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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  June 11, 2018 6:00am-8:31am BST

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hello. this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and louise minchin. all set for the singapore summit. donald trump says there's "excitement in the air" ahead of his historic meeting with the north korean leader, kim jong—un. good morning. it's monday the 11th ofjune. also this morning: the prime minster calls for unity over brexit ahead of key votes in the commons this week. after fears of a brexit meltdown last week, david davis is back in brussels for the latest round of talks. and we'll tell you how daydreaming in class could be a good thing! good morning. the retailers often use bad weather as an excuse for tough times on the high street. so with the warm spell we've been enjoying recently, i'll be looking at whether things are getting better. and in sport, scotland pull off one of the biggest wins in their cricketing history. they beat england, the best one—day team in the world,
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for the first time in edinburgh. and british talent was the talk of broadway last night as harry potter and andrew lloyd webber win big at the tonys. and carol has the weather. good morning. for many of us, a fine and dry and sunny day ahead. more cloud in scotland and northern ireland. and there are also a few showers in the forecast. i'll tell you where in 15 minutes. thank you. good morning. first, our main story. donald trump says there's "excitement in the air" as he prepares to hold talks with the north korean leader kim jong—un. both men are in singapore, where they'll meet tomorrow. north korean state media says the topic of giving up nuclear weapons is on the table. barbara plett—usher‘s report contains some flash photography. singapore is on alert, ready to give history a helping hand with its largest security deployment ever for the unprecedented meeting. these impersonators are as close as people here will get to the two leaders.
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vastly different in age and experience, but similar too, unpredictable and strong—willed. singapore's foreign minister had a chance to form his own impressions. both are supremely confident. both are hopeful. i think, at an emotional level, both of them want something significant out of this summit. donald trump is excited, eager to try his hand at convincing north korea to give up its nuclear weapons. he tweeted "there is excitement in the air." no—one knows how far kimjong—un is willing to go towards giving up his nuclear weapons, butjust being here is a win for him. a chance to shed his international isolation. he brought his own armoured car and running bodyguards, but his people only found about this daring escapade after he'd left.
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state television said he'd talk about establishing a new relationship with the us, preparing north koreans for a possible significant change. the meeting will take place on a tourist island, a near drive from where the two leaders are staying. the geography is all about privacy and security. officials say they will be starting talks with a one—on—one, a chance to take a measure of each other. and barbara plett—usher joins us now from singapore. there has been so much talk over so many months about all of this. donald trump is already saying he canjudge someone donald trump is already saying he can judge someone in donald trump is already saying he canjudge someone in one minute. what is your analysis what is likely to happen? in a best case... we do not know what is going to happen because we do not know what kim jong—un will put on the table. donald trump wants to find out how far he will go and whether he will ta ke far he will go and whether he will take any far he will go and whether he will ta ke a ny steps
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far he will go and whether he will take any steps to denuclearise. they will come out with a general statement about denuclearisation. there will probably be a peace declaration after 70 years of the korean war. and perhaps something about security for kim jong—un and his country. we are waiting to see how much detail there will be with the final summit assuming there is not a bust, they come up with something, we will see specifics, or whether it is just a general declaration. on his way to making peace with north korea, president trump unleashed a verbal tirade against some of america's closest allies. he fired off a string of angry tweets after leaving a divisive g7 summit in canada during which the issue of us tariffs on steel and aluminium was discussed. in one tweet he described the canadian prime minister, justin trudeau, as "very
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dishonest and weak. " brexit secretary, david davis, is in brussels for the latest round of talks with the eu chief negotiator michel barnier. 0ur correspondent, adam fleming, joins us live from there to tell us what's likely to be on today's agenda. good morning. we have a meeting. what is on the agenda? in brussels, they will be pleased to see the brexit secretary, david davis, because he has not been here for several months and most negotiations have been done by civil servants and officials. they will want to see some decisions and political haft. a lot to talk about. they have been talking about the draft brexit withdrawal. there are still outstanding issues, not least the irish border. a mechanism for resolving disputes between the eu and the uk after brexit. and how do you maintain redactions for regional products like champagne and cornish
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parties? they have many questions about that. a temporary customs proposal put on the table by the british last week. david davis is all about a security partnership at the moment the key people in the uk and eu safe after brexit. the words used to describe the meeting today are an informal stockta ke. used to describe the meeting today are an informal stocktake. i think thatis are an informal stocktake. i think that is code for do not expect much. interpreting the code. a ship carrying more than 600 migrants who were rescued from the mediterranean is being refused access to both italy and malta. they'd been picked up by a german charity of the coast of libya. the new italian interior minister, matteo salvini, who is leader of italy's far—right league, has called on malta to take them in, but the maltese say they aren't legally responsible. new measures designed to improve patient safety, as well as to protect doctors and nurses when mistakes are made are being unveiled this morning.
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the announcement follows concerns that were raised following the case of dr hadiza bawa—garba, who was struck off after being found guilty of the manslaughter by gross negligence of a six—year—old boy. 0ur health correspondent, dominic hughes, has more. the death of six—year—old jack adcock in 2011 is the tragic backdrop to today's announcement. the doctor in charge whenjack died, doctor hadiza bawa—garba, admitted a catalogue of errors in his treatment but her conviction for gross negligence manslaughter and subsequently being barred from practising shocked many doctors and nurses, leading to fears around how medical staff are expected to admit to and learn from mistakes. among the measures being introduced are the investigation of every death by a medical examiner or coroner. data on doctors' performance will allow them to see how they compare to others to help them improve. and the regulator,
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the general medical council, will no longer be able to appeal against the findings of disciplinary hearings, as it did in the bawa—garba case. what we do know is many of these errors are not about individual doctor or nurse, they are about a wider system, a system under pressure of inadequate facilities, inadequate doctors, understaffed wards, and what we need to see is a culture where we learn from these errors so they aren't repeated. doctors say medicine is about balancing risk, and that mistakes will happen. the important thing is to learn from them so tragedies like that of jack adcock can be avoided in the future. dominic hughes, bbc news. homelessness in britain could be eradicated within10 years with the correct measures in place, according to a new report by charity crisis. it says more than 100,00 social homes need to be built each year for the next fifteen years to help
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both the homeless and those on low incomes. the government says it's investing £1.2 billion to tackle all forms of homelessness. university graduates will be able to qualify as detectives in just 12 weeks under radical plans to tackle a shortage of police officers across england and wales. 1,000 investigators will be trained over the next five years. successful applicants will be put to work solving crimes as soon as they have finished the basic training and won't have to spend any time on the beat. it was a good night for british exports at the prestigious tony awards in new york. andrew garfield took home best leading actor for angels in america. harry potter and the cursed child won best play, and andrew lloyd webber was honoured with a special lifetume achievement award. 0ur reporter tom brook was at the ceremony. and the tony award goes to harry potter... harry potter and the
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cursed child which originated in london got six tony awards, best play, direction, and sound design... and it was a triumphant night at with glen jackson and it was a triumphant night at with glenjackson winning four best actress for her role as an elderly matriarch in three tall women, her first performance on broadway in more than three decades. angels in america got an award for the leading role of andrew garfield. a great night for britain. when it came to musicals, it was a rather different picture, because american productions triumphed. the best musical trophy went to the story of an egyptian police banned trapped in
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accounts. —— band. it won ten more than any other production. an out—of—control bin lorry wreaked havocin an out—of—control bin lorry wreaked havoc in a brooklyn neighbourhood, crushing cars, taking down trees and damaging a home. no—one was hurt in the incident which destroyed at least nine vehicles that were parked along the street. the driver of the truck was arrested. watch that again. one vehicle being pushed into another by a very large bin lorry. good morning. that was fairly shocking. do you know what else was fairly shocking on the weekend? the cricket! 0h fairly shocking on the weekend? the cricket! oh my goodness! what a
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brilliant, brilliant result for scotland. that's right, there was a big shock in the cricket as england were beaten by scotland for the very first time. they stunned the world number one side in the one—dayer, beating them by six runs in edinburgh. marc wood the last man to fall for england. it is without doubt the biggest win in scottish cricketing history. whilst we're on the subject of history, what about rafael nadal. an astonishing eleventh french open title for the king of clay who beat austria's dominic thiem in the final at rolan garros. it's his 17th major title, and he's now closing in on roger federer‘s record of 20. lewis hamilton has lost the lead of the formula one drivers championship. he could only finish 5th at the canadian grand prix as sebastian vettel led from start to finish to win in montreal. and even thouthonny brownlee pulled out of the men's race with illness, vicky holland led a british one—two at the world triathlon series in leeds, herfirst victory on home soil. iam sure i am sure that is something we will be talking about a little bit later
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in the programme because you were there. it was extremely hot! what was great about that was the support. a fantastic atmosphere. and we are still waiting for an update on brown. he pulled out because of stomach issues. he was seen by medics. but no update this morning. as you said, it was quite. and now for the papers. but first, the weather. good morning. this morning, clear skies to start. many of us will see a fair bit of sunshine from the word go. through the day, showers. more cloud in the forecast across parts of scotland and northern ireland. if you suffer from allergies to grass pollen, these are the pollen levels today. very high in england and wales and parts of south—western scotland. as i mentioned this morning, a lot of
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blue sky around. north—east scotland, a bit more cloud. not a cold start to the day. more cloud in northern ireland to be going south, across england and wales, a lot of clear sky. cloud here and there. showers scattered in south—west england and the channel islands. as always, with showers, hit and miss. we will not all see them. nothing like in auckland yesterday. through the day, more sunshine developing. —— scotland. we lose some cloud. highs of up to 25 somewhere in southern england. where we hang on to the cloud, in the east, for example, in showers, temperatures lower. this evening and overnight, many but not all showers will tend to fade. some will rock inland and we will see some cloud. a breeze towards the west and south—west of wales as well. not an especially
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cold night in prospect to be most of us cold night in prospect to be most of us in double figures. we start tomorrow with cloudburst in. thinning and braking and brightening up. —— cloud first thing. this is the area we expect clouds to form. temperatures tomorrow will be lower than today. 25 in the south. tomorrow, 19, perhaps 20. wednesday, starting with a largely dry and fine note. pieces of cloud. you cannot help but notice the change coming in from the west. we have had the weather for so long now coming from the west. we have had the weatherfor so long now coming in from the north near continent, this changes to the atlantic. the cloud will thicken, heavy rain coming our way, and the wind will strengthen initially across scotland and northern ireland. this deep area of low pressure, look at the isobars,
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two fronts coming with it as well, both of them going east and south—east. they will bring rain. here we go. thursday. the rain is pushing across england and wales and getting down into the south—east. not as heavy. rain crossing scotland which will be a bit heavier. scotland, especially in the north—west, the strongest winds. wherever you are on thursday, it will be windy. it will not be a write—off. there will still be sunshine, and temperatures, well, not too bad, charlie and lou. thank you. we are all here to look at the papers. people taking part in a celebration described as the centenary celebration described as the ce nte nary of celebration described as the centenary of the women's vote. it was a living artwork that included rallies in belfast, in cardiff to remember the suffragettes. that is pa rt remember the suffragettes. that is
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part of all those different marches that place yesterday. so much from the fallout of the g7 summit, donald trump saying he has been stabbed in the back. that is our lead story this morning. we have the first pictures of both donald trump in singapore and kim jong—un, pictures of both donald trump in singapore and kimjong—un, head of the meetings which will be under way this time tomorrow, assuming everything goes to plan. the daily telegraph, charities saying they should have a statutory duty of care to protect children from the developer views or addictive behaviour. the male's main story is about afghan interpreters who served with british troops will be given sanctuary in the uk, and this is a campaign they have running. 0ther sanctuary in the uk, and this is a campaign they have running. other of the business pages are dominated by the business pages are dominated by the story about rolls—royce, and speculation of about them announcing job losses. the chief executive has said it will take action after
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stating repeatedly he thinks the company has become bloated with unnecessary layers of management and you click onjobs. there unnecessary layers of management and you click on jobs. there are about 50,000 people you click on jobs. there are about 50 , 000 people employed you click on jobs. there are about 50,000 people employed by rolls—royce. they make cars and aeroplanes engines. you can see that as the picture there, a jet engine that they make for air bus and boeing. it is more likely to be areas such as finance, human resources and purchasing where we are expected to see around 4000 job cuts. that news is expected on friday so we will have more on that as we get there. a lot of the papers, the front page of the guardian is talking about the g7 summit. there must be a lot of interest about implications of the possible fallout if things get worse. i can't imagine getting a whole lot worse. if you look at what is happening with steel and the tariff there, that is a big concern for us. there is a lot of analysis,
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i think because there is much to and fro, nobody really knows where it will actually end up. this could even happen tomorrow. anybody feeling perhaps their age this morning? how are your knees holding 7 morning? how are your knees holding k morning? how are your knees holding up? 0k? look at rafael nadal. it is his knees that we need to watch the whole time. brilliant win to him yesterday at roland garros. his uncle tony, his coach, used to be his coach and also his uncle, says as long as his knees hold up on clay, he can keep on winning. the reason he is struggling at wimbledon is because he finds a change in surface so challenging. yesterday he had a problem with cramp in his hand. they were thinking that might be the thing, if the match had gone on longer, it would have caused in real trouble. but on longer, it would have caused in realtrouble. but he manage it. him
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and dominic thiem are really good friends. he had an emotional moment. world cup stuff? i like this picture on the back of the mirror, the spurs midfielder has been talking about how he will stay calm and not use —— lucy said and do anything stupid. i like the picture the nearer has chosen, because he is giving ace delia hard stare, he isjust having a stretch at training. even had a secret weapon. it is a south american drink. what is it? a kathleen drink made from leaves that if the vote to be brilliant the energy, depression, it has minerals in it --
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energy, depression, it has minerals in it —— caffeine drink. energy, depression, it has minerals in it -- caffeine drink. you normally drink it out of a special little... this is lionel nessie drinking out of a little cup. a little special pot. with straw! claris, he always put his success down to drinking it. they were introduced into the england camp if they can play like south americans are all is. i drank a lot of it in argentina. it is nice. ifeel in may need to have a morning where we test it out. let's do that. it is a really good idea. i sent some back and it got taken out. out of your suitcase? no, i think and it got taken out. out of your suitcase? no, ithink the and it got taken out. out of your suitcase? no, i think the parcel home and it got taken out by customs. that is our strong it is? we definitely need it. we will run it past the authorities. we definitely need it. we will run it past the authoritieslj we definitely need it. we will run it past the authorities. i can already hear the boss screaming, no,
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no! see you later on. when, in 2015, writer and columnist bryony gordon revealed she struggled with anxiety and depression, she decided to start a support group to help others experiencing the same. she tweeted an appeal for other people with mental health issues tojoin herfor a walk in hyde park to let it all out, which later expanded into a regular network of walking groups across the uk. let's take a look at how it all started. when my mental health was bad, it was really, really bad. it was awful. there were periods of my life i don't remember, really dark times, drugs, alcohol, i have lost great chunks of my adult life to mental illness. so, i knew that there were other people out there like me, i also
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knew that exercise in getting out of the house was one of the only things thatis the house was one of the only things that is proven to help with your mental health. mental health mates isa group mental health. mental health mates is a group i found it to .5 years ago now. we are in 23, 24 towns around the uk and we also have events in new york, jabbar, australia. it is about getting people together, like—minded people you can walk and talk without any fear ofjudgement. it is about getting you out of the house. fear ofjudgement. it is about getting you out of the housem fear ofjudgement. it is about getting you out of the house. it is nice to get out in the open, nice to have a walk around hyde park and other places, and it is a sense of community. it really is. spend sometime wishing they were someone else. i was suffering from anxiety andl else. i was suffering from anxiety and i was suffering from panic attacks. your mind just gets out of control and it gets very hard to regulate yourself and bring yourself
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or most back to earth, really. when you are not feeling great, it can be a struggle, knowing that there is a group of people who will have potentially faced the same issue in the same struggle just to get out the same struggle just to get out the door, and you get here and, like, thanks the coming and well done, like, it is that. ijust made a little diversion and thought, why do we just jump in? ijust made a little diversion and thought, why do we justjump in? why not? we are too afraid it is being sundays, though it is a hot day, there is water here and i do know how often you get to paddle in the water in cities, so that is what we are doing. i would say to anyone who is frightened or nervous or worry to come out and exercise is i was as well, and if i can do this, anyone can. anything is possible when you put your mind to it. what a lovely
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message. she willjoin us on the programme after 8:30 a.m.. coming up on breakfast this morning — have the midges been munching on you this spring? it seems that nibbling insects like mosquitoes and horseflies are out much earlier than usual this year. we'll find out why, and what you can do about it. tell us if you have found that to be the case or not. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. a new scheme is being launched in london today in an attempt to tackle violent crime. the peace education programme was originally used to help rehabilitate prisoners. it will be available for all londoners over
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the age of 14. life is not, three people were stabbed in london. today, the mayor of london is due to meet with the home secretary calling for more action. the police service has fewer offices since 2003, the population has grown by2 since 2003, the population has grown by 2 million, crime is more complex, we know the impact of social media and enough is enough. the same —— home secretary has to walk the walk now by investing in the police service. a skater from sutton who suffered a life—threatening head injury while performing a trick is launching a campaign urging others to wear helmets. rob glanville sustained a major brain injury and had to learn to walk and talk again after hitting his head while skating. he wasn't wearing protective head gear, but is now urging others to learn from his experience. if you stop what happened to me happening from to someone else, i wa nt to happening from to someone else, i want to influence the next generation, the younger generations though they make good decisions when it comes to wearing the right detective ghia so that they don't
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have to learn the hard way, like i did. london's first male—only nail bar is being launched. the pop—up in peckham in south london hopes to take advantage of the growth in the male grooming industry. let's have a look at the travel situation now. a good service across all lines. the track fault at liverpool street is causing some disruption to and from southend. in surrey, one lane is blocked on the m3 due to a broken down vehicle. 0n blackfriars bridge, alleyne is blocked and very slow due to an accident north bound at victoria embankment and new bridge street. the north circular southbound is partially blocked. let's ta ke southbound is partially blocked. let's take a look at the weather. it isa it is a lovely bright start this
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morning. a little bit of ms for some. the most part, it will stay fine and dry. we have some good spells of sunshine, one showers further south, but there will fizzle out. a pleasant afternoon, the sunshine quite strong at the moment, the pollen count is also high. temperatures upto 24 celsius. a lovely evening in the sunshine and some showers overnight. the cloud will work its way in again from the east, it should stay dry and a little bit of ms guinness. the minimum between 11 and 12 celsius. tomorrow, it could be a cloudy start. it will start to burn back. ata start. it will start to burn back. at a school as we head through tuesday. similar conditions much of this week with plenty of light —— dry weather. the risk of a shower are plenty of dry spells. haemorrhages staying in the low 20s. —— temperatures. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour.
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now, though, it's back to charlie and louise. bye for now. hello. this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and louise minchin. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning. can detectives be fully trained up in 12 weeks? that's the latest plan to tackle the shortage of police officers. we'll hear about the fast track scheme which allows graduates to become investigators. if you were ever told off for staring out of the classroom window, you may have been hard done by. schools are now being urged to allow pupils to daydream and stare in to space. children's laureate lauren childs tells us how it encourages creativity. also this morning, (ani) celebrity farmerjimmy doherty travels also this morning, celebrity farmer, jimmy doherty, travels the world to bring us the secrets behind what we eat. he's here to talk about his new series uncovering the truth about where our favourite foods come from. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. donald trump says he is excited
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about holding talks with enjoyment. they will meet tomorrow. north korean state media says denuclearisation is on the agenda. today, donald trump meant the singaporean prime minister. —— met. on his way to making peace with north korea, president trump unleashed a verbal tirade against some of america's closest allies. he fired off a string of angry tweets after leaving a divisive g7 summit in canada, during which, the issue of us tariffs on steel and aluminium was discussed. in one tweet he described the canadian prime minister, justin trudeau, as "very dishonest and weak. " a ship carrying more than 600 migrants who were rescued from the mediterranean is being refused access to both italy and malta. they'd been picked up by a german charity off the coast of libya. the new italian interior minister, matteo salvini, who is leader of italy's far—right league, has called on malta to take them in, but the maltese say they aren't legally responsible.
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theresa may is set to appeal for a show of unity from her warring mps ahead of tuesday's crucial commons vote on the eu withdrawal bill. 0ur political correspondent, chris mason, joins us now from westminster. chris, how significant is this week for theresa may and can we expect a tory revolt? good morning. people are weary. just explain why this is an important week for brexit. it is crucial. as you delicately hinted at, they come around four per month as far as brexit is concerned. theresa may will meet mps. two votes are coming
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up, tomorrow and wednesday. this is about the eu withdrawal bill which has halted brexit progress. it was in the house of lords recently and was defeated plenty of times. it has come back to the house of commons. two crucial issues this week, a customs union, the trading relationship between the uk and the eu after brexit, and the second, this whole idea of what happens with mps who reject the final deal that theresa may comes back with? mps on the conservative side are falling over themselves in pleas for unity. amber rudd and iain duncan smith, former cabinet ministers, and unlikely duo. they are showing how much is at stake. there is a chance the government will survive unscathed and will get it straight through this week. but as we said a moment ago, there will be another
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crucial week in about seven days' time. possibly even six, if that is possible. thank you. homelessness in britain could be eradicated within 10 years the death of six—year—old jack adcock in 2011 is the tragic backdrop to today's announcement. the doctor in charge whenjack died, doctor hadiza bawa—garba, admitted a catalogue of errors in his treatment, but her conviction for gross negligence manslaughter and subsequently being barred from practising shocked many doctors and nurses, leading to fears around how medical staff are expected to admit to and learn from mistakes. among the measures being introduced are the investigation of every death by a medical examiner or coroner. the tuition fees system for england's universities is "ripping off" students and gives "poor value for money", according to a parliamentary committee. the house of lords economics committee says the system is unfair and requires immediate reform. but the department for education said its review of fees would "make sure students are getting value for money. homelessness in britain could be eradicated within 10 years with the correct measures in place, according to a new report by charity crisis.
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it says more than 100,000 social homes need to be built each year for the next fifteen years to help both rough sleepers and those on low incomes. the government says it's investing £1.2 billion to tackle the problem. trains have returned to a section of england's highest railway line for the first time in more than 40 years. the south tynedale railway, a single narrow line along the pennines, closed in 1976, but has been restored by a preservation society. it will run steam trains between alston in cumbria and lintley in northumberland. and doesn't that look lovely? really does. straight out of harry potter! the duke and duchess of sussex will make an official visit to australia, fiji, tonga, and new zealand. harry and meghan‘s autumn tour, the first announced since the couple were married last month, coincides with the fourth invictus games, which will be staged in sydney in october. it was a good night for the british at the prestigious tony theatre awards in new york. harry potter and the cursed child won best play, and andrew lloyd webber
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was honoured with a special lifetime achievement award. 0ur reporter, tom brook, was at the ceremony. and the tony award goes to harry potter and the cursed child. harry potter and the cursed child, a broadway import of the celebrated british play which originated in london, picked up six tony awards. it won for best play, direction, costume, lighting, scenic, and sound design. thank you so much! this is such an extraordinary honour! glenda jackson. and it was a triumphant night for britain's glenda jackson, who won for best actress in a play for her role as an elderly matriarch in edward albee's three tall women. it's her first performance on broadway in more than three decades. the best revival of a play tony award went to angels in america, a production at britain's national theatre. andrew garfield won for his leading role. i want more life! all in all, it was a great night for britain with plays, with uk theatre talent taking home many tony trophies. but when it came to musicals, it was a rather different picture because american productions triumphed. the best musical trophy went to the band's visit, the story of an egyptian police band
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stranded in a remote israeli town. it won ten tony trophies more than any other production. tom brook, bbc news, new york. i have to see the harry potter one. i have to see the harry potter one. i have seen it. it is utterly, utterly brilliant. is it eight hours long or something ridiculous? yes, but a long break in the middle. there was a big shock in the cricket as scotland beat england for the very first time. callum played a huge part. scotland racked up their highest one—day total in edinburgh thanks to a century from big hitting calum macleod. england are the number one ranked
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one—day team in the world remember, but even a jonny bairstow hundred wasn't enough as they lost by six runs. a great day in the history of scottish cricket. the energy from the crowd, are own backyard. to chaseit the crowd, are own backyard. to chase it down, the ebb and flow. certainly one of the best games of cricket i have been involved in. 0n the subject of history, rafael nadal continues to write his own at the french open. rafael nadal won his eleventh french open title after beating dominic thiem at roland garros. he's nicknamed the "king of clay" for good reason, winning his 11th title at roland garros, beating austria's dominic thiem in the final. nadal has now won 17 major titles and is three behind roger federer, with wimbledon just three weeks away. but nadal‘s not yet sure if he'll play there.
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i will have to come back and speak with my team and decide what is better for my body. that is the main thing. i would love to be playing as many places as possible, but as you understand, i need to check how i am feeling in the next couple of days. lewis hamilton has surrendered the lead in the formula 1 world championship to title rival sebastian vettel, after the ferrari driver won the canadian grand prix. most of the drama happened right at the start of the race with a big crash involving the canadian lance stroll. the chequered flag was then waved a lap too early by model, winnie harlow, much to the annoyance of leader, sebastian vettell vettel went to to win comfortably, lea pfrogging hamilton in the standings after he could only finish fifth. i don't think it was really her faults, to be honest. —— fault.
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iam sure i am sure she didn'tjust decide to go like that at the wrong time. someone would have mentioned it to her. it is a bit awful. it was a british one—two at the leeds round of the world triathlon series. 0lympic bronze medallist, vicky holland, claimed her third world triathlon series win, her first on home soil. georgia taylor—brown finished seventeen seconds behind for herfirst world series podium. i was pretty much no use. i felt like i was holding on all day and yo—yoing. it took me a long time to find my legs. i cannot believe i actually won it. every time i thought i would win it, i told myself to relax, and just keep going. but then i finally thought "yeah, this is mine now." and finally, it's no secret that usain bolt wants to play football following his retirement from athletics, and he had the chance to showcase his talents in soccer aid last night. he did pretty well too, turning in a man—of—the—match
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performance and scoring a penalty in the shootout for the rest of the world team. his side lost the shoot—out, though, england the winners at old trafford. it was a penalty shoot—out? it was a penalty shoot-out? yeah. england were the winners at old trafford. really quite keen. look at that! england won at penalty shoot—out‘s isn't that quite rare? —— shoot—out? shoot—out‘s isn't that quite rare? -- shoot-out? usain bolt's penalty. it was good! he even did a dodgy
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mis—step and then took it. clever. final preparations are being made in singapore for the first ever meeting between a sitting president of the usa and a leader of north korea. donald trump will hold talks with kim jong—un tomorrow and say he will sense "within minutes" if mr kim is serious about making peace. 0ur asia correspondent, rupert wingfield—hayes, is in singapore. good morning. donald trump is somewhere behind you having lunch. today, this is setting up for the meeting, is it? yes. this is all of the preliminaries. it is very hot. about 35 degrees. it feels like 90% humidity, certainly. excuse me if i look a little sweaty. this is the entrance to the presidential palace
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in singapore. president donald trump went in there about 1.5 hours ago, having lunch with the prime minister of singapore. it is really a courtesy call in the setup of what is happening today, last—minute preparations for the summit. another meeting between lower—level officials from the us side and the north korean side, finalising, we think, whatever agreement will be declared tomorrow, and the details. even at this late stage, there are 11th hour preparations. they had very little time to prepare. donald trump said he will basically... he said it is up to his ability as a negotiator to go into a room in size up negotiator to go into a room in size up his opponent, kimjong—un, and decide if he can do a deal. very unconventional diplomacy. a lot is riding on it. everyone is hoping it
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will be a success. tell us about the first meeting tomorrow. as far as i understand it, correct me if i am wrong, together, they will be with just translators were the first couple of minutes? -- for the. off the record we have heard they will go intoa the record we have heard they will go into a meeting at nine o'clock tomorrow morning, yes, as you said, just kim jong—un and donald trump without advises, just translators, and it may be like for the first hours. —— advisors. that is extraordinary. us presidents don't do this. donald trump is exceptional, a president of the sort we have never seen exceptional, a president of the sort we have never seen before. kim jong—un is also unusual as a bigger. this is how they have decided to do it. -- this is how they have decided to do it. —— figure. it is an extraordinary meeting. everyone wa nts to extraordinary meeting. everyone wants to see the substance. it is
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very well to say you have done a deal, but what is the substance of the agreement? very good. tell us about the point of view from singapore. this is an extraordinary meeting. what does it feel like for them to happen there? a huge deal for singapore. a local person told me yesterday this may be the biggest thing to happen in singapore since independent. singapore has been host to these diplomatic meetings before, especially between china and taiwan. —— independence. but it is a com pletely —— independence. but it is a completely different scale. every time either of them move, big chunks of singapore have to be shut down, a massive security situation. three days, costing $20 million. singapore is footing the bill. most people say
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we are a small country and do not get much international attention so we are happy this is happening. though, some taxi drivers are upset. we can see pictures of the limo with guards either side. thank you. we will keep an eye on what is happening in singapore throughout the programme. 90 degrees and high humidity in singapore. that is pretty warm. - immunity as well. we have nothing like that on our shores. tebbutt is likely to be 25 celsius. what we have this morning is clear sky across many areas. scotland is being a bit more cloud. i want to mention straight up is if you have an allergy to grass pollen, these are the levels today. high or very high across most of england, northern ireland and parts of western scotland. this has literally
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just been up dated. this morning we have some clear skies around across many parts of the uk, there is more cloud across scotland and north east scotland. the bit more cloud across parts of northern ireland. a lot of england and all of wales starting off with some lengthy sunnies bells. towards the east and the south—west, a bit more clouded one or two showers across south—west england and the channel islands, but is always the ship —— as is always the way with showers, they could stay dry. you can see how more sunshine develops, but equally, so do more showers. we could see some across the pennines, into the midlands, northern ireland and scotland. they will not be the humdinger is that we had yesterday. temperatures today, cool in the east or in a shower, but we could hit about 25 in the south
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of england despite what you can see on the charts. that will feel pleasantly warm. into the evening and overnight, many showers will tend to fade. we will start to put more cloud from the north sea, spreading across most of the uk except for in some western parts and also including wales. temperatures, both staying in double figures so it is not going to be a cold night. as we start tomorrow, we will start off with a lot of cloud in the forecast, but through the course of the day, it will thin and break. we'll see sunny spells developing and a few showers. don't take this as gospel, it is the kind of locality we are looking at. temperatures down a notch or two on today. wednesday, we will start to see a change in the forecast. there is a lot of dry weather around, they're that of sunshine for england and wales. you can see we have a system coming in from the atlantic, heralding a real change to the weather from the near
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continent with high pressure. this is low pressure coming our way and it will introduce some heavy rain and also some strengthening wind. a strong list of which will be across scotland. cu in about half an hour. our high streets are facing challenging times at the moment. we have the latest figures out on how many people are actually going to the high street, the footfall figures. good morning. there are not as many of us heading to the shops like we were this time last year. and the announcement last week that house of fraser will be closing more than half of its department stores isn't good news either. so what's happening and can the high street still have a future in retail? i'm joined now by retail consultant kate ancketill who runs a firm which analyses the latest trends on the high street. good morning. the latest figures that we have the footfall, they are a mixed bag, still not as many people as last year, but it is
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improving a little bit. yes, what is happening with the high street is a complex picture, and we could be here all morning, analysing the reasons for the slow somewhat decline in physical retailfootfall, because of course most people still do buy in stores, but 15% of sales are now made online. that means that are now made online. that means that a physical store doesn't sell as much stuff as it used to, but it still pays as much rain and rates. that hasn't really caught up with this new situation. however, most people still are going to stores. 85% of people in this country, 90% of people in the us. stores are not failing. what happens is the middle class in this country was about 81%, sorry, 61% of people in the 1980s and it is now only about 48% of the population. fewer people are in that middle income bracket, so there is fewer people shopping in the kind of stores like house of fraser that a
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sickly were designed for a sort of middle income person. what you have is more people are the top, the high earners, the hedge fund managers and silicon valley type people, people who works at google and get paid shared loads. people at the bottom and fewer people in the middle. anything that is not highly differentiated and orientated in the middle and in a large space that is very expensive to rent and rates, like house of fraser, sadly, is in trouble. which is what we saw with the supermarkets for a time. either the supermarkets for a time. either the cheap or the top in doing well. there was a lot to talk about shops now need to be experimental than that makes a difference. is that still the case? it is also the fact that they didn't change with the times? absolutely. we know the ones that are probably not going to be with us in the next, not mentioning any names, but we know, we go there
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and think, get your stuff and get out. you compare that to the spaces that we all actually really enjoy being ina that we all actually really enjoy being in a new think of at referee because you can learn stuff there, you experience robots and technology and there is never a queue when you pay ina and there is never a queue when you pay in a mobile way and you think about all of the most accessible high spend per square foot which are not only at the top end, apple, harrods, selfridge's, they are all without exception extremely fun spaces without exception extremely fun s pa ces to without exception extremely fun spaces to be. we spend all day in selfridge's. would have gone to house of fraser to spend all day? for a laugh? in some places, there is an selfridge's, harrods, all these apple and that. some towns, middlesbrough, house of fraser was one of the big posh places and there isn't all these other stores dimension. it will happen to areas
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like that? it is a big question. when you have that declining middle class, if you don't have people with money, they are not going to be able to spend the money in retail no matter what the retail is. so there isa matter what the retail is. so there is a more fundamental issue there of people having to have good employment and having money that they can spend, which is a much bigger economic issue. but what you can do with what you've got for retail is it has to be experiential, it is probably find for it to go into smaller spaces because we have the end i'll now, you can go into a store like in america, nordstrom is a bit like house of fraser, properly a bit like house of fraser, properly a bit like house of fraser, properly a bit higher rent more of a harrods, and they have nordstrom local, where it isa and they have nordstrom local, where it is a tiny little store in la, no infa ntry it is a tiny little store in la, no infantry at all, nothing. they hold nothing there. it is basically click and select. you order online yourself, go there the next day and keep what you want and the key thing
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is they tailor it for you. basically, it is about posh tailoring and making sure it is perfectly in helping you with styling and nails and hair anachronistic, but that is a potential future for a large department store that can no longer afford these horrendous rates and rates that have not caught up with modern situations. we could talk about this for hours. thank you very much. the interesting ideas. thank you. parents and teachers should set aside time for children to daydream, look around or simply stare out the window. that's according to children's laureate and author lauren child, who believes it's a vital way of boosting creativity. backed by the reading charity book trust, she's launching a new project called staring into space, as breakfast‘s tim muffett reports. ican see i can see a pirate ship, lots of kids playing on. i can see leaves
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and bright colours. sites that surround us. 0ften and bright colours. sites that surround us. often overlooked, but inspiration perhaps for a story. surround us. often overlooked, but inspiration perhaps for a storylj wonder how would you get up there? there would be like a never—ending stairs, you go upstairs forever and ever and ever. you get asked this question constantly, where do you get your ideas from? the idea comes from the time where you are not doing anything, a time when you are bored or staring out of a train window or staring out of your own window. you have done it with some giant apple. rosendale school in south london, and lauren child is launching staring into space, her drive to boost creativity by simply looking around entertaining sites into stories. a fallen over tree. media giant spider would make it fall down. something like don't
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centipede. years ago in my 20s, in a share house, there was a bully that used to shout very loudly from his garden. he ended up eating the beginning of a story, and the story was a book, and the book started my career. the idea of schools actively encouraging children to daydream or sarah out the window might sound odd, but it is what many would like to see happen. the school is really going to factor that into their day, do you think? it is absolutely possible. we forget that that is what children are about, they have the most incredible imagination, and all you need to do is give them a little mother told inspiration. you could think up an improbable animal, like, say, a unicorn with a dragon's aired and the horse's care. some
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teachers would watch this and think, this is all very well, but you have to allow more kids to do nothing.“ that unrealistic? i do think it is doing nothing. ithink that unrealistic? i do think it is doing nothing. i think it is ideas and you are giving your brain and your mind time to think. it is his name? tommy. tommy the woodlice? he goes on escape board and pushes it and he is the best skateboarder in the world. that is a great story. i love that. tommy the woodlouse and his determination to succeed. that isa his determination to succeed. that is a good name for a story. so many tales just waiting to be told. all in favour of that. i completely agree. we could try to eat during the programme. do it quite a lot. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news.
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i'm alpa patel. a new scheme is being launched in london today in an attempt to tackle violent crime. it will be available for all londoners over the age of 14. last night, three people were stabbed in london in separate incidents. later, the mayor of london will meet the home secretary. the met police service has fewer officers since 2003, our population has grown by 2 million, crime is more complex, we know the impact of social media, and enough is enough. the home secretary has to actually walk the walk now about investing in our police service. a top skater from sutton who suffered a life—threatening brain injury while performing a trick is launching a campaign urging others to wear helmets. rob glanville had to learn to walk and talk again. he wasn't wearing head gear, but is now urging others to learn from his experience. it can stop what happened to me happening to someone else, so i want to try and influence
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the next generation, the younger generations so they make good decisions when it comes to wearing the right protective gear so that they don't have to learn the hard way, like i did. london's first male—only nail bar is being launched. the pop—up in peckham in south london hopes to take advantage of the growth in the male grooming industry. let's have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube, a good service on all lines. 0n the trains, a track fault at liverpool street is causing some disruption for greater anglia services to and from southend, harwich, ipswich and norwich. in surrey, one lane is blocked on the m3 due to a broken—down vehicle. that southbound, between j3 and j4. 0n blackfriars bridge, a lane is blocked and it's very slow due to accident on a201 northbound at victoria embankment and new bridge street. let's have a check on the weather
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now with kate kinsella. it is a lovely bright start this morning. a little bit of mistiness for some. the most part, it will stay fine and dry. we have some good spells of sunshine, one or two showers further south, but they will fizzle out. a pleasant afternoon, the sunshine quite strong at the moment, pollen count is also high. temperatures getting up to 24 celsius. a lovely evening in the sunshine and some showers overnight. the cloud will gradually work its way in again from the east, should stay dry and a little bit of mistiness. the minimum between 11 and 12 celsius. for tomorrow, it could be a cloudy start. again, that will start to burn back. a touch cool as we had through tuesday. plenty of sunny spells and
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temperatures staying in the low 20s. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to charlie and louise. bye for now. hello. this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and louise minchin. all set for the singapore summit. donald trump says there's "excitement in the air" ahead of his historic meeting with the north korean leader, kim jong—un. good morning. it's monday the 11th ofjune. also this morning: the prime minster calls for unity over brexit ahead of key votes in the commons this week. after fears of a brexit meltdown last week, david davis is back in brussels for the latest round of talks. graduates could be investigating crimes injust 12 weeks in a new scheme to solve a shortage of police detectives. more than three million school kids
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have taken part in personal finance lessons at school over the last 10 years, but it's not part of the curriculum, and there are still millions of young people who struggle with it. i will be speaking to a teacher who has just won an award for her finance lessons for kids. and the bees are buzzing outside our studio today. we'll hear how the warm spring means an early summerfor garden bugs. and carol has the weather. good morning. for many, sunny spells. the exception, northern ireland and scotland, especially north—east scotland. 0ne scotland, especially north—east scotland. one or two showers again. i will tell you exactly where in 15 minutes. thank you. good morning. first, our main story. donald trump says there's "excitement in the air" as he prepares to hold talks with the north korean leader kim jong—un. both men are in singapore,
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where they'll meet tomorrow. north korean state media says denuclearisation is on the agenda. barbara plett—usher‘s report contains some flash photography. singapore is on alert, ready to give history a helping hand with its largest security deployment ever for the unprecedented meeting. these impersonators are as close as people here will get to the two leaders. vastly different in age and experience, but similar too, unpredictable and strong—willed. singapore's foreign minister had a chance to form his own impressions. both are supremely confident. both are hopeful. i think, at an emotional level, both of them want something significant out of this summit. donald trump tweeted "there is excitement in the air." he's excited, eager to try his hand at convincing north korea to give up its nuclear weapons. no—one knows how far kimjong—un is willing to go towards giving up his nuclear weapons, butjust being here is a win for him. a chance to shed his
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international isolation. he brought his own armoured car and running bodyguards, but his people only found about this daring escapade after he'd left. state television said he'd talk about establishing a new relationship with the us, preparing north koreans for a possible significant change. the meeting will take place on a tourist island, a near drive from where the two leaders are staying. the geography is all about privacy and security. officials say they will be starting talks with a one—on—one, a chance to take a measure of each other. barbara plett—usher reporting. this is extraordinary. we are now understanding when they meet, no one else will be in the room, only translators. that is right. it could be forup to translators. that is right. it could
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be for up to two hours that they are talking on there and discussing what each of them is ready to bring to the table. donald trump has a list of things he is willing to give the north koreans. what steps are they willing to take? there is drama because we do not know what will come out of it. usually these things are scripted. at the same time, diplomats are managing expectations, saying these are complex issues with long histories. it is unlikely we will have a bargain out of one meeting. success would mean even if there was a general declaration that kicked off more meetings. it could even be in the details to see how much donald trump has got from kim jong—un. would the north koreans the willing to give an the tory of their weapons, which they have never done before. —— be willing to give an
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inventory. we will see what donald trump will give inventory. we will see what donald trump willgive in inventory. we will see what donald trump will give in return. this will probably not be the end of the story, even if it is called a success. barbara plett-usher, thank you. on his way to making peace with north korea, president trump unleashed a verbal tirade against some of america's closest allies. he fired off a string of angry tweets after leaving a divisive g7 summit in canada, during which the issue of us tariffs on steel and aluminium was discussed. in one tweet, he described the canadian prime minister, justin trudeau, as "very dishonest and weak. " a ship carrying more than 600 migrants who were rescued from the mediterranean is being refused access to both italy and malta. they'd been picked up by a german charity off the coast of libya. the new italian interior minister, matteo salvini, who is leader of italy's far—right league, has called on malta to take them in, but the maltese say they aren't
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legally responsible. brexit secretary, david davis, is in brussels for the latest round of talks with the eu chief negotiator michel barnier 0ur correspondent, adam fleming, joins us live from there to tell us what's likely to be on today's agenda. they have not met for a little while, these two. what will happen? this'll an informal chat rather than a formal negotiating round. they have not seen each other for a time. in brussels they have been asking for a while for david davis to come over and gives a political angle for the talks which is mostly done by officials and civil servants. plenty to talk about with regards to the treaty. finds outstanding issues. "5. treaty. finds outstanding issues. ——5. one includes the border with
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northern ireland. a mechanism for solving disputes arising between the two sides after the treaty is signed. and even what do you do with the system for protecting regional products like champagne and cornish parties? plenty to talk about. david davis's focus is a security partnership to keep people safe after brexit. show by men has questions for after brexit and after the transition period. —— michel barnier. david davis' ministerial car has just arrived and bumped into michel barnier in a coffee shop. they will be tucking into breakfast soon. they will be tucking into breakfast soon. what do we read into that? significant? the european commission catering service does not open until
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later. a nice gesture. not as grand asa later. a nice gesture. not as grand as a singapore summit. later. a nice gesture. not as grand as a singapore summitlj later. a nice gesture. not as grand as a singapore summit. i like the details, it gives it colour. thank you. new measures designed to improve patient safety, and protect doctors and nurses when mistakes are made are unveiled today. it follows the case of a doctor who was struck off after being found guilty of the manslaughter by gross negligence of a six—year—old boy. 0ur health correspondent, dominic hughes, has more details. the death of six—year—old jack adcock in 2011 is the tragic backdrop to today's announcement. the doctor in charge whenjack died, doctor hadiza bawa—garba, admitted a catalogue of errors in his treatment, but her conviction for gross negligence manslaughter and subsequently being barred from practising shocked many doctors and nurses, leading to fears around how medical staff are expected to admit to and learn from mistakes. among the measures being introduced are the investigation of every death by a medical examiner or coroner. data on doctors' performance
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will allow them to see how they compare to others to help them improve. and the regulator, the general medical council, will no longer be able to appeal against the findings of disciplinary hearings, as it did in the bawa—garba case. what we do know is many of these errors are not about individual doctor or nurse, they are about a wider system, a system under pressure of inadequate facilities, inadequate doctors, understaffed wards, and what we need to see is a culture where we learn from these errors so they aren't repeated. doctors say medicine is about balancing risk, and that mistakes will happen. the important thing is to learn from them so tragedies like that of jack adcock can be avoided in the future. dominic hughes, bbc news. homelessness in britain could be eradicated within 10 years with the correct measures in place, according to a new report by charity crisis.
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it says more than 100,000 social homes need to be built each year for the next fifteen years to help both rough sleepers and those on low incomes. the government says it's investing £1.2 billion to tackle the problem. glenda jackson won best actress at last night's tony theatre awards in new york last night. it's the first time she's picked up the prestigious accolade in her long career. andrew garfield made an impassioned speech about lgbt rights when picking up the best leading actor award for angels in america. harry potter and the cursed child won a plethora of awards, including best play. an out—of—control bin lorry wreaked havoc in a brooklyn neighborhood, crushing cars, taking down trees and damaging a home. no—one was hurt in the incident which destroyed at least nine vehicles that were parked along the street. the driver of the truck was arrested. you can see it in slow motion.
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really frightening. graduates can become detectives in a matter of months with the help of a new fast—track training programme, designed to deal with a severe shortage of police investigators across england and wales. the 12—week scheme will focus on problem—solving, crime prevention and safeguarding. joining us now is mattjukes, the chief constable of south wales police. good morning. thank you forjoining us. good morning. thank you forjoining us. is this a realistic prospect, someone us. is this a realistic prospect, someone becoming a detective and 12 weeks? the first thing to do is to give tribute to the amazing professionals that are the existing detectives. they are dealing with a
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lot of issues. the today programme which will take 12 weeks, but it will go for two years. —— it is a programme. there will be lots of men —— mentoring. they will be supported and will be coming to this after a very intense period of training and starting to do detective work from a very early stage. what kind of work? we will be working with police and independent organisations that work alongside us to develop the curriculum for their training in the way to introduce them to work. police will decide which rules to put the new police officers into so they can be supported as they grow in experience. can you give me an
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example of what they will do after 12 weeks? we would expect to see them working at the front—end of crime investigation, dealing with crimes affecting lives most often like burglary and crimes of violence which are typical in many of our cid teams. from a very early stage there would not be in complex and high risk situations. but talent will go on to do that later in careers. you say you will set a high bar for the people who can do this. what do you mean? there is a selection process. we have worked with 25 forces already to accelerate neighbourhood policing. they will be tested with behaviour and academic background, but more importantly, police is about getting on with people and
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dealing with people. they will be tested in their ability to work with others and critically to work with communities. as a former detective yourself, what key skills will they need? all detectives need to be analytical and able to communicate really well. above all, you need to be able to understand people. there are new skills coming as well. one of the reasons we are drawn to reinforce detective capacity is crime is changing. we need cyber investigators they can deal with a massive amount of information on social media. tremendous skills already in the workforce. we do need to reinforce that with new skills with people who can bring that. will they be police officers or civilians? there will be police officers. but this isjust civilians? there will be police officers. but this is just one measure. we will be looking to
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attract pcs not doing this already to be detectives and bring in more civilian investigators as well as this group coming in now. what would you say to people having spend out —— timeout on the beat? they're still wheel be the opportunity, the bulk of offices we bring through to detective roles will still come through one of those more traditional routes, but the reality is there is an enormous pressure on our detectives that the moment. i would like to see us feeling up to 5000 vacancies. in order to support those who have come through those traditional routes, we need to reinforce their numbers with a talented people we know that police now can attract. is there an age limit or anything, or anyone can apply? there is a whole set of criteria that are up on the police website about it easily, graduates who are expecting to get degrees can
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apply. they need to be so much more than that, but we want to see a really diverse talented group of people come forward to this scheme and work with police now to make sure they get the best quality training they can. thank you very much. thank you for your time this morning. we will have a look outside this morning. not sure how it is where you are this morning. we are expecting the flowers, notjust because it looks nice, although it does look nice. it looks like the beginning of a children's programme. we are looking at insects. there are suggesting there are more bugs around this time of year than there have been in the past. mosquitoes, not that we can see them there. generally there are a few more around. i was going to say the nice bugs as well. we like them. what you think? that is a nice picture. gust through the weather. it isa
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it is a beautiful picture. you are quite right. for many of us it will bea quite right. for many of us it will be a fine start through the day. a fair bit of sunshine. it will not be that everywhere. scotland and parts of northern ireland seeing a bit more cloud at times in a few showers that will crop up here and there. if you have an analogy to grass pollen, talking about flowers, you can see the levels we are talking about. higher across much of england and wales. we are off to a bright start this morning. the fog patches will clear almost immediately. across north—east scotland in particular, we will hang on to a lot of cloud. flat across northern ireland this morning and parts of the east of england and the south—west of england and the south—west of england where there are a few showers as there are across the channel islands. for the rest of england and northern wales, there is a nice day if you like it sunny. further sunny skies developing
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across parts of east of northern ireland, western parts of scotland example and much of england and wales. there will be showers, nothing like we saw in scotland yesterday, but showers popping up across the pennines, parts of the midlands, south—west england. if you do catch one in between the showers there will be sunny spells. temperatures likely to be highest where we have the sunshine for the longest, east anglia and southern counties. we could hit 25 celsius today. cool under the cloud and from showers today. for this evening and overnight, many showers will tend to fade. in mrto overnight, many showers will tend to fade. in mr to pull more cloud from the north sea, pushing across much of the uk. clear skies across parts of the uk. clear skies across parts of wales into the south—west at times and temperature wise almost all of us are staying in double figures, so it will not yet cold night. tomorrow we start off with a fair bit of cloud but that was the tooth in and break and some sunny spells will develop. a few showers
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across south—west scotland and south—west england. they are hit and myth. temperatures are down a touch on what we are looking at today. as we head into wednesday, changes afoot. we are starting off on a fine and bright day with sunshine across england and wales, more cloud across scotland and northern ireland. we have an atlantic system coming our way. we haven't seen one of them quite a while. it will bring thickening cloud, rain and strengthening winds. that is due to this the area of low pressure coming our way. two fronts with both keating to the east and south—east, bringing rain with at them as they do so. into thursday, the first one sits southwards, giving us light rain by the time against southern england. the second one pushes across scotland with some heavy rain and it is in the north we are likely to have the strong with winds. wherever you are on wednesday and thursday, you will notice the wind, particularly on thursday. the speak to you later.
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rolls—royce is set to announce more than 4,000 job losses this week. steph is here with more. it is important to point out it is not the clouds, rolls—royce also makes engines for aeroplanes. they makes engines for aeroplanes. they make various things for the nuclear industry as well. they employ around 23,000 people here in the uk at 30 different sites across the whole world and it is about 50,000 people. the company has said so far is that they want to simplify the staff structure, which is cold, coats they need to get rid of some of the jobs. the executive has said in the past that the company, there is lots of multiple jobs, that the company, there is lots of multiplejobs, jupiter that the company, there is lots of multiple jobs, jupiterjobs that the company, there is lots of multiple jobs, jupiter jobs and also he says that it is quite over bloated with unnecessary layers of management. what we are expecting to hear is that these job will be in
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areas such as fine and, hr and purchasing, and not the engineering side of the business. the chief executive has already cutjobs in the past, he has only cut 5500 jobs before. we are expecting on friday about the latest job before. we are expecting on friday about the latestjob cuts. analysts say it will be around 4000 across the world, so not necessarily all in the world, so not necessarily all in the uk. it is a very worrying time when you are working for a company and you know this is coming.|j when you are working for a company and you know this is coming. i like to think the company is sorry talking to its staff about the areas where they are looking at cuts and hopefully it is notjust us telling them. that has happened in the past. the first they have heard enough saying it on the news. it is terrible to think of, isn't it? and he very much. i know you keep up—to—date through the week as well. with more than two billion players worldwide, video games are big business. bigger, in fact, than the movie industry. this week the biggest gaming show in the world, e3, takes place in los angeles, where around 70,000 people will be hoping to find out about next year's
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most anticipated releases. dave lee is there for us this morning. we can speak to him now. this industry, it is a big industry worth a fortune. an absolute fortune. this the biggest week in the calendar if you are either a gaming fan of someone you are either a gaming fan of someone in the games industry. 0ver the few days, people can play games that haven't been seen before, they can get their hands on them for the very fullest time before most people in the world. they get bragging rights are doing that. if you are one of the 70,000 people that will be coming to this, that will be queueing for a long time to have ten minutes or on those gains to see what they are like, the show starts fully tomorrow, but people have or eb arriving and getting very excited. this is the xbox e 32018.
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this is the xbox e 320 18. we are now at a moment of exceptional creativity. we wanted to be here to see how it is like to be inside. another fabulous day. do you should be doing. all the new details about the games. we are looking forward to fallout 76. yeah, excited to see that. love the coal industry. games have been part of my whole life. congratulations. there is up. control point is ours. the imagery and the way these things look is quite staggering, but the bar is that higher all the time. i think microsoft are already showing something. covers about that. yes, further edition is microsoft with the xbox always goes first, and one
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of their challenges if he is to get more exclusive titles on its xbox in order to compete with the playstation which is doing better when it comes to sales globally. to do that, microsoft have been spending a lot of muggy. they are acquiring a new studio, they make games including two in the uk in the hope there will make games exclusively for the xbox. that will bea exclusively for the xbox. that will be a success. some of the big types we have seen this year from xbox a new gears of war five which will have a female lead for the first time, iwas have a female lead for the first time, i was able to, after the presentation from xbox, i was able to talk to phil spencer, the head of xbox coming here is what he had to say. the mono to is asian, the business side of gaming is growing double digits every year, when it is free to play games, download to own games, subscriptions, you see games reaching every person on every device with multiple business models and it showers the vibrancy and the
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art form that is games. so one monday, today, are the show will be kicking off and sunny will begin their announcement, showing what they to compete with xbox. 0ne their announcement, showing what they to compete with xbox. one of they to compete with xbox. one of the things i looking forward to is going to be tomorrow where there will be an enormous fortnight competition, if you haven't heard of it, someone in yourfamily competition, if you haven't heard of it, someone in your family will have done. they will hold a big condition ina stadium done. they will hold a big condition in a stadium of fortnight players to battle it out, and it will be quite a spectacle. that is what i would check out and there will be plenty more of gaming news coming this week. thank you very much. i have never heard of that. i have. i have never heard of that. i have. i have never played it. maybe i should have a look. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm alpa patel. a fire at a hospital in enfield has led to 45 people being evacuated.
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almost 60 firefighters tackled the blaze at chase farm hospital, which started just after 10:00 last night. seven people were treated for smoke inhalation. the cause of the fire is under investigation. a new scheme is being launched in london today in an attempt to tackle violent crime. it will be available for all londoners over the age of 14. last night, three people were stabbed in london in separate incidents. later, sadiq khan will meet the home secretary. the met police service now has fewer officers since 2003, our population has grown by almost 2 million, crime is more complex, we know the impact of social media, and enough is enough. the home secretary, whose appointment i welcome, has to actually walk the walk now about investing in our police service. a top skater from sutton who suffered a life—threatening brain injury while performing a trick is launching a campaign urging others to wear helmets. rob glanville had to learn to walk and talk again.
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he wasn't wearing head gear, but is now urging others to learn from his experience. it can stop what happened to me happening to someone else, so i want to try and influence the next generation, the younger generation so they make good decisions when it comes to wearing the right protective gear so that they don't have to learn the hard way, like i did. 0n the tube, a good service on all lines. 0n the trains, a track fault at liverpool street is causing some disruption fir greater anglia services to and from southend, harwich, ipswich and norwich. the north circular in ealing is currently blocked in both directions by an accident at the junction with corring—way near north ealing station. in dagenham, an accident is blocking one lane on the a13, coming into town just before chequers lane. 0n blackfriars bridge, a lane is blocked and it's very slow due to accident on a201 northbound at victoria embankment and new bridge street.
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let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. it is a lovely bright start this morning. blue sky and sunshine, a little bit of mistiness for some. in tost part, today will stay fine and dry. we have some good spells of sunshine, one or two showers further south, but they will fizzle out. the cloud will burn back towards the east coast. a pleasant afternoon, the sunshine quite strong at the moment, pollen count also high. temperatures getting up to 24 celsius. a lovely evening in the sunshine, then overnight, and some showers overnight. the cloud will gradually work its way in again from the east, should stay dry, again a little bit of mistiness. the minimum temperature between 11 and 12 celsius. for tomorrow, it could be a cloudy start. but again, that will start to burn back. some bright and sunny spells. a touch cooler as we had through tuesday. plenty of sunny spells
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and temperatures staying in the low 205. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. hello. this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and louise minchin. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. final preparations are being made in singapore for the first ever meeting between a sitting president of the usa and a leader of north korea. donald trump will hold talks with kim jong—un tomorrow. 0ur asia correspondent, rupert wingfield—hayes, is outside the singaporean prime minister's office, which mr trump visited earlier. give us an update. good morning. good morning from a very hot and sunny singapore. it is the president's palace in there. a beautiful old building from the colonial times of the past. that is
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where he now lives and where the prime minister hosted president trump for lunch a short time ago. his convoy left to do five minutes ago. 26 vehicles, i counted. they a p pa re ntly ago. 26 vehicles, i counted. they apparently had a birthday cake. they had a birthday cake for the us president because it was his birthday a few days ago. he is now going to the us embassy for a meeting. a lot of excitement on the eve of this historic summit. probably the biggest international event, political and diplomatic event, political and diplomatic event, that has ever happened in this very small citystate. tremendous excitement. a degree of pride that singapore was chosen to host the summit. thank you. interesting seeing the cavalcade. we will keep you updated on that. on his way to making peace with north korea, president trump unleashed a verbal tirade against some
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of america's closest allies. he fired off a string of angry tweets after leaving a divisive g7 summit in canada, during which the issue of us tariffs on steel and aluminium was discussed. in one tweet he described the canadian prime minister, justin trudeau, as "very dishonest and weak. " a ship carrying more than 600 migrants who were rescued from the mediterranean is being refused access to both italy and malta. they'd been picked up by a german charity off the coast of libya. the new italian interior minister, matteo salvini, who is leader of italy's far—right league, has called on malta to take them in, but the maltese say they aren't legally responsible. theresa may is set to appeal for a show of unity from her warring mps ahead of tuesday's crucial commons vote on the eu withdrawal bill. 0ur political correspondent, chris mason, joins us now from westminster. talk us through this week. it is one
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of those weeks where we say it could bea of those weeks where we say it could be a very important week. it is. there will be plenty more to come as well. the prime minister is addressing conservative mps tonight. a plea for unity across the newspapers yesterday. plenty of conservative mps have done that. they only do that when there is a fear of the absence of it to be a big vote in the commons tomorrow and on wednesday. there is to the ongoing discussion and debate about how close the uk should be to the eu after brexit. it is wounding to any prime minister, the prospect of defeat in the commons. especially for this prime minister given her position and brexit, the central issue defining her time in office. she will hope she can escape defeat this week. if she does, there is
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still the prospect of further trouble a little down the road. there are around four crucial brexit weeks in every month, i think. there are around four crucial brexit weeks in every month, i thinklj love that. four. new measures designed to improve patient safety as well as protect doctors and nurses when mistakes are made are being unveiled this morning. the announcement comes after concerns were raised over the case of dr hadiza bawa—garba, who was struck off after being found guilty of the manslaughter by gross negligence of a six—year—old boy. the tuition fees system for england's universities is "ripping off" students and gives "poor value for money," according to a parliamentary committee. the house of lords economics committee says the system is unfair and requires immediate reform. but the department for education said its review of fees would "make sure students are getting value for money." homelessness in britain could be eradicated within 10 years with the correct measures in place, according to a new report by charity
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crisis. it says more than 100,000 social homes need to be built each year for the next fifteen years to help both rough sleepers and those on low incomes. the government says it's investing £1.2 billion to tackle the problem. the duke and duchess of sussex will make an official visit to australia, fiji, tonga, and new zealand. harry and meghan's autumn tour, the first announced since the couple were married last month, coincides with the fourth invictus games, which will be staged in sydney in october. the couple follow in the footsteps of prince harry's parents, charles and diana, whose first royal tour was to australia and new zealand. you are up—to—date with all of the news. a lovely weekend coming up. carol will have the weather later. sometimes, there are results you can predict, like rafael nadal in the french open, and sometimes, they can ta ke french open, and sometimes, they can take you completely by surprise. have you ever thought about that? well, well, well, that is sport for
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you. that is right. there was a big shock in the cricket as scotland beat england for the very first time. scotland racked up their highest one—day total in edinburgh thanks to a century from big—hitting calum macleod. england are the number one ranked one—day team in the world remember, but even a jonny bairstow hundred wasn't enough as they lost by six runs. a great day in the history of scottish cricket. the energy from the crowd, are own backyard. to chase it down, the ebb and flow. certainly one of the best games of cricket i have been involved in. rafael nadal continues to write his own history at the french open. he's nicknamed the ‘king of clay‘ for good reason, winning his 11th title at roland garros, beating austria's dominic thiem in the final. he's now won 17 major titles and is three behind roger federer with wimbledon just three weeks away, but nadal‘s not yet sure if he'll play there. look how emotional he is.
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i will have to come back and speak with my team and decide what is better for my body. that is the main thing. i would love to be playing as many places as possible, but as you understand, i need to check how i am feeling in the next couple of days. i think we will let him have a couple of days of rest. lewis hamilton has surrendered the lead in the formula 1 world championship to title rival sebastian vettel, after the ferrari driver won the canadian grand prix. most of the drama happened right at the start of the race with a big crash involving the canadian lance stroll. the chequered flag was then waved a lap too early by model, winnie harlow, much to the annoyance of leader, sebastian vettell. vettel went on to win comfortably, leap—frogging hamilton in the standings after he could only finish fifth.
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i wonder what the regulations say, if you stop seeing the flag, what happens? i felt desperately sorry for her. someone told her to do it. she isjust for her. someone told her to do it. she is just the famous face doing what she was told. he went bonkers. it was boiling hot. it was a british one—two at the leeds round of the world triathlon series. 0lympic bronze medallist vicky holland claimed her third world triathlon series win, her first on home soil. georgia taylor—brown finished seventeen seconds behind for herfirst world series podium. we are still waiting for a bit of an update on what happened. england fly to russia for the world cup tomorrow, and they were given a special
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send off yesterday. by the red arrows, who flew over st george's park as gareth southgate's side trained. meanwhile, we've had a bit of insight into some of the vagueries of playing for england at a world cup, including players being told they are too fat. this is from the former england goalkeeper rob green, who played at the 2010 world cup in south africa under then manager fabio capello. a p pa re ntly apparently it happens a lot.|j apparently it happens a lot. i have spoken before about not knowing was playing i against americans until two hours before kickoff. it wasn't that they didn't tell me, theyjust didn't talk at all. we were told every day we were too fat after being weighed. every day? yes. two
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days before the opening game and you are told you are overweight and you do not know if you are playing or not, it is overwhelming at the minute. you could guess that was happening. not happy. no wonder they all... can you imagine being weighed at all?! i do not bother with that. we will see you later on. with more than 200,000 homeless people across england, wales and scotland, solving the problem completely might seem like a distant, and unlikely, ambition. but a report by the charity crisis claims homelessness in britain could be eradicated within ten years, if a series of measures and government policies are put in place. the report follows a £30m investment to help rough sleepers announced by the government this weekend. jon sparkes, chief executive of crisis, joins us from our london newsroom. thank you for your time. good
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morning. can we have a snapshot about this cure for homelessness? the plan we launched today sets out how we could end homelessness in great britain. what we mean by that, nobody rough sleeping in dangerous places like sheds and cars. people in emergency situations having the means to move on. and no one not having a place to go. there are solutions. of course, building housesis solutions. of course, building houses is a big part of it. 100,000 social homes need to be built each year. we also need to stop distinguishing between homeless people who get help and do not get help. a welfare system that truly cove rs help. a welfare system that truly covers the cost of housing. and we need to help people when they do become homeless or are at risk of homelessness. what are the costs of
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the policy you are talking about? 0ver ten years, the additional services and support for people, we think, over ten years, would cost £9.9 billion. we also have evidence there is a good benefit to the economy from this. local authorities would need to spend less eventually in supporting homeless people, and there would be less need for homeless people to use the nhs, less draw on the criminaljustice system, and more people able to work. the benefits are £26 billion, far outweighing the cost. you have looked internationally. and their models that have worked like this? with a tangible result? there are exa m ples with a tangible result? there are examples where parts of it have been done. finland, they have almost reduced rough sleeping 20. scotland, even, since 2003, a reduction of the number of people rough sleeping. ——
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to zero. and across the uk, between the late 90s and early 2000, we reduced it by two thirds. this is the first time there has been a comprehensive plan. you are speaking to us about this now and are the chief executive of crisis. how do you put this idea to government in a com plete you put this idea to government in a complete form with a structure to it? what do they say? we are talking to the governments in england and scotla nd to the governments in england and scotland and wales. i have to say there is a greater interest and commitment to tackling rough sleeping and homelessness generally than we have seen for many years. we have discussed this with the uk government is. i am chairing an action group for the scottish government. the idea of the plan is to help governments put their ronneblad together, but they need to be comprehensive plans. they cannot just tackle the symptoms, they have to get to the root cause. we
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mentioned the lead in, the government hasjust mentioned the lead in, the government has just announced £30 million for councils to help boost the immediate support available for people who are homeless, that is £30 million. they say they are also investing more than 1.2 billion to tackle all forms of homelessness. how do those figures sit in relation to what you think needs to be done? the additional £30 million announced to support people who are rough sleeping is incredibly welcome. clearly, a big part of this plan is when people end up sleeping rough, they need the help to get them out of that. it is very welcome the government are doing that. the bigger figure, government are doing that. the biggerfigure, a large part of that, is spent on temporary accommodation. if he can spend money on things that end homelessness, we will stop spending so much on temporary accommodation. this is welcome from all political parties, especially those in government. thank you very
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much for your time this morning. chief executive at crisis. and now for the weather. a beautiful weekend. a change is on the way? you are correct. good morning. a change in the weather forecast from wednesday to thursday. the last few weeks, high pressure has been in charge. we have been bringing in weather from the near continent and heat and thunderstorms. and now, from the atlantic. a change in the sense we will see wet and windy weather coming our way a bit today, sunny spells and a few showers. high, very high, levels of grass pollen. if you have an allergy, keep that in mind. you can see the levels on the map. first thing this morning, blue sky. cloud in scotland, especially the north and east. you will hang onto that for much the day. northern ireland, more
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cloud. the east coast of england, prone to more cloud. south—west england as well. this cloud is producing showers. they are hit and miss and will continue to be so through the gate. some sunshine. the sun is developing through the day. further showers will develop in wales, the pennines, down towards the midlands, for example. sunny skies for the longest period of time, east anglia, the midlands, southern counties. the highest temperatures, up to 25. the north sea coast, hanging on to the cloud. the evening and overnight, many showers will fade. hanging on to some of them. at the same time, more cloud from the north sea pushing across much of the uk. hanging on to clear skies in the west and wales and down the hampshire and dorset. 11-14. and down the hampshire and dorset. 11—14. starting the day tomorrow, a grey start. through the morning, the
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cloud will be in and break and we will start to see sunny spells developing. —— thin. sunny spells in scotland, south—west england, for example. temperatures will be down a touch on the day. today, we could hit 25, tomorrow, the south—east, more likely to be between 19 and 20. wednesday, starting off dry and sunny for scotland, southern scotland, that is, england and wales. cloud quickly building in scotla nd wales. cloud quickly building in scotland and northern ireland. you will see the change in the shape of the thickening cloud. some wet and windy weather coming away. the sunshine for the south, highs of 21. 0nly sunshine for the south, highs of 21. only 13 in stornoway. that is why we have low pressure with fronts going south—east. the low pressure is actually moving towards the north. that is what is going to bring the change. as the front goes south, it will take rain with it. it will be more week that goes across southern
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england. heavy rain in northern scotland. the strongest wind will be in the north. a windy day wherever you are. temperatures up to the low 20s. so, lou, that's the change you have been talking about. gardeners will like that. thank you. we talk about maths on this programme. there is a difference between maths and understanding numbers and personal fine and stuff. that is a complaint that there is not enough personal fine and talk to schoolchildren. it's fair to say that thousands of teenagers leave school every year not knowing anything about basic personal finance, such as how a credit card works, what tax is and how to protect yourself from id fraud. there are some schools that have taken the intiative to run their own money lessons. you might remember ijoined one of these classes recently in sacred heart primary mchool in manchester, where they were learning about currencies. we have learned about how to save
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muqqy we have learned about how to save muggy and what to do with it. do you think that is useful? yes. it helps you learn maths and i think i am pretty good at maths. i want to know ifi pretty good at maths. i want to know iflam pretty good at maths. i want to know if i am travelling somewhere, i want to know the conversions.” if i am travelling somewhere, i want to know the conversions. i have with my grandmother because she polish and she sometimes asks me about pounds and if that £5, 15, 20. and i tell her in english, yes. that is good. i'm joined now by joy ingram, the head of arkholme church of england primary school, who last week won the primary school personal finance teacher of the year award. thank you. tell us what it is you teachin thank you. tell us what it is you teach in schools. it is personal fine and. it is trying to instil the idea of money and the concept of
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money and the monetary value at a really early age. we are practically and hands on in an engaging and inspiring way and build it on through the curriculum, and i am really proud of the work that my stu d e nts really proud of the work that my students do with the rotary club so they are all young rotarians, part of the kids club and a look at personal finance of the kids club and a look at personalfinance in of the kids club and a look at personal finance in terms of money and how it benefits them but how we can use finance to support other people less fortunate than us. by the time the children you leave your school at 11, what they know? they have looked at how can we save money, how can we earn money, making decisions about it wisely, looking at credit, borrowing, loaning money, the benefit and negatives of that, obviously, and getting that role wider understanding of money, the value of money, the responsibility of having money and making wise and
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sensible decisions, really. why did think this is something that needs to be taught? it is an additional thing you do, isn't it? it is, but money is part of the mass curriculum, but we use our personal health and social education curriculum to focus on the aspects of both eager questions. it is really important because i think the primary school, we want our children to leave us as responsible citizens, they will be citizens of the future that have the responsibility and make those sensible and wise decisions. it isjust make those sensible and wise decisions. it is just giving them an early grounding of that so that and when they go to secondary school, they have a good foundation on which to build and take those concepts and that knowledge and understanding further. when i visited them and chatted to the parents as well, the pa rent chatted to the parents as well, the parent said to me, actually, their children helped commit them with money things that. what feedback you
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had? parents are great and supportive, and it is good to involve them. we are a very small programme and primary school, so children see it that part of our whole functioning as a school, really, and getting their in terms of fundraising for our school and setting challenges to kind of raise income, so children sit at that level and parents sit at that level as well, and we try and involve pa rents as well, and we try and involve parents in coming along to our open mornings, mass curriculum evenings to see how the children are learning and then to help with the board them and then to help with the board them and how they can support their children at home as well. really interesting. thank you so much and congratulations as well. a brilliant award there. that is it for me now. thank you. we havejust award there. that is it for me now. thank you. we have just been award there. that is it for me now. thank you. we havejust beenjoined by some bugs. can we see them now? we have a little select sherman. we can probably see them there, a little selection of bugs. thanks to record—breaking temperatures, britain is in full
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bloom much earlier than expected this year. but it isn'tjust our gardens that are prematurely springing to life. the insects that call them home have arrived in their numbers. we're joined now by entomologist sally ann spence, who can talk us through this bug boom, as well as dr barbara murray who can offer advice on how best to treat bites. lots of people are talking about being bitten at the moment. you love them presumably. talk us through what you brought today.” them presumably. talk us through what you brought today. i brought a non— biting selection. we only have a few, a very small amount of insects that right you compare to the insects around. what i have here is some chasers, these insects we are seeing at the moment. let's start off with something really pretty. there you go. these are ones that are from my garden, very quickly this morning. what is the green one? that is a mint leaf
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beetle. they are beautiful beetles, very shiny. fantastic colour. what is so striking is they look like jewels. they do. such a beautiful colour. we have beautiful insects in this country, really before insects, and we don't really appreciate them because they are so small. we go to other countries and they have amazing insects and beetles, but we have all that here isjust that amazing insects and beetles, but we have all that here is just that they are tiny. what are these ones? dung beetles. they are trying to look for some dung that they can bury their way in, spend a nice cosy night in a dung pats. i have not good record with insects away holding on tight. really good recyclers, dung beetles. 0k really good recyclers, dung beetles. ok with insects. i was thinking about dung more than the. they are from your garden? they are just in a
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field outside and they are important because they break down the dung. without the dung, with the dung being broken down, you don't have the time for the fly eggs and maggots to hatch and become flies, so maggots to hatch and become flies, so that lessons disease risk and things as well, they break down parasite and there is lots of things going on as well is breaking down the dung. we were talking about the biting and stinging. mosquitoes, it isa biting and stinging. mosquitoes, it is a anecdotally people say there are more this year. we have the brilliant weather, the hot and humid weather that is perfect for them. what is happening is people are getting bitten by the female, not the male, she is looking for a blood meal for she later eggs and she is looking for the best protein before she has her eggs, and she can eat blood from lots of different animals, most of which are covered in very thick hair and you go out there in fairly hairless, you are walking meal, really. at easy to get
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there. she will feed before she later eggs. the males are not all bad mosquitoes, the males are busy pollinating. we forget about things like that. i have had lots of bites. 0ur like that. i have had lots of bites. our people coming to you with problems? some do not cause problems. most people do not react, because they have a good indian systems you don't know you are reacting. some people have a hyperactive immune system and you do, some people say, ialways hyperactive immune system and you do, some people say, i always get bites. most people get rights. if there is a prevalence of these things, you need to be protected against them using the simple things that you can buy over the counter, like the substances containing deet, which is a repellent, i believe it affects the olfactory system so they don't like the smell of the deet. any of those sort of role on things. if you get a bite and irritate it or
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you break the skin, that can genuinely turned very nasty.“ you break the skin, that can genuinely turned very nasty. if it isa sting, genuinely turned very nasty. if it is a sting, you want to try and re move is a sting, you want to try and remove it, so that don't squeeze it because you are squeezing the poison back in. you need to scrape it off with a credit card or something. if it isa with a credit card or something. if it is a tick bite, i have a pair of tweezers, you want to remove it using something like this very fine's lift it directly off the skins are you are not leaving... this sounds horrible... the mouth it in because that is where the enemy is. and a tick, it is unusual, it is unusual to get a nasty disease? you can get diseases. there is a disease called lion disease where you can have immediate effects, swelling, redness and paying —— lime disease. the important thing is to remove the tick as soon as possible. if it stays on the skins and 24 hours and is infected with the bacteria, and
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thatis is infected with the bacteria, and that is when you are more likely to get the infection. on the whole, we welcome insects, don't we? we have very few biting insects in this country. that is a good thing. good to see both of you this morning and thank you for your advice. we were there to take home safely. time to get the news, travel and weather wherever you are watching. good morning from bbc london news. i'm alpa patel. a fire at a hospital in enfield has led to 45 people being evacuated. almost 60 firefighters tackled the blaze at chase farm hospital, which started just after 10:00 last night. seven people were treated for smoke inhalation. the cause of the fire is under investigation. a new scheme is being launched in london today in an attempt to tackle violent crime. it will be available for all londoners over the age of 14. last night, three people were stabbed in london in separate incidents.
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later, sadiq khan will meet the home secretary. the met police service now has fewer officers since 2003, our population has grown by almost 2 million, crime is more complex, we know the impact of social media, and enough is enough. the home secretary, whose appointment i welcome, has got to actually walk the walk now about investing in our police service. a skater from sutton who suffered a life—threatening brain injury while performing a trick is launching a campaign urging others to wear helmets. rob glanville had to learn to walk and talk again. he wasn't wearing head gear, but is now urging others to learn from his experience. it can stop what happened to me happening to someone else, so i want to try and influence the next generation, the younger generation so they make good decisions when it comes to wearing the right protective gear so that they don't have to learn the hard way, like i did. let's have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube, a good service on all lines.
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0n the trains, a track fault at liverpool street is causing some disruption fir greater anglia services to and from southend, harwich, ipswich and norwich. the north circular in ealing is currently blocked in both directions by an accident at the junction with corring—way near north ealing station. 0n blackfriars bridge, a lane is blocked and it's very slow due to accident on a201 northbound at victoria embankment and new bridge street. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. it is a lovely bright start this morning. blue sky and sunshine, a little bit of mistiness for some. in the most part, today will stay fine and dry. we have some good spells of sunshine, one or two showers further south, but they will fizzle out. the cloud, if you have it, will burn back towards the east coast. a pleasant afternoon,
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the sunshine quite strong at the moment, pollen count also high. temperatures getting up to 24 celsius. a lovely evening in the sunshine, then overnight, some clear spells and the cloud will work it way in again from the east, should stay dry, again a little bit of mistiness. the minimum temperature between 11 and 12 celsius. for tomorrow, it could be a cloudy start. but again, that will start to burn back. some bright and sunny spells. a touch cooler as we had through tuesday. plenty of sunny spells and temperatures staying in the low 205. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. good morning it's monday 11thjune.
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also this morning. the prime minster calls for unity over brexit ahead of key votes in the commons this week. we will speak to the soldier who made history by wearing a turban for the queen's parade. rolls royce is expected to announce 4000 jobs cuts as part of efforts to cut costs and boost profits. i'll have more shortly. and in sport, scotland pull off one of the biggest wins in their cricketing history. they beat england — the best one day team in the world — for the first time in edinburgh. and carol has the weather. good morning. for many, a day of sunny spells at a few showers. the exception to that, across scotland,
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where they have a small cloud across the north—east. and northern ireland, where at times it will be fairly cloudy for you, as well. top temperatures up to 25 celsius. i will have more in 15. good morning. first, our main story. donald trump says there's "excitement in the air" as he prepares to hold talks with the north korean leader kim jong—un. this morning mr trump met with the singaporean prime minister, lee shen long, beforejoining delegates for lunch. barbara plett usher's is in singapore he has been talking about excitement in the air. what can we expect from this meeting? we can expect him to stay excited. he has wanted to do this. he likes these big historic gestures. he feels he is uniquely equipped to meet with kimjong—un, size him up, persuade him to give up its nuclear weapons. he likes the challenge. we don't know exactly what will happen because of the fact we haven't had this kind of meeting
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before, the two leaders together, both unpredictable, both larger than life. they ultimately make the decision. we are looking to see what can come out of it. trump has a list of things he is ready to offer that would help improve the north koreans' economy, embassies in the future, at some stage. but he wants to know what kim jong—un future, at some stage. but he wants to know what kimjong—un is ready future, at some stage. but he wants to know what kim jong—un is ready to give up in terms of nuclear weapons. he used to talk about a big diplomatic breakthrough. he has come back from that. if it is the success it will be the start of a process he has said. but we will be looking to see what detail he will come up with. would kim jong—un see what detail he will come up with. would kimjong—un be ready to give us an inventory of his weapons? he's never done that before. will he let inspectors in to look at some of the sites? it is the details that people will be looking to see what has actually been achieved as long as the talks do not go bust. thanks very much. on his way to making peace with north korea,
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president trump unleashed a verbal tirade against some of america's closest allies. he fired off a string of angry tweets after leaving a divisive g7 summit in canada, during which the issue of us tariffs on steel and aluminium was discussed. in one tweet he described the canadian prime minister, justin trudeau, as "very dishonest and wea k". a ship carrying more than 600 migrants who were rescued from the mediterranean is being refused access to both italy and malta. they'd been picked up by a german charity off the coast of libya. the new italian interior minister, matteo salvini, who is leader of italy's far—right league, has called on malta to take them in, but the maltese say they aren't legally responsible. new measures designed to improve patient safety, and protect doctors and nurses when mistakes are made are unveiled today. it follows the case of a doctor who was struck off after being found guilty of the manslaughter by gross negligence of a six year old boy. our health correspondent dominic
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hughes has more details. the death of 6 year—old jack adcock in 2011 is the tragic backdrop to today's announcement. the doctor in charge whenjack died, doctor hadiza bawa—garba, admitted a catalogue of errors in his treatment but her conviction for gross negligence manslaughter and subsequently being barred from practicing shocked many doctors and nurses, leading to fears around how medical staff are expected to admit to and learn from mistakes. among the measures being introduced to the investigation of every death by a medical examiner or coroner data on doctors performance will allow them to see how they compare to others to help them improve. and the regulator, the general medical council, will no longer be able to appeal against the findings of disciplinary hearings as it did in the bawa—garba case. what we do know is that many of these errors are not about an individual doctor or a nurse,
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they are about a wider system. a system under pressure of inadequate facilities, inadequate doctors understaffed wards. and what we need to see is a culture where we learn from these errors so that they aren't repeated. doctors say medicine is about balancing risk and that mistakes will happen. the important thing is to learn from them. so tragedies like that of jack adcock can be avoided in the future. dominic hughes bbc news. homelessness in britain could be eradicated within 10 years with the correct measures in place, according to a new report by charity crisis. it says more than 100,000 social homes need to be built each year for the next fifteen years to help both rough sleepers and those on low incomes. the government says it's investing £1.2billion to tackle the problem. the duke and duchess of sussex will make an official visit to australia, fiji, tonga and new zealand. harry and meghan's autumn tour —
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the first announced since the couple were married last month — coincides with the fourth invictus games, which will be staged in sydney in october. the couple follow in the footsteps of prince harry's parents — charles and diana — whose first royal tour was to australia and new zealand. let's look on some of the babies. we have shown your images before the talks which are happening in singapore. this time tomorrow, in theory, if everything is in place, they will be having this talks already. —— let's take a look at some of the papers. very tough talking from donald trump, just ahead of yet another very important meeting. lots of papers carrying pictures from various different marches which took place yesterday to mark 100 yea rs took place yesterday to mark 100 years since some women took place yesterday to mark 100 years since some women got took place yesterday to mark 100 years since some women got the vote. this is a shot from edinburgh. it was described as a live artwork. sister marches and other places, as well. many of the papers talking
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about this other story, mps calling for police and parliament investigate links between a millionaire, a brexit donor, called alan banks, and the russian government. that is in the guardian and other papers. the ongoing interest in the private life of the beckhams. billion pound warplanes protected by a flimsy fife at picket fence, that is the tiny image you can see. “— at picket fence, that is the tiny image you can see. —— flimsy five foot picket fence. we can speak to professor robert kelly. today he is in singapore having a look at those proceedings today. robert, are you 0k, can you hear us? proceedings today. robert, are you ok, can you hear us? i can, thanks. thank you for your time. we've asked
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some people to look ahead to this summit, i suppose in some ways this is the most unpredictable of summits you could possibly imagine, that the chemistry between these two men, who knows what will happen? and we have this extraordinary setup. we understand, two hours, just the two men, with translators in the room. it is pretty exceptional. normally heads of state, whenever they meet with other heads of state, has some kind of transcription, staff, something there to make sure there isa something there to make sure there is a record. it is just two something there to make sure there is a record. it isjust two men in the room. this is the potential of some issues later. this is exceptional. they are both unique personalities. erratic and the rest of it. there is concern about what might come out after they have sat down because we don't know what they will say to each other. in the build—up, president trump has said that within 60 seconds he will know whether this is a man who he can do business with. what do you make of
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that language? it is so at odds with the way you normally see diplomacy working. this is part of president trump's persona. be erratic, the impulsive, that we were just talking about. my concern is that diplomacy with a state like north korea is more than whether donald trump feels he gets on with somebody he is meeting for a couple of hours. hopefully the president doesn't get into detail about policy. the issues we are talking about are deep and some are institutional and some transcend kim jong—un himself. some are institutional and some transcend kimjong—un himself. they have to learn about what the north koreans have, how much, in terms of nuclear weapons. the president, i don't think, has really possibly prepped for that. if they don't come out with this —— office with a check list of actual things that will happen, guarantees from north korea,
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will it be deemed to have been something ofjust a photo, a moment in history with two leaders meeting on nothing more than that? exactly. that's correct. i think that's the real threat here, that donald trump agreed to this just three months ago, which isn't enough time to organise something of this scale. he spent the last few months with his staff talking about the universal disarmament of north korea. that is an enormous task which will probably ta ke yea rs an enormous task which will probably take years to accomplish. it will certainly take more than a couple of months to prepare for that. just a few weeks ago donald trump was walking goes back. but the expectations have been large. american officials are still talking this way, too. there was a lot of pressure on the president to come away with something fantastic. but if it is a bust, if nothing happens, if it is a bust, if nothing happens, if they meet, shake hands, and that it, the north koreans still win because they get the photos of the
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american president on equal terms. that is why there was a lot of pressure on the president to make sure this isn't just pressure on the president to make sure this isn'tjust a photo opportunity. kim jong-un could walk away from this event. effectively, from his pr point of view, saying, i forced the us president to meet me andi forced the us president to meet me and i still didn't have agreed to anything. that is a risk, isn't it? exactly. i was concerned about this a few months ago. all the north koreans have to do is show up and it isa koreans have to do is show up and it is a victory. all they have to do is shake donald trump wants hand, smile, get donald trump to smile back, tell stories about, i don't know, dennis rodman, building a golf course in north korea, to have a television moment, and in the north koreans get what they want. they are only sticking around for a couple of hours of meetings. what the north koreans want they will get immediately, which is the photos. they will be happy to drag that out
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over yea rs . they will be happy to drag that out over years. we had a more positive approach, possibly, from the north koreans, this suggestion there will be sites destroyed. there has been evidence of that. what is your analysis of what has happened so far, if anything? the north koreans have good signals. i don't want to be hawkish about it. the north koreans have been making some good signals. so far what they have given is low hanging fruit, things that are not irreversible, like minor concessions. we want something serious from them. we don't know how many weapons they have, they could just tell us a number. that alone, that would be a huge step forward, right? we don't know if the sites they are destroying our relevant. 0ne they are destroying our relevant. one of the test sites, for example, which might have had a rupture, well, we need assurances to make sure that the things they are
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telling us, that the concessions are in fact concessions. they destroyed test sites, we know about that. but they might not necessarily be forward movements. even if they make a deal tomorrow, you have got to send people into north korea, which will be eight huge hassle, getting inspectors in there. who knows, by this time tomorrow we may well know which way this thing is going to go. thank you for your time. maybe we will catch up in 24 hours' time. thank you very much. —— which will bea thank you very much. —— which will be a huge hassle, getting inspectors in there. the weather was gorgeous this weekend, i don't know if it will stay that way. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. high levels of pollen. it is grass pollen at this time of year across many parts of the uk. for some of us, we many parts of the uk. for some of us, we are many parts of the uk. for some of us, we are hanging onto more in the way of cloud. high pressure is still
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in charge. but it is starting to slip away. things will change as we head into the middle of the week as low pressure then takes over our weather. things are fairly quiet today. lots of dry weather and some tried to start the day. but there will be showers developing through the afternoon. you can see showers coming out of the thick cloud for eastern scotland. brightening up over southern and western scotland. brightening up over eastern northern ireland, the west remains cloudy with showers. that is the same from northwest england. but a lot of other areas have a lot of sunshine. a few showers into the midlands. this evening and overnight, many showers will fade, but not all of them. more cloud will come in from them. more cloud will come in from the north sea, spreading to the west, although some western areas will have clearer skies. temperature wise, it won't be cold. we have a temperature range between nine and 14. we start tomorrow with a lot of cloud around. through the day you will find it will thin and break and
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sunny spells will develop. there will be showers in the forecast across southern scotland, south—west england, here and there, but they are hitand england, here and there, but they are hit and miss. temperatures will be down a touch. in southern england, it could hit 25 today, but tomorrow is more likely to be 19 or 20. temperatures will be that bit slower on the north sea coast line. by slower on the north sea coast line. by wednesday, we start with sunshine for england and wales and southern scotland, but a lot of cloud in the north. that cloud continuing to thicken as it will do over northern ireland, heralding the arrival of an area of low pressure with its intendant fronts. it will produce heavy rain. and the wind will strengthen. the strongest winds on wednesday will be in the northern half of the country. by thursday, the first front coming our way will be sinking south. the rain on it will be light as it cuts across southern england. and a second front
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will cross scotland with heavy rain. again, windy, we are keeping a close eye on the strength of the wind. as we come further south, it won't be as windy as it will be in the north. 0nly as windy as it will be in the north. only 12 to 13 in stornoway, to highs of about 21 as we sweep down to the south—east. thank you. brexit secretary david davis is in brussels for the latest round of talks with the eu chief negotiator michel barnier. 0ur correspondent, adam fleming, joins us live from there to tell us what's likely to be on today's agenda. what are they going to discuss, will there be any deals? this is very much an informal catch up. a stepping stone rather than a leap forward. about an hour ago michel barnier was in this coffee shop opposite his office buying the croissants, that is how informal
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basis. david davis has not been here for a couple of months which has been a source of frustration for negotiators here. they are happy with dealing with civil servants for a while but then they want some political input at top level. they are working on the treaty which sums up are working on the treaty which sums up the terms of the divorce. there are some outstanding issues. the big ones are how to avoid a border between northern ireland and ireland. and another tricky one where little progress has been made, how do you come up with a mechanism for solving disputes about the treaty between the two sides? david davis's focus will be on getting some sort of security partnership to keep people in the uk and the eu safe after brexit. plenty to discuss over the croissants but we are not expecting great leaps forward today. neither will do a press conference afterwards about what they have discussed. unlike the other meeting
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we have been talking about today. thanks very much. i suspect we will hear from donald trump tomorrow after the meeting. 0ne after the meeting. one would assume so. news from rolls—royce, another story aboutjob news from rolls—royce, another story about job losses. we are expecting them to announce they will cut about 4000 jobs. that will probably happen on friday. but there is lots of speculation. rolls—royce is a great british engineering name. not cause any more, those are made by bmw, but it is engine is used for aeroplanes and the nuclear industry, as well. it employs around 23,000 people in the uk at 13 different sites. it has a big place in british industry. across the world it is a big name. 15,000 jobs around the world, as well. the firm has said today that it is looking to have a more simplified staff structure. that will involve job cuts. that is what
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we are reading between the lines here. we heard the chief executive, warren east, say before that he thinks the business is bloated. he thinks the business is bloated. he thinks there is duplicated jobs, too many layers of management. we are expecting job cuts in areas like finance, hr, the administrative side of the business, the purchasing side, as well. not the engineering front line jobs. side, as well. not the engineering front linejobs. it is more thejobs in the administrative side of the business. we heard from him before aboutjob business. we heard from him before about job losses. he business. we heard from him before aboutjob losses. he has only been in thejob for three aboutjob losses. he has only been in the job for three years as chief executive but has already made his mark. we've already had job losses. we don't know exactly where they will be, but those 4000 jobs will be all over the world, notjust the uk, most likely, but we will have more detail on it on friday. so many days at the moment there are these phrases, streamlining, restructuring, jobs, ultimately, it is happening a lot right now.“
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restructuring, jobs, ultimately, it is happening a lot right now. it is. we were talking about we last week with house of fraser and the job losses there because of the closures of their shops. it's that time of yearagain of their shops. it's that time of year again where we see lots of businesses restructuring. the bills to pay with the retail side of thing. they have rents on these properties. it comes to certain times of the year where it is crunch times of the year where it is crunch time for some of these firms and they are looking at restructuring. it was a good night for the british at the prestigious tony theatre awards in new york. harry potter and the cursed child won best play, and andrew lloyd webber was honoured with a special lifetime achievement award. 0ur reporter tom brook was at the ceremony: broadway's biggest night of the year. top names in theatre came out for the event. the tony award goes to harry potter and the cursed child. the play originated in london
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and it picked up six tony awards. it won for best play, direction, costu me, won for best play, direction, costume, lighting, scenic and sound design. this is such an extraordinary honour. thank you to broadway for welcoming us so openly. the strong victory was good news for the man who directed the production, john tiffany. who thought harry potter would win tony awards when it was first announced we were doing this? just beyond exciting that we have been recognised like this tonight. me and all of my colleagues, it is fantastic. glenda jackson. and it was a triumphant night for glenda jackson who won best actress for her role as an elderly matriarch in three tall women. they are so different. it is extremely hard to make any direct
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comparison, other than at their best, both the theatre and politics, they are telling us the truth about ourselves and how we can actually create a working society for everybody. how are you going to celebrate tonight? i will have a drink whenever there is a drink in reach. the best revival of a play tony award went to angels. a production from the national theatre. it also earned an award for andrew garfield for his leading role in the play. i want more life. this play is for anybody who has ever felt like they feel alone, ostracised by their culture, who have been told, indoctrinated by religion or a society that they were somehow created wrong. andrew lloyd webber has a presence at the ceremony, his musicals have made a
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big impact on broadway and he was awarded with a lifetime achievement award. for me to get this from the home of musicals, broadway, it is just extraordinary. i'm pinching myself, i don't believe it. a great night for britain with plays and uk theatre talent taking away many tony awards. but when it came to musicals it was a different picture because american productions triumphed. the best revival of a musical tony award went a production of 0nce 0n best revival of a musical tony award went a production of 0nce on this island. it won ten tony trophies, more than any other production. i love glenda jackson's... what did she say, i will be having a drink. whichever drink that in reach. have you seen the harry potter?
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i have. it is an immersive, magical experience. it is a cross two different shows. it is... the magic in it is fabulous. —— across two different shows. this morning we have been talking about staring into the abyss of nothing. the children's laureate said children should be allowed to stare into space. what are the benefits? using your imagination. this message said people not on task was mentioned about a pupil who stares out of the window. another message says, we had an amazing teacher, she took us out into the meadows, i still remember the soft grass and dappled light. she would read to us, then we would close our eyes, lie down, and imagine... are you with
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me? he's not. it was brilliant because it allows our minds to wander undisturbed. are you talking? all fantastic. but it is about when it is appropriate. because if you are doing an exam today, sitting for 20 minutes, looking out of the window, orjust staring aimlessly at your feet, that isn't the time to do it. probably. and there is probably a place, as well. it is lovely to stare out if you can see the countryside. yes, good for you. countryside. yes, good foryou. speaking countryside. yes, good for you. speaking of good for you, bryony will be with us later, she is talking about mental health awareness. she has been doing these programmes about walking and other things which have benefited people. yes, she started it with one message she wanted to get out, and lots of people joined her. the outdoors always has a part to play in making you feel better.
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that's true, and she will talk to us about that, as well. time to get the news, travel, and whether wherever you are. good morning. we have something of a change in the weather as we go through this week, mainly from wednesday evening on into thursday. something we haven't seen for quite a while across the uk. but for the week really, warm and sunny start to the week. plenty of sunshine this morning across england and wales. more cloud across scotland this morning. into the afternoon there will be some showers developing towards the north and the west with that. some showers likely in south—west england, wales, the north midlands, the leeds and bradford area, and into eastern parts of yorkshire this afternoon. those
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showers across scotland. for many it is dry and bright in the sunshine and feeling quite warm once again. maximum temperatures across england and wales getting to about 20 to 24 degrees, 14—19dc in scotland and northern ireland. through the evening and overnight, showers will clear away. cloud in eastern areas will feed further south—west, and some clear spells in the further west you are, with temperatures no lower than 11 or 12. on tuesday it will start off a bit cloudy compared to this morning. that cloud will thin out and break up to bring sunshine. showers developing into the afternoon across south—west scotla nd the afternoon across south—west scotland and north west england. showers also around wales but pretty isolated. for most it will be dry and fairly bright. going into wednesday, high pressure still dominating things for many of us. but you notice towards the west, low
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pressure system slowly moves its way m, pressure system slowly moves its way in, bringing cloud and rain across scotla nd in, bringing cloud and rain across scotland and northern ireland, and an increasing wind as well later on wednesday. but for the bulk of england and wales, it will be dry and bright with temperatures up into the 20s. that is it from me. goodbye. this is business live from bbc news with sally bundock and ben thompson. deep divisions between the us and its key allies after president trump's g7 meltdown. live from london, that's our top story on monday, 11thjune. global markets are having to digester worst—case scenario as they wa ke digester worst—case scenario as they wake up to fresh trade to mile after a barrage of angry tweets from the us president berating nato nations.
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—— trade turmoil. and more diplomacy ahead as donald trump arrives

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