our health editor, hugh pym, explained the background to this pay deal. they have had 0% pay rises for a couple of years, and then 1%, like other public sector workers, they argued it meant they had fallen well behind inflation and the cost of living and some, some nurses, and hospital workers, were really struggling. that was leading to
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recruitment problems and retention problems. there is considerable p i’essu i’e problems. there is considerable pi’essui’e on problems. there is considerable pressure on the chancellor and the government to lift the cap, say back in march, after several months of negotiations, the government said they would lift the cap for these workers and agree to the 6.5% so when the unions accepted that it was looking fairly clear that members would vote in favour, which they have aside from the gmb. what will they do? they are meeting next week, i gather, they represent quite a large percentage of ambulance drivers. it is conceivable that they may want to take their own way forward , may want to take their own way forward, possibly even considering their own action but it is premature to speculate on that. it is interesting that the union recommended rejection, and those members of the gmb overwhelmingly went along with that and rejected that. but you have overwhelming
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a cce pta nce that. but you have overwhelming acceptance by unions like the royal couege acceptance by unions like the royal college of midwives and the royal couege college of midwives and the royal college of midwives and the royal college of nurses. right now, the vast majority of health workers in england have accepted this three—year deal. and at 12.30, we'll be speaking to the lead negotiator for the health unions. scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon has warned the government against forcing through key brexit legislation against the wishes of holyrood, saying it would be a backward step for the relationship between scotland and westminster. the scottish parliament has voted against giving its formal consent to the eu withdrawal bill unless changes were made to reflect powers on currently devolved matters. speaking at the snp conference, ms sturgeon said voting the bill through unchanged would have consequences. the vote has not happened in the house of commons yet, so i hope that the conservative government will respect the scottish parliament and respect the scottish parliament and respect the scottish parliament and respect the convention that has underpinned that parliament for almost 20 years now. if they don't,
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then they will be proving what a lot of people in scotland have long believed, that tories cannot be trusted with devolution. i think that would be regrettable and a retrograde step, and it would take us retrograde step, and it would take us into uncharted territory. it isn't too late for them to respect the position of the scottish parliament and even at this late stage, i hope they do that. england fans travelling to russia for the world cup have been warned they are at serious risk of racist, homophobic and anti—british attacks. a history of football violence — and the collapse of relations with russia after the salisbury poisoning — has left mps fearing for supporters' safety, as richard conway reports. the world cup is almost here, but this report from mps lays out in stark detail the issues british fans could face in the coming weeks if they travel to russia. mps say russia presents particular risks, due to a history of violence by football hooligans, intolerance towards the lgbt community, a history of racist abuse in and around football matches, the current heightened political tensions with britain, especially in light of the salisbury poisoning, and the threat of terrorist attacks. fans are being encouraged
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to sign up to online foreign office travel alerts, so they know about any developments. a lot of work has gone into making sure that fans have the right level of consular support in russia. we've also got to be aware that russia is a very difficult country in which to offer consular protection. the russian state is not like other countries. if fans are, for example, lgbt, or from an ethnic minority, then the russian state has more a history of abusing them than supporting them. while mps are reassured by the security measures and support in place in cities where england are due to play, there are particular concerns about the safety of fans away from these times and places. ultimately if the security situation deteriorates, mps say the government should be prepared to act fast and decisively and advise fans against travel or to issue specific directions on how to stay safe so everyone can enjoy the tournament. richard conway, bbc news.
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the comedian michael mcintyre has appeared for the first time since he was mugged by two men on a moped in london earlier this week. at the show in dublin he said he was "ok" and tweeted a picture of himself on the stage. mcintyre said it was "touch and go" whether he would perform after he was targeted near his children's school on monday. 0ur entertainment correspondent colin paterson explains. well, he absolutely tackled it head—on. it was the first of four nights at the three arena in dublin to an audience of 9000 people. he brought up the subject, he knew people would want to know about it. he said it hadn't been a great week but said he was ok. he confirmed his rolex had been taken and then he projects into his routine. it's
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a lwa ys projects into his routine. it's always painful hearing someone read out someone else's jokes but i have to do this! i am waiting! he would do this better, he said "they say time is the healer, i've lost my watch, how will time heal? i've no idea what time it is!" and then he said "it wasn't so much faster and the furious but stationary and panicking. i couldn't get the car started, it was fight or flight!" that really made me giggle, stationery and panicking. when you see stationery and panicking. when you see the footage on monday, it was a very serious incident, he was outside his children's school in north london, parked in a double yellow line. and with his kids present he was made to get out the car by two men on a scooter with the hammerand car by two men on a scooter with the hammer and made to hand over his watch. it is the sensible thing to do. i remember seeing jimmy watch. it is the sensible thing to do. i remember seeingjimmy carr do stand—up in the week it broke about
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tax avoidance, he took it head—on at the start of this cake. incidents are happening in a performer ‘s life and it is often the best way of dealing with it and getting the crowd on your side. that is what michael mcintyre did last night in dublin. he is doing four nights there, and it will be interesting to see there, and it will be interesting to see if he comes up with more mugging related material over the weekend! time for a look at the weather. let'sjoin time for a look at the weather. let's join tomasz schafernaker. .. time for a look at the weather. let's join tomasz schafernaker... it is looking good. blue skies behind me, the sign of some fine weather to come this weekend. we are expecting some showers, not everyone will catch those. let's say it is sunny spells this weekend and a chance of showers, most of them will be occurring across northern areas but in the short—term, this is what we have in the second part of the day. temperatures in the low 20s across the london area, getting up to 20 or
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so. the london area, getting up to 20 or so. some showers breaking out across scotla nd so. some showers breaking out across scotland and northern ireland through the course of the day and into the evening. 0vernight it is relatively quiet, some cloud floating around. some clear spells, mid—teens in the south, single on north sea coasts and then tomorrow, the focal point for showers will be scotland, it will be difficult to pinpoint where these showers will strike. and northern ireland, these could be heavy with some thunder and lightning but further south, weather is dry on saturday and on sunday too. good afternoon. this is bbc newsroom live. our latest headlines: downing street says the prime minister has full confidence in boris johnson after he warned of a brexit meltdown in a secret recording made at a private dinner. more than a million nhs workers in england will receive a three—year pay deal worth 6.5%. a 90—year—old woman is seriously ill in hospital after being attacked in her own bed in north west london. england fans travelling to russia
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for the world cup face the risk of hooliganism and racist and homophobic intimidation, according to a group of mps. let's get more now on the news that nhs workers in england have voted to accept a new pay deal. more than 1 million nhs staff — including hospital cleaners, nurses, security guard and paramedics — will get a 6.5 % pay rise over 3 years. of the 1a unions voting on the deal, 13 accepted the offer, but the gmb rejected it. i'm nowjoined by sara gorton, lead pay negotiator for the health unions. thank you forjoining us. perhaps you can begin by reminding our viewers how long this deal was in the making. this represents the
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culmination of two years preparatory work, but the real permission to negotiate only came after the trade unions put pressure on the government last autumn, went into the vacuum where pay public policy was not set, there was no news from the government about what it was going to do about public sector pay. the nhs trade unions broke with tradition and put in a pay claim, and that opened up the possibility for negotiation, and in december and january, the trade unions had negotiations with the department of health and with employers, and came up health and with employers, and came up with a package that we have been put into members over the last couple of months. and we know that 13 out of the 1a unions involved waited for this, their members who did vote in favour of those voted overwhelmingly. what sort of reaction have you been getting from them? my own union, we had a 3096 turnout in the ballot at unison, and 84% of people voted to accept it, the pattern was very similar. so
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quite a low turnout, even though the majority of those who did vote voted in favour. we are disappointed by that low turnout? not at all, it is a great turnout for a trade union thatis a great turnout for a trade union that is as large as ours, that represents that is as large as ours, that i’e p i’ese nts over that is as large as ours, that represents over 70,000 people saying they want to vote in favour of these proposals. and irrespective of turnout, the end result is that 6.5% pay settlement over three years. 0bviously pay settlement over three years. obviously you would have liked to have brought all 16 unions with you in terms of this vote in favour of the deal. what was the issue for the gmb in youropinion? the deal. what was the issue for the gmb in your opinion?” the deal. what was the issue for the gmb in your opinion? i don't speak for the gmb, you will have to talk to them. and we will be in a few minutes. the rest of the trade unions took the view that this was the best that could be achieved through negotiation. members have been suffering years and years of pay restraint. what matters now is
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going ahead and implementing this so that we can say definitively that the 1% pay policy is broken in the nhs, and this may be 6.5% consolidated for those of the top of the pay scales, but it is significantly greater for those at the bottom, and what's most important is that those people who have been earning poverty pay, less than the living wage, over 80,000 people have been earning under the living wage in the nhs in england, those people will get a rise of over £2000 this year. and i was quoting you earlier when you were breaking this news, and you said it's not an a nswer to this news, and you said it's not an answer to all the problems, but it does have an impact on staff morale in the nhs, which is obviously hugely important, and just briefly if you would explain to me, you think this could have an impact for the devolved nations? yes, so the fa ct the devolved nations? yes, so the fact that the money is going to be met through the department of health, an additional £4.2 billion worth of funding is being made
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available, and that means not only that employers would have to find the costs for patient care, but also that that opens up funding and potential negotiations in scotland, wales and northern ireland, so that health workers there can try and see the end to their 1% pay cap as well. sarah —— sara gorton, thank you for your time today. in a few moments, we your time today. in a few moments, we will be hearing from the gmb, the only union who voted to reject the pay deal. the us secretary of state, mike pompeo, has said he's received a personal assurance from kim jong—un that north korea is prepared to dismantle its nuclear programme. donald trump is due to hold talks with mr kim in singapore next week. mr pompeo told reporters at the white house that the north korean leader had been clear about his intentions, as our north america correspondent peter bowes reports. the summit is almost certainly on, but the strategies of the two nations are far from clear. the us wants north korea to give up its nuclear weapons, but there's been no public indication that denuclearisation is on the agenda with kim jong—un.
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this is the closest we've been to any senior figure suggesting it could be. he has indicated to me personally that he's prepared to denuclearise, that he understands the current model doesn't work, that he's prepared to denuclearise and two, that he understands we can't do it the way we've done it before, this has to be big and bold. but what does big and bold mean and do the us and north korea agree on what a definition of denuclearisation? yes. reporter: can you describe that a bit? no. earlier it was all smiles as donald trump met the japanese prime minister, shinzo abe, for a last—minute head—to—head—on strategy. the president was upbeat. i think it's going to be a very fruitful meeting, an exciting meeting. i think we're going to get
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to know a lot of people that our country never got to know. a getting—to—know—you session rather than a high—stakes meeting. perhaps playing down expectations that they could be soon about to sign a deal. mr trump dismissed any suggestions he isn't prepared for whatever the talks might have in store. i don't think i have to prepare very much, it's about attitude, it's about willingness to get things done, but i think i've been preparing for this summit for a long time. announcer: ladies and gentlemen, the president of the united states and the prime minister ofjapan. shinzo abe has real concerns about a lack of attention to detail over north korea's future. he wants to ensure japan's interests are not overlooked as the us warms to kim jong—un‘s vision for his country. donald trump is bullish about his aspirations, talking of a possible invitation to the us for mr kim if it goes well in singapore. reporter: sir, if you do invite him to the united states, would it be here at the white house
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or mar—a—lago? maybe we'll start at the white house, what do you think? and that would be quite a photo—op. peter bowes, bbc news. let's get more now on concerns voiced by mps and the foreign affairs committee that england fans travelling to russia for the world cup face the risk of hooliganism and racist and homophobic intimidation. my colleague chloe tilly has been speaking to several fans who are heading to russia next week. she began by asking di cunningham about how the lgbt community is feeling ahead of the tournament. the message was going out globally that there were a number of lgbt fans from england that wanted to go to russia and support our team. and we had the usual trolling on twitter, we were followed by bots, russian bots on twitter as well, and some facebook posts. and we had some e—mails, too. and some of those really were quite gruesome in their threats.
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so, yeah, we've. .. you kind of had to take them seriously, but we all know about keyboard warriors, so we're imagining that this is primarily what these people were. so do you feel that the foreign office, for example, the government, is doing enough to protect you and fans like billy and joe who are going to be heading to russia? i think as tom said, it's very difficult. russia's a federation, there are different laws in different parts of the federation and different approaches to the lgbt community. so we can't rely on the english foreign office. what we have tried to do is to work with fifa to make sure that we have protection afforded us by the world cup being in russia, by the eyes of the world to on russia. alexey smertin, the ambassador for quality for the russian fa,
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has said that it'll be fine to fly rainbow flags. we take that with a pinch of salt, but we are afforded a particular protection by the world cup being in russia forjune and july and we should... we think we should take advantage of that if we can to go to russia and show some solidarity with the russian lgbtq community as well as obviously supporting england. di, stay with us, because i also want to bring billy in. because we reported on this programme yesterday, billy, that danny rose, the england player, has told his family "don't go to russia, there's going to be so much racist abuse, i don't want you to be subjected to that." you must worry about that? i mean, you always worry about it. i mean, russia got the world cup, i must admit i was gutted and all my mates were gutted as well. and it becomes difficult, because if you've been to a lot of england games,
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like i said to you, this is going to be my 13th tournament, you consider what time you're going to step off. i was going to go to russia in 2007 with england and i was actually working for a russian client and i asked him, i said everyone has said "don't go, bill," and i had everything booked and i write him up and i said, "look, what do you reckon?" he said to me, "actually, it's probably not a good idea you go." and on that trip, to be quite honest with you, if anyone knows the history of that game in 2007, the russian fans did have a bit of a field day on the england fans. not necessarilyjust black england fans, but all england fans. caused a lot of trouble. i was also in marseille, i was in the thick of the, inverted commas, action, as you want to call it. we were there, there was a lot of england fans who were causing absolutely no trouble whatsoever. the russian fans did their military operation on them, they picked on them and it was quite scary.
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and it was interesting, because i actually met a policeman in st etienne a few days afterwards when england played their final game, and i was chatting to him and he said to me, "were you in marseille?" and i said, "yeah." he goes, "those" russians are cowards. i said, "why do you say that?" he goes, "well, they picked on the people who are just not interested in any trouble at all." he goes, "that's really cowardly, that is." and i thought that was really interesting, how in the world it's actually got around how russians, even though they think that they're really tough, they're actually kind of picking on... it's almost kind of playing a monopoly game and you've got all the money and you've got all the pieces and you're playing against somebody who doesn't even know the rules, and it's like what's the point? because the fans aren't really interested. joe, you've picked quite a world cup to go to for your first one. yeah. i mean, it's the world cup, it's the first one i've ever really had the opportunity to go to for both time and finances. and every football fan wants to be able to say that they've been to a world cup. it was definitely a decision that was very seriously taken about whether to go or whether to boycott the world cup. it was a conversation that a lot of members of pride in football had. your family must be worried?
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oh, my family really, really, really don't want me to go. i've been made to set up a chat group that i will have to message them morning, noon and night to let them know that i'm safe. and friends as well are really concerned about safety. those guests talking to chloe kelly. let's get more on that nhs pay deal, giving some health workers a deal, giving some health workers a 6.5% pay rise over three years. the one union out of 1a to vote against the offer is the gmb. gmb national officer kevin brandstatter is with us in the studio. 0ur our members voted by 87% to reject this pay deal, and each region rejected to revoke it —— voted to rejected to revoke it —— voted to reject it, which gives us a unanimous decision. 6.5% over three yea rs unanimous decision. 6.5% over three years is unanimous decision. 6.5% over three yea rs is less unanimous decision. 6.5% over three years is less than projected inflation, which again gives people
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a lowering of their standard of living. these people work long hours and saw the nhs through the winter crisis on their regard this as an insult. what is your take on why there was such a gulf between the view of your members on this offer and the views of the members of the unions who voted for it, in that case overwhelmingly, to accept the pay deal? i can't answer for the other unions, i am pay deal? i can't answer for the other unions, iam here pay deal? i can't answer for the other unions, i am here to represent gmb members. but do you have a take on why there was such a gulf in the opinion? no. we heard earlier from the lead negotiator for the unions that those who voted for this deal felt it was the best that could be achieved through negotiations. so what is next for the gmb? is it further negotiations or some further action like a strike? our next steps are down to our members. it was representative of our members who took the decision to reject this pay deal. we are meeting on the 15th of
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june where we will consider the outcome of the ballot and what we intend to do next. what would you personally recommend ? intend to do next. what would you personally recommend? that is a matter for our personally recommend? that is a matterfor our members, personally recommend? that is a matter for our members, and personally recommend? that is a matterfor our members, and i'm not going to discuss union strategy on the telly. but as an individual do feel there is some mileage in discussions with the department of health and nhs employers? the sounding from our members is that what they particularly don't like other strings attached to the pay deal the fact that those at the top of the scale are getting less than the level of inflation. what you mean by the strings attached? there are strings attached and reductions in sick pay an overtime payment, particularly in the ambulance service where their sick pay could be cut substantially in some circumstances. those numbers are really unhappy with this deal. the gmb members will still get the 6.5% presumably even though they didn't vote for it? that is for the department of health to decide. there is a meeting later this month where this will be discussed, but our members are vei’y angry where this will be discussed, but our members are very angry with what
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is on offer, and don't like the deal. thank you very much for your time. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: it is just after a quarter to one. downing street says the prime minister has full confidence in boris johnson after he warned of a brexit meltdown in a secret recording made at a private dinner. a 90—year—old woman is seriously ill in hospital after being attacked in her own bed in north west london. more than 1 million nhs workers in england will receive a three—year pay deal worth 6.5% after union members voted to accept the deal. a public health charity is calling for greater efforts to tackle ageism, which it claims is stigmatising many older people. the royal society for public health says ageism is the most common form of discrimination in the uk and the most likely to go unchallenged. one idea is for the beauty industry to stop using the phrase "anti—ageing" in advertising.
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richard lister reports. archive footage: here, in a finsbury workship near sadler's wells, 70—year—old men and women have started work again to bring a new interest into the enforced leisure of their old age. in the 1950s, old age was often portrayed as a long slide into irrelevance and decline. hands which might otherwise have gone stiff, handle nimbly the work which business firms send to the workshop. instead of moping at home lonely, the old folk find it does them the world of good to come out. but today's report suggests those views may not have changed all that much. the rsph questioned 2,000 people and found ageism alive and well. is that a thing? i suppose the way society is structured, now, i probably am, yeah. nah, i mean, if you're too old, you're too old. in fact, the survey suggests that 40% of young adults believe dementia is inescapable as you age, and a quarter think it's normal for elderly people to be depressed and unhappy.
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across all age groups, two—thirds of us have no friends more than 30 years older or younger than we are. that's it — wiggle those hips! the report says facilities for older people and the very young should be housed under the same roof to bring generations together. it urges the media to treat ageism in the same way as racism or sexism, and it points to research which indicates a more positive view of old age can lead to a longer life. richard lister, bbc news. earlier i spoke to claire 0'shea from the campaign to end loneliness a little earlier. it's very interesting to understand that younger people have these negative perceptions of old age. it's interesting from the perspective that there are many —isms applicable to characteristics
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you are born with, but many of us build up these negative attitudes early in life as to where you will be in future. it's an interesting perspective. almost a self—fulfilling prophecy? yes, but one that we should challenge. it's your attitude going into old age. your ability to build social connections and things that keep you feeling positive. and your mental wellbeing better, if you are servicing good relationships. and what is your practical experience in the campaign to end loneliness? who are the people involved? more younger people identify as lonely than older people. but we know that loneliness in old age is more difficult to challenge. it comes from bereavement, ill—health, and shrinking social circles. so we know the challenges for loneliness in old age are more difficult to overcome at times than the challenges for younger lonely people.
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we want to work on intergenerational movement that get younger people and old people building relationships with each other to challenge and counter loneliness in old age. so how will you be involved in taking the findings of this report, here you are, talking to me about it, and presumably doing lots of interviews about it today, how will you take this report forward and ensure it makes a difference and begins to change attitudes? we want to see intergenerational connection is being built, so more shared spaces for younger and older people to come together. we want communities to work on projects that bring younger and older people together... is any of that happening? there are a lot of positive things, people have seen children in care homes in these programmes, they build intergenerational relationships, there are a lot of projects out there like doing it but we want to see it growing and it work more quickly to counter that kind of breakdown in intergenerational relationships. claire 0'shea from the campaign to end loneliness, thank you. nasa says new discoveries
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on mars could mean life is present on the surface. the red planet might not be home to little green men, but it does have organic compounds as well as a source of methane gas, both of which could have a biological origin. andrew plant reports. it's not evidence of life on mars — not yet, anyway. but it could be one step closer. tantalising signs of potential biology — organic molecules and methane. both could be an indication that something's happening on or beneath the red planet's surface. we don't know that there was ever life on mars. the organic molecules that we have found are not specifically evidence of life, because there are other sources of making those molecules, including things that are nonbiological in nature. the samples have been taken by curiosity rover,
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slowly exploring the chemistry of mars, burrowing down into the billion—year—old rock of what was once an ancient lake. 95% of the methane on earth is produced from biology, it's produced from termites or rice paddies, or cows, orsheep, or termites, etc. because of that, there's always been this interest in mars' methane. at the moment, it is not clearjust how common life might be on other planets. we only have one example, here on earth. but discovering life on our next—door neighbour, even if it is only little green microorganisms, would tell us a lot about both ourselves and the likelihood of life outside our solar system. for the last couple of weeks, much of the country has been affected by rail disruption since a major timetable change last month — and one of the areas worst affected is cumbria. the situation there looks set to get even worse as a line closure
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through the lake district is likely to be extended. john maguire reports. amanda seeds is so fed up with her local train service that she's taking the drastic measure of moving house. she's relocating from the village of staveley to kendall, her local town, where three of her children will go to school. as a parent, the amount of hours that i have worried about the children, because the trains are cancelled and they're late for school, and they can't get home from school, and so ijust — we're going to relocate. that's that. the irony is that the train line runs across the end of her garden, but there are no trains. is that a station? yeah, that's the beginning of the station, just there. so when the trains were running, sometimes my children would be at home, and they'd see the train go past the house, and they'd set off at that point and run down the street, and they would always get it. they would always catch the train that they had just seen. the service was suspended for two weeks on monday,
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and replaced by buses, as northern rail brought in an emergency timetable in response to the chaos across its network. but amanda says the lakes line has been unreliable since northern took over the franchise two years ago. we've been subjected to cancellation after cancellation up here for months now, all through the winter. and the way that i see it, having experienced years and years of the train being faultless, if northern rail can't provide the service, as they said that they were going to, then as far as i can see, they must be in breach of their contract. they must be. this is the only train running in windermere at the moment. the summer season is well under way here, with visitors from around the world following in wordsworth‘s footsteps, inspired by his pen strokes. but, for those working to make hay while the cumbrian sunshine, the lakes line is vital. a year ago we were being promised
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electrification, new electric trains from windermere to manchester airport for a day. that was the promise. roll things on a year, we've now been inscripted as a world heritage site, and we've got a bus replacement. you know, i think that the economy, that the community, and that the visitors to the lake district — to be quite frank, they deserve an awful lot better. there you go, have a good day. nice to see you. take care, amanda, see you later. transport is always one of the challenges of rural life, and where the economy is also so dependent on ease of access, then when the system fails, the impact can be deep, widespread, and potentially long—lasting. in a moment, the news at one with jane hill. first the weather with tomasz schafernaker. the weekend is just around the
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corner, and the weather is looking fairly decent for most of us. there will be lots of bright and sunny weather around, but also the chance of capturing a shower. hay fever sufferers, not great at the moment. high pollen levels, very high in some levels, more comfortable in scotland. here is the satellite picture, quite a bit of cloud still floating around across spain and portugal, then across the uk, that speu portugal, then across the uk, that spell of relatively quiet weather continues, so for the rest of the afternoon it is a case of mostly bright if not sunny weather across the country, and a few showers developing in one or two areas, for example across scotland, maybe northern ireland, the majority of the country should have a fine evening. tonight, not much happens.
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we have clear spells but also some cloudy conditions closer to the eastern coast. temperatures overnight will dip to 8 degrees in newcastle, much milder in the south and cardiff, around 16 degrees. tomorrow morning starts murky and cloudy in some areas, particularly in the east, but i think overall, a bright if not sunny day for most of us, and also some showers developing. looking at these showers in more detail, developing across scotla nd in more detail, developing across scotland around the highlands, possibly the western isles, one or two in northern ireland, possibly some across the far north of england and one or two just around some across the far north of england and one or twojust around cornwall and one or twojust around cornwall and devon as well. showers are so difficult to pinpoint exactly where they are going to occur, this is just an indication of where we may well see them. then the rest of the afternoon, on saturday the weather is looking fine, saturday night also no change. here is the picture across europe on sunday, you can see how warm it is across the heart of europe. a lot cooler across spain
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and portugal, and that is because we have this area of low cloud and rain spreading around, we arejust have this area of low cloud and rain spreading around, we are just the of that, so here the weather remains settled through the course of sunday, but having said that, some showers are expected, perhaps across northern parts of england, but the majority of the country should once again have a dry day. goodbye. borisjohnson says the brexit talks are heading for meltdown, and that president trump could negotiate better. the foreign secretary told a private dinner that leave supporters may not get the deal they hope for. his comments were secretly recorded. the prime minister says she has confidence in her foreign secretary. we'll have the latest live from westminster. also this lunchtime... more heated disagreement about trade tarriffs between donald trump and the other g7 leaders on the eve of the summit in canada. a 90—year—old woman is seriously ill
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after being attacked in her bed at home in london. police say the assault was horrific. concerns are raised about the safety of british football
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