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tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  June 8, 2018 5:00pm-5:46pm BST

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today at 5 — theresa may says she won't be distracted from delivering brexit — despite doubts from within her cabinet. the prime minister moves to reassert her authority —— after suggestions from the foreign secretary that her government lacks guts. had strong views on principles of july. for the british people, that is what people want and that is what i'm doing. borisjohnson was recorded at a private dinner saying leave voters might not get the deal they wanted — and he hinted that donald trump could do a betterjob in brussels, the eu's chief negotiator says the government's latest backstop proposals won't solve the question of the irish border. we'll have the latest from
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brussels and westminster. the other main stories on bbc news at 5. breaking ranks — president trump says russia should be readmitted to the g7, as he arrives at the summit in canada. a 90 year old woman is seriously ill in hospital after being attacked in her bed in london. concerns are raised about the safety of british football fans at the world cup — mps warn of the risk of racist and homophobic attacks in russia. and, dinosaurs are threatened by a volcano injurassic world: fallen kingdom. find out what mark kermode thought of that, and the rest of the week's top cinema releases, in the film review at 5.45. good evening and welcome to the bbc news at 5, i'm jane hill.
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the prime minister has attempted to reassert her authority, after a week of criticism from some within her cabinet. theresa may has said she's determined to deliver brexit — despite reported disagreements with the brexit secretary, and the foreign secretary, borisjohnson suggesting that the government's negotiations with brussels lacked ‘guts‘. borisjohnson was recorded at a private dinner saying people who voted to leave the eu might not get the deal they want — and hinted donald trump might do a betterjob than mrs may. the prime minister was forced to respond to his comments as she arrived at a summit of g7 leaders in canada. she's been speaking in quebec to our chief political correspondent, vicki young. your foreign secretary, boris
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johnson said that you could perhaps learn something from donald trump's ways of negotiating. these are complex negotiations. but if you look at what we have achieved for the december report, people said we would not be able to do that, we did. they said he would be a will to deliver it by the period, we did just that. we will be dealing with the commons and lords on the withdrawal bill, and in the european council, will be discussing it with my fellows around that table the withdrawal agreement, and also ensuring that we move on to discuss oui’ ensuring that we move on to discuss our future relationship. ensuring that we move on to discuss ourfuture relationship. these are complex negotiations, but the british people want us to deliver brexit and we are doing that because there is a prize at the end of this, britain and control of its money, its borders and a brighterfuture. maintaining a good relationship with
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europe, but also been given to those good relationships with the other nations if elected are making the liquid is happened in these negotiations, we have actually done we said we would. we said we would deliver a report it would give us, european citizens in the uk and uk citizens and the rest of the eu 27, people said that businesses want an implementation they said that in march, now we're moving on to notjust a finalizing the details of the withdrawal, but what our future relationship will be. of course he is a complex negotiations, it is not easy, but i am going to deliver brexit to the british people and do that because there is a bright future for bridge and outside of the european union. you had your foreign secretary
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threatening to resign, what did you say them to stop them from doing that? became together and put together an alternative proposal to the european commission, about the arrangements to ensure no hard border between northern ireland and ireland. what we are doing at every stage of this is delivering for the british people and delivering for the people of the whole of the united kingdom. people want us to insured that we can unite the european union. that is what i'm getting on and doing. like nike must be frustrated and feel that people like borisjohnson be frustrated and feel that people like boris johnson and be frustrated and feel that people like borisjohnson and david davis to be more supportive of what you are doing. you blush on december acting on and doing it. when it comes to brexit, you must look at times and feel like your cabinet is teetering on the edge sometimes and the wheels are coming off. i may tentatively get to this position
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where you have to have these clashes with those on your own site? these are complex negotiations, there are strong views, i have strong views andi strong views, i have strong views and i want to deliver brexit to the british people. at every stage of these negotiations, we have seen people casting doubt on whether or not we can achieve what we want to achieve. they said that before, prior to his delivering the period in march, we are moving onto finalizing the withdrawal issues and also to move on to discuss our future relationship. and that is important, because why do people would do people want to see coming out of this? the prize for people in the united kingdom is that we are in control of our money in borders and also able to deliver a brighter future, which is good trade with the european union, but also new trade agreements around the rest of the world, what does that mean? a means prosperity, jobs or people in britain. spending so much time negotiating with your own party
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drunk cabinet, before even looking at what brussels is saying, and michel barnier might be signed up to the things that you're putting before them. michel barnier said, we put a proposal on the table, we will now set will now sit down and negotiated with european union. we are getting on with the job and as of the british people want. shortly after arriving in quebec where the g7 summit gets under way a little bit later. we'll be talking more about the summit later in the hour of course. but let's try to unpack everything that we have been steering there about brexit. adam has more on the comments there. let's go to westminster, just first in terms of that interview, with theresa may. it is striking isn't it
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that she has to spend so much of that she has to spend so much of that having just landed in canada at the g7, talking about her foreign secretary. clearly, ithink the prime minister would rather be talking about something else. but after those pretty explosive comments from boris johnson after those pretty explosive comments from borisjohnson at a private dinner earlier where he said that i'm a yes brexit would be irreversible, but it might not be the one that we want. that the uk might end up locked in orbit around the eu, even described the treasury is the heart of remain, and he also seemed to express his admiration for presidentjungle seemed to express his admiration for president jungle tonight donald donald trump, and when it comes to the negotiation that president trump might doa the negotiation that president trump might do a betterjob.
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i don't think those views over donald trump and brexit are surprising, we know he thinks those things. i also do not think it surprising that this private dinner was recorded and somehow ended up in the hands of the media, and ensure that boris and surprised that that is happened, although his friends have said they were sad and disappointed that these comments had ended up being reported. nevertheless, the prime minister doesn't remain to have full confidence in the foreign secretary. and we heard in that interview, are reassessing saying that she has strong views on brexit. and over the last 2a hours, we have seen brexiteers in the cabinet flexing.
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but david davis yesterday putting pressure on the prime minister over at that and wanted it to entail, other key cabinet brexiteer. we know brexit was never going to be easy. but the tory party does not agree with itself, the cabinet is split and it doesn't look like brussels will be giving us an easy ride either. stay with us, but let's talk more about exactly that, going to adam fleming in brussels. trying to unpack everything that michel barnier was talking about at such length over this lunchtime. a of talk about this deal, what does he make of it? what do we think this is thinking here? it was a very complicated press conference, lots of details and it required a little bit of clarification afterwards. but this is where we got to today, but
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the uk published this proposal about cooperation and effectively the uk would remain part of the eu for a temporary period after the end of the brexit transition period in december 2000 20. michel barnier has not ruled that out, yes i rejected that proposal, but he does say that he has lots of big questions about it. for example, would the uk be willing to see a role for the court ofjustice but willing to see a role for the court of justice but he willing to see a role for the court ofjustice but he overseeing the eu customs rules during that period? what about other things like corporations on cross—border vat, which kind of looks like customs, but isn't quite. and what about aligning with eu rules and regulations in northern ireland after brexit, which the eu says is a big part of dealing with the problem of avoiding a hard border. michel barnier said that all of this adds up barnier said that all of this adds up to that fact that at the moment, the only proposal that works is the proposal that he came forward for early on this year. and he explained why in this way. recognise that
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these questions are relevant and difficult. let me recall that our backstop power in this document, provides answer to each of these questions. it provides solutions to the unique situation. the uk is taking a different angle however, it is looking for a uk wide solution. let me clear, be very clear, our backstop cannot be extended to the whole uk. so what is going on here is that in private, the eu officials and diplomats they say that what was presented yesterday wasn't actually an alternative to the backstop as the uk said, it is something else. it isa the uk said, it is something else. it is a big proposal about future operations and customs. if you see
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michel barnier comments in that context, you see what he strained to do, which is focusing attention back on the idea that northern ireland is a special case and has to be treated separately from the rest of the uk and isn't about customs, its about northern ireland following lots of rules or the single market. not that isa rules or the single market. not that is a very tricky proposition for the uk, forall is a very tricky proposition for the uk, for all the reasons we have discussed. particularly politics and the conservative party and the dep which help prop up the government in westminster. so that is what michel barnier is doing, this very long press c0 nfe re nce , barnier is doing, this very long press conference, he also said the eu would not be intimidated or take pa rt eu would not be intimidated or take part in any kind of playing game, which is a very thinly veiled reference to a speech by david davis on wednesday, where he accused the european commission of playing games and undermining european and uk security because of their attitude towards future cooperation with the uk and the brexit talks. which is
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interesting because gas was coming on monday for a meeting with david davis after an absence of several months, michel barnier, i rolled my own rhetorical question there. an interesting breakfast meeting with david davis and michel barnier on monday, the first long—time. david davis and michel barnier on monday, the first long-time. adam, thank you very much. and they've got some time off on the weekend beforehand. let's get some final thoughts, because all of this is adam the suggesting there, it reminds us of the timetable of all of this and my goodness it is time isn't it? i think number ten is saying in response to those comments are michel barnier is that this is a negotiation and the next step is to fiow negotiation and the next step is to now get back to the talks on this backstop plan, which of course is an insurance policy if the uk and brussels do not come to an agreement on trade for when we leave the eu. the uk put its own proposal on the
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end of last year, number ten very keen to remind us that when he did that, the uk rejected it. now we have the uk putting its plan on the table and the signs are from brussels are perhaps once of rejection. they say look, we need to get back to the table and get down to the talks and that is just normal. that is what this process is going to be like. specifically responding to what michel barnier said today, the government spokesman said today, the government spokesman said we would never counter putting a customs border between northern ireland and the rest of the uk. and that we are committed to maintaining the uk's on internal market, something that has been the uk's position for some time and will not change. so yes he got this meeting with david davis and michel barnier on monday, i cannotjust that meeting but that big june summit which is coming in three weeks' time, it is another reason that we are seeing the tension rise, from
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both sides of the channel. there is an enormous amount of both sides of the channel. there is an enormous amount of pressure for progress to be made at that summit. i think theresa may knows that. it is negotiated with iran senior ministers, nationalist voter brussels and see which you can negotiate there. —— her own. she needs to get these decisions made and made soon. test to show you the scene in quebec. a sunshine for the start of that summit, theresa may there, i think possibly where the leaders are lining up for some photos, that's what it quite possibly looks like. smiles all around, possibly not how they're feeling inside. those comments that
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have been recorded by borisjohnson at that dinner that private dinner. jens abbe from japan, and the photographs being taken there in a very beautiful location in quebec. theresa may has said she is determined to deliver brexit for the whole of the uk — after borisjohnson was secretly recorded suggesting the government lacked guts in its negotiations with the eu. the eu's chief brexit negotiator has criticised theresa may's proposals for a backstop customs arrangement, designed to avoid a hard border in northern ireland. president trump has suggested russia should be readmitted to the g7 group of economies — four years after it was expelled because of the annexation of crimea. signs a new six—year contract, 41
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goals in all competitions for the sport last season, fastest in first practise for sunday's grenadian grande he's just the ten del potro in straight sets in paris. he will play dominic, he has never lost a french 0pen final. glavine on the stories just after. a 90—year—old woman is seriously ill in hospital after being attacked there have been some sharp exchanges to get it under there have been sharp exchanges between president trump and other members of the g7 on the eve of the summit. president macron of france has made clear the six other countries
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in the group will be sticking together in their opposition to us tariffs — president trump warned the eu and canada that if they don't remove their tariffs the us would more than match them. 0ur diplomatic correspondent james robbins reports from quebec. saying that russia should be readmitted to the g7. we have more. the summit here in this luxury hotel in the quebec countryside takes place at a time of particularly deep divisions amongst the powerful countries attending. and it is donald trump who is creating the biggest waves. speaking as he prepared to fly to canada this afternoon, he raised an issue which would have delighted the kremlin. it used to be the g8 because russia was in it, and now russia's not in it. now, i love our country, i have been russia's worst nightmare. with that being said, russia should be in this meeting.
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why are we having a meeting without russia being in the meeting? even before the president's plane landed in quebec, there had been a sharp response to his statement. a senior british official warning that russia had to change before it could rejoin the club. we should remind ourselves why the g8 became the g7, the official said. it was after russia illegally annexed crimea. and since then we have seen malign activity from russia, including on the streets of salisbury. but while the prime minister will reinforce that message at this summit, she may not be able to count on the support of italy, which has broken ranks, saying it backs russia regaining its seat at these meetings. and wants a review of eu sanctions on moscow. there is more unity do on the current big battles with the united states. particularly washington's imposition of tariffs on imports of aluminium and steel from the european union
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and other key countries. eu leaders at the summit are bewildered at what the trump administration is doing globally. what worries me most, however, is the fact that the rules based on international order is being challenged. quite surprisingly, not by the usual suspects, but by its main architect and guarantor, the us. rarely has there been a summit as fractious as this one could turn out to be. a reflection of the impact donald trump is having around the world. richard galpin, bbc news. 0ur correspondent gary 0'donoghue is in quebec city. any sort of response, what sort of response to his comments about
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letting russia back in? will someone agrees with him and that someone is the italian prime minister. giuseppe has only been in powerfor a week, he thinks it's a good idea. but he is about the only one if he does think that. the british have made their view very clear if through theresa may is worth. and i don't see any reason why the germans would particularly like that either because of their concerns. and that is kind of an extraordinary intervention, completely unforeseen, no indication that that was the president's view in many freaking second before in the white house. so thatis second before in the white house. so that is what people are still digesting here. at the same time, they are digesting the entrenchment of positions over international trade and tariffs. when actors to
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explain to viewers, we're imean, the i mean, the comments about russia are incendiary enough and prior to that, we thought that this summit would be really dominated, didn't we? by that there's disagreement about tariffs! president macro has been very clear! we are also seeing those pictures and i am here, and i imagine there will be full of smiles at these family photos tend to be. but i imagine for a lot of people my photograph, it will be through gritted teeth, because they will be absolutely furious by the suggestion that the us national security is the reason why the justification for these tariffs being put in place. the canadians have described that argument as ridiculous. the european union is curious and planning to
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target their sanctions to that area of the country of the us that favoured donald trump in the 2016 general election. and that is going to be the first branch of discussion that they will have after they finish of the photographers there. they will talk about these things, andi they will talk about these things, and i don't see, and it's very difficult to see that they can come to any kind of consensus because the escalation has already begun and people are already making complaints to roll trade organisations. donald trump is doubled down before he came here on his promise to force this through, and there is no sign at this stage that the parties are anywhere near one another. what we would give to be a fly on the wall when that meeting. let's turn our attention to the tensions at home. a 90—year—old woman is seriously ill in hospital after being attacked in her bed in north west london. iris warner was found by her son at her home in brent.
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she's told police a man struck her a number of times in the face — it's not clear whether anything was stolen. simonjones has this report — and just a warning that there are distressing images from the start. left black and blue, with bruises all over her body. the family of iris warner want people to see these pictures in the hope of catching whoever was responsible. she was found by her son at lunchtime on monday. doctors thought she might not survive, her injuries were so severe. her family say they're shocked and sickened, it sentiments shared by the police. this was a horrific assault on her. she has multiple injuries and two bleeds to the brain. the pictures talk for themselves. it is staggering to believe that anybody could and think anything could justify attacking this woman in her home. the police are doing what they can
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to try and catch those responsible so that they are brought to justice. if anybody has any information, please ring the police. iris warner has told police she remembers waking up in bed with a man standing over her. he hit her several times. it's thought he then ransacked her room. she may have been lying injured for up to two days. neighbours are worried. she's a local, so she used to go down to the sweet shop and buy a newspaper. i used to see her almost every other day. but, yeah, i'm just shocked. i'm absolutely... i'm horrified. it's adding to growing concern about crime in the capital. yesterday, police released this dash cam footage of a robbery on the north circular road in finchley. people in the car threatened by men on mopeds, armed with a hammer and a so—called zombie knife. they got away with watches. another attack, described by officers as shocking. following the attack on iris warner, police say they have stepped up patrols in the area. the police remain at the scene, and we've seen officers searching her house for clues. but the police are keen to stress that crimes of this nature
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are incredibly rare. and they don't want the public to panic. but images like these mean that message is not always getting through. simonjones, bbc news, brent. nhs staff in england have voted overwhelmingly to accept a three—year pay deal worth 6.5%, say health unions. more than a million nurses, physiotherapists, cleaners and other staff across england will receive the pay rise. the agreement, reached after months of negotiation between unions, employers and ministers, was made possible with an extra £4.2 billion of funding. the queen has undergone cataract surgery — it's emerged that she had the operation in may. buckingham palace described the procedure as short and planned. the queen has been seen wearing sunglasses at recent events, but she did not cancel or postpone any public engagements as a result. time for a look at the weather.
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the weather is looking absolutely fine over the weekend. not com pletely fine over the weekend. not completely dry, we are facing some showers, some could be even a crack of thunder, but overall the weekend is looking quite sunny and warm for much of the country. this is the weather across the country more or less right now, one or two showers, through parts of scotland that leads by 7pm. temperatures still in the low 20s, but for most of this evening, it is in the high teens, so a pleasant evening out there. not awful lot happening on the front, but of cloud and clear spells and temperatures around at 1011 mark gifford take. —— give ortake. —— give or take. the sun comes out
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and might stay cloudy across the coast of the day, at least in some areas. but they are expected to brew across scotland and northern ireland, one or two, across scotland and northern ireland, one ortwo, could be across scotland and northern ireland, one or two, could be very happy with the crack of thunder, but most of us should miss the worst of it. sent away to work as domestic servants, some are abused or even worse but those responsible are rarely brought to justice. this is bbc news — the headlines. the prime minister moves to reassert her authority, after suggestions from the foreign secretary that her government lacks guts in its negotiations with the eu. look, people like boris have strong
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views on brexit but so do i. i want to deliver brexit for the british people. that is what the people want andi people. that is what the people want and i am getting on and doing it. borisjohnson was recorded at a private dinner saying leave voters might not get the deal they wanted, and he hinted that donald trump could do a betterjob. in brussels, the eu's chief negotiator says the government's latest backstop proposals won't solve the question of the irish border. and, breaking ranks — president trump says russia should be readmitted to the g7, as he arrives at the summit in canada. we will talk much more about all of that and the film review is coming up that and the film review is coming up as well but right now we will catch up with the latest sports news. lizzie greenwood hughes has that. hello. rafa nadal is through to his 11th french open final. he used past
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one martin del potro in straight sets. the ten time champion in paris coped well with the big hitting del potro getting better and better as the match went on. meanwhile, rafa nadal will play austria's dominic thiem in the final, the only man to beat him on clay in the last five yea rs. beat him on clay in the last five years. it is his first grand slam final. now, tottenham fans can breathe sigh of relief today as their star striker and england captain harry kane has signed a new six—year contract. he scored 41 goals in all competitions for them last season but he has been linked with a possible move to real madrid. this new deal will keep him at the club until 2024 or at least it will make it very expensive for another club to buy him. meanwhile, it has been announced today there will be a winter break in the premier league every february
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starting the season after next. it will be staggered over ten weeks. the break means the fa cup fifth round will move to midweek and there will not be any replays at that stage of the competition like this one between tottenham and rochdale last season which was played in horrendous weather conditions. it is hoped they were matches will take place during the worst weather and england players should still have some gas left in the tanks for summer world cup and european championships. while the men's world cup is imminent in russia, the women's team are playing in a world cup qualifier. they are 2—1 up against russia in moscow. nikita parris scored the first goal and jill scott the second. england need to avoid defeat in this match to go top of their grip. the lionesses thrashed russia 6—0 at home in september. another women's football story. casey stoney will leave her role as
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assistant coach to phil neville to become the new manager of manchester united winning. they will be part of the new wsl championship next season and she has agreed to be their first boss. max verstappen has picked lewis hamilton in the formula 1 grand prix. the dutchman was zero went 88 seconds quicker using superfast soft tyres. hamilton was on the ultra soft tyres as was team—mate valtteri bottas in fifth and kimi raikkonen. the amp capped forward brad shields has been fast tracked into the first tea m has been fast tracked into the first team for the test against south africa in johannesburg. team for the test against south africa injohannesburg. head coach eddiejones has overlooked danny cipriani completely despite his outstanding season at wasps and lock joe launchbury has failed a fitness
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test. the england women's rocket team has been given a significant pay increase. the salaries of tempe is going up by at least 50% —— the women's cricket team. all players will be earning twice what they received last year when they won the world cup. the players welcomed the pay rise. it is a sign of how professional the women's game is going now. it is a sign of how brilliant last year was as well and how many people are interested in where the game is going so obviously, really delighted for us but our minds are on the cricket game tomorrow. that is all the spot for now but you can find out more on the bbc sport website. i will have more for you at 6:30pm in sportsday. thank you. more now on the leaked recording of the foreign secretary borisjohnson speaking about brexit.
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at a private dinner earlier this week, the foreign secretary suggested the government needed to show more "guts" in the negotiations, and hinted that donald trump might do a betterjob. mrjohnson also called the treasury the "heart of remain", and warned leave supporters might not end up with the brexit deal that they wanted. lucy fisher is the chief political correspondent for the times,
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who received a leak of the recordings, and shejoins me from our westminster studio. good evening to you. do you think he knew perfectly well he was being recorded? no, i don't actually, although that said i don't think the remarks are necessarily an helpful to him. i think having been a major leave champion, he feels in his end mind he is an emotional guarantor of brexit. the key is concerned about the way in which the deal is going, i think he will want it to be known that he is protesting that behind the scenes and has those worries. that is on the domestic issues and around brexit. ithink that is on the domestic issues and around brexit. i think some of his comments about very sensitive matters of international affairs, far more indiscreet, basically looks like he was showing off. the fact he had spoken to his us counterpart mike pompeo early in the day, he had
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been called on by the us to help dismantle north korea's missiles, i think that side was a less good look. the fact that a cabinet minister of this seniority was not sacked, doesn't that tell us something about where we are, about the state of the cabinet at the moment? that is absolutely right. i have had a number of remain inclined mps on the phone to me today, complaining about theresa may's inability to get a grip on her allies. i think this latest saga tops of what has been a difficult week for the prime minister which we say every week, comes after she faced down a cabinet revolt, she was forced to bring david davis into number ten twice yesterday in order to see off resignation threats, it seems she is buffeted from pillar to post at the moment. and how much of
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that at the moment specifically, how much of this is to do with the real pressure with the brexit timetable now? i know we have been saying for a long time time is running out, but if you look at what is coming down next week, the eu summit and for a few weeks after, the pressure is really on and is that part of it, that some big decisions have been put off and now there is so little time left? i think that is absolutely right. we see next week with the eu withdrawal bill coming back to the commons, we will not get some answers on some of the most difficult questions, around for example the customs arrangement, that has been pushed back into the long grass with the trade bill. there is another crunch point by which point brussels has to agree we have made enough progress in the brexit negotiations to move forward, looking to october was initially the time where you wanted to have an outline of a deal in place, in order to have time for both eu and uk parliament to ratify that deal, that timetable looks like it is slipping to december. it is all getting very fractious as we move ever closer to
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march 29 next year when we are due to leave. is it that situation where really nothing will change come march next year, because of everything we are outlining here, which is i suppose one of the things that boris johnson which is i suppose one of the things that borisjohnson was talking about at that dinner, for anyone who wants to leave, it is not what they feel they voted for? it is difficult to say right now. there are as many people willing to speculate that because too little progress has been made in the talks, that we are just going to crash out on world trade 0rganisation talks without a deal. these negotiations always come down to the wire, to the 11th hour. some people are more confident that there will be manoeuvring made. i think there are concerns that michel barnier was more negative about a backstop proposal but theresa may finally presented to brussels this week on how to avoid a hard border between northern ireland and
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ireland. i think there was some concern about the mood music coming out of brussels. i thought there was a sense that he would possibly be a bit more positive about the consensus that theresa may had tried to find and paper over in her cabinet, given how difficult it had been for her to get to this stage. a quick final thought about theresa may herself, there might be people listening thinking given everything you have outlined, in other circumstances, would the prime minister be going? outlined, in other circumstances, would the prime minister be going7|j think would the prime minister be going?” think she is under intolerable pressure. i would not want to be in her shoes. as we speak donald trump has just touched down her shoes. as we speak donald trump hasjust touched down in her shoes. as we speak donald trump has just touched down in quebec. her shoes. as we speak donald trump hasjust touched down in quebec. he hasjust touched down in quebec. he has refused to have a bilateral meeting with her but he has agreed to meet with emmanuel macron of france and justin trudeau of canada. it isa france and justin trudeau of canada. it is a bit embarrassing for the prime minister that she will not get her own meeting. she has been described as a bit schoolteacher
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—ish and priggish. we are heading close into the summer drinks season where mps will be pressing the fresh and drinking warm prosecco as the saying goes. last year there was a real moment of danger with talk of a leadership challenge. thank you for your time. more concerns have been raised about the safety of football fans at the world cup in russia, which begins next week. an estimated 10,000 british supporters are expected to travel to the event — and mps on the foreign affairs committee say they're particularly worried about racist and homophobic intimidation. 0ur sports correspondent richard conway reports. the world cup is almost upon us again, but as british fans prepare to travel to russia, a new report from mps lays out in stark detail the issues they could face there in the coming weeks. mps say russia presents particular risks due to a history of violence
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by football hooligans, intolerance towards the lgbt community, a history of racist abuse in and around games, the current heightened political tensions with britain — especially in light of the salisbury poisoning — and the threat of terrorist attacks. russia is a very difficult country in which to offer consular protection. you know, the russian state is not like other countries. if fans are, for example, lgbt, or from an ethnic minority, then the russian state has more a history of abusing them than supporting them. in response, the foreign office says it has acted to offer advice to lgbt, black and minority ethnic supporters, but some fans who are going are aware of what potentially awaits. i have to be streetwise. i'm under no illusions that there are some idiots out there in russia who will want to do damage to people like myself, do damage to england fans in general. so, yes, i do fearfor my safety, however i know there is also good people out there, and i think if you're streetwise
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hopefully you'll be able to avoid the trouble. it's been a really long process to actually work out whether i should go and whether it's right to go as an lgbt person, and that conversation has had to be had with lgbt russians as well as friends and family who are obviously concerned about my safety. fans are being encouraged to sign up to online foreign office travel alerts, so they can stay informed of developments. ultimately, if the security situation deteriorates, mps say the government must be prepared to act so everyone can safely enjoy the football. richard conway, bbc news. this is bbc news at 5 — the headlines: theresa may has said she is determined to deliver brexit for the whole of the uk — after borisjohnson was secretly recorded suggesting the government lacked guts in its negotiations with the eu. the eu's chief brexit negotiator has criticised theresa may's proposals for a "backstop" customs arrangement, designed to avoid a hard border in northern ireland.
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president trump has suggested russia should be readmitted to the g7 group of economies — four years after it was expelled because of the annexation of crimea. an update on the market numbers for you — here's how london's and frankfurt ended the day. the ftse and the dax closed down. positive trading on the dow and the now stack. —— nasdaq. now on bbc news a look ahead to sportsday at 6.30pm tonight. coming up on bbc news, for so long the request of football managers and now a reality, the premier league will have a winter break. the teams will have a winter break. the teams will split over weekends so fans will split over weekends so fans
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will not be without football at any point. more news coming up on sports day when we will also have the latest on england's women's world cup qualifiers in russia. now it is time for the film review.

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