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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  June 8, 2018 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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capital, not to market. services, capital, not to mention the free movement of people. the single market is one and indivisible with the united kingdom, and contributed to the creation of the single market, and the united kingdom was in fact a very influential. i was commission of the single market for five years, and i can testify to the united kingdom's commitment to the single market and the proper working of the single market. they are familiar with the rules. so the united kingdom has to decide what is going to happen when they leave. do they respect the rules, or do they not? it is up to the uk. i mentioned earlier, a free—trade agreement with the whole of the uk. 0n the proposal that has been put forward by the uk,
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i only received this document yesterday, early afternoon, we look at it overnight and we will continue to look at it. i don't have any firm ideological stance on this. is it a temporary baxter? —— backstop. no, backstop means backstop, as i have said, and the uk has said that this is not addressing the question of regulatory alignment. you don't want a border and we agree that we don't wa nt a border and we agree that we don't want a hard order, then there has two b and agreement on customs aspects —— has to be an. and also an agreement on regulatory alignment, and that is missing. backstop means
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backstop, as i said, so i'm just identifying problems so you don't set off on the wrong track. swiss television. translation: is it too early yet... you are watching bbc news, and michel barnier is taking questions in brussels. we will listen in because he's making some interesting comments on the british the gay shading strategy. —— the british negotiating strategy. translation: i mentioned earlier the procedures which are under way and this would include state aid issues in respect of the uk. some of the
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issues we have to deal with and we have not gone into in depth with the uk, how does one manage these ongoing proceedings, the european commission and the court ofjustice, which might still be in place where they were triggered before brexit but have to be followed up after brexit. that is a similar issue. to theissue brexit. that is a similar issue. to the issue of goods placed on the market, goods produced within the internal market before brexit, which would continue their life span after brexit, this is another issue relating to that. another additional issue which we have already raised in preliminary discussions is the issue of state aid in the wider context of the level playing field
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which we have two devise with the uk. in terms of our future economic relations. let me remind you, this is the first time in our trade history that an agreement, rather than being with a view to promoting convergence , than being with a view to promoting convergence, will be on the contrary to control or limiting divergent, so this is a first ever. it is possible... i visit various european capitals every week and i'm the representatives and professionals and professional bodies —— i meet. i was in budapest this week. i meet trade unionists and environmental groups and finance ministers, and so oi'i
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groups and finance ministers, and so on and so forth, and when it comes to this divergent is with the uk i always hear the same things, certain threats, certain ideas that this might be turned into some form of regulatory competition to the benefit of the uk economy, to use this divergent is as a means of social dumping, environmental dumping, at the expense of consumers, that is something we will not accept. indeed, the issue of state aid and competition issues are pa rt state aid and competition issues are part and parcel of this risk framework in terms of the regulatory competition, the tax competition. i'm saying this not with a view to stirring up trouble of any kind. all these agreements we have been talking about about the future are not on the same basis as article 50
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for brexit, these are agreements which require approval by the 27 national parliaments on our side and buy all of them. in some countries, regional parliaments will also have to give the go—ahead. don't underestimate how difficult this ratification process may prove to be. wheni ratification process may prove to be. when i visit national parliaments and meet national parliamentarians i want to make them pa rt of parliamentarians i want to make them part of this debate is already so the ratification will be smooth when the ratification will be smooth when the time comes. 0ur the ratification will be smooth when the time comes. our goal is to make the time comes. our goal is to make the progress base excess, notjust brexit and separation, but also the ratification process —— our goal is to make the process they successful top one more question. —— eight success. who are you? michel platini from the
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sky news. —— michelle — — michelle clifford —— michelle clifford from sky news for the why are you continuing to bother to analyse the document? translation: because i look at all british proposals in an objective manner. look at article 49. it was mentioned earlier. in the joint report. it mentions three options when it comes to future relations. there is a specific suggestion and proposals on the uk and then the backstop. we put the backstop on the
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table. let me just repeat once again, we need to be pragmatic and practical and not get bogged down in ideology. i'm getting to know ireland and northern ireland rather well. i listen to what everybody has to say and i believe more and more the practical solutions proposed in out the practical solutions proposed in our backstop, customs checks and regulatory alignment, would not call into question british constitutional order. it is a form of decentralisation to resolve a very specific problem where the uk has a responsibility as the co—guarantor of the good friday agreement and we also have a responsibility and we tried to assume those responsibilities. i look at the
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proposals very carefully and looking very carefully at the british proposals to see if there are any possible answers and i hope that on the basis of the feedback we will be able to make progress. thank you. have a good afternoon. that was michel barnier, the chief brexit negotiator for the eu, talking in brussels, with very interesting remarks about the british government's brexit strategy. saying the economic arrangement to avoid the hard border between ireland and northern ireland cannot be extended to the whole of britain as london has proposed. our reality check correspondent chris morris is here.
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he has sown another spanner in the works? this was as tough as it got, let me be clear, our backstop cannot be extended to the whole of the uk. we have had comings and goings in downing street agonising over the form of words and essentially he appears to have pulled the rug from under the proposal. he was pressed a few times, ie categorically ruling it out? —— are you. he did not quite say that. but he said all the other 27 countries, there cannot be any a la ca rte 27 countries, there cannot be any a la carte approach to membership of the single market, the implication being that if the whole of the uk was aligned with the customs union and eu regulations we would in effect get the benefits of being in all of those economic areas without paying the money or taking the
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responsibilities for it and he said thatis responsibilities for it and he said that is not acceptable. he had a few specific issues, the idea of it being a temporary arrangement, he said, how does the idea deal with the need to get rid of the absence ofa the need to get rid of the absence of a hard border in ireland under all circumstances? he said the idea ofa all circumstances? he said the idea of a temporary backstop is a contradiction in terms. he said backstop means backstop, in an echo of brexit means brexit. where does this leave the talks? it punctures a big hole in the british proposal which came out yesterday and don't forget it was in february we were discussing this... the eu came out with its legal text for the proposed backstop and the uk rejected it that has taken untiljune to come out with its proposal and equally the eu has come out and rejected that
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within one day. there was tough language from michel barnier, saying they were not going to be intimidated by people in the uk, talking about the blame game. uk is leaving and they have an accept the consequences, he said, and he said there has got to be more realisation of what is possible and what is not possible, throwing the ball back into the uk court. british officials will save this is a negotiation and we have sent the document and they are assessing it —— will say this is. but he does have a mandate from a27 is. but he does have a mandate from a 27 countries to be the chief negotiator. this is not a great response from a uk perspective to what was proposed yesterday. our political correspondent iain watson is in westminster. what the government finally came up with yesterday, this followed hours
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of agonising talks between the prime minister and the brexit secretary, trying to balance the various wings of cabinet opinion and now we have had michel barnier chucking a spanner had michel barnier chucking a spanner into the works, appearing to reject all of this. and saying backstop means backstop. he said he's open—minded and he's not taking an ideological approach to this and he doesn't rule out the british proposals entirely but it was doused in scepticism, his language, and a series in dimension from him. —— a serious intervention. downing street was said to not take his word as the word of god, he's not the adjudicator, he is the negotiator on the other side of the iconic, but it still looks pretty grim from the british perspective —— on the other side of the argument. to give david davis onside the prime minister had
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to agree to having the backstop to expire at some point in 2021, a temporary arrangement, but barnier said he did not want a temporary arrangement and he did not want businesses to have to adjust twice effectively to brexit. that was a difficulty from the outset. secondary, whether there is a de fa cto secondary, whether there is a de facto border in the irish sea. the government is propped up by the dup and they are against it. against having some kind of border in the irish sea. that is the implication of the backstop that the eu would prefer. to underline that, what michel barnier said, he thought the border checks would be easy on ferries and it would be a long 300 miles or so of border between northern ireland and the irish republic. he also stressed that he
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was making an exceptional case and northern ireland, that it could remain part of the uk customs territory, and that would be a deep rag rag to the dup. that gives theresa may many difficulties and this may well be either unacceptable to the british government or if it is acceptable to parts of the british government that we might resignations as a result. this comes on the back of a strawberry, john borisjohnson in which he said the brexit talks are approaching a meltdown —— on the back of an extraordinary range of comments from borisjohnson in which he said the brexit talks are approaching a meltdown and that may be donald trump could do a betterjob. the spokeswoman for the prime minister said that she still had confidence in borisjohnson. said that she still had confidence in boris johnson. political journalists said, why? they said
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eve ryo ne journalists said, why? they said everyone is working towards delivering brexit in government, but his comments jarred and we can hear from some of what he said in this private dinner. and how he was worried that long—standing campaigners for leave might not get what they wanted. borisjohnson being boris johnson being pretty borisjohnson being pretty sceptical about what might happen in the future and his comments very difficult for the prime minister. while the spokesman would not comment directly on them, but she
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did stress a range of things which were miles away from what boris johnson said at that dinner. for example, problems of the irish border might be relatively small, he said, but the prime minister said it isa said, but the prime minister said it is a priority to resolve them. thanks forjoining us. the chancellor philip hammond has been giving his reaction to the recording of borisjohnson saying the brexit talks could be approaching ‘meltdown'. my my experience has been that collaborative approach is generally more productive than a confrontational approach and certainly my advice to my colleagues is that the way to address the challenges that there are undoubtedly are of reaching a good brexit solution, is to engage with
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oui’ brexit solution, is to engage with our european partners and to understand their concerns and their anxieties about the future and to know their red lines, and then to work together to try to find mutually beneficial solutions. because it is very clear that we can only have a deal if it works for both sides. that was philip hammond speaking earlier. there have been sharp exchanges between president trump and other members of the g7 on the eve of the summit. president macron of france has made clear the six other countries in the group will be sticking together in their opposition to us tariffs — president trump warned the eu and canada that if they don't remove their tariffs the us would more than match them. our diplomatic correspondent james robbins reports from quebec. a chateau hotel in rural quebec — the most peaceful of settings for some of the world's most powerful leaders to meet. but this g7 summit could get noisy.
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donald trump will be isolated, as traditional american allies denounce his trade measures aimed directly at them. the president says he imposed tariffs on imported metals to protect american jobs and national security. the american steel and aluminium industry has been ravaged by aggressive foreign trade practices. it's really an assault on our country. leaders heading to the summit are angry. president macron of france urged politeness, but reminded donald trump sharply, no leader is forever. and canada's prime minister, the host, openly derides donald trump's reasoning. translation: it is laughable to say that canada, france, can represent a threat to america's national security, as we are in reality the best allies the united states has had
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for a long time. but a canadian academic, who has made studying the g7 part of his life's work, urges caution. john kirton told me all was not lost in this very public fight. the prime minister, i don't think, has quite crossed the line where he's said, "donald, you're irrational". he's simply said, "your argument is irrational". canada is looking for solid european support in this fight, welcoming theresa may, who made clear again on the flight here that the american tariffs were unjustified. the prime minister added the uk would continue to be a great champion for free trade around the world. everything is now in place, including the parody puppets who pop up at every g7. the real leaders will soon lock horns with donald trump as to who is the true threat to jobs and growth. the risk of prolonged trade conflict hangs heavy over this summit. james robbins, bbc news, quebec.
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our correspondent gary o'donoghue is in quebec city. even as they gather, a war of words and insults flying, is this possibly the most divisive g7 we have ever seen? we are used to a pretty anodyne outcome to these meetings, normally, usually an agreement on the importance of a rules —based approach to international trade and approach to international trade and a lot of agreement on political issues in terms of liberal democracies and often a unified approach to many foreign policy challenges but those things are under threat. in the last the minutes and its tawdry intervention by the president as he was about to leave to come back to the summit —— an extraordinary intervention. he suggested that russia should be back
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here at the g7, making it the g8, the way was, before was expelled. he said russia should be at the negotiating table and that will come asa negotiating table and that will come as a gobsmacking surprise to many of the leaders. i suspect it will be universally rejected as an idea given that these countries to have a range of sanctions in place against russia because of the annexation of the crimea. that is another thing which has been thrown into the mix. not to mention the thing you are talking about in terms of the differences over trade, which are huge and are becoming increasingly entrenched. thanks forjoining us. ageism is the most common form of discrimination in the uk — and the most likely to go unchallenged. that's according to a new report
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by the royal society for public health, which says many young people believe it's normal for older people to be lonely, unhappy and depressed. richard galpin reports. negative attitudes towards the elderly are endemic, affecting the health and well—being of everyone as they grow old. these are conclusions of the royal society for public health, which has carried out its own survey. it suggests almost a third of the population believes loneliness is normal when you get old. while 40% of young adults or millennials believe dementia is an inescapable part of ageing. a quarter of them believe it is normal for elderly people to be depressed and unhappy. those behind today's report say those negative attitudes need changing.
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we would not say negative things around race or sex. but with ageing, it is really surprising how much ageism there is. often the media perpetrates a lot of this, of the ageism. so it starts it and then it reinforces it, the bed blocking, the ageing time bomb. archive footage: here, 70—year—old men and women have started work again to bring a new interest into their old age. but ageism goes back decades. this film from the 19505 typical of the time, when old age was often portrayed as a long slide into irrelevance and decline. amongst the most powerful ways of turning all of this around, our projects like this one, which bring together the different generations. strengthen the bonds between them, ending isolation, and proving getting older can also bejoyous. richard galpin, bbc news. with me now is hannah pearce from age uk. do you think that is right, young
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people have a worrying view of the older population? and isn't ageing population. they see older people as more depressed and lonely. what the report provides is a way to think about negative attitudes and have a have a damaging impact. we are all ageing and society is getting old and that is a positive news story. it is better than the alternative, but if we want to talk about ageing positively the experience of ageing needs to be a positive one for everyone. as the report points out, people in their 20s and 30s who are most worried about ageing and hold the most negative views on ageing, maybe because of their lifestyles which are focused on developing their careers, they don't spend as much time with older generations, and we are quite sol
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much time with older generations, and we are quite so i load as a society, and i say the more time we can spend with each other in different generations, the more we will understand each other. is it simple things, you buy an anti—ageing cream, and automatically it is saying, ageing is bad? things like that that are conveying the wrong message? yes, there is guilt on the part of the media and the advertising industry but we are all guilty on thinking negatively about ageing and the onus is on everyone to think about ageing more positively and take responsibility for our own lives to age actively and keep taking part in physical activities and keep mentally stimulated, learning new things. ageing can be positive if we are able to age actively and continue to do the things that have given us joy in our lives. dust is at a real discrimination, the way younger
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people think about older people? —— does this amount to real discrimination. there is undoubtedly discrimination. there is undoubtedly discrimination at them we want to make that unacceptable. are we talking about the workplace, for example? we're talking about discrimination across society, in media and the depiction of stereotypical ageist roles in television and film, but also older people finding it harder to get back into work and older workers finding it harder to access training opportunities so even though we have strong age legislation in employment there are still ageist attitudes from employers. there's also discrimination in health care, older people find it harder to access some forms of health care, there was an mp who suggested older people, treatment should be in rationed for
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older people. there's a lot of work for us to do to counter ageist attitudes across society. thanks for joining us. michel barnier, who we heard from early on, with his dues covered, he has been on twitter —— with his press c0 nfe re nce . that is the latest from michel barnier. you said in another memorable phrase, backstop means backstop —— he said. echoes of theresa may saying brexit means brexit. nhs workers in england have voted
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overwhelmingly to accept a three—year pay deal worth 6.5% — health unions have announced. more than a million nurses, physiotherapists, cleaners and other staff across england will receive it. the agreement, reached after months of negotiation between unions, employers and ministers, was made possible with an extra £4.2 billion of funding. time for a look at the weather. here's tomasz schafernaker. is that a tornado? it is. this is not in the uk, so nothing to worry about. this is not the forecasts of the weekend either. so quiet on the weather front, we were trying to find exciting pictures. this is from the united states and this is also the united states and this is also the start of hurricane season. my
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neighbours asked me, what is the giver is between a hurricane and a tornado. —— what is the difference. this is a tornado, about a mile high, half a mile, this is a tornado, about a mile high, halfa mile, 100 metres wide, fa ntastically fast high, halfa mile, 100 metres wide, fantastically fast spinning air and we fantastically fast spinning air and we will compare this to this, what we we will compare this to this, what we get in the uk, not very impressive! this was from pembrokeshirejust the impressive! this was from pembrokeshire just the other day. there's another one, there, not quite like the wizard of oz. those are tornadoes. i'm going to show you what a hurricane is but i have clicked the wrong button. anyway, we will do the weather for the weekend. this is it. the satellite picture, stormy clouds to the south. as far
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as the weather goes for most of us today, looking fairly quiet with a few showers in the afternoon and early evening across scotland and a few in northern ireland but the rest of the country looks fine. evening temperatures around 21. this evening very quiet, partly cloudy skies across eastern areas, 13 in london overnight. eight in newcastle. as far as saturday is concerned it is not looking bad at all, plenty of sunshine. it might be a bit cloudy, but one thing we are watching on saturday is the possibility of heavy showers. not everywhere in the uk, but mostly across scotland and northern ireland and not everybody in scotland and northern ireland will catch them. bunbury downpours in scotland and a few developing in northern ireland —— thundery.
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clearly the vast majority of the uk is underneath the fine weather, with sunny skies. partly cloudy at times. showers continue in scotland and the possibility of flash flooding. sunday, look how hot it is in central europe, nearly 30. cool and showery in spain and portugal and parts of france. this pattern has been fairly steady now for weeks over been fairly steady now for weeks over there. we will have the odd shower during the course of sunday, most of us on sunday should have a fine day, with temperatures even hitting the mid—20s in london depending on the sunshine. the weekend is looking bad overall across the uk. let's make the most of it as things might change as we head into next week. this is bbc news afternoon live with
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me ben brown. the latest headlines. the prime minister says she has full confidence in boris johnson, after the foreign secretary is secretly recorded suggesting the government lacks guts in the brexit negotiations — and that donald trump could do a betterjob. meanwhile the eu's chief negotiator says the government's so called backstop proposal can only apply to northern ireland, and not the rest of the uk. a war of words as world leaders gather for the g7 summit in canada — with deep divisions over american trade tariffs. sport now on afternoon live with damian johnson. premier league clubs will have a winter break
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i ,it , it has been debated for years but now we are , it has been debated for years but now we are going to get it. a bit of a hot potato in the game and there will be a winter break every february from the season after next. we'll have to wait a bit. it will be staggered across two weeks with five matches played on the first weekend and five on the following one. fatigue at the end of a long season has often been blamed for england's failure at the world cup and the euros. they won't have that excuse in the future. the fa round will move to midweek, remember this game between tottenham and rochdale last season, played in horrendous conditions. it is hoped fewer matches will be played in the worst of the winter weather and england players will be better prepared for major summer tournaments. the proof of the pudding will be in the eating. i love football in the snow,
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it's fantastic to watch. we were talking about england's chances in the world cup. they are heading off with gareth southgate on tuesday, i think, to russia. a couple of decent friendly results under their belts. they've got the wind in their sales. gareth southgate says he'll have to sleep on a few selection dilemmas after his side ‘s final world cup warm up friendly before they go to russia, he doesn't have the benefit of his players having rested during a winter break get! marcus rashford of manchester united has written to claim a place in the starting line—up with his stunning goal in their win over costa rica. to be like all the others, making mistakes because they are making mistakes than they are trying things. for me, all of our players, if they want to try to be as good as they can be they have to try things and we have to accept that might mean that there is the odd failure. but then maybe
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you get the odd moment like he has produced tonight, there is a bit to sort out but that is great because we want a squad but are playing well and these lads are at the moment. england's women can go back top of their world cup qualifying group tonight as they avoid defeat against russia. kick off in moscow at five o'clock. england thrashed russia's accession zero back in september, not that the england coach is taking another win for granted.|j not that the england coach is taking another win for granted. i think it will be a good game. what i've said to my players today is, expect a tough game, it is the world cup qualifier, we sought the wales to mark way wales celebrated getting a draw at southampton, we are a big scalp for teams even to draw with us, so we scalp for teams even to draw with us, so we are scalp for teams even to draw with us, so we are going to have to play really well to get any kind of result. and full match coverage from moscow on the red button as well as on the bbc sport website and app.
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manchester united have confirmed casey stoney is the coach of their new women's professional team. she won new women's professional team. she won 130 caps for england and 12 major trophies in her career. she retired from playing earlier this year and has been an assistant coach to the lionesses. england women's cricket team have been given the significant pay increase. the ecb has confirmed it. the salaries of ten players are going up by at least 50% and the aim is that by 2020 all players will earn twice what they received last year when they win the world cup. the captain heather knight welcome to the pay rise ahead of england's first match of the summer against south africa in worcester. it's a sign of how the professional women's game is going. asign of professional women's game is going. a sign of how brilliant lustre was as well and how many people were interested in where the game is going so obviously delighted for us
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but our minds on the game tomorrow. seventh—seeded dominic thiem is into the final of the french open after beating marco cecchinato of italy in a straight sets. the austrian who has never won a grand slam before 17-5, 7-6, 6-1. he will has never won a grand slam before 17—5, 7—6, 6—1. he will play either rafael nadal orjuan martin del potro in the final. that's almost bought sport for now. thank you. we'll stay with the world cup for a moment. more concerns have been raised about the safety of football fans at the world cup in russia, which begins next week. an estimated 10,000 british supporters are expected to travel to the event — and mps on the foreign affairs committee say they're particularly worried about racist and homophobic intimidation. our sports correspondent richard conway reports. the world cup almost hear again but
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as fans get ready to travel to russia and new parliamentary report sets out in stark detail the problems they could face. mps say england fans present a particular risk because of former hooliganism, intolerance towards the lgbt committee, abuse around games, the current heightened tensions with britain especially in light of the salisbury poisoning and the threat of terrorist attacks. russia is a difficult country in which to offer consular protection. the russian state is not like other countries. if fa ns state is not like other countries. if fans are for instance lgbt or from an ethnic minority then the russian state has more of a history of abusing them and supporting them. in support of the foreign office says it has offered advice to black and ethnic minority and lgbt supporters with some fans who are going aware of what potentially awaits. and must be streetwise. i am
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under no illusion that there are some idiots in russia who will want to damage people like myself and damage england fans in general. so i do fear for my safety but i also know there are good people out there andi know there are good people out there and i think if you are street buys hopefully you'll avoid the trouble. it has been a long process to work out whether i should go and whether it's right to go as an lgbt person. that conversation i've had with lgbt russians as well as friends and family who are concerned about my safety. fans are urged to sign up to online foreign office travel alerts so they can stay informed of developments. ultimately if the security situation deteriorates mps say the government must be prepared to act so that everyone can safely enjoy the football. richard conway, bbc news. now let's bring you more on the latest on brexit. as we've been hearing, the european chief negotiator michel barnier has cast doubt on the uk's so—called "backstop" plan —
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in the event of no customs deal being agreed before brexit. he said an economic arrangement to avoid a hard border between ireland and northern ireland could not be extended to the whole of britain, as london had proposed. our brussels reporter, adam fleming, joins me now from brussels. you have the latest, adam, you were in that press conference and heard michel barnier pouring cold water on theresa may's plans. i'm glad you put it that way because there's so much confusion about what michel barnier was saying in the press conference. it is incredibly complicated, the language around the issue has got complicated and there has been a lot of muddying of the waters on both sides. what mitchell barnier and the eu feels is that the uk's proposal yesterday was about a uk's proposal yesterday was about a uk wide customs arrangements after
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brexit. and it didn't amount to uk counterproposal for a backstop to avoid a hard border in northern ireland as a sort of insurance policy. michel barnier‘s intention in that press conference, i think, was to try to bring attention back to those very specific, very precise northern ireland related issues. and for him that isn't about customs. it is about how northern ireland stays aligned with the eu's rules and regulations on products and food standards and all sorts of things so that trade between north and south on the island of ireland and daily life between northern ireland and the republic of ireland can continue as editors and. the eu brussels feels, having a kind of big bargain with the uk so that the uk can stay in the customs territory does not do that. you have to untangle all sorts of other things like tactics as we build up to a eu summit, the fact
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that eu is pushing its own version of the backstop and is doubling down on that, and a load of politics especially on the eu side. it boils down to that. michel barnier wants to talk about precise issues faced by northern ireland after brexit. he doesn't want to be talking about some huge customs deal between the uk and the eu that should really be discussed in the later part of the brexit talks when it is about a future economic relationship after brexit. that's kind of the easiest way i can explain it. very well done adam. ijust way i can explain it. very well done adam. i just want to show the viewers the tweet from michel barnier after his press conference. users, to avoid any confusion between the eu backstop and uk customs paper, i reiterate that our backstop cannot apply to the whole of the uk. this is not a rejection of the uk. this is not a rejection of the uk customs paper on which discussions continue. is that last line kind of crucial because at
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first it did sound a bit like rejection but now he's saying that it didn't. he says now he's got lots of questions about this paper. yesterday some people predicted it would be dead on arrival, brussels has rejected this must in advance before it even arrived. that's not the case. michel barnier went through technical questions and some might say that those questions were so insurmountable and cannot be a nswered so insurmountable and cannot be answered in a way that could make it work, maybe this proposal is dead on arrival but we'll have to wait and see, because they will be more rounds in negotiations where shall barnier and his team will ask more questions about david davis and the senior civil servants work for them, and they will have to redefine, refine and refine what the uk means. i'll come back to that point, michel barnier truly believes the solution to how the uk is treated after brexit lies in alignment with eu
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rules and regulations. someone said to me, only a percentage, 25% of those things to do with customs, so you've got to think of the rest and this is what people have to remember. he has spoken to northern ireland and he is convinced that this does not result in a border being drawn that will somehow separate northern ireland from the rest of the uk and cause a constitutional crisis. i kind of believe him when he says that but plenty of people will say that he's saying that for political reasons and even if he believes it possible 2o and even if he believes it possible 20 politicians in the uk well look at it and go, no way! good to talk to you adam, thank you. the latest from brussels. one of my producers has been suggesting that we from
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brussels to mussels. when you eat a bowl of mussels, you expect to be eating seafood — but researchers say they found tiny pieces of plastic in all the samples of mussels they collected from uk seawaters, and bought from supermarkets. researchers from the universities of hull and london say more work is needed to understand the implications of digesting the microplastic. here's our environment analyst, roger harrabin. the mighty oceans. nature at its most pristine. but, looks can deceive. human pollution is everywhere. including in shellfish like mussels. these creatures feed by filtering seawater. in the process, they're ingesting tiny bits of human debris. every 100 grams of mussels tested in this study contained an estimated 70 bits of waste. scientists suggest that consumption of micro—plastics and other waste by british people eating mussels is likely to be common and widespread. here's the source of many
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of the fragments of waste — our own washing machines. when we put clothes in the wash, small fibres break off and wriggle their way through the sewage filters into the sea. in a nutshell, if you like, we were able to find small microparticles — so these could be micro—plastics or other types of materials, perhaps textiles — inside every single batch of mussels we found, whether they came from the coastline or from a supermarket source. the big question for seafood lovers and the shellfish industry is whether mussels are still good to eat. researchers say there shouldn't be any problem with eating mussels. they say they need more tests to be absolutely sure. but frankly, if some people think that they may be eating the fibres of someone else's clothing in their meal, they may not be so keen. meanwhile, at the bottom of the ocean, scientists are still finding the effects of bigger bits of plastic rubbish. this blue tarpaulin.
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a whole bagful of plastic waste. a crab brandishing a plastic weapon. more plastic smothering sealife. world leaders meeting in the g7 have the oceans on their agenda. but, as usual in these summits, more attention will fall on politics than on the planet. roger harrabin, bbc news. ina in a moment we will have the business news in a moment, first a quick look at the headlines. the prime minister says she has full confidence in boris johnson, after the foreign secretary is secretly recorded suggesting the government lacks guts in the brexit negotiations — and that donald trump could do a betterjob. meanwhile the eu's chief brexit negotiator says the government's so called backstop proposal can only apply to northern ireland, and not the rest of the uk. a war of words as
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world leaders gather for the g7 summit in canada — with deep divisions over american trade tariffs. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. if you're a facebook user you might want to check your account — a software bug has meant millions of users may have unknowingly posted private information to the public. the glitch set a user's post to be shared to "everyone", even if a user had previously chosen a more restricted option. facebook says the fault has been rectified. users who may have been affected will be notified on the site's newsfeed. bt‘s chief executive, gavin patterson, is to step down after the company said a change of leadership was needed. the company said a poor reaction to its latest results, in which bt set out plans to cut 13,000 jobs, had prompted the move. bt said mr patterson, who has led the firm for five years,
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would remain in his post until a successor is chosen later this year. and an inquest has found the bmw delay in recalling cars due to an electrical fault has contributed to the death of the driver. we've been talking about business rates today after comments from the tesco boss, he was rather scathing about them? business rates have been mentioned. that's right, the boss of tesco says that business rates have caused an uneven playing field on the business high street. we've seen a lot of big retailers fall in the last few months and business rates are partly to blame. as a quick recap business rates are set by the government, taken in by local rates are set by the government, ta ken in by local authorities
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rates are set by the government, taken in by local authorities are basically linked to the business occupies. they have increased to two yea rs occupies. they have increased to two years ina occupies. they have increased to two years in a row and there have been complaints by lobbies that this has crippled businesses especially in the time where we are seeing a lot of moving to online sales. how worried should facebook users be about this glitch? it does sound worrying. and knowing the users have posted private information that they had restricted, inadvertently it has been posted to the general public because of the technical blip. paul blake isjoining because of the technical blip. paul blake is joining us because of the technical blip. paul blake isjoining us from new york. tell us more about what has happened here? good morning from wall street. this is interesting. facebook confirmed overnight they had had a glitch with their privacy settings. you know when you post a status update or are pictured as a drop—down menu or you can get to
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chooseif drop—down menu or you can get to choose if it is public orjust for friends. for a couple of days between 18th of may and 22nd made that option defaulted to public order as it typically defaults to a job setting he wanted to use. many people want to share content just with friends and not with the public and now facebook has admitted that things have been posted to the public when they wanted a post them to friends. they've fairly minor issue but it does throw the spotlight onto facebook and its privacy controls. a scary thought there. and they will be notified on there. and they will be notified on the facebook feed if they have fallen victim to this? yes, facebook says users will see item in facebook feed if they don't catch it in the news they will see a pair and they have done that with similar issues in the past notifying users when they've been affected by some issue on the network so fairly standard
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practice for the network to notify users in that way. and the g7 summit is coming up with trade talks top of the agenda. what will be on top of that list especially with tariffs in mind? you are right, traders at the top of the list. it looks as if it could be frosty relations then canada, donald trump and emmanuel macron have been sparring on twitter over the last couple of days and canadian prime minister justin trudeau has got involved in this, a lot of this goes back to the tariffs imposed by mrtrump lot of this goes back to the tariffs imposed by mr trump but it also goes back to other dealers like a paris climate accord and the iran deal. it's not a lot of extra tension on relations between these traditional allies. with see what it looks like in the next couple of days but it is certainly looking frosty right now. ok, paul, thank you. what's the
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latest on the markets. bt shares because their boss gavin patterson is stepping down that seems to have cheered up investors. he won't be thrilled by that! a lot people have been scathing about him. he is seen asa been scathing about him. he is seen as a flamboyant character from the world of advertising. bt is less flamboyant. so his image was an interesting contrast to the company. so he's leaving and they'll be quite happy about it, clearly investors did not like that plan and they will be happy he is going. right vishala, good to talk to you, thank you very much. now we can talk about the planet mars. nasa says new discoveries on mars could mean life
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is present on the surface. the red planet might not be home exactly to little green men — but it does have organic compounds, as well as a source of methane gas, both of which could have a biological origin. andrew plant reports. it is not evidence of life on mars, not yet anyway but it could be one step closer. ta ntalising not yet anyway but it could be one step closer. tantalising signs of potential biology. organic molecules and methane. both could be an indication that something is happening on, or beneath the surface of the red planet. we don't know that there was about life on mars. organic markers we have found are not specifically evidence of life because there are other sources of making those molecules including things that are non—biological. samples have been taken by curiosity rover slowly exploring the chemistry
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of mars, burrowing into the billion —year—old rock of what was once an ancient lake. 9596 of the methane on earth comes from biology, it's produced by termites, rice paddies, cows sheep, tonight izeta. because of that there's always been this interest in mars‘s methane. of that there's always been this interest in mars's methane. at the moment it is not clear how come life might be on other planets. we only have one example on earth. but discovering life on our next door neighbour even if only micro green organisms will tell us about ourselves and about life wood the likelihood of life outside our solar system. andrew planned, bbc news. time for a look at the weather. . . here's tomasz schaferneker. the weekend is looking bright and
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sunny, just the chance of showers are perhaps not completely dry weekend. for hay fever sufferers it's not looking great, the pollen is high in some areas, a bit more co mforta ble is high in some areas, a bit more comfortable in scotland and the of england, low levels of pollen. the satellite picture, picture, quite a bit of cloud over spain and portugal, that is where we've got thunderstorms across the uk that speu thunderstorms across the uk that spell of relatively quiet weather continues so for the rest of the afternoon it is a case of mostly bright if not sunny weather across the country and showers developing in other areas, for example across scotland, maybe northern ireland but the vast majority of the country should have a fine friday evening with temperatures around 20 in the south, closer to the mid—teens in the north—east of england. and tonight not much happens, we have clear spells but also cloudy conditions closer to the eastern coast. two bridges overnight will dip to eight degrees in newcastle, much milder in the south, cardiff 14
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degrees. tomorrow morning starts murky and cloudy in some areas, but i think overall a bright if not sunny day on the way for most areas. also some showers developing, let's look at them in more detail in the north of the country. in scotland showers developing around the highlands, possibly the western isles, one or two in northern ireland, possibly some across the far north of england and one or two just around cornwall and devon. showers are so difficult to pinpoint exactly where they will occur, it's an indication of where we could well see them. the rest of the afternoon, on saturday the weather is looking fine as well, saturday night also no change. here's a picture across europe on sunday. see how warm it is in the heart of europe. much cooler across spain and portugal because we've got this area of low pressure, more cloud, rainstorms swelling, we arejust to more cloud, rainstorms swelling, we are just to the north circular weather remains settled on sunday
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but having said that some showers expected. i think the vast majority of the country should again have a dry day on sunday. goodbye. hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm ben brown. today at 3. the pm says she has full confidence in boris johnson, after he is secretly recorded suggesting the government lacks guts in the brexit negotiations — and that donald trump could do meanwhile the eu's chief negotiator says the government's so called backstop proposal — published yesterday raises a number of questions. the uk is taking a different angle,
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however, it is a thing for a uk wide solution. let me be very clear, our backstop cannot be extended to the whole of the uk —— it is looking for auk whole of the uk —— it is looking for a uk wide solution. a war of words as world leaders gather for the g7 summit in canada — with deep divisions over american trade tariffs. mps say they're concerned about the safety of british football fans at the world cup in russia — with warnings of racism and homophobia. coming up on afternoon live all the sport. news of the long talked about winter break in the english premier league? historic change for english football, premier league clubs will have a two—week break to help england's players prepare for major tournaments. details coming up. thanks. and a look at the weekend weather.
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the weekend is just around the corner and the weather this weekend is looking absolutely fine but there are showers and even a thunderstorm in the forecast. thanks. also coming up — a report says many young people believe it's normalfor older people to be lonely, unhappy and depressed — and that ageism is the commonest form of discrimination in the uk. hello, everyone — this is afternoon live. even by his own standards, boris johnson's language
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was colourful and controversial when he was secretly recorded discussing brexit. he said talks with the eu could be approaching ‘meltdown' and suggested the british government lacked ‘guts'. he claimed donald trump might do a betterjob. well despite all that, downing street said theresa may still has ‘full confidence' in her foreign secretary. our political correspondent chris mason is at westminster. borisjohnson has a knack for creating headlines, adverting or otherwise. and along comes the latest case today, not a photo opportunity, but a covert recording at a dinner this week. his friends say he is disappointed his remarks were recorded. but it's not surprising they were. he also had a pop at the department run by this man, the chancellor,
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philip hammond, describing the treasury as the heart of remain. oh, and then there was this. not for the first time, mrjohnson is provoking conversation at westminster. rupa huq is a labour mp who is part of a group called open britain, which campaigned against what it calls a hard brexit. it would be very entertaining, the way that he had a go at china, russia...
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he's turning into a trump tribute act, almost. he said that trump could handle the negotiations better. it would be amusing if this was not our foreign secretary. the cat has been let out of the bag. this is what they really think when caught off guard. this is the reaction from scotland's first minister. to dismiss concerns about the irish border as if they do not matter suggests that he is, and i think he is one of many in the uk cabinet, who doesn't care one jolt about people's livelihoods, and jobs. and the prosperity of people across the country. i think it is shameful. but mrjohnson's fellow brexiteers, like the former conservative leader lord howard says, see the big picture. there were always going to be spears. we have to focus on the essentials of the situation. the european union wants a deal.
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and has to wait. and remember, all of this comes after the interventions of these two yesterday. the european union's chief brexit negotiator michel barnier has criticised theresa may's proposals for a "backstop" customs arrangement, which she wants introduced if the uk fails to reach a deal before leaving the eu. the government's plan was finalised yesterday to include a cut off date. speaking in brussels, mr barnier said the time limit meant it could not be considered a true fall back — and stressed that any such arrangement could apply only to northern ireland. he later tweeted that this did not constitute a rejection of the uk customs paper — and discussions were continuing. our brussels reporter, adam fleming, joins me
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now from brussels. he was asking some profound questions about the proposals. he said was good to see the uk engaging on this issue but then he listed questions he had about it. with the uk remaining in the customs territory, to what extent would that mean the uk except the rulings of the european court ofjustice? —— accept throw. what about how you deal with the 80 across the border? —— deal with the 80 which do they really mean it when they say temporary and what does the word temporary and what does the word temporary really mean? it has
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multiple meanings. the eu would like a backstop which is there until a solution is found and they say by having the temporary and naming the end date, that is not living up to the expectation, so he has poured cold water on it and raised many questions about it. are those questions about it. are those questions effectively una nswerable orare questions effectively una nswerable or are the answers so critical it means it can never or are the answers so critical it means it can never happen? there will be much more discussion and i think what michel barnier is really doing, he thinks the uk is boarding the discussion about ireland into a big discussion about how customers will not between uk and the eu after brexit, and michel barnier wants to focus the debate back down to what happens in northern ireland specifically. they say that is what the discussion should be about, and that raises loads of problems for politicians in the uk because there
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are many concerns there about creating a wedge between northern ireland and the rest of the uk. it is so complex, but we have got to the process with the terms are so complex and the positions of people are so nuanced and it is getting harder to even discuss it. as you say, it is complex, and i'm not sure if this will help, but we also heard from michel barnier himself. the uk itself recognised that these questions are relevant and difficult. let me recall that our backstop, our backstop in this document, provides answers to each of these questions. it provides specific solutions to the unique situation of northern ireland. the uk is taking a different angle, however — it is looking
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for a uk—wide solution. let me be clear, very clear, our backstop cannot be extended to the whole of the uk. that was michel barnier, a memorable echo of brexit means brexit, but he also said very clearly, brussels will not be intimidated by people who want to play a blame game and blamed the eu for the slowness of the brexit talks —— blame. blamed the eu for the slowness of the brexit talks -- blame. this is a theme which has emerged in brussels, officials who work for the eu institutions and the other member states, what the uk has started to do in the last few weeks is to make lots of proposals on things like, keeping the european arrest warrant, and if brussels says no then as a result the eu and the uk are less safe as a result. uk double down on
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that strategy earlier this week when david davis gave a speech on wednesday where he said that the european commission was in danger of shooting itself in the foot over this just to prove shooting itself in the foot over thisjust to prove it shooting itself in the foot over this just to prove it has a shooting itself in the foot over thisjust to prove it has a gun. that makes people in brussels very upset, whether it is true or not, they get very upset, and although michel barnier did not name david davis as the one playing the blame game or trying to intimidate the eu, eve ryo ne game or trying to intimidate the eu, everyone got the impression that he meant david davis. that is interesting because on monday, guess who will be in brussels for the first time after a very long time? david davis. that sets about potentially tense meeting between the men when they meet on monday. you will be there to report on all of it. thanks forjoining us. our political correspondent eleanor garnier is in westminster. theresa may, david davis, all of
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those agonising talks to put together this compromised proposal yesterday and now it appears to be cold water may be poured on by michel barnier, certainly picking holes in it and asking questions about it. that is right. even yesterday when the document was published, it gave more detail on what the uk was proposing when it comes to that backstop, the insurance policy if you like, if the uk and the eu cannot agree some trade deal when it comes to us leaving the eu, this is the insurance policy of what would come into play if that happened. number ten said they don't expect it and they don't want it and they don't intend the backstop to come into play but it needs to be in the legal text. downing street would say this isa text. downing street would say this is a negotiation, remember last year when the eu put forward their proposal when it came to the
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backstop, uk rejected it, and now the uk is putting forward their proposal and we're getting signs from brussels but number ten saying clearly yesterday that this is a negotiation, we have that our proposal on the table and now we need to get into the talks about it. —— we have put our proposal. we know david davis as the meeting on monday but i think the brinkmanship if you like is all the more significant and is becoming more tense because we have the crucial eu summit of the leaders at the end of this month, in just three weeks, so there's a lot to play for ever huge amount of pressure to make some sort of progress at the june pressure to make some sort of progress at thejune summit and pressure to make some sort of progress at the june summit and that is why we are seeing the tension rising. and also some of the language pretty colourful from rising. and also some of the language pretty colourfulfrom boris johnson, the foreign secretary, where he was saying the brexit talks
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could be approaching meltdown and that the british government lacked guts and maybe donald trump could do cents and make dene“! “j“? cejd dz:— a 5555 55! m555 95n5'd “j“? 555“! 55 a =~=r~::j°b e 5555 5n5 '“5?'5 d?n5'5 “j“? 555'5 55 a 5555510b with 5555 5n5 '“5?'5 d5n5'5 “j“? 555'5 55 a 555.5]ob with the negotiation, a betterjob with the negotiation, what about the fallout from that at westminster? colourful language from borisjohnson but westminster? colourful language from boris johnson but we westminster? colourful language from borisjohnson but we know he's the man who can often make headlines. i don't think these views he expressed ata don't think these views he expressed at a private dinner are that surprising, we know this is what he thinks. it is also not that surprising they ended up being recorded and falling into the hands of the media and shall borisjohnson was not too surprised that happened. —— and i'm sure. low friends of his said they were disappointed a recording had been made covertly —— although friends. the prime minister still has confidence in the foreign secretary with her spokesman saying all of the government is working ha rd to all of the government is working hard to deliver brexit. but it wasn't just on the hard to deliver brexit. but it wasn'tjust on the eu and brexit that boris johnson wasn'tjust on the eu and brexit that borisjohnson was caught talking about, user spoke about his
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admiration for president trump and his method —— he also spoke. and he suggested that donald trump may even doa suggested that donald trump may even do a betterjob when it comes to the brexit negotiations, something philip hammond did not quite agree with. my experience has been that collaborative approach is generally more productive than a confrontational approach and certainly my advice to my colleagues is that the way to address the challenges that there are undoubtedly are of reaching a good brexit solution, is to engage with our european partners and to understand their concerns and their anxieties about the future and to know their red lines, and then to work together to try to find mutually beneficial solutions. because it is very clear that we can only have a deal if it works for both sides. those words from boris johnson
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revealed overnight but we had yesterday david davis and also we know liam fox, another key brexiteer in the cabinet, they have been flexing their muscles over the last 24 hours. one thing we can say, theresa may has a tough job on her hands. thanks forjoining us. news coming in. the queen has had eye surgery to remove a cataract. she underwent a successful procedure in may. she had been seen wearing sunglasses at a number of events including the royal windsor horse show and buckingham palace garden parties. the press association are reporting she was treated as a day patient at the private hospital in london. a spokesperson being quoted
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as saying that they can confirm the queen did successfully undergo a short planned procedure to treat a ca ta ra ct short planned procedure to treat a cataract last month. she did not actually have to cancellara ‘s back postpone any engagements —— she did not actually have to cancel or. a ca ta ra ct not actually have to cancel or. a cataract is when the lens of the eye develops cloudy patches and they can cause some rather blurry and misty vision and eventually if not treated blindness. we'll be talking to our royal correspondent shortly. the queen, the age of 92, has undergone successful surgery to remove a ca ta ra ct successful surgery to remove a cataract and that happened in may. more on that in a minute. there have been sharp exchanges between president trump
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and other members of the g7 on the eve of the summit. president macron of france has made clear the six other countries in the group will be sticking together in their opposition to us tariffs — president trump warned the eu and canada that if they don't remove their tariffs the us would more than match them. we can go to our correspondent in quebec. pretty unusual for the g7 summit to be so divisive before it has even started. yes, insults have been flying and they have been ratcheting up flying and they have been ratcheting up in the last few hours to a rather fever pitch between the president on the one hand and many of these so—called allies on the other. the other fly in the ointment, the other cu rve ball other fly in the ointment, the other cu rveball from other fly in the ointment, the other curveball from the president, before he arrived, is suggesting russia
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should be readmitted into the g7, making it the g8 all over again. russia was ejected from the organisation because of its annexes asian —— annexation of the crimea and sanctions are still in place because of that. the president has had some support for that, from italy, giuseppe conte, the new populist prime minister, uses it would be a good idea. i don't think many of the other leaders here today will agree with him —— he thinks it would be a good idea. gary, thanks for joining would be a good idea. gary, thanks forjoining us. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. the prime minister says she has full confidence in borisjohnson, after the foreign secretary is secretly recorded suggesting the government lacks guts in the brexit negotiations — and that donald trump could do a betterjob. meanwhile the eu's chief negotiator says the government's so called backstop proposal can only apply to northern ireland, and not the rest of the uk.
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a war of words as world leaders gather for the g7 summit in canada — with deep divisions over american trade tariffs. and in sport... the premier league is to introduce a two week winter break meaning an end to fa cup fifth round replays and better preparation for england before major tournaments. close call in the french open as 7th seed dominic thiem finally overcomes the italian outsider marco cecchinato. and a pay rise for england's women cricketers who are going to earn twice as much in 2020 as they did during last year's world cup win. i'll be back with more on those stores later. it's been reported that the queen underwent surgery last month to remove an eye cataract.
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let's get more from our royal correspondent. there is not much else i can tell you. we have gone through the details, at some time in the last month, the queen went through a procedure to remove a cataract from one eye, at a private hospital in london, no appointment is cancelled. she was seen at the royal windsor hall show and a garden party wearing dark glasses, that might be enough to affect of the procedure. —— might be an after—effect. it is the trooping the colour celebration tomorrow am and trooping the colour celebration tomorrow am and we trooping the colour celebration tomorrow am and we think she will be there, and she remains in good health. this operation to remove a ca ta ra ct health. this operation to remove a cataract is one of the most widespread and most popular operations conducted by the nhs,
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something like 400,000 operations carried out every year. those other details. sometime last month the queen went in as a day patient to hospital in london and had a ca ta ra ct hospital in london and had a cataract removed from an eye. no disturbance ready to her royal duties. apparently not. -- really. yes, business as usual. work goes on. thanks forjoining us. ageism is the most common form of discrimination in the uk — and the most likely to go unchallenged. that's according to a new report by the royal society for public health, which says many young people believe it's normal for older people to be lonely, unhappy and depressed. richard galpin reports. negative attitudes towards the elderly are endemic, affecting the health and well—being of everyone as they grow old.
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these are conclusions of the royal society for public health, which has carried out its own survey. it suggests almost a third of the population believes loneliness is normal when you get old. while 40% of young adults or millennials believe dementia is an inescapable part of ageing. a quarter of them believe it's normal for elderly people to be depressed and unhappy. those behind today's report say these negative attitudes need changing. we would not say negative things around race or sex. but with ageing, it's really surprising how much ageism there is. often the media perpetrates a lot of this, of the ageism. so it starts it and then it reinforces it, the bed blocking, the ageing time bomb. archive footage: here in london, 70—year—old men and women
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have started work again to bring a new interest to their old age. but ageism goes back decades. this film from the 19505 typical of the time, when old age was often portrayed as a long slide into irrelevance and decline. amongst the most powerful ways of turning all of this around, our projects like this one, which bring together the different generations. strengthen the bonds between them, ending isolation, and proving getting older can also bejoyous. richard galpin, bbc news. it's been 25 years since steven spielberg's film jurassic park defined dinosaurs for an entire generation. it sparked a golden age of interest in dinosaurs. and ever since new revelations about the age of the dinosaurs have continued to make the headlines. let's speak to steve brusatte,
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a palaeontologist who is in cardiff today talking aboutjurassic park's impact and enduring reputation. and our fascination with dinosaurs. there seems to have been so much research about them that has given us new research about them that has given us new information in the last few yea rs. us new information in the last few years. that is right. jurassic park 25 years ago, unleashed public interest and obsession with dinosaurs and in that time a bunch of young people of my generation have been going out and travelling around the world, digging up dinosaurs and using new technology to study dinosaurs and we now know more about how they lived and evolved than ever before and i have a new book out about the rise and fall of the dinosaurs and i tell the story, which has only come to pass because of the enthusiasm from
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jurassic park which has fuelled the renaissance in my field of palaeontology. most of us now how they became extinct, but how did they became extinct, but how did they rise if you like? what were they rise if you like? what were they like as they were evolving? you are right. everybody knows that dinosaurs fell suddenly, their empire collapsed when the big asteroid hit 66 million years ago but the origin story of dinosaurs is even more but the origin story of dinosaurs is even more fascinating because the very first dinosaurs looked nothing like t rex or brontosaurus. they we re like t rex or brontosaurus. they were the size of house cats. they we re were the size of house cats. they were living in the aftermath of one of the worst mass extinctions, but that period of death gave rise to a new world, the first turtles and crocodiles and the first mammals, the first dinosaurs were rising in
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that world but the dinosaurs stayed humble for 50 million years. they we re humble for 50 million years. they were eclipsed by their crocodile cousins can now they had crocodiles back then which were the size of bars and is >> studio: -- they were clips by their crocodile cousins, there were crocodiles back then the sides of buses, but then cybill volcanoes started to rub —— but then super volcanoes volcanoes started to rub —— but then super volcanoes started to erupt. we had global warming, but the dinosaurs made it through, and then we're into thejurassic park, the ageing dinosaur dominance, they spread around the world and they grew into huge sizes, the biggest one was the size of a boeing aircraft, an amazing story. you spoke about what we have discovered in the past two years because of the
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new technology, what are some things we have discovered recently? dinosaurs had feathers? you are absolutely right. you would know that if you saw absolutely right. you would know that if you sanurassic park because when that came out in 1993 we did not know dinosaurs had feathers and none of them had been found. three years after the film came out there was a farmer in north—eastern china digging on his land and he came across the small skeleton land and he came across the small s keleto n of land and he came across the small skeleton of a dinosaur covered in feathers and that unleashed a gold rush basically, a fossil rush, and now rush basically, a fossil rush, and now thousands of fossils from that pa rt now thousands of fossils from that part of china are real bona fides dinosaur skeletons coded in feathers and these tell us that birds evolved from dinosaurs but also that the image of green scaly drab coloured dinosaurs is totally wrong and most dinosaurs is totally wrong and most dinosaurs would have looked like overgrown big birds. steve, thanks
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for joining overgrown big birds. steve, thanks forjoining us. you have painted a fantastic picture of what the dinosaurs were like. and now we have the weather prospects for the weekend. the weekend is around the corner and the weather is sucking mostly fine across the uk. a bit of rain across the midlands and ordering them —— is looking mostly fine. not guaranteed to stay completely dry but most of us to stay completely dry but most of us should have a dry and bright weekend. this is what it looks like late in the afternoon, temperatures in the low 20s. a chance of a shower inafew in the low 20s. a chance of a shower in a few areas, scotland and northern ireland, but then tonight, mostly quiet on the weather front. 13-14 in mostly quiet on the weather front. 13—14 in the south and a bit fresher
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in the north, down to single figures. tomorrow begins cloudy in eastern and southern areas, but the sun it should be out and a relatively bright day on the way, very pleasant. showers are in the forecast for parts of northern ireland and scotland and maybe even the odd crack of thunder. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. the pm says she has full confidence in boris johnson, after he is secretly recorded suggesting the government lacks guts in the brexit negotiations — and that donald trump could do a betterjob. meanwhile the eu's chief negotiator says the government's so called backstop proposal published yesterday raises a number of questions. a war of words as world leaders gather for the g7 summit in canada — with deep divisions over american trade tariffs. and mps says they're concerned about the safety of british football fans at the world cup in russia, with warnings of racism and homophobia. sport now on afternoon live with damian johnson, and a winter break for the premier
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league, it's been talked about for yea rs, league, it's been talked about for years, as long as i can remember and it will finally happen. a bit of a talking point over the years as you say, premier league clubs will have a winter break every february starting with the season after next. it will be staggered across two weeks with five matches played in the first weekend and five on the following one. fatigue at the end of a long season has often been blamed for england's failures, so many in world cups and european championships, it's too early for that but it means the fifth round will move to midweek and an end to replays at this stage of the competition like this one, remember totte n ha m competition like this one, remember tottenham versus rochdale last season played in horrendous conditions, it is hoped to matches will be played in the worst weather of the year and england players will be better prepared for major summer tournaments. that will be interesting to see because it's a lwa ys interesting to see because it's always have the excuse is single and not doing so well, it's the lack of
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a winter breaks one will they do better? we'll see. and while we have you there there's news of a shake—up in the world of women's cricket. equally dramatic, the england women's cricket team have been given a pay increase, long deserved you may argue, is being given by the ecb. the salaries of the top players are going up by at least 50% and the aim is that by 2020 all players will be earning twice what they received last year when they won the world cup. captain heather knight welcomed a pay rise ahead of england's first match of the summer with south africa tomorrow in worcester. it's a sign of how the professional women's game is going now. a sign of how brilliant last year was and how many people were interested in where the game is going so delighted for us but obviously our minds are on the cricket game tomorrow. england's world cup captain harry kane has signed a new six—year contract with
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spurs. he scored 41 goals in all competitions the spurs last season, 30 of them in the league. since leaving the academy has become the club's leading scorer in the premier premier league year he should remain at the club with this new contract until 2024. england's women can go back top of their qualifying group later if they avoid defeat against russia, kick in moscow was at five o'clock. england thrashed russia's 6-0 o'clock. england thrashed russia's 6—0 back in september, not that the england coach is taking another win for granted. i think it will be a really good game. what i've said to the players is, expect a tough game. it isa the players is, expect a tough game. it is a world cup qualifier. we saw the way it wales celebrated when they drew with us at southampton. we area they drew with us at southampton. we are a scalp, the number two ranked tea m are a scalp, the number two ranked team in the world, we are a scalp for teams to even draw with us so we are going to have to play really well to get any kind of result. meanwhile casey stoney will leave
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her role as assistant to england coach phil neville who was speaking there to become the new manager of manchester united women. they'll be in the new wsl next season and the former england captain has agreed to be their first boss. she willjust bring everything she brought as a player. she was captain of england when i played, she was captain and lincoln. she's got this leadership qualities. i think she will pass them on. she knows football inside and out, she'll talk football all day! the tactics, systems, formation. the team will be very well organised. and she will attract players because she is a name, she isa players because she is a name, she is a figurehead. people will respect it instantly. i think it's a great appointment for manchester united, they will be setting out their stall and so many candidates will have gone for thatjob, in the men's game from wsl one teams so the fact that she has got it, enjoy the interview
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was fantastic and that's probably the reason she got it. sue smith, a former team mate of casey stoney. dominic thiem is into the final of the french open after beating vishala of italy in straight sets. the austrian who has never won a grand slam one 7—5, 7—6, 6—1. he will play either nadal orjuan martin del potro in the final. that second semifinal is under way with the top seed nadal 3—3 in the first set. a long way to go. that's all the sport for now. back later. speaking of the world cup, more concerns have been raised about the safety of football fans at the world cup in russia, which begins next week. an estimated 10,000 british
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supporters are expected to travel to the event — and mps on the foreign affairs committee say they're particularly worried about racist and homophobic intimidation. the world cup is almost upon us again but as british fans get ready to travel to russia and new report from mps lays out in stark detail issues they could face there in coming weeks. mps say russia presents particular risks due to the history of violence by football hooligans. intolerance towards the lg bt hooligans. intolerance towards the lgbt community, history of racist abuse in and around games. the current heightened political tensions with britain especially after the salisbury poisoning and the threat of terrorist attacks. russia is a very difficult country in which to offer consular protection. the
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russian state is not like other countries. if fans are, for example, lg bt countries. if fans are, for example, lgbt orfrom countries. if fans are, for example, lgbt or from an ethnic minority then the russian state has more of a history of abusing them and supporting them. in response the foreign office says it has acted to offer advice to ethnic minority of lg bt fans so offer advice to ethnic minority of lgbt fans so that they are aware of what might await. i have to be streetwise. and under no illusion that there are some idiots in russia will want to do damage to people like myself, england fans in general. so i do fearfor my safety. however i know there are also good people there and a few are streetwise hopefully you'll be able to avoid trouble. has been a long process to work out whether i should go, whether it is right to go as an lg bt go, whether it is right to go as an lgbt person, that conversation has had to be had with lgbt russians as well as friends and family who are concerned for my safety. fans are encouraged to sign up to foreign office on $9 so they can stay informed of developments. yet if the situation deteriorates mps say the government must be prepared to act so that everyone can safely enjoy
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the football. richard conway, bbc news. joining me now is england fan mattjordan who is flying out to russia next week for the world cup. how worried are you after hearing those warnings? quite apprehensive after everything that's gone on recently but i think that if you keep your wits about you and you are sensible it shouldn't be too much to worry about a really. we talked about the euro is a couple of years ago, russian fans clashing with england fans in marseilles, which was pretty vile and frankly. do you think we might see a recurrence of that behaviour? possibly. possibly a lot of england fans who went there probably won't go to russia. so with it being so close, the euros, you'll probably only get more fans going there to watch the football. so hopefully they shouldn't be a similar hostile atmosphere, we were
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in marseille as well and managed to stay clear of all the danger. do you think that if you really want to keep away from potential flash points and violence you can do? yes, certainly. there may be the odd time where you willjust getjumped on, or something like that and if you keep your wits about yourself it should be fine. did you think twice about going to russia? the world cup in brazil and japan russia is very attractive, maybe russia doesn't have the same allure. it's not as glamorous as the ones you mention! it was only about six months ago that i decided to go. once i realised that demand for the tickets was not that high and we could get to get all the england that i thought, go on, why not! sue you are going with a group of fans? just with my friend from back home, just two of us going. we've got three weekends, two weeks.|j
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two of us going. we've got three weekends, two weeks. i suppose we have to talk about the prospects of england! everyone is beginning to get a bit optimistic after that result in a friendly last night. are you one of those england fans are a lwa ys you one of those england fans are always builds up their optimism on the eve of a big tournament? and so quietly confident. we do seem to be playing good football. we look solid upper back. it the world cup, anything could happen! we do a bit of luck! could england win? could win. i will be happy if we reach the knockout stage because we haven't done that for a while and that we can leave the tournament with our heads held high, i think that's what we've missed from the last couple of tournaments. is you are looking forward to it, you'll be going to vilnius and to saint petersburg as well? yes, moscow, lithuania, and then italian, making a trip of it.
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—— then the capital of estonia. i don't think russia was ever going to be top of my list of destinations, it's a great opportunity to go to places i wouldn't normally go to! mattjordan, enjoy and stay safe! thank you. thank you forjoining us. despite those warnings about fans‘ safety, locals in kaliningrad, where england play belgium in theirthird group game later this month, say they want to offer a warm welcome to visitors. wedged between lithuania and poland, kaliningrad is separated from the rest of russia, and has a more european look and feel to it. but as sarah rainsford found out, fans are still being warned to follow local rules. there is a little bit of england on this russian street. kaliningrad is almost ready
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to welcome the team here, and crowds of fans. some locals are even taking them into their homes. nikolai shows me the space he has offered an england supporter for free, and from the decor it is not hard to guess why... his visitors should feel quite at home with this bathroom. the flat could be a squeeze, with nikolai's girlfriend living here, too. but on match night, nikolai tells me he doesn't think his guests will be sleeping much anyway. you wanted to do it for free because... ? because it is fun. it is not about money, it is about football and friendship. we are not frightening. we don't have bears and guns in every room. kaliningrad was part of germany before world war ii, and it still looks and feels quite european in parts, but this exclave
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is now part of russia, and some in britain still have concerns about fans‘ safety at the world cup. this official called fears of racism and homophobia here made up. translation: the main thing of course is to respect the laws and traditions of the country you visit, like any tourism. you follow the customs of the country. there are traces of this city's european past, even here at the local football club. these columns come from the german church that was almost destroyed in world war ii. in soviet times they became part of the grand entrance at baltica fc. the club currently plays at the oldest ground in russia. in the 1930s nazi troops paraded here but the swastikas have long since been removed. baltica will inherit this now, after the
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world cup. kaliningrad's brand—new stadium. that is where nikolai's guests will watch england play. laughter greg's already got his t—shirt. he tells me he's looking forward to his trip, that others are not too worried to come to russia. there are a lot of fans sharing what their fears may be, obviously the main thing stems events that have gone on. in the past few months. it didn't faze me one bit. i think the world cup is going to be great. he won't have far to go, from his front‘s flat. the world cup will be right on the doorstep. sarah rainsford, bbc news, kaliningrad. pictures of donald trump's flight
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arriving in canada for the g7, this could be one of the most tense g7 summits because of the controversial american tariffs on steel and aluminium that are pushing the country to the brink of a trade war. president trump does before setting off caused more controversy by saying that russia should be admitted to the g7 because russia was expelled back in 2014 after it annexed crimea. he claimed russia could still play a leading role in the g7. that's caused more controversy on top of all the controversy on top of all the co ntrove rsy over controversy on top of all the controversy over his trade tariffs as well. so it's going to be a difficult summit for donald trump. but there he is in a force one just
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arriving in quebec. —— in air force one. in and the news with vishala. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. the prime minister says she has full confidence in borisjohnson, after the foreign secretary is secretly recorded suggesting the government lacks guts in the brexit negotiations — and that donald trump could do a betterjob. meanwhile the eu's chief brexit negotiator says the government's so—called backstop proposal can only apply to northern ireland, and not the rest of the uk. and a war of words as world leaders gather for the g7 summit in canada — with deep divisions over american trade tariffs. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. if you're a facebook user you might want to check your account — a software bug has meant millions of users may have unknowingly posted private information to the public.
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the glitch set a user's post to be shared to "everyone", even if a user had previously chosen a more restricted option. facebook says the fault has been rectified. users who may have been affected will be notified on the site's newsfeed. bt‘s chief executive, gavin patterson, is to step down after the company said a change of leadership was needed. the company said a poor reaction to its latest results, in which bt set out plans to cut 13,000 jobs, had prompted the move. bt said mr patterson, who has led the firm for five years, would remain in his post until a successor is chosen later this year. and an inquest has found that bmw's delay in recalling uk cars with an electrical fault contributed to a driver's death. right vishala we are going to talk about men's fashion week. being a fashion a step that you are ben i am sure you are well aware of this!
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a p pa re ntly sure you are well aware of this! apparently it is a growth market projected to rise by 11% because there's more interest in men buying fashion items and retailers have responded by putting add more lines. to talk to us a bit more about this is caroline rush, ceo of the british fashion council. . good to see you. why is it a growing market?|j fashion council. . good to see you. why is it a growing market? i think it's more interesting to men in terms of quality and online shopping, they are more engaged in buying and refreshing their wardrobes. we are seeing real break in the market, it is predicted to reach 11% in the next four years, 3% this year and a lot of this growth is coming from online. are they buying suits for work or more casual
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wear? is across the board, depending on age groups, and lifestyle but of course over on age groups, and lifestyle but of course over the next three days we shall see the breadth of brilliant british fashion and some international brands in london showing the collections. these collections have set the tone and aspiration and excitement for the consumer aspiration and excitement for the consumer which will no doubt fill some of those sales. imagine online sales being a big part of this growth story. we've heard a lot over the last few months about british retailers having to file for administration because of the lack of customers going into their stores. could this mean a shift in british fashion retail where we see online taking the lead? digital is disrupting businesses across the board whether in the fashion industry or in other sectors. we have seen this coming for some time. we've seen the growth of online. those traditional retailers are building their own online business
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is so it's not necessarily that they are losing the consumer but they are shopping in different ways and responding to it and making sure that their businesses are fit for the future. will be excited to see the future. will be excited to see the lines this week. please luck out. abbey following that very closely! let's talk about markets. bt shares have been up since they announced that the ceo is to step down. he established bt as a sports broadcaster and brought a lot of rights to premier league games, some critics have said that money was spent wrongly and he needed to focus more on broadband for example, controversial moves there, they had some financial results recently and they were not too healthy and his plans to restructure by cutting jobs mean that some investors are quite
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happy about his resignation! he must be gutted! you leave and everyone is thrilled and the price goes up! bt has lost value at a time in the ftse has lost value at a time in the ftse has gained 20% so it's a bit damning. the rest of the markets, it looks as if it's ending in negative territory, fairly flat is nothing to write home about yet but i'm sure we will have more of that later in the markets. keep us posted vishala, thank you, good to have you with us. we've heard a lot recently about the enormous problems caused by the new rail timetables to commuters trying to get to work every day. now, the focus is shifting to rural communities, also affected by the changes. john maguire has been to the lake district where one family is going to extraordinary lengths to solve their travel needs. amanda seeds is so fed up with her local train service that she's taking the drastic measure
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of moving house. she is relocating from the village of staveley to kendall, her local town, where three of her children will go to school. as a parent, the amount of hours that i have worried about the children, because the trains are cancelled and they're late for school, and they can't get home from school, and so ijust — we're going to relocate. that's that. the irony is that the train line runs across the end of her garden, but there are no trains. is that a station? yeah, that's the beginning of the station, just there. so when the trains were running, sometimes my children would be at home, and they'd see the train go past the house, and they'd set off at that point and run down the street, and they'd always get it. they would always catch the train that they had just seen. the service was suspended for two weeks on monday, and replaced by buses, as northern rail brought in an emergency timetable in response to the chaos across its network. but amanda says the lakes line has
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been unreliable since northern took over the franchise two years ago. we've been subjected to cancellation after cancellation up here for months now, all through the winter. and the way that i see it, having experienced years and years of the train being faultless, if northern rail can't provide the service, as they said that they were going to, then as far as i can see, they must be in breach of their contract. they must be. the suspension of the lakes line real service started on monday for a two—week period, but the fear now is that it could extend to three, possibly even to five, weeks, and the problem there is that that gets perilously close to the beginning of the school holiday summer season — vital for the tourism industry in this part of the lake district. this is the only train running in windermere at the moment. the summer season is well under way here, with visitors from around the world following in wordsworth's
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footsteps, inspired by his pen strokes. but for those working to make hay while the cumbrian sun shines, the lakes line is vital. a year ago we were being promised electrification — new electric trains from windermere to manchester airport for a day. that was the promise. roll things on a year, we've now been inscripted as a world heritage site, and we've got a bus replacement. you know, i think that the economy, that the community, and that the visitors to the lake district, to be quite frank, they deserve an awful lot better. there you go. have a good day. cheers — see you later. nice to see you. take care, amanda, see you later. transport is always one of the challenges of rural life, and where the economy is also so dependent on ease of access, then when the system fails, the impact can be deep, widespread, and potentially long—lasting. john maguire, bbc news, in the lake district. beautiful scenery in the lake
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district. donald trump hasjust arrived for his summit in canada, other members of the g7 feel that they are on the brink of a trade war and some leaders like emmanuel macron are pretty cross with donald trump, some insults have been flying over trump, some insults have been flying over ta riffs trump, some insults have been flying over tariffs on steel and aluminium, it is being described as possibly one of the most divided g7 summits in the 42 year history of the organisation, and donald trump has caused more controversy
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organisation, and donald trump has caused more controversy by saying just before he left for his flight to canada, saying, we are going to deal with unfair trade practices, if you look at what canada and mexico and the european union have done to us and the european union have done to us for many decades... and there is donald trump with a wave. if we look at what they are doing we have to change it and they understand it will happen. that is mr trump, the focus of the anger of other leaders at this summit. he also caused more consternation, by the way, just before leaving by saying that russia should be readmitted to the g7 despite having been thrown in 2014 for annexing crimea. so donald trump as ever for annexing crimea. so donald trump as ever causing for annexing crimea. so donald trump as ever causing controversy for annexing crimea. so donald trump as ever causing controversy but arriving in canada for that summit. let's look at the weather now with tomasz schafernaker. the weekend is around the corner,
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the weather is looking decent, bright and sunny, the chance perhaps other shower on the weekend, also hay fever sufferers, not great at the moment, high foreign levels, it's a little bit more comfortable in scotland and the far north of england, low levels of pollen to you. here's the satellite picture, floating around spain and portugal, that spell of relatively quiet weather continues so for the rest of the afternoon it is a case of mostly bright if not sunny weather across the country and some showers developing in some areas for example across scotland, maybe northern ireland but the vast majority of the country should have a fine friday evening with temperatures around 20 in the south, closer to the mid—teens in the north—east of england. cloudy conditions closer to the eastern coast, temperatures overnight will fall to 8 degrees in
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newcastle, much milderfair, in cardiff and is around 14 degrees. tomorrow should start murky in some areas especially in the east and south, but i think overall a bright if not sunny day on the way and also some showers developing. leather pouch hours in more detail across the north of the country, so in scotla nd the north of the country, so in scotland you can see showers developing across the highlands, possibly the western isles, some in northern ireland, possibly some across the far north of england and one or twojust across the far north of england and one or two just around cornwall and devon. showers are so difficult to pinpoint exactly where they will occur, this is just pinpoint exactly where they will occur, this isjust an indication of where we may well see them. the rest of the afternoon, on saturday the weather is looking fine, saturday night no change. in europe on sunday you can see how night no change. in europe on sunday you can see how warm night no change. in europe on sunday you can see how warm it is across europe, much cooler across spain and portugal because of this area of low
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pressure the weather remains settled on sunday but having said that still some showers are expected perhaps across northern england but i think the vast majority of the country should once more have a dry day on sunday. bye bye. hello, you're watching afternoon live. today at 4. the pm says she has full confidence in boris johnson, after he is secretly recorded suggesting the government lacks guts in the brexit negotiations — and that donald trump could do a betterjob. this meanwhile, the eu's chief negotiator has criticised theresa may's proposals for a customs arrangement. the queen has had eye surgery
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to remove a cataract — the 92—year—old monarch underwent the successful procedure in may. a war of words as world leaders gather for the g7 summit in canada — with deep divisions over american trade tariffs. mps says they're concerned about the safety of british football fans at the world cup in russia — with warnings of racism and homophobia. coming up on afternoon live all the sport. we had news of a shake—up for english football with premier league clubs agreeing a two—week winter break, bringing an end to fit round fa cup replays and a boost for the england team —— fifth round. fa cup replays and a boost for the england team -- fifth round. facts. the weather weekend forecast?m
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england team -- fifth round. facts. the weather weekend forecast? it is looking good. maybe not blue skies everywhere but overall the weekend is looking fine. thanks. also coming up — a report says many young people believe it's normalfor older people to be lonely, unhappy and depressed — and that ageism is the commonest form of discrimination in the uk. hello everyone — this is afternoon live. i'm ben brown. even by his own standards, boris johnson's language was colourful and controversial when he was secretly recorded discussing brexit. he said talks with the eu could be approaching ‘meltdown' and suggested the british government lacked ‘guts'. he claimed donald trump might do a betterjob. well despite all that, downing street said theresa may still has ‘full confidence'
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in her foreign secretary. our political correspondent chris mason is at westminster. borisjohnson has a knack for creating headlines, adverting or otherwise. and along comes the latest case today, not a photo opportunity, but a covert recording at a dinner this week. his friends say he is disappointed his remarks were recorded. but it's not surprising they were. he also had a pop at the department run by this man, the chancellor, philip hammond, describing the treasury as the heart of remain.
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oh, and then there was this. not for the first time, mrjohnson is provoking conversation at westminster. rupa huq is a labour mp who is part of a group called open britain, which campaigned against what it calls a hard brexit. it would be very entertaining, the way that he had a go at china, russia... he's turning into a trump tribute act, almost. he said that trump should handle the negotiations. it would be amusing if this was not our foreign secretary.
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the cat has been let out of the bag. this is what they really think when caught off guard. next the reaction from scotland's first minister. to dismiss concerns about the irish border as if they don't matter suggests that he is, and i think he is one of many in the uk cabinet, who doesn't care one jolt about people's livelihoods, and jobs. and the prosperity of people across the country. i think it's shameful. but mrjohnson's fellow brexiteers, like the former conservative leader lord howard say, see the big picture. there were always going to be spears. we have to focus on the essentials of the situation. and that is the european union wants a deal. and remember, all of this comes after the interventions of these two yesterday. chris mason reporting.
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the european union's chief brexit negotiator michel barnier has criticised theresa may's proposals for a fall back customs arrangement, which she wants introduced if the uk fails to reach a deal before leaving the eu. the government's plan was finalised yesterday to include a cut off date. mr barnier later tweeted that this did not constitute a complete rejection of the uk customs paper — and discussions were continuing. our brussels reporter, adam fleming, joins me now from brussels. you were at the news conference earlier, it was quite long, and he was pouring cold water on some of those proposals from the british government but not dismissing them out of hand, he was keen to stress. that is a very good description of what was a very long and confusing and very technical press conference by michel barnier. he has not rejected the uk customs proposal but he has asked tricky questions. if
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the uk is happy to sign up to the eu's customs code, does that mean it is happy to sign up to the european court ofjustice, is happy to sign up to the european court of justice, supervising is happy to sign up to the european court ofjustice, supervising the customs law? when the uk talks about checks at the border, does that include cross—border and vat? heels made the point that the issue of the irish border is notjust about customers but also to what extent does northern ireland and the uk and —— aligned with the products on consumer —— aligned with the products on consumer standards for example. the uk itself recognised that these questions are relevant and difficult. let me recall that our backstop, our backstop in this document, provides answers to each of these questions. it provides specific solutions to the unique situation of northern ireland. the uk is taking a different angle, however — it is looking
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for a uk—wide solution. let me be clear, very clear, our backstop cannot be extended to the whole of the uk. michel barnier also sang a quite angry when he said the eu would not be intimidated by people in britain who are blaming the eu for the slow pace of these talks trash also sounded —— also sounded. pace of these talks trash also sounded -- also sounded. it was more the content, especially milik comes to cooperation on security and crime fighting after brexit —— especially when it comes. this is based on the fa ct when it comes. this is based on the fact that in the talks what the uk has been doing is saying, look at these things where we cooperate, like the european arrest warrant, if that was not to continue after brexit, the uk and the eu and their
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seasons would be less safe as a result. —— there citizens. the eu say that is a consequence brexit, don't blame brussels making people less safe and they get very annoyed when the accusation is made against them. the show barnier has put that on record and said that the eu will not be intimidated or become part of a blame game —— michel barnier. he did not mention david davis in particular but he said, david davis, in midweek, that the eu was doing very much this. there might be tension in the air when they meet for the first time for the first face—to—face meeting in quite a long time on monday. thanks forjoining us. our political correspondent eleanor garnier is in westminster. yesterday we had the proposal on the
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backstop from the prime minister which was achieved after lots of wrangling with david davis. the compromise emerge, but now michel barnier picking holes in it. —— emerged. no surprise in westminster this has happened, number ten will say that this is a negotiation over the backstop which is an insurance policy if you like, if the uk and the eu can't come to an agreement on a trade dealfor when the eu can't come to an agreement on a trade deal for when we leave the eu, this is what will come into play, but number ten continuing to emphasise they don't want it and i don't intend this backstop to be needed but it needs to be in the legal text —— they don't intend. a government spokesman said they would never government spokesman said they would never accept a customs border between northern ireland and the rest of the uk and they said they we re rest of the uk and they said they were committed to maintaining the
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uk's own internal market, so reiterating their criticisms of the initial proposal that brussels put forward on the backstop idea, and i think on that number ten is keen to stress that if you think back to the end of last year when brussels but the idea on the table, uk rejected it, and now the uk have responded, their idea for the backstop it on their idea for the backstop it on the table, and the signs we are getting from brussels are those of rejection. number ten st, this is a negotiation, and the brinkmanship, —— saying this is a negotiation, and the brinkmanship... —— saying this is a negotiation, and the brinkmanship. .. remember, —— saying this is a negotiation, and the brinkmanship... remember, we have the june summit the brinkmanship... remember, we have thejune summit of eu leaders, three weeks away. there is an enormous amount of pressure three weeks away. there is an enormous amount of pressure for progress to be made at that summit so it is no surprise that the tension is rising. the tension is rising and some of the colourful language we have been hearing from
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borisjohnson in that language we have been hearing from boris johnson in that secret recording, saying those talks could be heading for a meltdown. st british government lacks guts —— saying the british government. saying maybe donald trump could do a betterjob, i wonder what theresa may thought of that. colourful language. we know borisjohnson has the ability to create headlines, but the ability to create headlines, but the prime minister we understand has confidence in the foreign secretary with her spokesman saying all of government was committed and working ha rd to government was committed and working hard to achieving brexit. it wasn't just brexit that boris johnson hard to achieving brexit. it wasn't just brexit that borisjohnson had been commenting, at this private dinner earlier this week, and he also said the treasury was the home of remain and he talked about his admiration for donald trump and his technique and madness, he said, some michael vick, and he suggested when it comes to the —— some might call
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it, and he suggested when it comes to the brexit negotiations donald trump might do a betterjob of it. the chancellor did not agree with this. my experience has been that collaborative approach is generally more productive than a confrontational approach and certainly my advice to my colleagues is that the way to address the challenges that there are undoubtedly are of reaching a good brexit solution, is to engage with our european partners and to understand their concerns and their anxieties about the future and to know their red lines, and then to work together to try to find mutually beneficial solutions. because it is very clear that we can only have a deal if it works for both sides. we have seen borisjohnson flexing his brexiteer muscles, if you like.
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we had david davis the brexit secretary doing the same yesterday alongside liam fox, another of the key cabinet brexiteers and it is clear their views are known and they are putting a lot of pressure on the prime minister. she has managed to negotiate the backstop deal inside her own cabinet but now she needs to go to brussels and see if she can negotiate it with the teams over there. thanks forjoining us. there have been sharp exchanges between president trump and other members of the g7 on the eve of the summit. president macron of france has made clear the six other countries in the group will be sticking together in their opposition to us tariffs — president trump warned the eu and canada that if they don't remove their tariffs the us would more than match them. james robbins reports from quebec. earlier i asked our north america correspondent gary o'donoghue about the tensions that exist between president trump
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and other g7 allies. yes, the insults have been flying and they have been ratcheting up in the last few hours to a rather fever pitch between the president on the one hand and many of these so—called allies on the other. the other fly in the ointment, the other curveball from the president, before he arrived, is suggesting russia should be readmitted into the g7, making it the g8 all over again. of course, russia was ejected from the organisation because of its annexation of the crimea in 2014 and sanctions are still in place because of that. the president has had some support for that idea, from italy, giuseppe conte, their new populist prime minister, he says it would be a good idea.
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i don't think many of the other leaders here today will agree with him. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. the prime minister says she has full confidence in borisjohnson, after the foreign secretary was secretly recorded suggesting the government lacks guts in the brexit negotiations — and that donald trump could do a betterjob. meanwhile, the eu's chief negotiator says the government's so called backstop proposal can only apply to northern ireland, and not the rest of the uk. the queen has had eye surgery to remove a cataract — the 92—year—old monarch underwent the successful procedure in may. and in sport. england's world cup captain harry kane assigns a six—year contract with his club tottenham hotspur after he scored 41 goals in all competitions last season for his club. the premier league is to
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introduce a two week winter break meaning an end to fa cup fifth round replays and better preparation for england before major tournaments. and a pay rise for england's women cricketers who are going to earn twice as much in 2020 as they did during last year's world cup win. i will be back with more at half—past. it's been reported that the queen underwent surgery last month to remove an eye cataract. a little earlier our royal correspondent nicholas witchell gave me a few more details. at some time in the last month, the queen went through a procedure to remove a cataract from one eye, at a private hospital in london — no appointments cancelled. she was seen at the royal windsor horse show and a garden party
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wearing dark glasses, that might be part of the effects. it is the trooping the colour celebration tomorrow and she will be there. and she remains in good health. this operation to remove a cataract is one of the most widespread and most popular operations conducted by the nhs, something like 400,000 operations carried out every year. those are the details. sometime last month the queen went in as a day patient to hospital in london and had a cataract removed from an eye. no disturbance really to her royal duties. apparently not. yes, business as usual. the mayor of london sadiq khan has described an attack on a 90—year—old woman — who was asleep in her bed — as "barbaric". iris warner was found
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by her son at her home in brent, north—west london. her injuries included bruising to herface and body. she's told police a man struck her a number of times in the face — it's not clear whether anything was stolen. nhs workers in england have voted overwhelmingly to accept a three—year pay deal worth 6.5% — health unions have announced. more than a million nurses, physiotherapists, cleaners and other staff across england will receive it. the agreement, reached after months of negotiation between unions, employers and ministers, was made possible with an extra £4.2 billion of funding. the celebrity chef and food writer, anthony bourdain, has died. he was 61. the us television network, cnn — for whom mr bourdain worked — said he had been found dead in his hotel room in france, where he'd been filming an episode of his food and travel focused programme " pa rts unknown". the network said mr bourdain had taken his own life. ageism is the most common form of discrimination in the uk —
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and the most likely to go unchallenged. that's according to a new report by the royal society for public health, which says many young people believe it's normal for older people to be lonely, unhappy and depressed. richard galpin reports. negative attitudes towards the elderly are endemic, affecting the health and well—being of everyone as they grow old. these are conclusions of the royal society for public health, which has carried out its own survey. it suggests almost a third of the population believes loneliness is normal when you get old. while 40% of young adults or millennials believe dementia is an inescapable part of ageing. a quarter of them believe it's normal for elderly people to be depressed and unhappy. those behind today's report say these negative attitudes need changing.
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we would not say negative things around race or sex. but with ageing, it's really surprising how much ageism there is. often the media perpetrates a lot of this, of the ageism. so it starts it and then it reinforces it, the bed blocking, the ageing time bomb. archive footage: here in london, 70—year—old men and women have started work again to bring a new interest to their old age. but ageism goes back decades. this film from the 19505 typical of the time, when old age was often portrayed as a long slide into irrelevance and decline. amongst the most powerful ways of turning all of this around, are projects like this one, which bring together the different generations. strengthening the bonds between them, ending isolation,
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and proving getting older can also be joyous. richard galpin, bbc news. it's been 25 years since steven spielberg's film jurassic park defined dinosaurs for an entire generation. it sparked a golden age of interest in dinosaurs. and ever since new revelations about the age of the dinosaurs have continued to make the headlines. steve brusatte, a palaeontologist told us on the eve of the latest jurassic blockbuster — fallen kingdom — what we've recently learnt about dinosaurs. that's right. jurassic park 25 years ago, unleashed public interest and obsession with dinosaurs and in that time a bunch of young people of my generation have been going out and travelling around the world, digging up dinosaurs and using new technology to study dinosaurs and we now know more about how they lived and evolved than ever before. i have a new book out about the rise and fall
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of the dinosaurs and i tell that story, which has only come to pass because of the enthusiasm from jurassic park which has fuelled the renaissance in my field of palaeontology. most of us know how they became extinct, but how did they rise, if you like? what were they like as they were evolving into those massive creatures? you're right. everybody knows that dinosaurs fell suddenly, their empire collapsed when the big asteroid hit 66 million years ago. but the origin story of dinosaurs is even more fascinating because the very first dinosaurs looked nothing like t—rex or brontosaurus. they were the size of house cats. they were living in the aftermath of one of the worst mass extinctions ever, but that period
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of death gave rise to a new world, the first turtles and crocodiles and the first mammals, the first dinosaurs were rising in that world but the dinosaurs stayed humble for 50 million years. they were eclipsed by their crocodile cousins. they had crocodiles back then which were the size of buses. they were ruling the world back then. but super volcanoes started to erupt. that brought about cracks in the earth will stop. we had global warming, but the dinosaurs made it through, and then we're into thejurassic park, the age of dinosaur dominance, they spread around the world
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and they grew into huge sizes, the biggest one was the size of a boeing aircraft — an amazing story. you spoke about what we have discovered in the past few years because of the new technology, what are some things we have discovered recently? dinosaurs had feathers? you're absolutely right. you would know that if you saw jurassic park because when that came out in 1993 we did not know dinosaurs had feathers — none of them had ever been found. three years after the film came out there was a farmer in north—eastern china digging on his land and he came across the small skeleton of a dinosaur covered in feathers and that unleashed a gold rush, basically, a fossil rush, and now thousands of fossils from that part of china are real bona fide dinosaur skeletons coated in feathers and these tell us that birds evolved from dinosaurs but also that the image of green scaly drab coloured dinosaurs is totally wrong.
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and most dinosaurs would have looked like overgrown big birds. steve, thanks forjoining us. you have painted a fantastic picture of what the dinosaurs would have looked like. time for a look at the weather. here's tomasz shafernaker. no one can call him a dinosaur. laughter you have a tornado behind you? we we re you have a tornado behind you? we were talking about this earlier and i thought we would have a look again, a beautiful picture of a tornado, a violent storm, and i want tornado, a violent storm, and i want to compare this to a hurricane. they are very to compare this to a hurricane. they are very different but sometimes people think they are the same thing. this is because we have had our first hurricane of the season. there were many last year,
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devastating storms, we had ourfirst one in the pacific this year. there's tornado is half a mile high, 100 metres across, ferociously improve, capable of blowing a house down. we get tornadoes in this country, but nothing like that. that is not even a tornado, that one, thatis is not even a tornado, that one, that is called a final cloud. —— hopefully we can now compare this to a hurricane. hurricanes are com pletely a hurricane. hurricanes are completely different things, they are still evolving, but this is hundreds of miles across. it is hurricane has formed off the coast of hurricane of the season. this is in the pacific and not the atlantic.
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—— this hurricane has formed off the coast of mexico, the first of the season. in america they film things like ona season. in america they film things like on a —— tornadoes all the time. but what about the weekend weather here? relatively quiet, maybe thunderstorms, but that is the only seve re thunderstorms, but that is the only severe weather and that will only be locally. this is the weather for the weekend. not looking bad for most of us. because we are anticipating some heavy downpours and they will be local and probably fairly brief and affecting mostly northern parts of the country. this is the satellite picture right now, some sunshine across a number of northern and western parts of the country, it has been decent, but a fair bit of cloud. showers in the forecast for the evening across scotland and a
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few in northern ireland and temperatures verily deliver macro very pleasant —— very pleasant. tonight is very similar to last night and the nub before, the weather is repeating itself —— the night before. low cloud around the north sea, with temperatures around 10-12. the north sea, with temperatures around 10—12. the sun will come out tomorrow morning and this is where we are expecting heavy showers. showers are only 5—10 miles across, one town gets it but the other one doesn't come impossible to say precisely what location. maybe in and across scotland and a few in northern ireland and maybe some around the west country, but clearly the majority of the uk is enjoying a fine weekend with plenty of sunshine. saturday evening, showers
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continuing, maybe rumbles of thunder, as well. this is the picture across europe on sunday, nearly 30 in some areas, but in iberia, unfairly cool, in the high teens and low 20s —— fairly cool. we are in the window of quiet weather and look at these showers developing across the continent. march, but a few showers are expected further north. a relatively hot day in the sunshine in the south. that is it, the weekend is not looking bad at all. this is bbc news, our latest headlines. the prime minister says she has full confidence in boris johnson, after the foreign secretary is secretly recorded suggesting the government lacks guts in the brexit negotiations — and that donald trump could do a betterjob. meanwhile the eu's chief brexit
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negotiator says the government's so called backstop proposal can only apply to northern ireland, and not the rest of the uk. the queen has had eye surgery to remove a cataract. the 92—year—old monarch underwent the successful procedure in may. sport now on afternoon live with damian johnson. and a bit of relief for spurs fans. harry kane has signed a new deal with tottenham. fat might end some speculation that he might go abroad. yes, a six—year contract, he's been linked in the past with a possible move linked in the past with a possible move to real madrid, the spanish giants. these should put some of those stories to bed. a new contract should make it even more expensive to prise him away from north london should he wish to go. he is spurs and england's talisman with weight
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of expectation on his shoulders with the world cup coming up, he scored 41 goals for his club last season, he has become their leading scorer in the premier league era. his new deal should keep him at spurs until 2024, one less thing to worry about for him before the world cup. and the premier league is going to have a winter break, they have talked about this for ages, another will do it. it's a bit of a soap opera in the english game, they've disgusted fears. traditionalists feared an upset of the winter fixtures, others said that without a break the players would be one out at the end of the season and have no chance of making an impact in bigger tournaments. it's coming after the season after next, in february, staggered over two weeks with five matches played on the first weekend and five on the following one. this means the fa cup fifth round will move means the fa cup fifth round will move to mid week and an end to
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replays at this stage of the competition like the one between totte n ha m competition like the one between tottenham and rochdale last season, played in horrendous conditions. it is hoped fewer matches will happen during the worst weather and england players. have some gas left in the tank for the summer world cups and european championships. england's women can go european championships. england's women can go back top of the world cup qualifying group later today if they avoid defeat against russia. kick off in moscow is at five o'clock. england thrashed russia's 6-0 o'clock. england thrashed russia's 6—0 back in september. not that the coaches taking another win for granted. i think it will be a good game. expect a tough game, told my players, we saw the way wales celebrated when they got a draw against us, that's the scalp, we are the number two ranked team in the world, teams are excited even two draw with us so we will have to play really well to get any kind of
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result. casey stoney will leave her role as assistant to phil neville who you just had to become the new manager of manchester united women. they'll be part of the new wsl championship next season and the former england captain will be their first boss. she will bring everything she brought as a player. he was captain of england on my plate, captain of lincoln, she's got those leadership qualities which i think she will pass on. she knows football, she will talk football all day, the tactics, the system, the formation commission will get that. the team will be very well organised. and she will also attract players because she is an name. she isa players because she is an name. she is a figurehead. people will respect this instantly. a great appointment for manchester united, they are setting out their stall of what they wa nt setting out their stall of what they want to do. so many candidates will have gone for thatjob in the men's game, ithink have gone for thatjob in the men's game, i think the fact that she has
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got itjust shows, i'm sure her interview was fantastic, and that is the reason why she's got it. dominic thiem is into the final of the french open after beating marco cecchinato of italy in straight sets. the austrian who never won a grand slam before won 7—5, 7—6, 6—1. he will play either rafael nadal or juan martin del potro in the final. the second semifinal is under way, nadal has taken the first set 6—4 and is leading 5—1 in the second. the england women's cricket team have been given a significant pay rise, the salaries of ten players will rise by at least 50%, the aim is that by 2020 all players will earn twice what they received last year when they played in the world cup and won it, they will play their first match of the new season against south africa tomorrow in worcester. that's all the sport for
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now, lizzie will have more for you in the next hour. now on afternoon live let's go nationwide and see what's happening around the country in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. let's go to sally taylor in southampton, who can tell us about the second busiest airport in the uk, gatwick airport, which is celebrating 60 years since it was officially opened in its modern form. sadly, tell us more about gatwick. yes, the 60th anniversary is actually tomorrow but like all people who go to gatwick we are trying to get an early getaway! it is the second busiest runway in britain, the second busiest airport in britain. last year it had something like 45 million passengers, using that single
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runway. every year you can build 5% on top of that so it's getting busier and busier. people like freddie laker and richard branson launched their airlines at gatwick many years ago. but what strikes me todayis many years ago. but what strikes me today is some of the wonderful footage that we can see now. the very old footage of their heyday, the beginning of gatwick. modern gatwick in the south terminal was built on the old gatwick racecourse. here's a fun factor for you. flights back then even before it was built on an earlier britain to paris, for pounds five shillings. not bad eh? a bit of a beehive, it was the first circular terminal which was then copied around the world. back then to give you some idea of numbers, and passenger numbers were the same as one weekend today in gatwick. that's quite extraordinary. the queen opened modern day gatwick, as
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we know it, and then there was this extraordinary lengthy blessing from a local bishop. week, william, bishop of kingston upon thames do solemnly bless this airport, the control tower, the runway, the reception area and the many departments in the name of the father, the sun and the holy ghost, are men. a blessing the gatwick. extraordinary to see some of the archive footage. how have things changed over the 60 years? in six decades, it has turned dramatically. you got the north and south terminals now, just years ago we had some of the airline is changing from the north to the south and the south to the north. this phenomenal air bridge was built. if you have been to gatwick, you will know that the planes go underneath it. so as passengers you are walking across the top of it. it's quite mind
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blowing to see even today it's quite extraordinary. i suppose the biggest, latest thing happening now is of course the introduction of the biometric technology. this is the whole idea of cameras recognising faces and irises which then open up boarding gates, the idea is to speed up boarding gates, the idea is to speed up that long track from baggage drop to boarding. i have been talking about this as if it is a single ru nway about this as if it is a single runway airport, of course this week the cabinet has approved at heathrow will be the airport to get the next runway. but in the years to come i don't think that. people fighting for a second runway at gatwick. i wouldn't mind a week is going to paris, for £4 and five shillings, would you? get in and book that to get! thank you, sally taylor. good
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to talk to you. and if you want to see more on any of those stories you can get access to them through the bbc i play. we go nationwide every weekday afternoon at 4:30pm here on afternoon live. more concerns have been raised about the safety of football fans at the world cup in russia, which begins next week. an estimated 10,000 england fans are expected to travel to the event — and mps on the foreign affairs committee say they're particularly worried about racist and homophobic intimidation. the world cup is almost upon us again, but as british fans get ready to travel to russia, a new report from mps lays out in stark detail the issues they could face there in the coming weeks. mps say russia presents particular risks due to the
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history of violence by football hooligans. intolerance towards the lgbt community, a history of racist abuse in and around games. the current heightened political tensions with britain, especially in light of the salisbury poisoning and the threat of terrorist attacks. russia is a very difficult country in which to offer consular protection. the russian state is not like other countries. if fans are, for example, lgbt, or from an ethnic minority then the russian state has more of a history of abusing them than supporting them. in response the foreign office says it has acted to offer advice to ethnic minority or lgbt fans with some fans who are going aware of what might await. i have to be streetwise. i'm under no illusion that there are some idiots in russia who will want to do damage to people like
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myself, england fans general. so i do fear for my safety. however i know there are also good people there and a few are people there and if you are streetwise hopefully you'll be able to avoid trouble. it has been a long process to work out whether i should go, whether it is right to go as an lgbt person, that conversation has had to be had with lgbt russians as well as friends and family who are concerned for my safety. fans are encouraged to sign up to foreign office travel alerts online so they can stay informed of developments. yet if the situation deteriorates mps say the government must be prepared to act so that everyone can safely enjoy the football. richard conway, bbc news. i have been talking to one england fan, matt jordan. he is flying out to russian. i asked if he was concerned about trouble especially after the clashes whistle at marseille after the euros two years ago. i think a lot of the england fans that went over there probably won't be going out to russia, so i think with it being so close to the euros you'll probably get more fans that
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are only going there to watch the football. so hopefully it shouldn't have a similar kind of hostile atmosphere. we were there in marseilles as well and managed to steer clear of all the danger. there may be the odd time where you would just kind of getjumped on, or something like that but no, i think if you have your wits about you, you should be fine. that was matt jordan, that was mattjordan, and england fan. joe line is with me for the business news, are you looking forward to the world cup?|j business news, are you looking forward to the world cup? i am, although ireland are not their but england will do fine, i am sure!l shame. before the business is let's look at the latest headlines. the prime minister says she has full confidence in borisjohnson, after the foreign secretary is secretly recorded suggesting the government lacks guts in the brexit negotiations — and that donald trump could do a betterjob. meanwhile the eu's chief negotiator says the government's so—called backstop proposal can only
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apply to northern ireland, and not the rest of the uk. the queen has had eye surgery to remove a cataract. she underwent the successful procedure in may. hello, i'mjoe hello, i'm joe lineham. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. if you're a facebook user you might want to check your account — a software bug has meant millions of users may have unknowingly posted private information to the public. the glitch set a user's post to be shared to "everyone", even if a user had previously chosen a more restricted option. facebook says the fault has been rectified. users who may have been affected will be notified on the site's newsfeed. bt‘s chief executive, gavin patterson, is to step down after the company said a ‘change of leadership' was needed. the company said a poor reaction to its latest results, in which bt set out plans to cut 13,000 jobs, had prompted the move. bt said mr patterson,
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who has led the firm for five years, would remain in his post until a successor is chosen later this year. more on that in a moment. and an inquest has found that bmw's delay in recalling uk cars with an electrical fault contributed to a driver's death. the car—maker said it had followed all the directives given but recognised the need to follow the procedures. so bt have parted company with their chief executive? especially if you are only being paid £1.3 million to walk away, how will he manage living in london! he's been with bt for 14 years. the share price has halved in the last two years while the ftse100, the benchmark, which you should at least
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benchmark, which you should at least be in touch with, has risen substantially in that time. that did not bode well for him, the company just wasn't in the right direction. let's talk about the g7 summit in canada. we are already in a trade war. this is an extraordinary summit ina way war. this is an extraordinary summit in a way that the tensions, even before it has started, so palpably, insults flying and everything. normally the g7 is all about backslapping and pretending to be all about bon bonhomie and bromance. emmanuel macron and thomas trump have been exchanging, not barbs but less than cordial tweets. i like
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exchanging, not barbs but less than cordialtweets. i like the exchanging, not barbs but less than cordial tweets. i like the way that you pronounce emmanuelle macron's name. it's beautifully said. you could be french! staying with donald trump, he is of two meeting in singapore, of course. after the g7 in canada he is going to nip to singapore for a meeting that most people are not talking about. this is with president kim jong—un of north korea, long spoken about. and that bodes badly it'll be interesting to see how the market reacts to that. if a storm of in opposite directions that could have an impact on the markets. someone who might know is jasper lawlor, from the london capital group, on the line. let's start with that meeting in singapore. and the federal reserve meeting which is next week. they could have an impact on markets if they go certain ways couldn't pay. what makes the action
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lacklustre today is possibly investors sitting on their hands because of the risk. the default scenario is that a lot of handshaking is taking place in the kim — trump meeting, perhaps a replay of that north—south meeting we saw weeks ago, that's possibly the default but there is a risk that things go wrong and that is what markets could potentially react to. in terms of interest rates they have been rising for a while, perhaps out of some of the emerging markets typically thought of as more risky back into the us, and also we have european central bank meeting that they are shifting their focus back towards eventually raising rates in europe. that's a bit of a risk factor if you own the shares after what has been a good general run in shares. the markets have largely
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shrugged off the imposition of steel ta riffs shrugged off the imposition of steel tariffs on all american imports, including those from g7 allies. will they still shrug it off if there's a nasty g7 summit? we have already seen barbs being traded. it's interesting with these summits, typically what you would expect them to be asa typically what you would expect them to be as a lot of hand shaking. i think the same thing has happened this time but what these meetings can do is set the agenda and what is interesting this time is that the agenda has really been said before hand largely by donald trump in imposing these tariffs beforehand. it's all been seen very much through the eye of a trade war, and if they don't seemed to be able to get and that would suggest that it filters down the line to these tariffs being more permanent. what do you think the legacy of gavin patterson will
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be, apart from paying a fortune to show live football! i don't know if we can blame him just for that. there's been a lot of contributions, re ce ntly there's been a lot of contributions, recently amazon have joined the fray so recently amazon have joined the fray so they will contribute to higher prices as well. i think probably at the moment his legacy isn't looking too rosy but over time it might look better. what we are seeing at the moment is the kind of ideas he came up moment is the kind of ideas he came up with which is playing a bigger role in fighting against sky, buying up role in fighting against sky, buying e role in fighting against sky, buying upee,we role in fighting against sky, buying up e e, we are not seeing the results yet but we are seeing the costs, share prices have been suffering since he was ousted, i think over time these ideas could bear more fruit and maybe his legacy will look rosier overtime. jasper lawlor thank you. let's have a quick look at the markets and see what the bt share price did today, up 1%,
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probably embarrassing for former boss, if that share price goes up on the day you leave it doesn't bode well. can you say the name of the french president once more? emmanuel macron! joe thank you very much. we've heard a lot recently about the enormous problems caused by the new rail timetables to commuters trying to get to work every day. now, the focus is shifting to rural communities, also affected by the changes. john maguire has been to the lake district where one family is going to extraordinary lengths to solve their travel needs. amanda seeds is so fed up with her local train service that she's taking the drastic measure of moving house. she is relocating from the village of staveley to kendall, her local town, where three of her children will go to school. as a parent, the amount of hours that i have worried about the children, because the trains are cancelled and they're late for school, and they can't get home from school, and so ijust — we're
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going to relocate. that's that. the irony is that the train line runs across the end of her garden, but there are no trains. is that a station? yeah, that's the beginning of the station, just there. so when the trains were running, sometimes my children would be at home, and they'd see the train go past the house, and they'd set off at that point and run down the street, and they'd always get it. they would always catch the train that they had just seen. the service was suspended for two weeks on monday, and replaced by buses, as northern rail brought in an emergency timetable in response to the chaos across its network. but amanda says the lakes line has been unreliable since northern took over the franchise two years ago. we've been subjected to cancellation after cancellation up here for months now, all through the winter. and the way that i see it, having experienced years and years of the train being faultless, if northern rail can't provide the service, as they said
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that they were going to, then as far as i can see, they must be in breach of their contract. they must be. the suspension of the lakes line rail service started on monday for a two—week period, but the theory now is that it could extend to three, possibly even to five, weeks, and the problem there is that that gets perilously close to the beginning of the school holiday summer season — vital for the tourism industry in this part of the lake district. this is the only train running in windermere at the moment. the summer season is well under way here, with visitors from around the world following in wordsworth's footsteps, inspired by his pen strokes. but for those working to make hay while the cumbrian sun shines, the lakes line is vital. a year ago we were being promised electrification — new electric trains from windermere to manchester airport for a day. that was the promise.
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roll things on a year, we've now been inscripted as a world heritage site, and we've got a bus replacement. you know, i think that the economy, that the community, and that the visitors to the lake district, to be quite frank, they deserve an awful lot better. there you go. have a good day. cheers — see you later. nice to see you. take care, amanda, see you later. transport is always one of the challenges of rural life, and where the economy is also so dependent on ease of access, then when the system fails, the impact can be deep, widespread, and potentially long—lasting. john maguire, bbc news, in the lake district. let me bring you some news just reaching us from the reuters news agency, they say is really fire has
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killed four palestinians on the gaza border. the reuters news agency is quoting medical teams in gaza saying that israeli fire has killed four palestinians. there have been a large number of deaths in recent weeks in clashes between israeli security forces and palestinians on that gaza border. some reports say at least 120 palestinians have been killed along the border since that campaign was launched at the end of march demanding the right to return to ancestral lands lost to israel in 1948. that is the latest we are hearing, four palestinians killed among the gaza border, we will bring you more on that in the news at five, which is coming up in a moment. that's it from the afternoon live team today. let's leave you with a quick look at the weather from tomasz schafernaker. the
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weekend just around the corner, the weather looking fairly decent, bright weather around but also the chance of catching a shower, not a com pletely chance of catching a shower, not a completely dry weekend. for hay fever sufferers high pollen levels in some areas, a little more co mforta ble in some areas, a little more comfortable in scotland and the far north of england, low levels of pollen there. the satellite picture, low levels of cloud across spain and portugal, that is where we have thunderstorms. across the uk the speu thunderstorms. across the uk the spell of relatively quiet weather continues so the afternoon as the bright sunny weather across the country and showers developing in some areas for example across scotland, maybe northern ireland but the vast majority of the country should have a frying friday evening with temperatures of 20 in the south, closer to the mid teens in the north—east of england, tonight not much happens, some clear spells but also cloudy conditions closer to
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the post. temperatures to match and dip to8 the post. temperatures to match and dip to 8 degrees in newcastle, much admired in the south and newcastle ‘s dashboard in cardiff 14 degrees. tomorrow should start mickey and cloudy in the east, but i think overall a bright, if not sunny day on the way, some showers developing come across the north of the country, you can see showers developing along the highlanders, when all to showers in northern ireland, some across the far north of england and one or two just around cornwall and devon. showers are so difficult to pinpoint exactly where they will occur, this is just an indication of where we may well see them. the rest of the afternoon on saturday the weather is looking fine as well, saturday night, also no change. a picture of europe on sunday, see how warm it is in europe, 30 degrees, much cooler
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across spain and portugal because we have this area of low pressure, rainstorms swelling, we just to the north of that so the weather remains settled through sunday but having said that still some showers are expected perhaps across northern parts of england but i think the vast majority of the country should again have a dry day on. bye bye. —— again have a dry day on. bye bye. —— a dry day on sunday. bye bye. today at 5 — theresa may says she won't be distracted from delivering brexit —
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despite doubts from within her cabinet. the prime minister moves to reassert her authority —— after suggestions from the foreign secretary that her government lacks guts. had strong views on principles of july. for the british people, that is what people want and that is what i'm doing. borisjohnson was recorded at a private dinner saying leave voters might not get the deal they wanted — and he hinted that donald trump could do a betterjob in brussels, the eu's chief negotiator says the government's
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