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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 10, 2018 2:00pm-2:31pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm lukwesa burak. the headlines at 2pm: in the last hour, president trump arrives in singapore for an historic summit on denuclearisation with north korean leader, kim jong un. kim jong un has already been greeted by singapore's prime minister. the historic summit with the us leader will take place on tuesday. the g7 summit ends in disarray over trade tariffs. president trump lashes out at the canadian prime minister, calling him dishonest and weak. i have made it very clear to the president that it is not something we relish doing, but it is something we relish doing, but it is something we absolutely will do. as canadians, polite, reasonable, but we also will not be pushed around. companies are to be forced to justify the pay gap between their highest and lowest earners. processions are taking place all over the uk with women wearing the colours of the suffragette movement — green, white and violet. a very good evening and welcome to
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singapore. it is nine o'clock local time here and president trump has just arrived in singapore. just behind us, you will see the stunning singapore nightline, the financial district, the marina bay, the iconic landmark on the singapore skyline, and not far away kim jong landmark on the singapore skyline, and not far away kimjong unis settling into the st regis hotel, where he will be staying up the road, and the president is checking into his lodgings where he will be staying tomorrow when he meets kim
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jong un, on tuesday. it is worth emphasising that this is a historic moment. the first time sitting us president has met north korean leader. on saturday president trump described it as a one—time shot at peace. it is hoped the summit will kick—start a process which will eventually see kim jong un giving kick—start a process which will eventually see kimjong un giving up his nuclear weapons. with the latest developments in singapore, here's jane frances kelly. from the g7 in canada to the summit in singapore. commentators are hoping president trump's meeting with kimjong un will be a great deal smoother than relations with his allies, who have been deeply unsettled by the imposition of us tariffs. when asked about how he felt the summit would pan out, the president said he would know within the first minute of meeting mr kim whether the north korean leader was serious about the nuclear negotiations.
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you know the way they say you know if you're going to like somebody in the first five seconds? you ever hear that one? well, i think that very quickly i will know whether or not something good is going to happen. i also think i will know whether or not it will happen fast. the north korean leader has already arrived in singapore, amid tight security. both men have had an extraordinarily volatile relationship over the past 18 months, trading insults and threatening war before announcing a surprise face—to—face meeting. the summit is costing around $20 million to stage, but the prime minister of singapore says it is a price worth paying. i would say, plus or minus, it is around $20 million. we may be able to recoup a little bit of that, but i think it is a cost which we are willing to pay, and it is our contribution to an international endeavour which is in our profound interest. the prime minister and north korean
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leader appeared relaxing each other‘s company before cameras but whatever happens with mr tron behind closed doors is anyone's guess. the meeting will take place on the island of sentosa. mr kim can reflect on the glory of bringing the president of the united states to the negotiating table. kim jong un wants to rebuild the north korean economy, but whether he will give up his main bargaining chip is still hotly debated. no final deal is expected from the summit. jane frances kelly, bbc news. you will have seen in that report all the preparations under way in singapore. roads are being repainted, various areas of the city have been spruced up. the island is being sealed off, where the summit will take place on tuesday. and arriving at the media centre, some 3000 people, who will be accredited from the world's media, watching this summit very closely. barbara plett—usher is that the media centre for us. just listening to the
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singaporean prime minister, $20 million for an event that will take place over three days. and real pressure on the singaporeans to pull it all together within the space of two weeks. yes, and a senior official mentioned that as well, that it had been a real challenge, not just the short timing but the on—again and off—again element of it. it was on for a while and then it. it was on for a while and then it was off and they were not sure how to proceed. they had to work quickly and carefully to try to get it organised. but it is a small citystate and it is familiar with putting on meetings, especially sensitive meetings, and it does have a very good record in terms of security, some would say too good. that is also one of its appeals. despite the pressure and because, if it is successful, and kim jong despite the pressure and because, if it is successful, and kimjong un alluded to this, singapore's role will go down in history if it is successful. it is called the singapore summit, so that is
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something to take away. and important to say that north korea does have an embassy here, which they don't have in other countries around the world of course, so they have done some of their business dealings through singapore over the yea rs. dealings through singapore over the years. it is a good, neutral setting, important for both sides, i suppose. no one—upmanship, no games men's ship in what is unlikely to u nfold men's ship in what is unlikely to unfold over the next few days. yes, and a neutral setting will be the most basic part of that. there were questions initially about whether the chinese would post this, which they did with the six party talks, they did with the six party talks, the talks between 2003 and 2009. they were very much involved in sponsoring and hosting those and working with the north koreans. they have not really been in the picture at all this time. it is very much a north korean — us bilateral event, and the singaporeans have been mediators to get this going with lots at stake. but this is seen as
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talks between the us and the north koreans, and singapore is the most neutral venue. also a venue that is geographically convenient because it isa geographically convenient because it is a six or seven hour flight from north korea and i don't think the north korea and i don't think the north korean leader wanted to go that far revealed. he has only been out of the country twice before since he took power and that was to china. they also have good relations with singapore, which also made it a good venue for this meeting. thank you very much. let's go to the shangri—la in the main diplomatic area of the island. visit wingfield hayes has been watching. you have seen the cavalcade arrived at the shangri—la. seen the cavalcade arrived at the shangri-la. yes, and it took quite a while. there was a big trafficjam here. the presidential motorcade to try to get into the entrance to the presidential suite of the shangri—la, which is 30 metres away
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from me here. it was interesting, as president trump's motorcade came in, we clearly saw president trump sitting in the second of the limousines, waving to us as he went past. the really interesting moment for me, i think, was a few cars further on, lots of photographers taking flash photography here, and as one did, it lit up the very distinctive face and walrus moustache ofjohn distinctive face and walrus moustache of john bolton, distinctive face and walrus moustache ofjohn bolton, the national security adviser. there was a lot of talk before this summit that maybe mr bolton would be left behind, or kept in the shadows, because he is extremely unpopular in north korea. a few weeks ago he came out and said that the libya model would be imposed on north korea as a form of denuclearisation. well, we know what happened to colonel gaddafi and libya after he gave up his weapons of mass destruction. a few years later he was overthrown and murdered rather brutally by rebel forces there. it is an analogy, an image, which is not
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welcome at all in pyongyang. it presents here might cause a few negative feelings, shall we say? —— his presence here. there is so much that will be deliberated by both sides. the queues and messages, the visible messaging that might be there as we watch the two teams over there as we watch the two teams over the course of the next few days. thank you, rupert. let's go to the st regis hotel, just five minutes down the road from shangri—la. that is where kim jong un down the road from shangri—la. that is where kimjong unis down the road from shangri—la. that is where kim jong un is staying. have you seen any sign of him? well, he arrived earlier this afternoon and he left here to meet with the singaporean prime minister, lee hsien loong. it is not farfrom where president trump is staying. you can practically walk it within ten minutes. this is a 5—star hotel buying in the middle of the area, a famous and popular shopping
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district. —— bang in the middle. one suite would cost thousands of dollars so the question has been asked who is footing the bill. i put that question to the singaporean minister earlier and he didn't want to go into the details. this is where chairman kim is expected to be staying. the summit with president charm is not until tuesday so the question remains on what he will be doing. —— president trump. opinions among singaporeans are somewhat split about being the host of the summit. some are excited and others are annoyed about the trafficjams it is causing. it was also interesting that the singaporean national newspaper had an opinion column saying that singaporeans behave, don't complain about the government, and if you have booked a table at your restaurant and there isa table at your restaurant and there is a foreign journalist, give up your seat! yes, not a bad place to be isolated for a day, st regis. the
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presidential suite is $10,000 a night. professor kelly is with me, professor of political science. you have been watching donald trump arriving. rupert was talking about john bolton sitting next to him, visible in the car. every time that mike pompeo has been to pyongyang, just before that, north koreans have been to see the chinese. yes, china plays a pretty big role here. the silent partner, in the background of all of this. they want the north koreans to meet the americans. we know that a lot of north korean trade goes through china. and finance deals happen in chinese banks. although they are not here, they are visible in the background? they are indeed. when the young and gets permission to do this, they go to china first. —— pyongyang gets permission. people thought the chinese were behind this. and they came in on a chinese plane? yes,
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that shows how they are behind this. john bolton sitting next to the president. not a figure of any appeal at all to the north koreans because of what he said previously. although he is not publicly involved, does that show as he is involved, does that show as he is involved in the background and in the presidency? yes, it was not clear a few days ago whether he would come at all. concern after what he said about the libya model couple of weeks ago. but he remains here and i don't know why he would stay on if he would not be involved. but if this doesn't work, now we can strike because we tried diplomacy at the very top level and it didn't work. we will keep watching as this unfolds. the president saying it ta kes unfolds. the president saying it takes just five minutes to suss out the north korean president. you get a feel for these things and it is all about attitude and whether there isa all about attitude and whether there is a willingness to deal. that is the picture in singapore. back to the picture in singapore. back to the studio. christian, thank you.
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the g7 summit in canada has ended in disarray, after president trump rebuked the canadian prime minister, justin trudeau. mr trudeau told reporters that canada would not be pushed around on trade tariffs, prompting mr trump to accuse him of being "dishonest and weak". the president then withdrew his endorsement of a joint communique on the importance of free trade. from quebec, our correspondent gary o'donoghue reports. scarcely 2a hours after the president arrived at a summit he had thought about skipping altogether, he was off, defiant in the face of a clutch of world leaders still furious with america's unilateral trade tariffs.
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the warning signs that something was wrong came early when the president showed up late for a leaders' breakfast on gender equality — one of the few areas where there had been hope of a meeting of minds. while officials worked towards a final agreement all the leaders could sign up to, the president was sticking to his position, blaming former us leaders for allowing the rest of the world to take advantage of america on trade. it's going to change, 100%. tariffs are going to come way down because we... people cannot continue to do that. we're like a piggy bank that everybody‘s robbing, and that ends. and it was clear the president didn't much like how he was being spoken to. a moment captured in this photograph, later posted on social media by the german chancellor herself. but when she faced the cameras, she said a common statement didn't mean the differences had been taken off the table. translation: for us, it was important that we have a commitment to a rule—based trade order, that we continue to fight against protectionism, and that we want to reform the world trade organization. but it was the words of the canadian prime minister, justin trudeau, who announced he had got all seven countries to sign up to the final agreement, that seem to have tipped
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the president over the edge. i have made it very clear to the president that it is not something we relish doing but it is something that we absolutely will do because canadians are polite, reasonable, but we also will not be pushed around. that led to a barrage of tweets from the president, on board air force one itself. in one he said, "based onjustin‘s false statements, i have instructed our us reps not to endorse the communique." they worked hard to avoid this kind of meltdown and they thought they had done just that. but in the space of two or three tweets, the divisions between these supposed allies are now as deep as ever. gary o'donoghue, bbc news, quebec. labour has said it will seek to change the government's plans for brexit in the commons on tuesday. but labour's brexit spokesman, sir keir starmer, said the votes this week were not the last chance to alter the british approach. there would be other opportunities in the coming weeks. here's our political correspondent, susana mendonca.
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dark clouds are gathering ahead of a crucial vote for the government this week. backbench tories are threatening to rebel and labour says this will not be their only chance to do so. the idea that this tuesday or this wednesday is the last chance saloon on a single market deal is misconceived. there will be another chance with those bills. i hope we get significant victories this week on the things that matter, which is the meaningful vote, the customs union. the "meaningful vote" refers to giving parliament the power to force ministers back to the negotiating table and have a final say on what to do next if there is no deal between britain and the eu. the government wants ministers to keep hold of that decision—making power. people thinking about voting against the government this week need to think very seriously about it. the most important thing is we get the legislation through, because it avoids the legal cliff edge. it makes sure we have a smooth
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legal transition in relation to brexit and sends the prime minister into thejune council with the wind in her sails. from opposite ends of the brexit debate, brexiteer iain duncan smith and former home secretary amber rudd, a key remainer, have joined forces to urge potential tory rebels to vote with the government. but this veteran pro—european says this week's votes could help the prime minister to fend off cabinet brexiteers. when we get to a final negotiated deal with the european union then we will be in a crisis if they behave in exactly the same way and insist on vetoing it all. we need to rescue the prime minister from this terrible treatment she is getting. theresa may will hope that any showdown with her backbenchers now won't leave her in a weakened position ahead of talks with eu leaders later this month. susana mendonca, bbc news. it is 17 minutes passed. the headlines on bbc news: president trump arrives in singapore for an historic summit on denuclearisation
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with north korean leader, king jong un. kim jong un has already been greeted by singapore's prime minister. the historic summit with the us leader will take place on tuesday. the g7 summit ends in disarray over trade tariffs. president trump lashes out at the canadian prime minister calling him dishonest and weak. big companies will soon have to justify the gap in salary between their highest paid executives and the average worker. the business secretary, greg clark, wants publicly listed companies with more than 250 employees to publish their pay gap every year. labour says the policy won't change pay disparity and accused the government of being unwilling to take on bosses. our business correspondent, joe lynam, has more. three of the best paid executives in the uk last year — sir martin sorrell, ra kesh kapoor and pascal soriot.
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between them they earn £70 million. the amount senior bosses get paid compared to their staff will be brought into sharp relief from january next year. the average earnings for a ftse 100 chief executive were £45 million last year, that is 120 times more than what the average employee earned. from january, publicly listed firms must publish their pay ratios. but there will be no official cap on them. nobody is suggesting that successful business leaders shouldn't get remunerated well, but we do think there is an accountability. we do think by having this transparency and for the first time being able to see that ratio between the top pay in the boardroom and the average worker, that will mean that bosses will think twice about the decisions that they make and that will lead to better decisions and fairer decisions for everybody concerned. the cbi said comparing pay ratios between different sectors was as meaningless as comparing apples with oranges. the tuc welcomes the new rules, but called for workers to sit on company boards.
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joe lynam, bbc news. i'm joined by kate bell, who is head of economics and social affairs at the tuc. thank you for coming in this sunday. what we to achieve by this? we think this is a step forward and we hope to see company by company by company the big pay disparities that we have been here about for so long but if we wa nt been here about for so long but if we want to reduce those gaps, which we want to reduce those gaps, which we think it's really important, then we think it's really important, then we need for change and we think are really important step forward would be to allow workers to speak in the committees when chief executive pay is actually set. the idea of giving the employee voice in the boardroom, don't you think that will add a further obstruction to getting things done and moving forward? not at all. employees have a voice in the boardroom and a guaranteed place in most european countries, in 19 out of 27. this is perfectly normal
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business there. i am surprised when executives think there would be something strange about allowing the people who work for them to speak up on issues like chief executive pay. we have seen this disparity widen horrifically over time. your package was saying that the average ftse chief executive earns 120 times the pay of the average worker, so i think most people agree something has got to change. a fairer economy should work for everyone, so if we go down this route, and it hasn't been passed yet, not untiljanuary next year, how will that translate? you have thought about narrowing that gap. are we talking about pegging back executive pay or increasing the pay of lower earners? we have seen workers in britain in the longest pay squeeze for 200 yea rs the longest pay squeeze for 200 years right now. people watching this will know that their pay has not been going up while the pay of cheap executives has been soaring. we very much want to see an increase
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in pay for the average worker, that is absolutely our priority. but i do think we should be looking at the pay of the top bosses and calling for restraint. many people running these businesses will say they risk losing their top—flight executives. it is like the brain drain. they will go somewhere when they don't have to because of this process. the leader of the tuc says many of these high earners willjust shrugged and don't care. is there a risk that that will happen and they will move? we have to think about why people are motivated to do theirjob. most of us go to do the job partly for the pay of course, but also because we wa nt the pay of course, but also because we want to make a success of ourjob and we care about it and we are passionate. those people would want to employ somebody motivated by those reasons rather than whether their pay packet is slightly bigger than the next boss next door. labour think that the tories are not doing enough. i think the tuc generally say that it is a start. labour think we should be taking on the buses. how? do you agree with that?l
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really important step forward would be what we have called for, to allow workers to speak up in the boardroom and on the committees that set that pgy- and on the committees that set that pay. that is about workers having a voice, not a veto over those decisions. but i think it is really important that we allow people with everyday experience of the work to have a say in these discussions when they take place. kate bell, it has been a pleasure. thank you. processions are taking place all over the uk to mark 100 years since the first women won the right to vote. those taking part are wearing either green, white or violet, the colours of the suffrage movement. in a moment we will take to our correspondent frankie mccamley in central london. first to catriona renton who is at the march in edinburgh. what is going on? we arejust
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waiting for the march to come through. this was one of the locations that important march 1909 and we want to recreate that picture in the 21st century. i am joined here by one ofjesse stevens's supporters. why are you here to remember her? one of her great nieces lives opposite me in edinburgh, so we know the family. she wanted to commemorate the fact that her great aunt jessie was a suffragette. she was a suffragette and trade unionists, which is particularly interesting. she organised domestic servants in glasgow in the early part of the 20th century, at a time when women did not have the vote. she organised good working conditions for servants from the age of 15 when she began working in the big houses in the we st working in the big houses in the west end of glasgow herself. and we have been talking about how extraordinary it is here. lots of tourists asking what is going on in
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edinburgh and it is a chance to retell the story is. yes, we think thatis retell the story is. yes, we think that is really important. a lot of people don't know their own history. they don't know that women didn't have the vote until 1918, some women in britain didn't get it until 1928 at the age of 21, and some people don't know that. everybody has a story about a suffragette, a suffragette, people who campaign for quality in their own family, this is a great up 20 to find out about our own history and name some of the women. “— own history and name some of the women. —— great opportunity. lots of these women campaign for equal rights and rights in parliament. wonderful day with lots of stories to tell. yes, and it is important that we don't forget that people died so that we can vote. whether you are man or a woman, use it because it is important and it a difference. that is what is happening here today. tens of thousands of women across the uk
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joining in this procession. frankie mcca mley joining in this procession. frankie mccamley is in london. yes, here i am along the streets just down from piccadilly. hundreds of thousands of women have lined the streets from hyde park down piccadilly, heading from here to trafalgar square, then to downing street and onto the houses of parliament. people are in all different colours and they have all been given scarves of white, green and violet, the suffragette colours, to create a moving piece of artwork. it looks incredible. some of the banners here, 100 banners designed by 100 different female artists, from across the country. i have pulled out a few people from the crowd who have kindly stop for me. caroline, this is an extremely personal day for you. absolutely, my grandmother, bertha lockwood of what fun turn in yorkshire marched for the suffragettes before the first
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world war before she sadly lost her first husband in the battle of the somme. she worked be horrified that we still need on the reverse votes for women everywhere because we got votes for women in this country, following new zealand who just went past us, but there are many countries who do not have the vote. we are here for female solidarity, for women around the world to get the vote. speaking about votes around the world, that is something you both campaigned for. yes, i worked role london based women's rights organisation which supports women's rights movement in africa and asia. it is great to see a celebration of women's suffrage in the uk that these activities are important throughout the world, from uganda to nepal and everywhere. how does it feel to be walking alongside so many women today? really inspirational. a fantastic celebration of how far we have come and we should be proud of all the women who came before us as part of
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this fight. but the fight is not over and i hope it is inspiring for people around the world who are living in less free times. they can have the solidarity of knowing that we are part of their cause and we wa nt to we are part of their cause and we want to help everyone, girls everywhere. thank you forjoining me and good luck with the march. so many different people of all ages, all walks of life, and fantastic banners, all here to celebrate 100 yea rs banners, all here to celebrate 100 years since women got the right to vote. back to you. catriona renton in edinburgh and frankie mccamley in london, thank you to both of you. let's find out how the weather is looking. not too bad in edinburgh. certainly sunny in london. what is going on? all quiet, really, for most of us. fewer showers around compared to yesterday and a good slice of sunshine to be found. temperatures are starting to climb up temperatures are starting to climb up nicely and for the rest of the day we keep sunny spells and just the small chance of a shower. looking at the satellite picture for
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the last few hours, the bulk of the cloud is in scotland and northern ireland. elsewhere we keep clear skies and sunshine. a scattering of showers and eastern scotland and northern parts of england. through the latter stages of the day, into the latter stages of the day, into the south—west, we see a cluster of showers developing here. overnight tonight, things will quieten down. if we keep the showers in the south—west, they will be fairly isolated. nine to a0 degrees to greet us first thing tomorrow. then we almost do it again. —— nine to 14. we almost do it again. —— nine to 1a. sunshine comes through and some scattered showers in the afternoon but predominantly dry, settled and sunny with temperatures reaching 2a degrees. and wednesday night into thursday we will see more wet weather. more details coming up on that in the next half an hour. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. president trump arrives in singapore for an historic
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summit on denuclearisation with north korean leader king jong—un. kim jong—un has already been greeted by singapore's prime minister. the landmark summit with the us leader will take place on tuesday. the g7 summit ends in disarray over trade tariffs — president trump lashes out at the canadian prime minister, calling him dishonest and weak. companies are to be forced to justify the pay gap between their highest and lowest earners. the tuc has welcomed the move, but says workers should also be appointed to boards. 100 years after the first british women won the right to vote, women across the uk are set to march together. they will don the colours of the suffragette movement — green, white and violet — and join a mass procession.

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