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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 9, 2018 12:00pm-12:31pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines at 12: the queen's birthday honours are announced. among the names on this year's list are former liverpool manager kenny dalglish, who is knighted, and actress emma thompson, who is made a dame. to get this far and to come out and get the accolade i've been awarded is very humbling. but there's anger too as the chief executive of network rail, mark carne — is made a cbe — despite the recent chaos on the railways. the second and final day of the g7 summit begins — after negotiations failed to resolve divisions over us trade tariffs yesterday. theresa may says the government's white paper on its brexit position won't be published until after the eu summit at the end of this month. also in the next hour... the trooping the colour parade in central london is taking place. the queen and members of the royal family are taking part
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in her official birthday celebrations, during which they will watch a fly—past by the royal air force. in a moment... click looks at the technology behind the world cup: visiting fifa hq, examining the world cup football, and taking penalties against a robot goalkeeper. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. the queen's birthday honours list has been announced — with a knighthood for the former liverpool manager kenny dalglish, while oscar—winning actress emma thompson is made a dame. the list recognises the achievements of more than 1,000 people across the uk, many for work done in their communities. this year's honours have not been without controversy — the boss of network rail is made
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a cbe in the same week that the firm was criticised for railway disruption. lizo mzimba reports. been a bit of a shambles, really. it'sjust been a nightmare. they were just stuck, because there were so many northern trains just sat at platforms, because they had no drivers. the decision to make network rail‘s chief executive mark carne a cbe for services to the rail industry was made many weeks ago, but is still being seen as controversial, following network rail‘s role in the recent and ongoing chaos affecting hundreds of thousands of passengers. the department for transport acknowledged the timing was unfortunate. commentator: kenny dalglish! less controversially, player, manager and a figure who gave huge support to the hillsborough families, kenny dalglish, says he's hugely proud to receive a knighthood. for everybody that made a contribution, and maybe even had to tell one or two untruths about myself to get it this far, to come out and get the accolade i've been awarded is very humbling. imagine your husband bought a gold necklace, and come christmas,
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gave it to somebody else. oscar—winning actress and writer emma thompson becomes a dame, for services to drama. the troops have been firing indiscriminately... among the cbes, the award just below knight and damehoods, bbcjournalist, kate adie. announcer: asking the questions, bamber gascoigne. and author and broadcaster, bamber gascoigne. becoming an 0be, gold—medal winning winter 0lympian, lizzy yarnold. commentator: that is a gold—medal winning run. most honours have gone to people for work in communities, people like akeela ahmed, the founder of online forum she speaks we hear. i really wanted to elevate the everyday voices of muslim women, because i felt that more often than not, they're spoken about in negative terms, but we didn't really get to hear their authentic voices.
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the oldest person recognised, becoming an mbe, 103—year—old rosemary powell, britain's longest—serving poppy seller, who retired after 97 years, earlier this month. lizo mzimba, bbc news. to talk about the network rail boss being made a cbe is bruce williamson from rail future. being made a cbe is bruce we have a nice view of the clifton suspension bridge behind you. no trains on that, but plenty of training issues in the west country, not least three days of closures coming up this week because of important infrastructure work that network rail is doing. isn't that the argument for fifth giving him this award? it's a recognition of a transformational period in the railways, notwithstanding the difficulties over the timetables. indeed. there is a lot of investment happening in the railways at the
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moment, a lot of major projects. where mark carne deserves some credit is that he has improved management within network rail. it wasn't very good and there is probably still a lot of work to do with improving it. in bristol, for instance, they are electrifying the great western mainline. current plans don't come as far as bristol and the whole electrification project has been problematic with cost overruns and delays and so on. that is an example of web project management has gone wrong. i hope it will get better in future, thanks to the work that mark carne has done. then is it the timing of this, which some say isjust then is it the timing of this, which some say is just an unfortunate coincidence? presumably, someone put his name on the list maybe six months ago. absolutely. the timing could barely be worse. even though we can argue that it is justified, these public perceptions matter because it reflects badly on the
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railway. there is a lot of anger amongst the public at the moment towards the rail industry and it makes the industry look bad when apparently, failure is being rewarded. it is analogous to the ongoing problem you here from time to time about top pay, bonuses for chief executives when they don't appear to be doing a good job. that is another argument that is made for people in his sort of position getting honours, that it is part of the compensation package for the fa ct the compensation package for the fact that they haven't gone to the private sector to earn millions. i know people find it confusing because we talk about network rail asa because we talk about network rail as a company, but it doesn't have shareholders. it is an arm's length body of the department for transport, so he is a glorified civil servant. he is. network rail is effectively nationalised. it is publicly owned and there are no shareholders. when it comes to rewards, i think it is fair that people in the public sector are paid what they could be expected to get in the private sector. top pay at
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network rail is a lot more than i earn andi network rail is a lot more than i earn and i suspect you earn as well. the idea of reward generally, there are people at the coalface, the bottom end of the pecking order, who also work hard and do a greatjob, and they deserve those rewards as well. could this as an honour to be seen as well. could this as an honour to be seen as a well. could this as an honour to be seen as a vote of confidence in the rail industry because of the work thatis rail industry because of the work that is being done? i could imagine ifi that is being done? i could imagine if i was a commuter waiting on an empty platform in hertfordshire for a train that didn't turn up or a commuter on the outskirts of central manchester in one of the outlying suburbs, waiting for a train that was due at a particular time that didn't turn up and then the one on the emergency timetable didn't turn up the emergency timetable didn't turn up either, i would think, how could he ask this question, but looking at the wider picture, can he make a case for why he was right to accept is? i think he could, although because of the timing issue, you
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would think someone would have said, the timing is not great, put it back to the new year honours when all this has blown over. time will tell. in several years' time, hopefully the investments will have paid off and a lot of the major projects will be working well and we can look back and say he did a good job. it's a bit early to say. bruce williamson of rail future, thanks for talking to us. there's been no breakthrough at the g7 summit in canada between president trump and the other leaders over the trade tariffs recently imposed by the us. there's now concern on the second and final day that the countries won't be able to agree a joint statement. 0ur diplomatic correspondent, james robbins, reports from quebec. serious faces, as the leaders sat down to confront the collision course on trade which so divides donald trump from america's traditional partners and friends. but once they were alone, the talking was apparently tough and one official described strong
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emotions around the table. the president apparently fired off his sets of numbers, showing america suffering from unfair treatment. other leaders fired back their very different figures. the two narratives on who is bullying who can't easily be squared but there are suggestions that limited progress has been made. when canada's prime minister met the president separately, justin trudeau tried to sound upbeat. we both got elected on a commitment to grow the middle class and help those working hard tojoin it, and that's exactly the kind of things we're going to stay focused on. it's a pleasure to have you here, donald. donald trump opted for a joke, at his host's expense. justin has agreed to cut all tariffs and all trade barriers between canada and the united states. so, i'm very happy. so i'd say nafta's in good shape! but we are actually working on it. the big question for this second and final day of the summit is how much can be salvaged from the wreckage of the most
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divisive first day at a g7 anyone can remember. and if an agreement can be achieved at the end of the day, will it be at the price of diluting fundamental principles simply to bring together president trump and america's traditional allies? it's notjust trade which isolates president trump from the other six nations. there are big divides over climate change, iran and the israel—palestinian conflict. germany's chancellor angela merkel is one of those suggesting it may be impossible to agree a final summit communique. it's more honest, she said, to name the differing views and try to overcome them than try to pretend everything is ok. one thing is certain, whether this is g7 or g6+i, president trump will be long gone before the summit ends. last to arrive, first to leave, seeming to confirm his lack of appetite for this whole forum, where he can't make the individual deals he much prefers.
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james robbins, bbc news, quebec. theresa may says her cabinet will hold another awayday at chequers as it tries to agree a final brexit position. the government hopes to complete its negotiations with the eu by october. mrs may insists that progress hasn't been hampered by rows within the conservative party and that a lot of activity is planned for the coming weeks. as our political correspondent matt cole explained, theresa may has endured another testing week over britain's departure from the eu. she's been under pressure on wednesday at prime minister's questions. labour leaderjeremy corbyn once again asked, when are we going to get this white paper, the proposals document on the next stage of brexit, including that controversial issue of what plan for our customs arrangements in future that is so dividing the cabinet? and some of those cabinet divisions then made things harder for mrs may, with rumours that the brexit secretary david
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davis was threatening to resign if he didn't get a particular thing as part of that pushed through. that seemed to just about go away, some suggesting that theresa may had done well. then a recording emerges of boris johnson, the foreign secretary, saying he didn't think the talks were going well and that they could even go into meltdown. so theresa may disappeared off to the g7 summit in canada, but by the time she landed, all of the boris johnson recordings had emerged. so she is now talking tough, trying to regain some of the initiative. people like boris have strong views on brexit, but so do i. i want to deliver brexit for the british people. that is what people want and i am doing it. how many times can we get to this position where you have to have these clashes with those on your own side? at every stage in these negotiations, we have seen people casting doubt on whether or not we could achieve what we want to achieve.
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we are now moving on to finalise those withdrawal issues and also to move on to discuss our future relationship. if that has been a difficult week and it is going to be a difficult weekend with the divisions over trade at the g7, she is back at the start of next week for a big parliamentary week on brexit. indeed. we have the withdrawal from the eu bill, the brexit bill, which returns to the commons on tuesday. some 15 amendments were made to it by the house of lords. two six—hour sessions. there was going to be one 12—hour session on tuesday, but they have now broken it up. but theresa may only has a working majority of 13. trying to keep everybody on side to make sure that none of those amendments stay in could be difficult. all of these things are putting huge pressure on her, with a big eu summit at the end of the month.
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and we now know that the white paper, with all the plans that were meant to come out before that summit, now won't be. how confident do you think ministers are privately that things are on track? there is this deadline that the eu has imposed, saying we have to get this signed off by october because the ratification process, which is required by individual member countries, will take most of six months before you walk out of the door. not least ratification by the parliament here. one of the amendments being discussed next week is what happens if parliament get a meaningful vote and says no. does it go back to the government to have 28 days of thinking if they can get the revised amendment through, who knows? the taliban in afghanistan has announced a three—day ceasefire to take place over the muslim holiday of eid at the end of next week. it's the first offer of its kind
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since the us—led invasion in 2001. the militants said foreign forces would be excluded from the ceasefire and that they would defend themselves from attack. afg hanistan's ambassador to neighbouring pakistan described the move as an important step towards prospects for peace. i spoke earlier to our kabul bureau chief shoaib sharifi, who told us how we got to the first ceasefire for 17 years. since february this year, there have been more affairs going on about bringing the taliban to the negotiating table. the president in february announced an unconditional peace deal with the taliban which a few weeks down the line, the taliban responded by launching a very fierce spring offensive. and less than a week ago, top american military officials announced that they and the afghan officials have managed to reach some
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mid to high level taliban in order to make them sit at the negotiation table and finally take practical steps towards ending violence in afghanistan. two days ago, the afghan government announced a week—long ceasefire which it said was in response to a grand religious scholar's demand. they asked both sides to stop violence. this morning, the taliban's announcement surprised everyone in afghanistan. a group which has fought the us—backed afghan government non—stop for 17 years has announced that it will halt the attack against afghan security forces for three days. it is only three days, but for the first time, the country will be experiencing a bilateral ceasefire, which is hopefully happening in six days' time from now.
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there's obviously a great symbolic importance. it's a case of seeing whether that is followed through in practical terms. but when the taliban say "we will carry on fighting the foreign forces", in truth, are there now many clashes with international troops or has it been the case that they have stepped back and the afghan military has stepped forward? in fact, since the exit of foreign forces in 2014, afghan forces are in the driving seat and front line. so the foreign forces are mostly training and advising. in fact, since the exit of foreign forces in 2014, afghan forces are in the driving seat and front line.
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so the foreign forces are mostly training and advising. they have significantly dropped from over 100,000 to about 10,000 foreign forces, mostly in the bases. so it is the afghan forces who are facing the fighting of the taliban. so it is a big step. it is the first time the taliban are at least saying that they are not attacking afghan security forces. in the past, they used to say they would only engage with americans in the peace talks. they were not recognising the afghan government as a side of the conflict. this is the first time they are saying they will not engage afghan security forces. practically, it is a big step forward towards peace talks in afghanistan. we have some breaking news on developments in afghanistan. 19 local police officers were killed earlier this morning in a confrontation in a north—eastern province. the taliban attacked a local police base there. in the
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fighting that followed, 19 officers we re fighting that followed, 19 officers were killed and nine taliban fighters also died. that is a week before the ceasefire is due to begin, but it's a reminder that the level of persistent violence and conflict in afghanistan remains high. there are areas which are still regarded as beyond the control of the government and clearly, the taliban are still trying to push to ta ke taliban are still trying to push to take control of more territory. so 19 local police officers were killed in north—eastern kunduz this morning. we will be live in kabul for the latest in our. —— in an hour's time. the headlines on bbc news: the queen's birthday honours are announced — former liverpool manager kenny dalglish is knighted, and actress emma thompson is made a dame. but there's anger too as the chief executive of network rail, mark carne — is made a cbe. the second and final day of the g7 summit begins — after negotiations failed to resolve divisions over us trade tariffs yesterday. theresa may says the government's
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white paper on its brexit position won't be published until after the eu summit at the end of this month. let's return now to the g7 summit in quebec, where leaders are going into the final day of talks without a breakthrough over the issue of us trade tariffs. with us now is sirjeremy greenstock, the former british ambassador to the un. are you looking at this g7 with a sense of disappointment, or do you think it was to be expected that we are ata think it was to be expected that we are at a stage in the relationship between those countries that some kind of break—up in terms of their outlook was always on the cards?|j think this was always on the cards. it is not unexpected. it's very unwelcome that the two sides with the advantage should be talking past
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each other on something as important as global trade, but this is president trump at his most political in terms of his domestic constituency and his audience back home. he wants to show that he is fighting for america first, for the people who have been left behind by globalisation. that was what he was brought to the white house for. so he was giving less credence to his allied leaders than to his own constituency and he doesn't like these multilateral meetings. so it was always going to be difficult. given that he is going to be in the white house for at least the next three years and he could be there for as much as another eight years, what lesson do you think the other g7 leaders and indeed other leaders beyond a relatively small organisation, need to take from this in terms of how they deal with the united states? it's a very different approach to the one they would have expected from 0bama or either of the
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president bushes. everyone operates according to their own domestic economies. the europeans have problems with russia and migration and other things to worry about than us the mystic politics. but it is different to have the united states so different to have the united states so far away on different to have the united states so far away on some different to have the united states so far away on some of the main issues of our time, as on global security with russia, syria and iran etc, as on climate change, with the americans withdrawing from the paris agreement. so this is difficult and they have to learn how to talk to a man who is not really willing to engage. apart from that, they have to wait for this storm to pass and to wait for this storm to pass and to see what else comes out of the
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trump presidency. he is quite unpredictable. he can produce some moves from the american side that could be advantageous for the west. we will have to see. but it is a disturbing moment for other western leaders to find such a different kind of president in the white house. the singapore summit is coming up this week and we will see what comes out of that and whether there is a rapport between donald trump and kimjong—un and there is a rapport between donald trump and kim jong—un and whether they come down to negotiating rather than the theatre of this. but what about the g7? is it a bit of an anachronism? it was never a decision—making organisation like the united nations security council or like nato. it's always been an informal club of major economies, trying to coordinate their approach to economic growth and global trade.
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so there are plenty of things that the 7-1 so there are plenty of things that the 7—1 could do together. they are following the principles of a more open market approach than president trump seems inclined to. but it isn't a decision taking body. what do you make of president trump's suggestion that russia should be invited back in and that it should become the g8 again, a view that appeared to be echoed by italy's new prime ministerfor a appeared to be echoed by italy's new prime minister for a time? actually, i have been one of those that think we should be talking more with russia and getting together to see what has gone wrong in the relationship with russia to see what our mutual interests. the russians have an interest in global security and a working global economy and a free—flowing energy market, as we do. they have behaved badly in ukraine. they have behaved unpredictably and badly in syria.
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they are on the other side of us on iran and other issues. but we need the russians alongside us in managing global issues collectively andi managing global issues collectively and i think we should talk to them. whether they come into the g7 to do that or we do it in a different form, that is up to the leaders to decide. you can see that they don't wa nt to decide. you can see that they don't want to give russia a gift because they have issues with russia. but trump has something here, as he has something with kim jong—un trump has something here, as he has something with kimjong—un of trump has something here, as he has something with kim jong—un of north korea. he needs a transactional deal, and he is prepared to take some punishment for that.|j deal, and he is prepared to take some punishment for that. i should imagine that you are rather happy to be where you are this weekend rather than having to be one of those diplomats desperately trying to turn all these differences into common words on a piece of paper. jeremy greenstock, thank you very much. the queen is celebrating her official birthday this morning with the trooping the colour parade.
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the queen travelled solo in a horse—drawn carriage down the mall, towards horse guards parade. the duke and duchess of sussex were also there, along with the rest of the royal family. 1,000 soldiers are taking part in the annual parade. joining us now from buckingham palace is our royal correspondent, nicholas witchell. we are coming up to one of the highlights of today. yes, the balcony appearance. that will be in about 35 minutes. the parade at horse guards is over. it went very smoothly. the colour of the coldstrea m smoothly. the colour of the coldstream guards was trooped and the queen is now making her way back up the queen is now making her way back up the mall, preceded by the massed bands of the footguards and with some of the foot guard divisions. she isjust a some of the foot guard divisions. she is just a few hundred yards away from buckingham palace now. she will go in and at around one o'clock, we have the fly—past by 23 aircraft of the royal air force, which
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celebrities 100th anniversary this year. and the people who many will be looking for, we have already seen them making their way down to horse guards and they are on their way back, the duke and duchess of sussex. almost three weeks to the hour since their wedding in windsor, they have made their first major appearance ina they have made their first major appearance in a row context as a couple. they made their way down in a carriage —— in a royal context. they were watching the queen's birthday parade from a window overlooking horse guards, and the crowds have seen them make their way back to buckingham palace. the queen is nearly here. i can see her carriage coming into site at the top of the mall. and it is a hot day. 0ne of the mall. and it is a hot day. one is apt to forget that. there are nearly 2000 soldiers, including the musicians, and 200 horses. the horses of the household cavalry have gone straight back to barracks, and that maybe something to do with the heat. you can probably hear the
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bands. here they come, back into buckingham palace. quick refreshment for the queen, and then out onto the balcony for the fly—past. for the queen, and then out onto the balcony for the fly-past. no refreshment for you yet, nick! let's look at the weather. there could be a lot of rain in the short amount of time in northern ireland. some showers are creeping into northern england through parts of wales. but many places are dry with spells of sunshine and temperatures rising. this evening, most of the showers will fade away. there will be clear spells, but cloud tending to fill back in as the night wears on. tomorrow, many
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places again are having a dry day. more sunshine across much of england and wales, but still some showers around, this time across the eastern parts of scotland and south—west england. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. the queen's birthday honours are announced. amongst the names on this year's list are former liverpool manager kenny dalglish, who is knighted, and actress emma thompson, who is made a dame. but there's anger too as the chief executive of network rail, mark carne — is made a cbe — despite the recent chaos on the railways.
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