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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 10, 2018 9:00am-9:31am BST

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this is bbc news. i'm ben brown. the headlines at 9: the g7 summit ends in disarray over trade tariffs — president trump lashes out at the canadian prime minister calling him dishonest and weak. i have made it very clear to the president that it is not something we relished doing, but it is something that we absolutely will do. because canadians, we are polite, we are reasonable but we also will not be pushed around. and president trump is on his way to singapore, where north korea's leader kim jong un has just arrived — the two men will hold historic talks on denuclarisation. companies are to be forced to justify the pay gap between their highest and lowest earners. the millionaire brexit campaigner arron banks reportedly had undisclosed meetings with russian officials and discussed a deal involving six russian goldmines. and our sunday morning edition of the papers is at 9.35 —
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this morning's reviewers are anne ashworth and james millar. good morning and welcome to bbc news. the g7 summit has ended in disarray, with a war of words between president trump and the canadian prime ministerjustin trudeau. mr trudeau said canada would not be pushed around on trade tariffs — mr trump then accused him of being "dishonest and weak". the president has withdrawn his endorsement of a joint communique on the importance of free trade. from quebec, our correspondent gary o'donoghue reports. scarcely 2a hours after the president arrived at a summit he had thought about skipping altogether, he was off, defiant in the face of a clutch of world leaders still furious
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with america's unilateral trade tariffs. the warning signs came early when the president showed up late for a leader's breakfast on gender equality, one of the few areas where there had been hope of a meeting of minds. while officials worked towards a final agreement all the leaders could sign up to, the president was sticking to his position, blaming former us leaders for allowing the rest of the world to take advantage of america on trade. it's going to change, 100%. tariffs are going to come way down because we people can't continue to do that. we're like a piggy bank that everybody‘s robbing, and that ends. and it was clear the president didn't much like how he was being spoken to. a moment captured in this photograph, later posted on social media by the german chancellor herself. but it was the words of the canadian prime minister, justin trudeau, who announced he had got all seven countries to sign up
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to the final agreement, that seems to have tipped the president over the edge. i have made it very clear to the president that it is not something we relish doing but it is something that we absolutely will do because canadians are polite, reasonable but we also will not be pushed around. that led to a barrage of tweets from the president, on board air force one itself. in one he said, "based onjustin‘s false statements...| have instructed our us reps not to endorse the communique". they worked hard to avoid this kind of meltdown — and they thought they had done just that. but in the space of two or three tweets, the divisions between these supposed allies are now as deep as ever. gary o'donoghue, bbc news, quebec. president trump is due to land in singapore in a few hours‘ time ahead
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of his planned summit with the north korean leader kim jong then, of his planned summit with the north korean leader kimjong then, kim jong—un has just arrived korean leader kimjong then, kim jong—un hasjust arrived in singapore for those talks, scheduled on tuesday. donald trump has described the forthcoming meeting as a one—time shot at peace. our correspondent in singapore is rupert wingfield—hayes, therefore the arrival. here is the motorcade carrying kim jong—un. it left the international airport about 30 minutes ago. he is in his armoured mercedes. we have the advanced guard. here comes the limousine now. the van is flying the north korean flag... we think that this is the car carrying kim jong—un arriving flag... we think that this is the car carrying kimjong—un arriving in central singapore, going into the hotel behind me here. that is where the north korean delegation is staying. is the beginning of the
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biggest diplomatic event for this small citystate in its history and probably the biggest diplomatic event for north korea in a very, very long time, kim jong—un arrived ona very long time, kim jong—un arrived on a chinese aircraft, we weren‘t sure which one he would come on, in the end he went on the chinese 747, it went to pyongyang and picked him up, it has brought him here. after the arrival here, we were waiting for the arrival of president donald trump, he is on his way from crete on air force one. he is expected to arrive here this evening. this extraordinary diplomatic event will then get under way. then these leaders will meet with the prime minister of singapore than the main event, the historic event, is the meeting between kim jong—un, event, the historic event, is the meeting between kimjong—un, the north korean leader, and president trump on tuesday morning, the first timea trump on tuesday morning, the first time a leaderfor trump on tuesday morning, the first time a leader for north trump on tuesday morning, the first
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time a leaderfor north korea and a sitting us president have ever met. an enormous diplomatic event, this isa an enormous diplomatic event, this is a one—time shot for peace on the north korean peninsula, there is a. riding here in singapore in the next few days. let‘s go live to singapore and join oui’ let‘s go live to singapore and join our correspondent. barbara plett—usher. rupert saying it is an extraordinary diplomatic event, it is, i suppose until recently it was unthinkable. these two men had been exchanging barbed insults? negotiators and north korean experts in washington, i was speaking with them and many are wary about what donald trump‘s negotiation style may be but they also said this isjune 2018, not june 2017, throughout most of last year there was a real fear that they could be a war on the korean
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peninsular, people were very concerned. then we had this about—face, started by kimjong—un. before christmas he made an extraordinary diplomatic turnaround, a charm offensive through the 0lympics that were held in south korea. the south koreans facilitated the meeting, the connection between donald trump and kim jong—un. the meeting, the connection between donald trump and kimjong—un. now the meeting, the connection between donald trump and kim jong—un. now mr trump decided to suddenly accept a sudden invitation. things have com pletely sudden invitation. things have completely turned around. as rupert was saying, now people are talking about the possibility of some sort of piece on the korean peninsula. that would have implications not just for the north and south korea but the entire region. it has been quite the year and this is quite an event. but it is really unpredictable, what will happen at this summit. donald trump has repeatedly said if he does not like what is on offer he will simply walk away? yes, that is another thing that has people watching quite
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closely. normally something like this, this kind of big summit, is preceded by weeks or months or even yea rs of lower—level preceded by weeks or months or even years of lower—level diplomacy. things will have been agreed and scripted, a communique will have been organised. there is little preparation of that sort and it will depend on the two leaders themselves. donald trump has already said that he will improvise. he has said that he will improvise. he has said he has preparation but that is not the most important thing. we strongly believes in his ability to size up his opponent and likes the idea of a battle of wills and as $0011 idea of a battle of wills and as soon as he gets into the room he will be able to type something positive can come out of it but kim jong—un is also very strong willed and powerful, a man who is very much across the details of what they have been discussing which is to do with nuclear disarmament. we don‘t know what will come out of it but mr trump has signalled that perhaps a grand bargain is not really on the table at the moment. he has talked
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about this being the beginning of a process , about this being the beginning of a process, the beginning of a relationship that people will be closely watching to see what kinds of parameters i established, if that is the case and whether this meeting will set the tone for further meetings and a continuation of this process. and we are seeing live pictures from outside the hotel in singapore where kim jong—un is staying. you talked about the unpredictability, in terms of donald trump, he is arriving at that summit in singapore, he hasjust left trump, he is arriving at that summit in singapore, he has just left the other summit he‘s been to in canada, as we have been reporting, in a state of disarray because of the war of words between him and justin trudeau, underlining how unpredictable a president he is, ripping up the joint communique that he endorsed? that is right, he is leaving his g7 allies angry with him
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and he angry with them, he has come to singapore to make peace. he is a force unto himself but i would say that this is probably more his comfort zone. he likes the big and historic gesture, that is what he is hoping to achieve here. the feels more comfortable with these one—on—one, face—to—face showdown diplomacy is, he has great faith in himself and his ability as a deal—maker and how he sizes up the situation and determines whether something can come of it. he has in excited about this opportunity, he didn‘t really want to go to the g7 summit because he knew that his partners there were angry with him but also he wanted to get here. we will see whether that bad feeling that was left after the g7 affects his encounters here but i do think he sees it as quite separate.
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barbara, we will see what unfolds. barbara, we will see what unfolds. barbara plett usher, live in singapore, thank you. big companies will soon have to justify the gap in salary between their highest paid executives and the average worker. business minister, greg clark, wants publicly listed companies with more than 250 employees to publish their pay gap every year. the tuc has welcomed the move, but says workers should also be appointed to boards. our business correspondent, joe lynam has more. three of the best paid executives in the uk last year — sir martin sorrell, ra kesh kapoor and pascsal soriot. between them they earn £70 million. the amount senior bosses get paid compared to their staff will be brought into sharp relief from january next year. the average earnings for a ftse 100 chief executive were £4.5 million last year, that is 120 times more than what the average employee earned.
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from january, publicly listed firms must publish their pay ratios. but there will be no official cap on them. nobody is suggesting that successful business leaders shouldn‘t get remunerated well, but we do think there is an accountability. we do think by having this transparency — and for the first time being able to see that ratio between the top pay in the boardroom and the average worker — that will mean that bosses will think twice about the decisions that they make and that will lead to better decisions and fairer decisions for everybody concerned. the cbi said comparing pay ratios between different sectors was as meaningless as comparing apples with oranges. the tuc welcomes the new rules, but called for workers to sit on company boards. joe lynam, bbc news. the founder of pro—brexit campaign group, leave eu, has confirmed he will appear before a committee of mps this week to answer new allegations about his links with russia.
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the sunday times reports that arron banks — who funded the unofficial leave campaign — had more meetings with russian officials than he previously admitted. joining me now is our correspondent susana mendonca. what are the allegations against him? the latest allegations in the sunday times is that he had three meetings with the russian ambassador to britain. previously, arron banks, in his book which was about brexit, was called the bad boys of brexit. they are more meetings when he previously said that he had. it‘s important because arron banks was the main donor of the leave.eu campaign group, a lead campaign group, notan campaign group, a lead campaign group, not an official campaign group, not an official campaign group, during the referendum that pushed through a leave vote in the referendum. the culture and media committee has been quite concerned
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about the closeness, perhaps, of that campaign to russian officials. that is why it is an important issue. there is some reaction from him quoted in the papers today. we will hear more when he appears before the media committee in parliament? they have tried to arrange a meeting with him sometimes, we understood he did not wa nt to sometimes, we understood he did not want to attend but since these allegations have come out, we understand he will meet with them on tuesday. so far, we‘ve heard he has played down these meetings with the russian ambassador, describing them as two boozy lunches and a cup of tea. really playing it down. he has described it as a political witchhunt. we will hear more from him when he addresses the committee on tuesday. no doubt we will, susanna, thank you. the former home secretary amber rudd has led calls for conservative party rebels to back the prime minister on brexit ahead of a crucial commons vote next week. writing in the sunday telegraph, ms rudd, who backed remain,
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joined the former party leader iain duncan smith to call for unity, as the government tries to overturn more than a dozen changes to the eu withdrawal bill put forward by the house of lords. and we‘ll be talking all things politics in our sunday morning edition of the papers, with political commentator james millar and anne ashworth, associate editor at the times. that‘s after the sport, at half past nine. the headlines on bbc news: the g7 summit ends in disarray over trade tariffs — president trump lashes out at the canadian prime minister calling him dishonest and weak. and president trump is on his way to singapore, where north korea‘s leader kim jong un has arrived: the two men will hold historic talks on denuclearisation. companies are to be forced to justify the pay gap between their highest and lowest earners. later today, processions are taking
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place all over the uk to mark 100 years since some women won the right to vote. those taking part will be wearing either green, white or violet — the colours of the suffrage movement. among those getting involved are the staff at guys and st thomas‘s hospital. 0ur reporter fiona lamdin‘s been to meet them. iam behind i am behind the scenes at one of the old est i am behind the scenes at one of the oldest hospitals in the country, guy ‘s and st thomas ‘s. upstairs, patients are waiting for operations but through here, you will see a tea m but through here, you will see a team of nhs staff doing something com pletely team of nhs staff doing something completely different... these women have been here for the last six weeks. remembering their female heroes. i think it is really important that women vote, and when
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we heard about the march, it was a reminder of how far we‘ve come within the uk in respect of women‘s suffrage. i thought it was something worth celebrating. later today, these women, with this banner, will join thousands of others across the country as they march, remembering the suffragettes. 0ne country as they march, remembering the suffragettes. one thing about sewing that i think is really important is that it is an act to prepare and joining things together. leading these medics is the artist in residence at college london. we have,in in residence at college london. we have, in the river, are the names of women who are significant in history, pioneering in health. we have florence nightingale, we have elizabeth garrett anderson, recognised as being the first openly female physician to qualify in the country. she is also a suffragette as well. in the bottom corner, we have tessa jackson my stitch that on the day she died, i wanted to
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recognise how much she has done for women and children in particular in health care. this is notjust about the historical known women. there‘s also a place on the banner for the personal. different people have put inspiring people, i have put my grandma. idid inspiring people, i have put my grandma. i did not know her name, called her nanna, i had to go and research my own grandma's name, it was embarrassing but i asked my mum. it's interesting, my mum, my grandma and my sister all have the same name. this experience has given me my grandma's name which is quite awesome, actually! and i love that i am showing a nurse how to thread a needle! heatherwood has been nursing at this hospitalforfour needle! heatherwood has been nursing at this hospital for four decades. 40 years ago, women were in traditional roles in the health services, but now a woman can be in any role, from chief executive to nursing, doctors, physios, any role.
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the suffragettes campaigned for better women‘s health care. 100 yea rs better women‘s health care. 100 years on, those who helped to deliver it are staging their names into history. —— stitching. 0ur correspondent jane frances kelly is at the march in central london. she is at parliament square, one of those marchers will be happening there. tell us what will unfold. parliament square will be a see of colour later on. tens of thousands of women and girls and individuals who identify as women have been invited to descend on the streets of london, edinburgh, cardiff and belfast, and they will be given scarves in the colours of the suffragettes. that is white, green and violet, they have been choreographed to walk in blocks of
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colour. they represent an enormous suffragette‘s banner. i have one of the organisers with me, jenny walrond. what are you hoping to achieve with this work of art?m walrond. what are you hoping to achieve with this work of art? it is an individual to women and girls everywhere to join an individual to women and girls everywhere tojoin in an individual to women and girls everywhere to join in these four political capitals of the uk. to celebrate what happened 100 years ago. that women like millicent fawcett behind me and the suffragists and the suffragettes finally managed to get the first women getting the vote in the uk. and later, in 1918, women getting to stand in parliament. it is paying tribute to those were in 100 years ago who created opportunities that women in the last 100 years have had, celebrating the achievements of the last 100 years and looking forward and motivating all of us to achieve more in future. and what do you think dame millicent fawcett
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would think? it is her birthday tomorrow and we have this beautiful statue by gillian waring, the first woman in parliament square. as she stands proudly in parliament square and looks at the scene a suffragette colours rather than suffragists, which is what she was, i think she would be proud of what women have achieved and how far we have come in the last 100 years. i think she would also be thinking what more we could all do and what woman could do to ensure there is more equality in future. and our men invited to take pa rt future. and our men invited to take part in the march? in the procession? 0r must theyjust spectate? men have been part of the whole process, developing processions. they have been involved in the banner making workshops but this afternoon, this is a moment for women to come together. we are looking forward to men standing by,
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supporting and watching the women in their lives and families and friends celebrating women today. it is a living portrait of living in the zist living portrait of living in the 21st century. thank you. there will bea 21st century. thank you. there will be a special programme on bbc one between 2pm and 4pm presented by ki rsty between 2pm and 4pm presented by kirsty young. jean francis kelly in parliament square, thank you. a man in his 30s has died after being stabbed in north london. it happened near turnpike lane tube station in haringey. police have launched a murder investigation, the 74th in the capital so far this year. the labour leader, jeremy corbyn, will announce new proposals to ensure all hospitality workers receive 100—percent of their tips, if his party comes to power. he‘ll call on the owners of restaurants and bars to stop taking a cut from the money given to staff by customers. he claims any eventual changes could affect around 2 million people across the uk. an earthquake with a magnitude of 3.9 has
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struck eastern england. the tremor, which happened at quarter—past—eleven last night, was centred on grimsby but was felt up to 66 miles away. the british geological survey said it had received reports from residents including one who told how "the whole house shook for a couple of seconds", and someone who "thought it was a lorry crashing outside". would you share food with a stranger? an app is encouraging people to do just that, to cut down on food waste. it‘s based in the uk, but used around the world, as dougal shaw reports. nothing today? 0k. poppy trawls cafes in her north london neighbourhood like this once a week. she is a so—called food waste hero, collecting and sold food from businesses that would otherwise have gone to waste. some seeded bread in
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there. she takes the food that she has salvaged back to her home but it will not remain there for long. so we have white loaves... she uploads pictures of each item onto an app, and locals can then requested for free and come and collect it. food waste is a huge environmental problem, this is the little bit that you can do. the un estimates $1 trillion of food is thrown away every year. trillion of food is thrown away every yea r. to trillion of food is thrown away every year. to fight food waste, people are also sharing food they have bought for themselves, then realised they no longer need. this polish student has arrived to collect some unwanted ice cream. polish student has arrived to collect some unwanted ice creamlj think it is crucial to fight against food waste. also, i am a student. this way i get free food! the app is run bya this way i get free food! the app is run by a small team from this north london flat. it has been going for just over three years but for its human based to grow, a fear has to
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be overcome... will people be willing to share food with strangers that have looked after it? we have built into the 0lio app any checks so users built into the 0lio app any checks so users have profiles and user ratings, and things can be reported to us. people looking after the food have to be happy letting strangers into their home. if anything it means i get to know people in my community and i feel more secure. whether it is to save the planet or save themselves some money, more and more people are embracing this way of sharing food with strangers. an eight—year old boy has become the youngest person ever to climb one of britain‘s tallest sea—stacks off the coast of 0rkney. edward mills scaled the 450 foot old man of hoy in aid of the charity "climbers against cancer", after his mum was diagnosed with the illness. donations have already reached more than 20,000 pounds. he spoke to bbc breakfast alongside his trainer a bit earlier.
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i wanted to do it again. but when i was up there, it was, like, i didn‘t wa nt to was up there, it was, like, i didn‘t want to do it again. because up on the top it felt really high. it was very, very tough. congratulations to him, edward mills, just eight years old. while most of the uk was enjoying warm weather yesterday, parts of scotland were struck by extreme, unseasonal conditions, including hailstorms and torrential rain. lightning set fire to a house in wooddilee in east dunbartonshire, and hailstones stopped traffic on the m9 motorway. the met office has issued a yellow weather warning. time for a look at the weather across the uk now, alina jenkins has the latest forecast. hello, for many it isa the latest forecast. hello, for many it is a fairly sunny sunday. most places will be largely dry. however,
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some thunderstorms in the forecast. the channel islands, eastern scotla nd the channel islands, eastern scotland and some filtering southwards in northern england will see those. these are the pollen levels, very high across wales and england. the same in north—east england, moderate for southern scotla nd england, moderate for southern scotland and lower further north. very high in northern ireland. this is the forecast through the afternoon. much of the country is dry. more sunshine and we saw yesterday across england and wales, wales may pick up some showers. speaking of showers, the heavier ones further north. 19—24d, higher in london and south—east england but these are the details on those showers. further east than they were yesterday. not as prevalent but still be chance of heavy rain, torrential downpours, some of those storms creeping for the southwards in northern england. some lighter showers, while scattered across wales, south—east england. dry with
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plenty of warm sunshine. a fine end to the day for many. some showers in northern england, eastern scotland, a couple of showers in parts of south—west england. that cloud is creeping back westwards as the night wears on. some clear spells, on a par with last night. 9—14d, feeling muqqy par with last night. 9—14d, feeling muggy and humid particularly across central and southern england. we start the new week for many, largely dry with good spells of sunshine, especially in england and wales, icardi affair in northern ireland, dry with more cloud in scotland. some patches of rain in the afternoon. some showers creeping in in northern england. in the sunshine, 19—24d, feeling warm as it will do for england and wales on tuesday. 0n will do for england and wales on tuesday. on wednesday, we see a change. pushing into northern ireland, strengthening winds,
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outbreaks of rain, that slips south and eastwards through the end of the week. it is dry, turns unsettled, thenit week. it is dry, turns unsettled, then it is feeling fresher. goodbye. this is bbc news, our latest headlines: the g7 summit has ended in disarray, with a war of words between president trump and the canadian prime ministerjustin trudeau. mr trump then accused him of being "dishonest and weak". and president trump is on his way to singapore, where north korea‘s leader kim jong—un has arrived. the two men will hold historic talks on denuclearisation. companies are to be forced to justify the pay gap between their highest and lowest earners. the tuc has welcomed the move, but says workers should also be appointed to boards. the millionaire brexit campaigner arron banks reportedly had undisclosed meetings with russian officials and discussed a deal involving six russian gold mines. he will appear before mps on tuesday.
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100 years after the first british women won the right to vote, women across the uk are set to march together. they will don the colours of the suffragette movement — green, white and purple — and join a mass procession.

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