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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 10, 2018 12:00pm-12:31pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm ben brown. the headlines at midday: the north korea leader kimjong—un is welcomed to singapore — ahead of an historic summit with us president, donald trump. president trump is currently en route to singapore and expected to arrive later today. the two men will hold talks on denuclearisation. meanwhile, the g7 summit ends in disarray over trade tariffs — president trump lashes out at the canadian prime minister, calling him dishonest and weak. i have made it very clear to the president that it is not something we relish doing, but it is something that we absolutely will do. because canadians, we're polite, we're reasonable, but we also will not be pushed around. and 100 years after women won the
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vote, women across the uk are set to march today. hello, good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. the north korean leader, kim jong—un, has arrived in singapore for his summit with president trump. my colleague christian fraser is there for us. let's go straight there now. good evening. welcome to singapore. we are on the eve of something quite extraordinary here, an unprecedented summit between the leader of north korea and is sitting us president, the first time this has ever happened. we don't know much about the detail of this meeting, but it is going to go ahead in two daves'
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time, on tuesday morning. in the next hour and a half president trump is due to arrive here on the west side of the main island on singapore, so we will bring you that live, so tojoin us here, as it forced one lands here, live in singapore. the north korean leader arrive here courtesy of the chinese government, a chinese flight, telling you a bit about how deep the sanctions have been, that the leader can't even arrive here on his own plane. but they did bring in three planes from pyongyang, and one of them was the mercedes—benz he will use for his security while here in singapore. correspondent was watching the develop an commentators are hoping president trump's meeting with kimjong—un will be a great deal smoother than relations with his allies, who have been deeply unsettled by the imposition of us tariffs. when asked
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about how he felt the summit would pan out, the president said he would know within the first minute of meeting mr kim whether the north korean leader was serious about the nuclear negotiations. you know the way they say you know if you're going to like somebody in the first five seconds, you ever hear that one? well, ithink five seconds, you ever hear that one? well, i think that very quickly i will know whether or not something goodis i will know whether or not something good is going to happen. i also think i will know whether or not it will happen fast. the north korean leader has already arrived in singapore, amid tight security. both men have had an extraordinarily volatile relationship over the past 18 months, trading insults and threatening war before announcing a surprise face—to—face meeting. the summit is costing around $20 million to stage, but the prime minister of singapore says it is a price worth paying. i would say plus or minus it is around $20 million. we may be
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able to recoup a little bit of that, but i think it is a cost which we are willing to pay, and it is our contribution to an international endeavour in our profound interest. the meeting will take place on the island. the prime minister can reflect on the glory of bringing the president of the united states to the negotiating table. kimjong—un wa nts to the negotiating table. kimjong—un wants to get to the negotiating table but whether he will give up his main bargaining chip is still hotly debated. bbc news. yes, donald trump arriving in fairly bullish mood, after the g7, making it clear before he set off this is a one—time opportunity to find peace one—time opportunity to find peace on the korean peninsula. the big question of course is whether kim jong—un will meet the needs and the timescales that the president has set out for him. let me give you a bit ofan set out for him. let me give you a bit of an idea of where we are. we have quite a spectacular backdrop in
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singapore over the next few days. you can see over singapore over the next few days. you can see over here singapore over the next few days. you can see over here the financial district of singapore, then you have the fullerton hotel just district of singapore, then you have the fullerton hoteljust behind us here which used to be the old british post office. then you have the resort there are, quite an iconic retort leader hotel on the horizon. panning around, —— an iconic hotel on the horizon. panning around, you see the big wheel, the singapore flyer, then down at the bottom, which might bejust out singapore flyer, then down at the bottom, which might be just out of your shot, the singapore parliament, so we your shot, the singapore parliament, so we have it all here behind us, the full panoply of the buildings in singapore. but let's focus for a moment on what the us is likely to wa nt moment on what the us is likely to want out of this summit. the us and its regional allies want to see north korea give up its nuclear weapons, but mr trump acknowledged it will take longer than just one meeting to realise that goal. the two lea d e rs
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meeting to realise that goal. the two leaders will be talking about denuclearisation, but president trump has indicated he may accept a phasing out of the programme in exchange for those sanctions. both leaders playing on their personal connections. it could be that a date of friendly conversation at the beachis of friendly conversation at the beach is enough to break the deadlock for now and get the peace process moving. mr trump did not address the north's human rights record during the meeting with a top aide to the korean leader injune, but before departing for the summit the president told reporters "we will bring it up, and we will certainly bring it up here, as a dog about the summit over the next days. let's go over to the media centre in singapore where barbara plett—usher is standing by —— but we will certainly bring it up as we cover the summit over the next few days. two and half thousand —— we hear 2500 people have been accredited? simon yates, around 2000 journalists, i hear, have been accredited, possibly more —— journalists, i hear, have been accredited, possibly more -- yes, around 2000 journalists. this is
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something important to media in the region, notjust internationally. although the american focus is very much on a nuclear disarmament agreement with north korea, in the region i think more often you hear them talking about hopes for peace. certainly that is what you heard the prime minister of singapore saying, that for a prolonged time they have hope for peace on the korean peninsula. there is a great deal of anticipation to know what exactly will come out of the summit, and as you have been saying we think mr trump has signalled that probably will not be a great grand bargain but everybody wants to know what mr kim is willing to put on the table. those images of him coming here the singapore, being greeted by the foreign minister, then the prime minister, itjust shows he is intent really the transition from that image of a nuclear armed dictator to a statesman. and he will be using this summit to try to continue that. and kim jong—un, barbara,
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this summit to try to continue that. and kimjong—un, barbara, straight into business. we understand this evening he has gone to a meeting with the singaporean prime minister? yes, that's right. he has met the prime minister of singapore, who greeted him at his government office. he told them, you know, that he was very pleased to be hosting this summit, saying that they were hoping this would change the dynamic in the region. although he said we know there is a very difficult history, of what has been here before, mr kim thanking him for hosting the summit, and saying that singapore's paul wood go down in history if the summit was a success. —— singapore's role would go down in history. we also know that the singaporean prime minister will be meeting mr trump tomorrow after he arrives, probably tomorrow. he is not mediating in this meeting but he is serving as the host and greeting both of the leaders. and where they are meeting, just tell us a little bit about that, because it is ideal for a bit about that, because it is ideal fora summit of bit about that, because it is ideal for a summit of this nature. you can
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cut it off from the main island. where are the meeting, and what is likely to be the protocol? they are going to be meeting at nine o'clock in the morning at the capello hotel, a hotel on the resort island of sa nta a hotel on the resort island of santa rosa, normally a place for clues to, but this will be the venue for this very high—stakes summit, at security wise it is easier to keep it separate, to break it off, because it is an island —— this will because it is an island —— this will be taking place on the island of sentosa. we don't know if it will be a one—on—one meeting, between mr trump and mr kim, or whether there will be other people in the room. we are expecting secretary of state mike pompeo to be present for at least part of it but we know this is very much hope mr trump sees his comfort zone. he likes this sort of high—stakes deal— making, as comfort zone. he likes this sort of high—stakes deal—making, as he would see it. he believes he is able to
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size up his opponent quite quickly and he has said he will be able to tell within a few seconds whether the meeting will be positive. barbara plett—usher, at the media centre, thank you very much indeed. let's have a little look at what north korea has built up over the decades it has been trying to build this nuclear programme. for one reason, of course, it has been trying to guarantee its own survival. for pyongyang to even consider scaling down its weapons programme it will certainly want a reduction of the us military presence on the peninsula, around 20,000 troops of course stationed in south korea. kim jong—un 20,000 troops of course stationed in south korea. kimjong—un of 20,000 troops of course stationed in south korea. kim jong—un of course wa nt to south korea. kim jong—un of course want to be a player on the global stage, he wants to be treated with respect, and as an equal alongside china, russia, japan and south korea. president trump well over the course of the next few days at least needs to ditch all those references to the rocket man. under his leadership north korea has been trying to reinvigorate its economy, which means they are desperate for
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all international sanctions to be lifted, which will allow them to actively engage in international trade. well, over the course of the next few days and very pleased to say we will have the company of doctor robert kelley who has been studying north korea for some time. he is of course this professor of political science at pusan university. let's start with absolute basics. why is kim lukas mai? they have been under pretty heavy sanctions for a long time, north korea —— why is kim here? but they want to negotiate between the americans with some kind of deal, so i think now kim has the weapons and the ability to hit the us mainland, he is shopping around, you will meet a bunch of leaders including president trump and look for some kind of deal. and why is donald trump lukas mai? right, |
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right, i the right, ithe president right, i the president has a genuine interest in american security —— why is donald trump here? i don't think the threat is as great as it was made at the last but i think there are a lot of domestic political considerations, at mid—term election for president in the fall, and if he comes out with a win or at least something that looks like that it will help them politically in the fall. said this was an unprecedented summit, and that is because we have so summit, and that is because we have so little detail of what the americans want and how it will pan out. a lot of discussion in the last week. even in the last few weeks at the shangri—la, secretary madison, we want open—mac complete an irreversible disarmament, " and we want open—mac complete an irreversible disarmament," and most people think it is highly unlikely the north koreans will give us that. if they don't, we'll be except something less? some kind of sub outcome we will find acceptable? there's just outcome we will find acceptable? there'sjust not outcome we will find acceptable? there's just not been outcome we will find acceptable? there'sjust not been anything floated around out there so i think thatis floated around out there so i think that is one of the big uncertainties. if they are not going to give us into the back everything, will be negotiate for something less? 0k, andjust quickly, the north koreans, they have made many promises before, and so academics like you, it would be fair to say,
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somewhat sceptical? sure. that is correct. the north koreans have been telling us on many occasions, at least three or four macs in the 1981, they would be willing to give up 1981, they would be willing to give up nuclear weapons if the west —— four since 1991. and this has broken down again and again which is why we are where we are so down again and again which is why we are where we are so think a lot of the concern in the analyst community, will the north koreans keep to deal? even if we strike a deal in the next days, which would be great, verification will be the real sticking point. we will have to get in there to see if they are blowing up what they say they are, we need cameras and inspectors in there, that will be very hard. we will top plenty more. doctor robert kelley, for the minute, thank you. stay with us because in the next hour. donald trump will be here. you're watching bbc news. that was christian fraser in singapore. in a moment will bejoining
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christian fraser in singapore. in a moment will be joining viewers on bbc one for the weekend news. stay with us. good afternoon. the g7 summit has ended in disarray, with a war of words between president trump and the canadian prime ministerjustin trudeau. mr trudeau said canada would not be pushed around on trade tariffs — mr trump then accused him of being "dishonest and weak." the president has withdrawn his endorsement of a joint communique on the importance of free trade. from quebec, our correspondent gary 0'donoghue reports. scarcely 2a hours after the president arrived at a summit he had thought about skipping altogether, he was off, defiant in the face of a clutch of world leaders still furious with america's unilateral trade tariffs. the warning signs that something was wrong came early when the president showed up late for a leaders' breakfast on gender equality —
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one of the few areas where there had been hope of a meeting of minds. while officials worked towards a final agreement all the leaders could sign up to, the president was sticking to his position, blaming former us leaders for allowing the rest of the world to take advantage of america on trade. it's going to change, 100%. tariffs are going to come way down because we... people can't continue to do that. we're like a piggy bank that everybody‘s robbing, and that ends. and it was clear the president didn't much like how he was being spoken to. a moment captured in this photograph, later posted on social media by the german chancellor herself. but when she faced the cameras, she said a common statement didn't mean the differences had been taken off the table. translation: for us, it was important that we have a commitment to a rule—based trade order, that we continue to fight against protectionism, and that we want to reform the world trade organization.
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but it was the words of the canadian prime minister, justin trudeau, who announced he had got all seven countries to sign up to the final agreement, that seems to have tipped the president over the edge. i have made it very clear to the president that it is not something we relish doing but it is something that we absolutely will do because canadians are polite, reasonable, but we also will not be pushed around. that led to a barrage of tweets from the president, on board air force one itself. in one he said, "based on justin's false statements, i have instructed our us reps not to endorse the communique." they worked hard to avoid this kind of meltdown — and they thought they had done just that. but in the space of two or three tweets, the divisions between these supposed allies are now as deep as ever. gary 0'donoghue, bbc news, quebec. well, president trump is due to arrive in singapore within the hour for his summit with the north korean
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leader kim jong—un. there are hopes it will begin a process that leads to north korea giving up its nuclear weapons. mr kim has already arrived in singapore — this was him being greeted at the airport. and a short while ago his motorcade — flanked by his security team — whisked him through the streets of singapore. and barbara plett usher is in singapore for us. asummit, a summit, really, that not so long ago would have been unthinkable. what are the expectations that the hopes for it? we are not quite sure what to expect, really. it is so much driven by the will and personalities of two unpredictable men. we know the broad outline of the trial, the us wants north korea to give up its nuclear weapons and kim jong—un wants assurances about his security if he we re assurances about his security if he were to take such a step, and also
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sanctions lifted. —— lifted. but we do not know what he is ready to put on the table when it comes to his programme. the president prides himself on being a great deal maker, thinks he can size up an opponent quickly and says he will know in seconds whether the outcome could be positive, but at the same time he has been reducing expectations for that outcome, he is talking more about starting a process beginning a relationship rather than striking a grand bargain on the difficult issues at this meeting. something that will begin a process, he says. we will see how serious both sides are about moving on. thank you, barbara plett usher, in singapore. labour has said it will seek to change the government's plans for brexit in the commons on tuesday. but labour's spokesman, sir keir starmer, said the votes this week were not the last chance to alter the british approach — there would be other opportunities in the coming weeks. here's our political correspondent susana mendonca. dark clouds are gathering ahead of
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the crucial votes for the government this week. backbench tories are threatening to rebel and labour says it will not be their only chance to do so. the idea that this tuesday or wednesday is the last chance saloon ona wednesday is the last chance saloon on a single market deal is misconceived. there will be another chance with those bills. i hope we get significant victories this week on the things that matter, the meaningful vote on the customs union. the meaningful bowled refers to giving parliament the power to those... to force ministers back to the negotiating table and have a final say on what to do next. the government wants ministers to keep hold of that decision—making power. people thinking about voting against the government this week need to think very seriously. the most important thing is we get the legislation through, it avoids the legal cliff edge and make sure we have a smooth legal transition in
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relation to brexit and sends the prime minister into thejune council with the wind in her sales. brexiteer iain duncan smith and former home secretary amber rudd, achy remainer, havejoined former home secretary amber rudd, achy remainer, have joined forces to urge potential tory rebels to vote with the government. —— eight keep remainer. but some people say that the vote could help the prime minister to fend off cabinet brexiteers. when we get to a final negotiated deal with the eu we will be in negotiated deal with the eu we will beina negotiated deal with the eu we will be in a crisis if they behave in the same way and insist on featuring at all. we need to rescue the prime minister from all. we need to rescue the prime ministerfrom this all. we need to rescue the prime minister from this terrible treatment. theresa may will hope that any showdown with her backbenchers now will not leave her in a weakened position ahead of talks with eu leaders later this month. the founder of the leave. eu campaign, arron banks, is facing new allegations about the extent of his contact with senior russian officials. it's being reported that he held more meetings than previously disclosed, and that he was offered the chance to take part in a business deal involving
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six russian gold mines. the allegations have raised fresh questions about whether the kremlin sought to influence the outcome of the eu referendum in 2016. mr banks says he is the victim of a political witch—hunt. a man in his 30s has died after being stabbed in north london. it happened near turnpike lane tube station in haringey. police have launched a murder investigation — the 74th in the capital so far this year. big companies will soon have to publish and justify the pay gap between high paid executives and their average worker. under new laws to be laid out in parliament tomorrow, uk listed companies with more than 250 employees will have to disclose the so—called pay ratios in their organisation every year. the tuc welcomed the move but says workers should also be appointed to boards. thousands of people are expected to take part in processions
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across the uk today to mark 100 years since the first women won the right to vote. it's part of a uk—wide event that will see participants wearing the colours of the suffrage movement. chi chi izundu is in parliament square in central london. so what's happening? this will be the end of the procession that will occur in london. as you said, it is a nationwide event with processions in edinburgh, cardiff and belfast. tens of thousands of people are expected to march to commemorate the women's suffrage. with me now isjoanne, her daughter rosie, her son jacob suffrage. with me now isjoanne, her daughter rosie, her sonjacob and friend chrissy who are taking part today. why did you feel it's important to be here today? to show our appreciation for what these women did for us 100 years ago today. i just
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women did for us 100 years ago today. ijust feel that they did not have to do what they did for us to get this votes, but as you have seen, my placard says we still have a long way to go, such as equal pay and equal rights with men. that is why i felt compelled to come here today. you brought your daughter, why? i feel it is very important for the next—generation to understand. the next generation to carry on this fight which the suffragettes started 100 years ago. it is respect to the suffragettes, really. wonderful, thank you. 30,000 women are expected to march across london, the marchers are expected to start across the uk from tpm. chi chi izundu, thank you. you can see more on all of today's stories on the bbc news channel. the next news on bbc one is at 6:30pm. goodbye. some changes to come in the week
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ahead. for this afternoon, some changes to come in the week ahead. forthis afternoon, more some changes to come in the week ahead. for this afternoon, more of what we have been used to, still some warmth and sunshine. this was taken not so long ago in bude in cornwall. elsewhere, there has been more cloud which is thinning and breaking so most of us will see brighter or sunny spells. still some thunderstorms in the forecast, particularly for eastern and southern scotland. some filtering down into northumberland and moving into parts of northern england. hello. you are watching bbc cap you are watching bbc news. with me, ben brown. 0ur
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correspondent, frankie mccamley, is at marble arch in london, covering the march to mark 100 years since women one might vote. go as you can see, 100 banners in marble arch, designed by women across the country, to celebrate 100 years since women were given the right to vote. we a re since women were given the right to vote. we are already seeing hundreds of people gathering here, getting these banners ready. . to tell you more about this one specifically is evil and from the girl guides. there will be hundreds of you here today? yes, hundreds from all over the and also the other three possessions happening. we made this banner. just by looking at you, i can tell you we re by looking at you, i can tell you were not here 100 years ago, but this is extremely important to you? it is really important to remember what these women did, all the
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important things they did for us, the rights they give us and we need to think about these things and the issue still facing women, and the problems we still have to overcome, that we need to look back to see what they did, to get their courage and power and bring what they did, to get their courage and powerand bring it what they did, to get their courage and power and bring it forward for today. thank you very much, evil and, from the girl guides, speaking there. women from all ages, all different backgrounds, speaking today —— evil —— evelyn from the girl guides. why have you dressed up like this? why are you going here today? why is this deysel important to you? —— this deysel important to you? —— this day so important. this deysel important to you? —— this day so importantlj this deysel important to you? —— this day so important. i think all these women have come before us and fought all these battles on our behalf. for me personally i often express myself through my clothes, so express myself through my clothes, so it is my way of connecting with
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that, to be wearing these clothes and these sort of restrictions, to have a feeling of what it was like then. obviously not, but a bit. to see all of these women gathering, this is an all—female event. to do something like that make you feel?” think it is quite empowering for women to be in women space, to have something that is women lead, for women and about women, that actually celebrates the women in this country who perhaps have been ignored historically. thank you very much. what have untested outfit. we just have to take another look at that. —— what a fantastic outfits. many women here dressing up, creating banners. we can see another banner here, 100 of these all coming together. this march will go down to westminster where it will finish around four o'clock this afternoon. a lot of excitement here, and a lot of women gathering here today. ben.
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frankie, great stuff, and lovely sunshine there for it. let's see what the weather is doing for the rest of the day. time for a look at the weather. many places will be dry with some warm sunshine today. but there are still some thunderstorms in the forecast. those most likely to see them will be across eastern parts of scotland, northern england and a few for the channel islands as well. for most, it is dry, plenty sunshine. you can see how those showers are starting to develop across eastern parts of scotland. filtering their way down into northern england. mainly dry if rather cloudy for northern ireland. can't rule out a few showers for wales and south—west england too. the sunshine, highs between 19—24dc. for most it is a fine end to the day. most of the showers fade away but we could keep a few going across eastern parts of scotland and south—west england. clear skies for a time but that cloud starting to feel back in.
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