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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 10, 2018 10:00pm-10:31pm BST

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tonight at ten, donald trump is in singapore for his eagerly anticipated summit with kim jong un. is in singapore for his eagerly both both men are confident progress can be made. the president hopes the talks will lead to north korea giving up its nuclear weapons. will lead to north korea giving while mr kim wants security guarantees, and the end of punishing sanctions. guarantees, and the end it was all smiles at the start of the g7 summit two days ago, but tonight us officials launch a stinging attack on canada'sjustin trudeau, over trade talks. a stinging attack on canada'sjustin there's a special place in hell for any foreign leader that engages in bad faith diplomacy with president donald] trump. we'll take a look at how donald trump conducts foreign policy with friend and foe. donald trump conducts foreign policy also on the programme. donald trump conducts foreign policy tory mps are urged to rally round theresa may as the government prepares for a series of crucial parliamentary votes on brexit. thousands march across the uk, marking a hundred years since the first british women won the right to vote. game set and match nadal. won the right to vote.
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and the king of clay, rafael nadal, does it again for the eleventh time, winning the french open. does it again for the eleventh time, good evening. donald trump and kimjong un are in singapore, preparing for their historic summit on tuesday. it'll be the first time a us president, has held talks with any north korean leader. president, has held talks with any the white house hopes the meeting will kick—start a process that will eventually lead to pyongyang giving up it's nuclear weapons, giving up its nuclear weapons, while mr kim wants security guarantees and an end to international sanctions. guarantees and an end just five months ago, the two leaders were trading insults, but now mr trump says he's on a mission of peace. our correspondent, laura bicker, reports from singapore.
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the waiting is over. reports from singapore. the hard work starts now. reports from singapore. donald trump has arrived in singapore to try to do a deal that has eluded past us presidents. in singapore to try to do a deal he hopes his unconventional political style will persuade kimjong unto disarm. political style will persuade i think within the first minute i'll know. reporter: how? minute i'll know. just my touch, my feel, that's what i do. the north korean leader doesn't look like he's feeling his way. considering this is his debut on the world's diplomatic stage, he looked calm and relaxed as he discussed his hopes for peace with the singaporean prime minister. as he discussed his hopes for peace he's taking no chances with security. his hand—picked bodyguards have flown with him, along with his bullet—proof limousine. flown with him, along thousands took the chance to catch a rare glimpse of this usually reclusive leader. a rare glimpse of this if mr kim is trying to transition from nuclear armed dictator to global statesman,
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this summit is offering him the perfect platform. this summit is offering him at this church in singapore, south koreans pray for the possibilities this may offer. south koreans pray for and tears for the years of war the peninsula endured. some have criticised south koreans for being overly optimistic about this meeting. south koreans for being overly but after a year of brinkmanship, most see the summit itself as progress. most see the summit translation: there's a korean saying that the first spoonful of food will not make you full. that the first spoonful of food i know the summit will be the first step to much bigger changes, so even if the results aren't significant i'll be thankful.
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while every detail is being dealt with on the island where they'll meet, no—one is really sure whether they'll be in this secluded spot for two minutes, two hours, or even two days. the hopes of nearly 70 million korean people lie here. it's their best chance of peace in decades, and it's fallen to an unpredictable us president and an untested north korean leader. us president and an untested perhaps the calm waters of this luxury resort will compel them to take tentative steps towards a deal. but rarely has there been a summit with higher steaks and greater uncertainty over its outcome. with higher steaks and greater laura bicker, bbc news, singapore. with higher steaks and greater well, as president trump made his way to singapore from the g7 summit in canada, he rejected the joint statement all the heads of government had just agreed. that sparked criticism from his european allies, with president macron of france tweeting that international cooperation could not depend on fits of anger. but mr trump's advisers defended the president,
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saying america had been "stabbed in the back," following comments by the canadian prime minister on trade tariffs. here's our north america correspondent, chris buckler. we had a great time in canada, it's a great country. i'm now going to singapore and i'll see you there. president trump tried to sound positive as he left quebec for a second summit, having signed up to a final joint communique. having signed up to a face saving agreement after what was in reality a bad—tempered meeting. after what was in reality inside, there had been no hiding the divides between america and the other g7 nations over its imposition of steep tariffs. over its imposition as canadians, we're polite, we're reasonable, but we also will not be pushed around. we're reasonable, but we also donald trump responded to those remarks from onboard air force one, with tweets that withdrew america from the agreement, and attacked justin trudeau, who he said had acted so meek and mild during the g7 meetings.
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who he said had acted so meek in fact, he said, he was dishonest and weak. he really kind of stabbed us in the back. and in a series of interviews white house advisers made clear in no uncertain terms that daggers have been drawn. there is a special place in hell for any foreign leader that engages in bad faith diplomacy with president donaldj trump, and then tries to stab him in the back on the way out the door, and that's what bad faith justin trudeau did with that stunt press conference. justin trudeau did with that america has argued that tariffs on imported steel and aluminium are needed to protect its national security, but that seems to be at the expense of age—old relationships. the national security pretext is absurd and frankly insulting to canadians. is absurd and frankly the closest and strongest ally the us has had. america's old allies have been united in sending a message to the white house. been united in sending
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after the difficult diplomacy in quebec, there is an open frustration with president trump, particularly after his late withdrawal from that supposedly agreed g7 statement. even his old friend the french president emmanuel macron has been fiercely critical. the french president emmanuel macron in a statement he said that international cooperation can not be dictated by fits of anger and throw away remarks. the images that emerged from this g7 told their own story. president trump out of step with the other leaders, and in his quest to put america first, it increasingly looks like america sits alone. first, it increasingly looks chris buckler, bbc news, washington. first, it increasingly looks our north america eitor jon sopel is in singapore. jon sopel is in singapore. jon sopel is in singapore. after jon sopel is in singapore. after the jon sopel is in singapore. after the comments jon sopel is in singapore. after the comments fron president jon after the comments from president trump's advisers over canada, a long time ally of the united states, how serious is all this for the g7, do you think? very. on friday night when i was in quebec
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isaidi on friday night when i was in quebec i said i thought it would be unlikely there would be a communique, i landed in hong kong and saw the breaking news there had been a communique agreed, only before i took off from hong kong to find that donald trump rescinded it. this is highly unusual behaviour and it seems it was nothing to do with justin trudeau trying to rewrite the communique it was all to do with him taking exception tojustin trudeau saying i won't be pushed round and the trump team thought that was dishonourable and that is why he called him a weak figure an dishonest. it is deeply damaging to the g7 as well. you raised the question how in the headlines how does trump treat foes and friends alike? seems rather easier to be a foe. yes, because north korea and america are still we need to remember this technically at war, they are adversaries but mr trump is going to have to make nice if this summit is to yield something
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fruitful? and i think trump was dreading going to quebec and really looking forward to coming here where he believes this could be his moment in history. north korea's moment in history, a turning point for the world. while it is kind of easy to laugh at some of the dysfunction that surround both, this is really really important, this is an epic get together. i am in the hotel where donald trump is staying, about less tha n where donald trump is staying, about less than half a mile from here is the saint regis hotel where kim jong unis the saint regis hotel where kim jong un is staying. they will sit together on tuesday morning, no—one knows what will happen. they will probably sit down alone. there is no d raft probably sit down alone. there is no draft text, probably sit down alone. there is no d raft text, they probably sit down alone. there is no draft text, they will free—wheel, and see where it leads. the only hope that any reasonable person could have is they find some common ground, and sort of disarm the most dangerous flash point in the world today. thank you for that. conservative mps have been urged to support the prime minister,
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ahead of a series of crucial parliamentary votes on brexit. the former home secretary amber rudd, who backed remain, and iain duncan smith who backed leave, have called for "discipline," in party ranks, when the commons votes on the eu withdrawal bill this week. when the commons votes on the eu our political correspondent iain watson reports. they used to call this a busman‘s holiday. theresa may has spent a weekend at a rancorous summit of world leaders, and this week she's facing further arguments and another rebellion over brexit. the eu withdrawal bill is a key piece of legislation that takes the uk out of the european union. piece of legislation that takes is she worried? piece of legislation that takes well, here's a clue. piece of legislation that takes the leading leave campaigner iain duncan smith has had tojoin up with a former remainer, amber rudd, to issue a warning to conservative mps. amber rudd, to issue a warning in the sunday telegraph, they said... getting this legislation through will be a key turning point,
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i think, in the brexit process, because we'll have the laws in place to make sure we can have that smooth transition. so what are the issues for the government? theresa may is keen to kill off some of the changes the house of lords has made to the withdrawal bill. of the changes the house of lords the lords wants the government to negotiate a customs union with the eu, but this clashes with the conservative manifesto. and if parliament rejects theresa may's deal with brussels, in a so—called meaningful vote, the lords want to put mps, not ministers, in charge and to rule out the option of no deal. labour's shadow brexit secretary backs the lords in these issues and has this message for conservative rebels. if tory mps who do care about those amendments vote with us, there is a real chance for parliament to change the course of the brexit negotiation and to bring some order where there's real chaos. and to bring some order so just how much trouble is theresa may in? that will depend on how many of our own mps are willing to defy her. when the government suffered
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a defeat on brexit late last year, ii conservatives were willing to vote against the prime minister's wishes. to vote against the prime now it's my understanding that not all of them are prepared to do so again, at least not yet. but even if they do decide to stay loyal this week, there'll be further opportunities to vote against the government at a later stage and a leading rebel is telling his colleagues, look, there really is no time like the present. kicking the can down the road for another month is hopeless. when we get to the customs and trade bill, exactly the same thing will happen again, and when we get to a final negotiated deal with the european union, then we'll be in a crisis. the european union, then we'll be given the challenges she faces at westminster, that rancorous g7 summit might soon seem like a relaxing mini break for the prime minister. seem like a relaxing mini break iain watson, bbc news. seem like a relaxing mini break there are still arguments over the brexit referendum itself? that is
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right. basically leading figures in the leave campaign are coming under scrutiny. this wasn't the official leave campaign, its main funder was aaron banks who is a friend of nigel farage. on tuesday mps from a committee which is looking into how russia is trying to influence western democracies will question him on his russian connection, today the sunday times revealed that aaron banks met the russian ambassador on three occasions rather than once which he claimed and looked into his business dealings. steven kinnock told me he will be writing to the police asking for them to investigate as well. aaron banks says this is a political witch hunt. the russian embassy didn't try to influence brexit. i must tell you two years on from the referendum, it feels like campaigning is still in police in essex have called off the search for a woman who worked as a door—to—door debt collector,
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after finding a body in a house. tina cantello, who was a9, was last seen on friday evening, as she went out to work. was last seen on friday evening, a man is being held on suspicion of murder. tens of thousands of people have been marching across the uk, to mark 100 years since the first british women won the right to vote. many taking part wore the colours of the suffragette movement, green, white and violet. of the suffragette movement, special events were held in edinburgh, belfast, cardiff and london, as chi chi izundu explains. they followed in the footsteps of the suffragettes of a century ago. in belfast, they started at the titanic quarter. in cardiff, their procession passed through the city centre. and in edinburgh, they marched towards holyrood park.
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it's been a great opportunity to find out more about our own history and name some of the women. to find out more about our own there's so many, many more women have great stories. with all of these women it's amazing, but especially to represent the inmates who we worked with on our banners in particular. there's one banner back there that has all of the names that they embroidered on. has all of the names we wanted to remember kiwi women who were the first women in the world to get the vote. who were the first women some of them came over and helped the british suffragettes. 100 female artists were commissioned to work on projects to sew banners and make placards, just as the women of the suffrage did. just as the women women like emily wilding davison, who famously threw herself under the king's horse, spotted here, in the black robes, for the first time recently, in this archive footage of a march in 1910. in this archive footage a commemoration, a celebration towards all those involved in the fight to secure some women the right to vote. for a lot of these women
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it is about paying homage to the suffrage movement that walked this very park 100 years ago, but then again for a lot of other women it's about the future and how they can achieve equality for all. women it's about the future and how chi chi izundu, bbc news. women it's about the future and how with all the sport, here's karthi gna nasegaram at the bbc sport centre. here's karthi gna nasegaram clive, good evening. here's karthi gna nasegaram it has been a momentous day for scottish cricket. they have beaten england for the first time, by six runs in a one off, one day international. it's the biggest win in scotland's cricketing history against the side ranked number one in the world in this format. joe wilson reports. in this format. scottish in this format. cricket may feel isolated neglect, scottish cricket may feel isolated neglect, the authorities cut the world cup next year to ten team, scotla nd world cup next year to ten team, scotland aren't in it. england hope to win it. but for hours in edinburgh it was scotla nd but for hours in edinburgh it was scotland who looked like the world's
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number one ranked nation. not england. macleod, his family roots in the outer hebrides he was trying to hit the ball there. he made 140 in scotland's 371ment their highest ever score. when buenos aires sprinted to 100 england's chase seemed simple but then wickets, scotla nd seemed simple but then wickets, scotland removed men who could have w011 scotland removed men who could have won the match for england. moeen ali aiming forthe won the match for england. moeen ali aiming for the boundary, failing. eight down. six runs needed. anyone down. sharif bowling. wa and england all out. this day was all about scotland. to have the number one tale in our backyard and the energy from the crowd today, and to set a total like that and chase it down, ebb and flow, what a game of cricket. a thrilling victory that deserves attention far beyond edinburgh. it is a magnificent 11
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for rafael nadal, after the world no 1 won the french open, by beating the seventh seed, dominic thiem, in straight sets. by beating the seventh seed, and it's a 17th grand slam for nadal, putting him just three majors behind his great rival, roger federer. patrick gearey reports. roger federer. for all the french ceremony on men's final day, this is spanish territory. on men's final day, this rafael nadal‘s red carpet, where he can look his best and lap up the adulation, his game perfectly moulded to roland—garros‘ clay. his game perfectly moulded he has won all the finals he has played on the surface. finals he has played dominic thiem is one of the few to have beaten him. that was in rome. of the few to have beaten him. but in paris... of the few to have beaten him. he matched him until the tenth game, and this mistake. the set was gone, minutes later. game, and this mistake. as a powerful austrian, thiem is known as the thiemenator, but the real machine was at the other end. no male tennis player has been as dominant at a grand slam as him. was there a weakness? as dominant at a grand slam as him. perhaps cramp could stop him? as dominant at a grand slam as him. it prompted nadal to get this done quicker, the champion—to—be raced through the pain.
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quicker, the champion—to—be on clay, against any opponent, and his own body, rafael nadal conquers all. opponent, and his own body, patrick gearey, bbc news. opponent, and his own body, sebastian vettel has won formula one's canadian grand prix to re—take the championship lead from great britain's lewis hamilton. there was drama at the start of the race, with a crash between lance stroll and brendon hartley, which resulted in hartley heading to hospital for a check—up. vettel eventually took the chequered flag to return to the top of the drivers standings while hamilton finished in fifth place. while hamilton finished all of the day's top stories are on the bbc sport website including wales's geraint thomas winning cycling's criterium du dauphine, with england's adam yates finishing in second place. that's all from the bbc sport centre. the football world cup gets under way in russia on thursday, with the hosts taking on saudi arabia in moscow. while thousands of fans will travel to the country, billions will be watching around
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the globe, giving russia a golden opportunity to boost its image, after several recent diplomatic controversies. to boost its image, after several our moscow correspondent steve rosenberg has more. russia's singing grannies are on a mission. to give russia a friendlier face for the world cup. these bubbly babushkas have penned a world cup anthem. and produced a pop video to go with it. the message to foreign football fans —, you have nothing fans — you have nothing to fear from russia. fans — you have nothing "i won't scare you", anna says. fans — you have nothing "i'll hug you, i'll kiss you." fans — you have nothing "i'll sing and dance for you." fans — you have nothing russians will even smile at you. fans — you have nothing ahead of the world cup, train conductors here have been taught to forget the frowns and give foreigners big shiny smiles. to match the big shiny new stadiums built for the tournament.
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russia's reputation on the world stage, though, isn't so impressive. a global sporting event of this scale is the perfect stage for a host nation to promote itself to the world, to boost its image, and russia knows right now it has an image problem. locked in a diplomatic war with the west, moscow's been accused of everything from meddling in elections, to carrying out the nerve agent attack in salisbury. in elections, to carrying out but can four weeks of football bring russia in from the cold? i believe we do many good things for the world. reputation is not as good as the things we do, i believe, and the world cup should help us to create better image, better reputation for russia. to create better image, it's already creating excitement, especially among these school—children enjoying a pre—world cup treat — a visit by russian soccer stars.
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cup treat — a visit even if the world cup don't boost russia's image abroad, at home russians are proud to be hosting the world's most famous festival of football. hosting the world's most famous steve rosenberg, bbc news, moscow. hosting the world's most famous that's it. but do stay with us on bbc one, it's now time for the news where you are. have a very good night. now time for the news where you are. hello. this is bbc news with martine croxall. a memorial garden in west london has opened to the public, to remember the victims of the grenfell tower fire. this week marks the first anniversary of the disaster. the bishop of london and the mayor attended the ceremony at st clement's church in notting dale, in the shadow of the tower. caroline davies reports. may this garden teach us regeneration... nearly a year on, neighbours,
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friends, family met at the church at the foot of the grenfell tower — this time to welcome new life. a memorial garden for the community left devastated by the fire. particularly in the week that is coming, which i think will be very difficult, it will provide a space for people to find quietness, but also reflection to think about not just looking back but to look forward. st clement's was just one of the religious and community centres that found itself at the heart of the response. its doors opened at 3am that morning, providing shelter and taking donations. it became a kind of emergency depot for people who were coming to the local area. it also became a place where people could just rest and be. i remember praying with a number of people in the building. that's kind of all you can do at moments like that. the mayor of london was also at the service. he's written to the prime minister saying the way the survivors have been treated is chaotic and inhumane. i've been speaking to grieving families where the pain is still raw, but they're having
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to be campaigners, having to lobby and campaign and be advocates — that shouldn't be the case. they should be allowed to grieve completely without having to be campaigners, as well. the government say they are working with survivors to support them rebuild their lives, and to ensure they get the truth and justice they deserve. for some, the garden is part of the healing process. a donation by the family of one of the fire's victims made it possible. i hope that whenever people go past this garden, it'lljust be a sign of hope. it'll be a sign that things can change, that the grenfell tower at the moment, which is a symbol that reminds us of tragedy and pain and loss, it could one day become a symbol of real transformation and my hope is that grenfell will be a time when we'll look back on in ten, 20 years and think, that was a time we really changed. this is more thanjust a place of calm, but a symbol of hope that something good can come from tragedy. caroline davis, bbc london news. let's bring you a bit of breaking
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news regarding the agenda on tuesday when this summit takes place in singapore between kim jong when this summit takes place in singapore between kimjong un and donald trump. according to north korea's state media, they will be discussing a permanent and durable peace mechanism on the peninsular, the removal of nuclear weapons on the removal of nuclear weapons on the peninsular and other issues of mutual concern. the report also said mr kim was accompanied by his foreign minister, his defence minister and his sister. of course what actually constitutes getting rid of the weapons hasn't been pinned down and many commentators are saying the north korean definition of this is very different from the american one. but nonetheless, it's being billed as a historic summit in singapore due to ta ke historic summit in singapore due to take place on tuesday and it will get plenty of coverage here on bbc news. reporters are being advised to
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treat it as a breaking news story even though it has been in the diary for a few days. we will bring you more on that in a little while. time for a look at the weather with stav. hello. after a bit of a cloudy start for some of us, the sunshine came out and it was pretty widespread through the afternoon. a warm day, temperatures into the mid—20s celsius in some places. this weather watcher photo here in somerset shows pretty much what many people experienced. but there were some showers and thunderstorms around south—east scotland, into northern england. these will fizzle out this evening, and certainly overnight it will be a dry one for most. there will be some clear spells, but also some cloud returning to many northern, southern and eastern areas. where we hold onto the cloud, pretty warm temperatures, into the mid—teens celsius. again, a few chilly spots under some clear skies. tomorrow, then, a similar sort of day. we've got high pressure still in control. there will be some warm spells of sunshine and also the chance of some isolated, heavy showers and thunderstorms. it looks like scotland may stay a little bit cloudier throughout monday. the odd shower here. but for england and wales, certainly, and northern ireland, lots of sunshine around. this will spark off some heavy downpours,
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particularly over the pennines, maybe into wales and the south—west of england. top temperatures, 24, maybe 25 celsius. on into tuesday, we still have high pressure with us. this is a ridge of high pressure. but slightly cooler air moving down on a northerly breeze. that, i think, will be pretty noticeable across the board. it's going to be a little bit cooler. we will have a bit more cloud around generally. some sunny spells here and there, perhaps the odd shower, but most places will be dry. top temperatures, instead of the mid—20s celsius, will be 19—20. i think that could be quite noticeable for some. on into wednesday, still with a ridge of high pressure. but look to the west. that is something we haven't seen for a long time. an atlantic low, racing towards our shores. but it does mean wednesday starts off fine. there will be a lot of sunshine around, particularly england, wales, southern and eastern parts of scotland. further west, south—westerly winds will begin to pick up, touching 40mph across western scotland and northern ireland. more persistent rain here. again, a fairly warm day,
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warmer than tuesday, 23 or maybe 24 celsius. as we head on into thursday, a very different feel to the weather. it will be windy, maybe even gales across parts of scotland, as this atlantic low brings a band of rain that will sink southwards and eastwards across the country through the day. tending to weaken as it reaches eastern parts. so, we are starting the new week on a dry and warm note. lots of sunshine. then it turns unsettled, midweek onwards, with some wind and rain in the forecast and also turning a bit fresher, too. hello. this is bbc news. we'll be taking a look at tomorrow mornings papers in a moment — first the headlines. president trump is in singapore for an historic summit on denuclearisation with north korean
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leader, king jong—un. mr trump described it as a "one—time shot" at peace and said both leaders
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