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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  June 11, 2018 9:00am-11:01am BST

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hello it's monday, it's 9 o'clock, i'm victoria derbyshire, welcome to the programme president trump says there's "excitement in the air" ahead of his historic meeting with kim jong—un. north korean state says it could be the beginning of "a new relationship" with the united states. iam i am live in singapore. final preparations are taking place. final negotiations will take place. president trump and kim jong—un will be sitting down to meet each other a very short distance from where i am. also, deaf people tell our programme exclusively they're being left behind by the nhs in england because of a shortage of face to face interpreters — one deaf mum to be was told via tablet that she had miscarried her baby, and this man pulled out a tube from his throat because he panicked and there was no interpreter there to let him know what was going on. you can just imagine
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you canjust imagine if the you can just imagine if the world switched places for a while, and i became hearing, and everyone else was —— and everyone else was deaf. -- and everyone else was deaf. we will talk to agnes dyab. currently many deaf people do not have access to make appointments with doctors. and — challenging the ‘same roof rule'. this woman was sexually abused and raped by her stepfather between the ages of 4 and 16 — but can't claim compensation because she lived in the same house as her abuser. my mum used to work at a fish shop and she did nights. that's when it would happen. we'll bring you the story after ten. let me introduce you to matthew.
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welcome to our programme, we are live until 11. if you're deaf, have you ever gone to a hospital or doctor's appointment and not been offered a face—to—face interpreter? perhaps you were forced to take a family member with you — when you were there to discuss something personal? or maybe you were given bad news by an interpreter appearing on a tablet? today we're talking about a shortage of sign language interpreters in the nhs in england — and how deaf people are being left alone and confused in the worst of situations. do get in touch on all the stories we're talking about this morning — use the hashtag victorialive
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and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. our top story today... president trump says there's "excitement in the air" as he prepares to hold his historic summit with the north korean leader kim jong—un. both men have arrived in singapore — and they'll hold face to face talks tomorrow. we'll go over live to singapore in a second, but first this report from barbara plett usher's — a warning, it contains some flash photography. singapore is on alert ready to give history a helping hand with its largest security deployment ever for the unprecedented meeting. these impersonators are as close as people here will get to the two leaders. vastly different in age and experience but similar too — unpredictable and strong—willed. singapore's foreign minister had a chance to form his own impressions.
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both are supremely confident. both are hopeful. i think at an emotional level both of them want something significant out of this summit. there is excitement in the air, mr. trump tweeted shortly before meeting singapore's prime minister. he's excited too — eager to try his hand at convincing north korea to give up its nuclear weapons. no one knows how far kimjong—un is willing to go with that. butjust being here is a win for him — a chance to shed his international isolation. he brought his own armoured car and running bodyguards, but his people only found out about this daring escapade after he'd left long. state television said he'd talk about establishing a new relationship with the us preparing north koreans for a possible significant change. the meeting will take place on a tourist island — a near drive from where the two leaders are staying. the geography is all about privacy and security. officials say they will be starting talks with a one on one a chance to take the measure of each other. let's go over live now
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to singapore — our reporter there is rupert wingfield—hayes what are the officials doing before they meet? president trump and kim jong—un have been meeting with the singaporean prime minister, who is the host of the summit. the more interesting meetings are those going on at lower level, between senior us officials and senior north korean officials. they've been meeting for the past few weeks in south korea. they are meeting here again today to iron out the final detail. interesting this is happening right up until the last minute. because this summit, although it is important, perhaps an historic meeting, it is happening in a short amount of time. it has been organised within two months. but the real preparations did not happen untiljust a real preparations did not happen until just a couple real preparations did not happen untiljust a couple of real preparations did not happen until just a couple of weeks real preparations did not happen untiljust a couple of weeks ago.
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such a short period. a momentous event. it is going down to the wire. we don't know what they are potentially agreeing on or what might be in the communique tomorrow. everybody will be looking for when that meeting happens tomorrow for the details, what will come out of it, what will kim jong—un commit himself to in terms of getting rid of his nuclear weapons, if that is indeed what he is prepared to do. what concrete steps if he committed to in return for lifting sanctions and other things that north korea actually wants. thanks very much. that get a summary of the rest of today's news. —— let's get. on his way to singapore, president trump unleashed a verbal tirade against some of america's closest allies. he fired off a string of angry tweets after leaving an ill—tempered g7 summit in canada,
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which was dominated by the us imposition of tariffs on imports of steel and aluminium. in one tweet he described the canadian prime minister, justin trudeau, as "very dishonest and wea k". the brexit secretary david davis, is in brussels for the latest round of negotiations over the uk's exit from the european union. a breakfast meeting is scheduled to take place between mr davis and the eu chief negotiator michel barnier. it comes as tory mps have been urged to rally round theresa may ahead of a crucial series of house of commons votes on the brexit bill, following threats of a revolt by pro—remain mps. this programme has been told that deaf patients are missing out on key operations and receiving poor treatment because of a lack of face—to face interpreters. the department of health and social care says it's "unacceptable if deaf patients are not receiving the support they need to access care". some hospitals have started using video interpreting services — but one patient — jeff parfitt — who is undergoing treatment for cancer, says it's unreliable. i was, like, fine go ahead.
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so i've got this interpreter on the ipad, seems okay, but the sound wasn't working. a woman who was sexually abused as a child by her stepfather is challenging a law which means she cannot receive compensation, because they lived in the same house. the victim was abused by her stepfather between the ages of four and 16. in 2012 her stepfather was jailed for the offences, but under the so—called "same roof" rule the victim isn't eligible for compensation. a legal challenge will take place next week. new measures designed to improve patient safety, and protect doctors and nurses when mistakes are made
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are unveiled today. it follows the case of a doctor who was struck off after being found guilty of the manslaughter by gross negligence of a six—year—old boy. our health correspondent dominic hughes has more. the death of 6 year—old jack adcock in 2011 is the tragic backdrop to today's announcement. the doctor in charge whenjack died, doctor hadiza bawa—garba admitted a catalogue of errors in his treatment that her conviction for gross negligence manslaughter and subsequently being barred from practicing shocked many doctors and nurses, leading to fears around how medical staff are expected to admit to and learn from mistakes. among the measures being introduced to the investigation of every death by a medical examiner or coroner data on doctors performance will allow them to see how they compare to others to help them improve. and the regulator, the general medical council, will no longer be
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able to appeal against the findings of disciplinary hearings as it did in the bawa—garba case. what we do know is that many of these errors are not about an individual doctor or a nurse, they are about a wider system. a system under pressure of inadequate facilities, inadequate doctors understaffed wards. and what we need to see is a culture where we learn from these errors so that they aren't repeated. doctors say medicine is about balancing risk and that mistakes will happen. the important thing is to learn from them. so tragedies like that of jack adcock can be avoided in the future. dominic hughes bbc news. a ship carrying more than 600 migrants who were rescued from the mediterranean is stranded at sea, after being refused permission to land by both italy and malta. the migrants been picked up by a german charity off the coast of libya.
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the new italian interior minister, matteo salvini, who is the leader of the nationalist italian political party league, has called on malta to take them in, but the maltese say they aren't legally responsible. on tuition fees assistant for england's universities is ripping of stu d e nts england's universities is ripping of students and gives poor value for money according to a parliamentary committee. they say the system is unfairand requires committee. they say the system is unfair and requires immediate reform. the department for education says its review of fees would make sure students are getting value for money. homelessness in britain could be eradicated within ten years if the correct measures were put in place, according to crisis. it has more than 100,000 social homes need to be built each year for the more than 100,000 social homes need to be built each yearfor the next 15 years to help both rough sleepers and those on low incomes. the government says it is investing £1.2 billion to tackle the problem. the duke and duchess of sussex will make an official visit to australia,
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fiji, tonga, and new zealand. arian meghan —— harry and meghan ‘s tour will include the invictus games. nobody was hurt in the incident, which destroyed at least nine vehicles that were parked along the street. the driver of the track was arrested. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. we can bring you some breaking news. poundland has gone into administration. set to go into administration. set to go into administration at 10am this morning. it has over 5000 staff and over 300 stores, but poundland has gone bust. talks with an investment company have failed, meaning the owner felt it had no option but to put the
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company into administration. that's breaking news in the last minute. poundland has gone bust. over 5000 staff, 335 stores. i beg your pardon, poundworld, it has gone into administration. premature births are the biggest cause of death for children under five worldwide and now professor robert winston's charity which does medical research into why and how things can go wrong with conception, pregnancy and birth — says it's on the brink of major breakthrough which may save thousands of babies' lives every year. we will talk to him after 9:30am. if you would like to get in touch please do. your messages regarding
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oui’ please do. your messages regarding our exclusive story this morning, the lack of face—to—face interpreters is causing stress for a number of deaf patients accessing the nhs in england. julie hamilton says i'm so sick of reading every day about discrimination against disabled people in the uk. another message, they are using a video interpretation service over a rubbish hospital wi—fi, it isn't ideal. anthony says this, my brother is deaf, he also has learning difficulties. he has been in hospital a great deal over the past few months and i've never had the feeling, when he is in hospital, that anybody could communicate well enough for him in the absence of family members. an historic win for scotla nd family members. an historic win for scotland in the cricket at the expense of england. absolutely. a big shock in the world of cricket. scotland beating england for the first time. not just that, they did it in some style, the wind
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—— the win is the greatest in their history. this was at the grange in edinburgh. the world rankings went out of the window. scotland, ranked 13th, wrapped up their highest one—day total against england thanks largely to a century from calum macleod. jonny bairstow‘s effort wasn't enough. scotland reached 350 for the first time in their odi history. 47 boundaries. the most by an associate nation. they are not in next yea r‘s world an associate nation. they are not in next year's world cup. rafael nadal, amazing yesterday, king of the french open, but will he make london? we still don't know. rafael nadal continues to rewrite his own history at the french open. he is nicknamed the king of clay and rightly so. he beat dominic thiem in straight sets
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in the final. ps three behind roger federer in terms of titles with wimbledonjust federer in terms of titles with wimbledon just three weeks away. —— he is three behind. but he had an issue with hand cramp in paris. he has not made a decision on whether he will take part in the grass court season. thanks very much. this programme has been told exclusively that deaf people are missing key operations and receiving poor treatment for serious illnesses because of a lack of face—to—face interpreters. to deal with the problem some hospitals have started using video interpreting services. that is only when they cannot provide somebody in person. deaf patients have told us that the system can sometimes crash, making an already stressful situation even worse. others claim the video interpreting is being used
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in inappropriate situations — one deaf patient told us an online signer informed her that she had miscarried. the nhs is legally required to make sure health providers meet patients communication needs — and the department of health and social care says it's "unacceptable if deaf patients are not receiving the support they need to access care". anna collinson has this exclusive report. a department of health and social care spokesperson said: "it's unacceptable if deaf patients are not receiving the support they need to access nhs care. we expect trusts to make arrangements to accommodate their needs and we changed the law so that health and care providers are legally required to provide people with a disability or sensory loss with information that they can access and understand." nhs england says it's up to individual trusts to make a decision when to use video interpreters. thank you for your messages. beth on
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twitter says: this doesn't surprise me. i once trained as a hearing—impaired teacher because there was a deaf unit where right taught and even then there was such ignorance. and this one: i completed my bsl level one this weekend. everybody should learn it at least to level one. it is no big deal and your piece today shows it is of high importance. and this one: i have often wondered why deaf signing is not put on the school curriculum. if all children were taught to sign, nobody would feel death because we could talk together. —— nobody would feel deaf. thank you for your comments. still to come: professor robert winston is here to talk about the major breakthrough his charity is on the verge of making that could save the lives of thousands of premature babies each year. and how one charity believes homelessness could be ended in britain within ten years.
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we'll be speaking to them and to someone who was homeless for several months. time for the latest news. here's carole. president trump says there's excitement in the air as he prepares to hold his historic summit with the north korean leader kim jong un. both men have arrived in singapore ahead of face to face talks tomorrow. trump wants north korea to abandon its nuclear weapons programme. on his way to singapore, president trump unleashed a verbal tirade against some of america's closest allies. he fired off a string of angry tweets after leaving a divisive g7 summit in canada, during which the issue of us tariffs on steel and aluminium was discussed. in one tweet he described the canadian prime minister, justin trudeau, as "very dishonest and wea k". the troubled high—street chain poundworld is set to go
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into administration in the next half hour after talks to rescue it failed. 5000 jobs at the bargain store chain — which has more than 300 shops across the uk — could be at risk. it's the latest high—street retailer to face administration this year, after maplin and toys r us. the brexit secretary, david davis, is in brussels for the latest round of negotiations over the uk's exit from the european union. a breakfast meeting is scheduled to take place between mr davis and the eu chief negotiator michel barnier. it comes as tory mps have been urged to rally round theresa may ahead of a crucial series of house of commons votes on the brexit bill, following threats of a revolt by pro—remain mps. a ship carrying more than 600 migrants who were rescued from the mediterranean is stranded at sea, after being refused permission to land by
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both italy and malta. the migrants been picked up by a german charity off the coast of libya. the new italian interior minister, matteo salvini, who is the leader of the nationalist italian political party league, has called on malta to take them in, but the maltese say they aren't responsible. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. thank you. let's get the latest sport. there was a historic win for scotland as they beat england for the first time. safyaan sharif with the final wicket of the match to give scotland a six run win over england who are top of the world one—day rankings. rafael nadal continues to make history at the french open. he's won his eleventh title at roland garros beating dominic thiem in the final in straight sets. he's not yet sure if he'll play at wimbledon though. sebastian vettel is the new leader of the formula one world championship after a comfortable win at the canadian grand prix. he takes over from lewis hamilton
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who finished fifth in montreal. and the former england goalkeeper rob green says fabio capello told most players they were too fat during the 2010 world cup. green famously made a mistake in england's first match of that tournament, and capello's side were knocked out in the last 16. that's all the sport for now. thank you. good morning. premature births are the biggest cause of death for children under five worldwide and now professor robert winston's charity, which does research into why and how things can go wrong with conception, pregnancy and birth, says it's on the brink of a major breakthrough which may save thousands of babies' lives every year. let's talk to professor winston, and also nicola jackson, who had a very premature baby boy at 28 weeks. as you can see, jamie is now two. and hopefully we will talk to our
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guest in oxford when we have sorted out our technical problems. this chair is forjamie should he wish to sit in it but he is doing his stickers, which is perfect. he is consistently sticking them upside down, which is interesting! there may be method in the madness! tell us may be method in the madness! tell us what you have found and why it might help. it is not my research, it is the genesis research, a trust which i chair. what has been discovered is a very important and simple issue. it is the bacteria in the genital tract, if it is in the wrong ratio, harmless bacteria, but if there is not enough of them there, there is a risk of premature birth. this might be a very important cause of premature birth, and a simple swab at the beginning of pregnancy could identify which bacteria are present and it could prevent premature birth in perhaps as many as half a million people. the wonderful thought of the human
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cost of premature birth and the massive cost to the nhs, this is a big saving for a very simple treatment. so what you have discovered is the swab can identify the harmful bacteria ? discovered is the swab can identify the harmful bacteria? more than that actually. it looks at the macula believes macromolecular structure of all the bacteria present and you can screen for several hundred bacteria. the bacterium we are really interested in at genesis is a milk bacteria found in yoghurt. if there is not sufficient of this bacteria in the body, other bacteria can creep in which are harmful and they can cause infection of the membranes around the baby. if you can discover this in this simple test, watch treatment can be given to the mother? the first thing is to stop using unnecessary and biotics. previously when women were in premature labour, you gave them antibiotics to protect the baby. so
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not giving that very common antibiotic, that is one issue. and you can correct the ratio of bacteria in the vagina because there are different chemicals, like lactic acid, which can change, and you can change the environment of the vagina. and if you can correct that, the mother will go to full term? yes, that is right. the figures show that in these women they will go to term and we have done a controlled trial. nicola, hello, and thank you for bringing jamie in. jamie was born at 28 weeks. when did you know there was potentially a problem?- 20 weeks when we went for the anomaly scan they said he was not growing properly. how are you doing? yes, we need to get you up there, don't we, jamie? at 20 weeks they said there was a problem and they said there was a problem and they said there was a problem and they said the best case for him was 24 weeks. but they didn't think he
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would make it that far. they didn't think he would get to bed. that was the diagnosis i got at 20 weeks. —— they didn't think he would get to birth. how did you respond to that? we hadn't expected it at all. my husband tried to prepare for bad news. i wasn't expecting it. husband tried to prepare for bad news. iwasn't expecting it. i thought we would get the gender of my child and that would be great. lots of tears and calling family and friends and trying to get support in. and then thinking, 0k, what can we do to get him to 24 weeks, which is what everyone is telling us we need to do? i was signed off work andl need to do? i was signed off work and i was just need to do? i was signed off work and i wasjust trying to be stress—free and relaxed. looking after myself in any way but they said there wasn't really anything they could do to help him, it was just a case of wait and see. but you hung on to 28 weeks? that was something. and nobody expected it, not even the doctors. when he was delivered, the explanation was they
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had never got this far with someone like him and it was better out than in at 28 weeks. how frightened were you about the possibility of losing your baby? very frightened. we had lost three pregnancies before him and he was our fourth pregnancy. that was not something, having experienced it, iwas that was not something, having experienced it, i was happy to go through again. as christians, we had a lot of support from our church and are really supportive family. i think that helped. and we had scans every two weeks, which was good news, bad news, really, so you would wait and see. thankfully each time it was good news. he kept growing, which was nice. hey, mr, iwould really like you to sit down on this chair! set on manny's lap. how is jamie? he is very good. he is very
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small for his age and he is not registering on the nhs charts. he is two, but other than that, he registering on the nhs charts. he is two, but otherthan that, he is chatty and active. i think he is pretty much a normal two—year—old. he doesn't sit still. but in terms of general health, he is doing really well, i think. a lot better than could have been, certainly with a baby born at 28 weeks. he was quite sick in his first year, so we had quite a few hospital admissions for breathing problems. and getting him to grow and put on weight was quite stressful. but he is doing very well. this is the kind of scenario where had your swap being used, your swab test, had you been able to work out the ratio of bacteria, you might have prevented jamie being born at 28 weeks? nicola's situation is slightly different because she had
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intrauterine growth retardation so the baby was very small. her bacterial count was not tested so we don't know for certain. genesis has supported research into premature birth like jamie for a very long time. this isjust another breakthrough for us. it is amazing to think what the cost to the nhs is ofa to think what the cost to the nhs is of a premature birth. perhaps £200,000 to keep them going for nine weeks and the delivery that is needed and so on. what are the risks to babies? we have talked about death obviously, but the risk to babies as they are born prematurely? jamie is wonderful but so many babies are brain—damaged or they have physical damage, so they end up not able to lead what we would regard as a full life. and there are long—term consequences as well. by the age of 60 or 70, there are risks as well in older age, with a range
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of things like heart disease and stroke may be being associated with very small babies as well. what has to happen now? you have described the breakthrough. what needs to happen now for it to be put in use in the nhs today? it is a question of simple, routine antenatal care, a visit to the midwife, swab taken, and the analysis is not conjugated because it can be automated and it can be looked at and you can say if it isa can be looked at and you can say if it is a person at risk or not. thank you very much. jamie, good boy. we are done. thank you for coming on the programme. thank you, nicola, and thank you for bringing injamie. thank you, robert winston. thank you. coming up: some very north korean style security on display in singapore on the eve of the summit between president trump and kimjong un. we'll get the latest live from singapore just after 10, that's about 5pm their time
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britain could completely eradicate homelessness within 10 years according to crisis, if governments followed the charity's action plan. 236,000 people are homeless in england, wales and scotland, that's according to figures from a not—for—profit news organisation called the bureau for investigativejournalism. that includes people living on the streets, in cars and tents, or in unsuitable temporary accommodation. and it says an average of three homeless people have died every week since last october. so what measures does crisis think need to be introduced to tackle the problem? let's talk to hannah gousy from crisis, lucy watson from fulfiling lives which is part of the housing first project in london, and steve windsor who lived on the streets for three months in surrey. thank you very much for coming on the programme, all of you. steve,
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let me begin with you, if i may? you rented a house with others after getting divorced and you were paying rent to one of the other occupants but it turned out she was spending your rent money and not pass it on and not giving it to the landlord, so you were evicted. what happened after that? you end up on the street and totally clueless. you don't know what to do and where to go. you don't think about becoming homeless. it always happens to somebody else. i wandered around. i went to the council. the council basically said you are male between this age and they said, you are not a priority. you are not vulnerable enough? yes. i ended up homeless and my son managed to locate a charity in his borough rather than my own and he put me in touch with them and they put me in touch with them and they put me in touch with a charity in my borough and they helped me from that point onwards. where did you sleep and where did you go before that
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happened? in woodland, town centres, anywhere, you just found somewhere on the spur of the moment where you felt safe and you sleep where you feel safe. can you describe to our audience, most of whom have never slept in the woods, on a bed, in a town centre, what it is like? —— on a bench. it is terrifying. you hear noises and you don't know what is happening. you settle down and the police ask you to move on and you have to. you never get proper rest so you are always tired and it makes you anxious and edgy all the time. you don't get the chance to sit down and be quiet and be on your own, be quiet, relaxed. we will come back to the people who helped you in a moment. but hannah, how are you? your charity says it is possible to end homelessness within ten years. what is your definition of ending homelessness? we have been working with experts from across britain and around the world to develop this
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plan. in terms of our definition of ending homelessness, that means nobody sleeping rough on our streets. it means nobody living in a unsuitable temporary accommodation, nobody sleeping in tents, in their car, and nobody leaving a state institution without a home to go to. too often we have people leaving prison, the care system, people fleeing domestic violence, who then find themselves homeless, which is completely unacceptable. for that to happen, how many social homes need to be built in this country every year? of course that is a really important part of the solution. we need around 100,000 new social homes being built every year for the next 15 years to sustainably tackle the homelessness crisis. i have been looking at the numbers for the last ten years, and it is between 30000 and 40,000 council homes and housing association homes being built, so way off what you say the target
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should be to end homelessness in this country. exactly. we have seen another people experiencing homelessness rise significantly since 2010 which has largely been driven by a lack of affordable housing and cuts to the benefit syste m housing and cuts to the benefit system as well. to sustain a blue tackle homelessness we desperately need investment in the welfare syste m need investment in the welfare system as well as affordable homes. this is what the housing and communities and local government department tell us. everybody needs a safe place to live and we are committed to tackling rough sleeping and we are working with crisis. last week we announced 30 million for councils to boost the immediate support for people living on the streets. we are also investing 9 billion to build more affordable homes and we are piloting the housing first approach to get people off the streets and into accommodation. it is a lot of money and a serious commitment. it is a very serious commitment and we are very serious commitment and we are very pleased to see the government committing to ending rough sleeping altogether by 2027, but for every person we are seeing sleeping rough
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on the streets, there are thousands more people living in a very dangerous situation, in unsuitable temporary accommodation, and actually what we need from politicians and the government is the commitment to end homelessness much more broadly. what would that involves to avoid people living in file temporary accommodation? we have produced a toolkit for politicians who want to take on this commitment. there are core principles in that plan and they focus on having the right legal framework in place so that nobody is turned away when they are asking for help and support. we have a situation at the moment but some people go to the local authorities and they are not eligible for housing and they are told they are not vulnerable enough. we need prevention policies in place. we are already spending quite a lot of money on tackling homelessness but quite a lot goes on helping people when they are
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already in a crisis type situation. we need to help people further upstream and we need that investment in affordable housing and in our welfare system. and we need things like housing first, housing led solutions. tell our audience about housing first. it is helping people, often who have convex needs like mental health issues and substance abuse issues. if you give someone a home of their own and put around them a package of support tailored to them and their needs, what we see is that housing retention for those people is much better than those whose only option is a homeless hostel or something like that. it is an approach that is used not just hostel or something like that. it is an approach that is used notjust in britain. it started off in the usa and there is an international evidence base which says for that client group we see about 80%
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tenancy sustained, who are people who normally have poor outcomes around housing, so that is really significant. you measure success by judging whether a person stays in the home. we do but other things as well. the nice thing about housing first is they say that the housing is notjust conditional first is they say that the housing is not just conditional on first is they say that the housing is notjust conditional on people engaging with other support options. we see if you give someone their own home as a base and platform, they naturally of their own accord to bet in other areas as well. the project i work with, we have seen ever 2% of our clients, who were offending frequently before getting their own homes, they have not offended at all since having their own flat. dreich two over 70% of our clients. some of them have been housed for up to three years now. we are seeing good increases in people's physical and mental health. if you are homeless and on the street it is very difficult to access treatment of any
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kind. providing somebody with stability, they are able to access things they need to rebuild their lives. steve, tell us a little bit more about how you got into accommodation in the end after three months. basically i was put in touch with a local charity. they interviewed me. initially they didn't have anywhere to put me. but they found me somewhere else to another charity. they went through a process of interviews and showing me different rooms that i could rent out that sort of thing and they placed me in the place i have been inforfour placed me in the place i have been in forfour years. placed me in the place i have been in for four years. and are you all right? i am loving it. when you reflect back, can you believe that you ended up homeless? no, everything was hunky—dory. for me it was quite a long spiral. it started with divorce. you take one step at a time and all of a sudden, that is it and it spins out of control. there is nothing you can do to control it
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after that point. not having the rent paid on my behalf when i was already paying it, and being unaware of that, you come home and you find the locks have been changed and everything else, you go into panic mode and there is nothing you can do. it is totally out of your own control. so who is listening to you in terms of the big ten year plan, do you think? our plans have already been endorsed by a number of people including the archbishop of canterbury and by louise casey, who led a very successful rough sleepers initiative in the early 2000s. we need all politicians to make this commitment. alongside lodging our plan today, we are launching the second phase of our everybody in campaign, so we are asking politicians to make the commitment. can viewers go to the crisis website and take action and write to their mp to ask them to help end
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homelessness. thank you all for coming on the programme. coming up: the latest news and sport at ten including our political guru normal smith on mrs may who's spending the day trying to persuade mps in her party to make sure they back her on some key brexit votes this week. it gives us an opportunity to play this — which many of you will have already seen — the latest from brexit from itv‘s love island what do you think about brexit? what's that? where we are leaving the european union. i seriously don't... it was to leave the eu so we wouldn't be part of europe. the eu! yeah, yeah. which would mean, like, welfare and things we trade with would be cut down. does that mean we won't have any trees? cheese? trees? no, it's got nothing to do with it, babe. that's the weather. we're just not in the european union. we're still classed as being in europe. doesn't it mean it'll be harder to go to, like, spain and stuff?
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so it will be harder to go on holidays? yeah, i think so. i love my holidays. hayley was definitely talking about trees not cheese. if you want to listen to some experts on brexit, do download the bbc‘s excellent brexitcast podcast. thank you for your comments on the story that we have brought you today that some deaf people feel they are excluded from the nhs in england because of a lack of face—to—face interpreters. on twitter colon cancer doctors not right? why cancel an appointment because of a lack of signers? iam an appointment because of a lack of signers? i am sure doctors can write so can it that way. it might be slower but at least he or she can be seen. and emma said: written english is not comfortable to british sign language which is an entirely different language with its own syntax and grammar structure. written english can often be considered a second language for
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deaf bsl users. we will talk more about that in the second hour of the programme. please send us an email to tell us about your experiences. you can message us on to tell us about your experiences. you can message us on twitter and facebook and whatsapp as well. now the latest weather. good morning. if you have an allergy to grass pollen, these other levels you can expect today. bear that in mind if you are stepping out. the forecast for many of us is sunny spells but some showers in the forecast as well. i pressure is still clinging onto our weather by the skin of its teeth. —— high pressure. low pressure will ta ke high pressure. low pressure will take over in the middle of the week which will mean a real change for some of us. at the moment clear skies across england and wales but more cloud in scotland and northern ireland and some showers notjust in parts of the north but part of the south as well. very few and far between at the moment. we hang onto
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a lot of cloud in northern and eastern scotland, producing showers. the west and south seeing something brighter. northern ireland will brighten up in the east but you are not immune to showers either. showers coming into yorkshire, lincolnshire, the north midlands, wales and the south—west, but a lot of dry weather. in the sunshine, in the south, we get up to 25. overnight we lose many but not all of the showers. more cloud coming in from the north sea and drifting west. some parts of the west will hang on to clear skies. temperatures will not be cold. nine in aberdeen to 14 towards plymouth. tomorrow we start off with a lot of cloud but through the day we see it learning and breaking up, with sunny spells developing and some showers in some areas. don't take this literally, you know the school would showers,
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hit and miss. but temperatures are coming down to touch. —— you know the score with showers. by wednesday, a lot of dry and bright weather for scotland and wales but the cloud bills in scotland and northern ireland, and that is because of this change i was telling you about. it will introduce some rain and some strengthening winds. temperatures, no heatwave in stornoway, but still 21 as we push down towards the south—east. this is an area of low pressure coming our way, with various weather fronts. the first one sinks south on thursday taking rain with it, which will be lighter by the time it gets to the south. the second one is drifting across scotland, producing heavy rain. it will be accompanied by strong winds and the potential for some gales with exposure especially in the north west of scotland, which we will keep you updated on. temperatures still
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disappointing in stornoway forjune. our top temperature once again will be somewhere in the south—east, around 20. good morning, our top story: president trump and north korean leader kimjong un are now both in singapore for their historic encounter tomorrow. expectations are building for progress towards long—term peace on the korean peninsular. but is that at all realistic? it has been organised in just two months. the real preparations did not begin until a couple of weeks ago. it is a short period to prepare for such a momentous event. it is going to go right down to the wire. also, deaf people tell our programme exclusively they're being failed by the nhs in england because of a shortage of face to face interpreters — this man pulled out a tube from his throat because he panicked and there was no interpreter there to let him know what was going on. we'll speak to the chair of the
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british deaf association agnes dyab. not having access to appointments at the nhs is not acceptable. your experiences are welcome. and it was a triumphant night for british theatre at the tony awards last night, with harry potter and the cursed and the cursed child picking up seven awards. we will bring you all of the details. good morning. here's carole walker
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in the bbc newsroom with a summary of todays news. president trump says there's "excitement in the air" as he prepares to hold his historic summit with the north korean leader kim jong—un. both men have arrived in singapore ahead of face to face talks tomorrow. president trump has called for north korea to abandon its nuclear weapons, while the north korean regime is looking for economic sanctions to be eased. and we'll be getting the latest on the summit live from singapore when victoria talks to our correspondent rupert wingfield hayes in a few minutes' time. on his way to singapore, president trump unleashed a verbal tirade against some of america's closest allies. he fired off a string of angry tweets after leaving a divisive g7 summit in canada, during which the issue of us tariffs on steel and aluminium was discussed. in one tweet he described the canadian prime minister, justin trudeau, as "very dishonest and wea k". the troubled high—street chain poundworld has gone into administration in the last few minutes after talks
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to rescue it failed. 5000 jobs at the bargain store chain — which has more than 300 shops across the uk — could be at risk. it's the latest high—street retailer to face administration this year, after maplin and toys r us. i'm joined now by our business correspondent, jonty bloom. is this the end for poundworld? not quite the end for all of the stores possibly. the administrators will try to sell the company as a going concern. but that looks unlikely because they have been trying to do that themselves for a while. if it cannot do that it will try to sell off groups of the stores or keep some of the company going. however, this is a massive blow for the organisation and the 5000 people who work there. poundworld has been hit by many other retailers by high
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rents, rates, and falling consumer confidence. but pound shop import a lot of the stuff they sell and they have been hit by the fall in the pound which they could not cope with. —— pound shops. pound which they could not cope with. -- pound shops. thanks. theresa may will tell her backbench mps today that the conservatives must show a "united" front, as the house of commons prepares to vote on crucial brexit legislation this week. the prime minister wants to overturn a series of amendments made by the house of lords, but faces possible defeat if conservative remainers side with labour. our assistant political editor, norman smith joins me now from westminster. some crucial votes coming up tomorrow and wednesday. are they really enough conservative mps prepared to rebel and inflict defeat on the prime minister? honestly, nobody knows. even the rebels themselves are not quite sure of their numbers. but what is clear is that theresa may is determined to try to pull them back. tonight she
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will warn that if they rebel not only would it undermine her hand just weeks before those critical negotiations, but also that it could pave the way for a jeremy corbyn government. whether that will influence the remaining rebels, i doubt. for them the calculations seem to be whether they rebel this week or hold their fire until next month. some believe that they've got to make a stand now ahead of negotiations to shape theresa may's approach on the critical issue of the customs union. others believe better to hold their fire until the trade bill comes back to the commons next month. that is also driven by a view that theresa may's position is so precarious and fragile, that if they were to inflict a significant defeat on her now that could trigger a leadership challenge by the hard brexiteers. it is that sort of debate that is going on amongst the remaining rebels as to whether they
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decide to strike now or wait until next month. many thanks. this programme has been told that deaf patients are missing out on key operations and receiving poor treatment because of a lack of face—to face interpreters. the department of health and social care says it's "unacceptable if deaf patients are not receiving the support they need to access care". some hospitals have started using video interpreting services — but patients say it's unreliable. new measures designed to improve patient safety as well as protect doctors and nurses when mistakes are made are being unveiled this morning. the announcement comes after concerns were raised over the case of dr hadiza bawa—garba, who was struck off after being found guilty of the manslaughter by gross negligence of a six year old boy. a ship carrying more than 600 migrants who were rescued from the mediterranean is stranded at sea, after being refused permission to land by both italy and malta. the migrants were picked up by a german charity off the coast of libya. the new italian interior minister, matteo salvini, who is the leader of the nationalist italian political
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party league, has called on malta to take them in, but the maltese say they aren't legally responsible. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 10.30. thank you. this message is from lawrence davies on the issue of face—to—face interpreters for deaf people when they go to hospital appointments. we have really struggled with access during my pregnancy. my partner is deaf blind and needs specially trained interpreters that can use tactile british sign language. hospital staff asked me to do it instead. i was lying on the examining table with my belly covered in jelly. do get in touch with us throughout the morning —
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use the hashtag victoria live and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. sport now with reshmin chowdhury. the scotland head coach says his side need to be given the opportunity to play more cricket after they beat england for the first time. it was an historic win for scotland in edinburgh as they beat the world's top one—day side by six runs. their main aim now is to secure test status. it was a statement for all associate nations but various serious cricket teams out there. to wake up this morning and to know our team have taken down the number one team in the world is a pretty special feeling and one we will savour. such an impressive victory. you're not a test side yet. with that in mind and the fact you are not in the world cup, where do you go from here and what does the future hold? we have a couple of nice games coming up over the next
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couple of days. we enjoyed last night. rightly so. there were lots of tears. night. rightly so. there were lots of tea rs. to night. rightly so. there were lots of tears. to see what it's meant for so many people was very cool. but todayis so many people was very cool. but today is a work day. we prepare for pakistan who come to our backyard tomorrow and wednesday for two twe nty20 tomorrow and wednesday for two twenty20 games. what they really cool opportunity to play pakistan. after that we don't have any more cricket on our schedule for the rest of the year. that is the world we live in in associate world. we don't have the funding to stage enough cricket. we would love for that to change. for us and this team, you know, we are desperate to keep improving, keep sharing the icc especially and our funders and backers, sport scotland, and our sponsors, that this is a team we are backing and we would love to have more cricket like yesterday that
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took place. rafael nadal continues to write his own history at the french open. he is nicknamed the king of clay and rightly so. he won an 11th crown yesterday, beating dominic team in the final. he is three behind roger federer‘s record. he's not sure if he will play at wimbledon. he suffered cramp and he will assess things with his medical team over the next few days. lewis hamilton has surrendered his lead after sebastian vettel won the canadian grand prix. most of the drama happened at the start of the race. lons stroll had a big crash. the chequered flag was waved one lap early, much to the annoyance of leader sebastian vettel. —— lance stroll had a big crash. lewis hamilton the cropped —— sebastian vettel leapfrogged lewis hamilton the cropped —— sebastian vettel lea pfrogged lewis hamilton hamilton the cropped —— sebastian vettel leapfrogged lewis hamilton in the overall standings. lewis
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hamilton finished fifth. thanks very much. well — this could possibly be the most unlikely summit in history. two men — who only a few months ago were exchanging insults — will tomorrow sit down together — pretty much alone. will it be a triumph, a disaster — or something in between? yesterday president trump declared that he'd know almost immediately after shaking hands with kim jong—un whether or not a deal was possible. but no—one really knows exactly what north korea wants, or exactly what the agenda looks like. conventional — this is not. donald trump says he will be able to size up kimjong—un donald trump says he will be able to size up kim jong—un very quickly. donald trump says he will be able to size up kim jong—un very quicklym the first minute, i will know, my touch, my feel, that is what i do. in singapore is olivia enos. she is from a us conservative think tank who says that it is not always
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supportive of trump's administration. what do you think trump's key aims are from this —— for this meeting with kimjong—un. he has made it clearfrom the beginning that the primary goal is unique, verifiable, irreversible dismantlement of north korea's nuclear programme. we also got encouraging signs on friday ahead of the g-7 encouraging signs on friday ahead of the g—7 summit when president trump said he would also plan to raise human rights issues in the discussion with kim jong—un. i human rights issues in the discussion with kimjong—un. i think the us has made its goal is known and very clear. the big question, and very clear. the big question, and whether this summit will be a success orfailure, and whether this summit will be a success or failure, the failure of it will be on kimjong—un. success or failure, the failure of it will be on kim jong-un. is it realistic to think that he will agree to full denuclearisation? we have two proceeding to this summit with a degree of caution. —— we have
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to proceed into the summit. the most positive outcome would bejune 12 being the start of us moving towards this process of denuclearisation. but that would be a highly optimistic and positive outcome. so i think we should be looking to see signs as to whether or not kim jong—un is ready to notjust agree to what the us definition is of denuclearisation, but say that it is committing and demonstrate practical steps it is going to take to move the needle on denuclearisation. what could president trump offer in return? this is one of the most pressing and interesting questions about the summit. a lot of the time people forget who we are dealing with. kim jong—un is people forget who we are dealing with. kimjong—un is not a nice guy. the fact he has a nuclear programme is in violation of the regime oats international agreements. it is a signatory to the non—proliferation treaty. the us does not have to put
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a whole lot on the table in order to convince north korea that it leads to abide by the laws it said it would agree to in the first place. i think that only after the us can verify that north korea is moving towards denuclearisation can we even consider the lifting of sanctions or the reduction in pressure. regardless of the success of the summit, the trump administration would continue to maintain its focus on maintaining level ridge, which includes involving a maximum pressure strategy over north korea. —— maintaining leverage. pressure strategy over north korea. -- maintaining leverage. what should president trump's approach be? we know about his personality and character. will it be the same when meeting kim jong—un? character. will it be the same when meeting kim jong-un? his approach should be straightforward. he should continue to reiterate his calls for dismantlement of north korea's nuclear and missile programme. but i
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think resident trump should also be clear and call for the closure of risen camps in north korea. and press the regime on these human rights issues. june 12 will be the beginning ofan rights issues. june 12 will be the beginning of an authentic relationship between the us and north korea. now is the time to be frank and open and honest. notjust about the challenges we have with north korea's rogue nuclear programme, but also the threats we see emanating from the human rights abuses that kim regime exacts against its own people. do we know approximately how many people are in those labour camps? yes. there are between 80000 and 120,000 individuals in death inducing conditions in these camps. evidence suggests more than 400,000 people have already died in this prison camps. the least president trump can do is speak for the north
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camps. the least president trump can do is speakfor the north korean people who cannot speak for themselves. and to call on kim jong—un, frankly, to maybe eventually move towards closure of those prison camps. 0k. eventually move towards closure of those prison camps. ok. we saw the tweet from president trump earlier that he is excited, there is excitement in the air. is that the general mood 24 hours ahead of this summit there in singapore? it's an exciting time to be in singapore. it's an exciting time to be covering policy towards north korea. everybody is waiting with eager expectation, but also trying to temper those expectations. because if past negotiations are any indication, north korea has proven time and time again to be an unequal negotiating partner. we need to be cautious. we need to hope for the best. we need to make sure we have realistic expectations going into this summit. we will see what happens. thanks. we don't have long to wait. thank you, olivia. olivia enosis to wait. thank you, olivia. olivia
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enos is from the heritage organisation, the conservative think tank which is broadly conservative, but not always, of president trump's foreign policy. thank you for your messages over the issue of deaf people facing shortages or face—to—face interpreters when accessing services on nhs england. karen says i can relate, without my siblings and i to act as ears and interpreters for our elderly father during his end of life process, with so many conflicts medical needs, when he was often omits delirium alongside his deafness, then he would have struggled immensely. i witnessed deafness, then he would have struggled immensely. iwitnessed it first hand. hospital staff have little time to deal with these complex needs of those incapacitated alongside limited sensory disabilities. i feel sorry for any patient without a family or trusted friend or carer trying to assist during these processes. it really is
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daunting. tina says it is absolutely disgusting, disabled people yet again without their human rights. i am disabled and i am fed up. doctor tony kent, on twitter, i've worked with british sign language interpreters many times and was surprised to learn, the hard way, of pretty significant regional variations in british sign language. my variations in british sign language. my welsh patient struggled with my english interpreter and everything seemed to take twice as long. more on that to come in the next few minutes of the programme. before that... it's been a triumphant night for the brits at the prestigious tony awards in new york. "harry potter and the cursed child" won best play — one of six awards it took on the evening. andrew garfield got best actor for his performance in "angels in america", a drama about aids at the time of president reagan. and at 82 years of age, glenda jackson picked up best actress, for her part in her performance in edward albee's "three tall women." on top of all that,
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there was also a special honour for andrew lloyd webber. ruthie fireberg is a senior features editor at playbill — a us theatre news website — who was at last night's awards and has been to various post—awards parties, so is up to speed with all the gossip. what would you take from the night's events ? what would you take from the night's events? it was a really exciting night. the thing to draw from was that it was pretty much a sweep. it isa that it was pretty much a sweep. it is a smaller musical. it is a quiet show. very different from the bigger, flashy titles like mean girls, frozen, and spongebob. andrew garfield made
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quite an impact in his performance in angels in america. he has been so impressive. he has done lots of press talking about the show, talking about its importance, and he drove that point home in his a cce pta nce drove that point home in his acceptance speech tonight honouring the lgbtq community, the spirit of that community. i was in the media room during the show. he was saying that it was such a landmark play and he cannot wait to see how it affects people. i don't think he will realise that until he has been away from it for a while. remarkable to watch him. especially when he was tony nominated. really extraordinary. what kind of reception was there for glenda
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jackson? people have been enamoured with her since she came back to broadway. it's been 30 years since we had her. many times in the british parliament. we have respect for people who serve in government here. she was marvellous in the press room. one of my favourite reactions from the night, somebody told her that her performance was a masterclass. and she said, then i should have liked to have seen it. chuckles she also said that she and edward, when he directed her, had a complicated relationship. someone said, what do you wish you could say to edward, and she said i wish he could have seen this production, i would have liked to have heard what he had to say. she has been really gracious to her audiences, signing autographs at the stage door. she is definitely well loved in the states. andrew lloyd webber, getting a lifetime achievement award. he is
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hugely influential. notjust in british theatres but across the state, as well. absolutely. 70 years old. this has been a landmark year for him, as well. he had a memoir. he won a lifetime achievement award. he won a lifetime achievement award. he proves his longevity when you see the number of titles he has. he is the number of titles he has. he is the most produced composer in the world. from jesus christ superstar, which was the landmark creation for many people. mark platt of la la land, and one of the producers of jesus christ superstar, he was very influenced by him. and he also had
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the phantom of the opera running for a very long time here.|j the phantom of the opera running for a very long time here. i heard there was some controversy. a very long time here. i heard there was some controversylj a very long time here. i heard there was some controversy. i don't know if it was censored for you. robert de niro had some words for president trump. he said what he thought. a lot of people stood and applauded. some didn't. it is a mixed bag here. but that was certainly a controversial moment of some colourful dialogue, if you will. can you tell us the gist without using any you tell us the gist without using a ny swear you tell us the gist without using any swear words? shore. it was f trump. he said it twice. —— sure. with angels in america playing, many plays made a political statement by not making a political statement. by
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showing the humanity of the community that has often been depicted as opposite that, there was a play about a story of arabs and israelis coming together. it was a beautiful profile of middle eastern culture. it is a place that is embracing diversity. that isn't necessarily what we are seeing from the administration, so it is definitely a belief held by many in the theatre community. some people alluded to it. robert de niro came out and said it. thank you so much. thank you for staying up. in the era of the "metoo" movement, initiated by accusations against the hollywood movie mogul harvey weinstein, there's been renewed focus on the experience of women who fall prey to powerful and sometimes predatory men in the workplace. add to that recent revelations officials from agencies like oxfam — which included their workers using prostitutes whilst in the field delivering aid — and it suggests that male abuse of power is a problem of global proportions. let's talk to purna sen.
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she's recently been appointed as a spokesperson on sexual harassment and discrimination for un women, the un entity that works for greater gender equality. the un has faced its own harassment claims, with current and former female united nations staff criticizing the organizations handling of those complaints. apologies, i may have walked right in front of the camera there. let's talk about you getting your house in order first — at the beginning of this year, the guardian reported on dozens of current and former un employees who told the newspaper that the un has allowed ‘sexual harassment and assault to flourish in its offices around the world, with accusers ignored and perpetrators free to act with impunity‘. is that right? that has been reported. that certainly seems to be the case. it
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has to be taken absolutely seriously. you chose your words really carefully there, as if you are not clear that there is a problem. there is a problem. if there was a crisis of confidence among the staff and the public. it is clear to me because i'm hearing from women specifically that there are cases they have experienced. and perpetrators have not been held to account. there is a lot of work going on to make sure that we understand this is a broader issue of violence more generally, that perpetrators must be held to account, and we must understand how power and equality is between men and women. how it manifests. how it works in the workplace. sexual harassment is a part of that. how many women have come forward to you since you took up your role? about 20. are you shocked? no,
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u nfortu nately. 20. are you shocked? no, unfortunately. having worked on violence for several decades i am clear that women's accounts are much higher, women experience things more than we recognise. the fact 20 have come forward, and there are many others, many others have said they will tell their stories, that isn't a shock. the sadness is that employers and others have not dealt with it and perpetrators have got the way with it for so long. how is it that the un has allowed perpetrators within its own organisation to get away with it, as you put it? it is a cultural issue. it isn't just the you put it? it is a cultural issue. it isn'tjust the un. there are other organisations, such as oxfam, which you mentioned. some sectors are only now just which you mentioned. some sectors are only nowjust starting to listen to what women are saying. the data we have, although not adequate yet, says at least one in two women in europe have experienced something.
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the media has changed. women are now being listened to. it has now reached public attention. that brings a pressure. women speaking out internally. and that public pressure. together creating a situation where perpetrators have been put on notice. you say it is all about a cultural shift rather than passive, week members of staff being in positions of power, and able to do something about the perpetrators? the culture shapes the procedures and measures taken. instead of treating women as suspicious and as fabricators of their experiences they talk about. if you do not minimise their experiences the cultural change and you will have more victim focused work. you consult women on what steps they want taken. you ensure they have a say in what the final steps a re they have a say in what the final steps are that are taken. you make sure managers are responsible for
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creating safe workplaces, places of respect. you make sure that those who witnessed sexual harassment are able to act. you also need women to understand and be sure that if if they report abuse, it will be listened to, and men won'tjust be able to walk away and get a newjob without consequences. is yourjob made harder by things like this? some have called for the resignation of michel sidibe, excutive director of unaids, for allegedly mishandling an internal sexual misconduct claim into his deputy. he's still in place. he is. whether or not he stays in place is up to the secretary—general. staff there have spoken about their experiences. and their partners have experienced and reported lack of confidence, as well. this is an illustration of
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that. how can you do yourjob effectively and with credibility when you have allegations around people like him in such senior positions? we have a particular moment now. the metoo movement has really put things on the agenda. we can say that we have heard women, we have heard that they are experiencing the most shocking types of abuse, and they don't feel they can getjustice. of abuse, and they don't feel they can get justice. we of abuse, and they don't feel they can getjustice. we have to take this moment. the un will have steps on this to fundamentally and in a lasting way change that. whether there are one, two, ten, 20 people not doing the right thing, the question is what we are going to do now to put it right. ourjob is to ensure that women's voices and experts are helping to address these issues and create a new culture. time for the latest news — here's carole. the bbc news headlines this morning. president trump says there's
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"excitement in the air" as he prepares to hold his historic summit with the north korean leader kim jong—un. both men have arrived in singapore ahead of face to face talks tomorrow. president trump has called for north korea to abandon its nuclear weapons, while the north korean regime is looking for economic sanctions to be eased. the troubled high—street chain poundworld is facing administration this morning after talks to rescue it failed. 5000 jobs at the bargain store chain, which has more than 300 shops across the uk, could be at risk. it's the latest high—street retailer to face administration this year, after maplin and toys r us. theresa may will tell her backbench mps today that the conservatives must show a united front, as the house of commons prepares to vote on crucial brexit legislation this week. the prime minister wants to overturn a series of amendments made by the house of lords,
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but faces possible defeat if conservative remainers side with labour. new measures designed to improve patient safety as well as protect doctors and nurses when mistakes are made are being unveiled this morning. the announcement comes after concerns were raised over the case of dr hadiza bawa—garba, who was struck off after being found guilty of the manslaughter by gross negligence of a six—year—old boy. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. sport now with reshmin. there was a historic win for scotland as they beat england for the first time. safyaan sharif with the final wicket of the match to give scotland a six run win over england who are top of the world one—day rankings. rafael nadal continues to make history at the french open. he's won his eleventh title at roland garros beating dominic thiem in the final in straight sets. he's not yet sure if he'll play at wimbledon though. sebastian vettel is the new leader of the formula one world
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championship after a comfortable win at the canadian grand prix. he takes over from lewis hamilton who finished fifth in montreal. and the former england goalkeeper rob green says fabio capello told most players they were too fat during the 2010 world cup. green famously made a mistake in england's first match of that tournament, and capello's side were knocked out in the last 16. that's all the sport for now. thank you. alex conversation is going to be signed. —— our next conversation. this programme has learned deaf people are missing key operations and receiving poor treatment for serious illnesses because of a lack of face—to—face interpreters. video interpreters are being used by some hospitals instead but patients say that's not good enough because the system can often crash and can be difficult to understand. and others have told us online signers are being used in inappropriate situations including one example where it was used to tell a woman she had lost her baby.
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in a few minutes we'll speak to the creator of sign live, the video interpreting service used in the film we are about to show you. and to the chair of the british deaf association, two key voices from the deaf community. but first a short reminder of the issues from our reporter anna collinson. well, let's now speak to joel kellhofer. he is the founder of sign live, the video interpreting service used in the film. he'sjoined by his bsl interpreter russell andrews. and chair of the british deaf association, agnes dyab. her interpreter is matthew banks. welcome to you both and thank you for coming on the programme. joel, i wa nt to for coming on the programme. joel, i want to ask your opinion. do you think of video interpreter should be used to tell someone they have had a
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miscarriage, for example? no. sign live is not a replacement for a face—to—face interpreter. if in emergency situations it has got to be used, then it needs to be provided. and what do you think about the fact that someone was told they had had a miscarriage via video, effectively? well, in my opinion, i don't think it is acceptable. my own personal experience, i don't think that is acceptable, but it is always down to the deaf person's choice. if that person had requested to use sign live, that would be her choice, but ido live, that would be her choice, but i do have grave concerns about losing a baby in that way and having a video interpreter. the example thatjeff gave in our film, effectively pulling out the tubes for the endoscopy because he panicked and there was no face—to—face interpreter there to what was happening? yes, i think
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thatis what was happening? yes, i think that is when you need communication before the procedure and afterwards. before the procedure that information should have been given very clearly, what would happen. it is when information is not delivered clearly. if there was an interpreter even there? if there was, was delivered clearly or by sign live7 that interpretation has got to be clear. when information is not delivered clearly, that is when we find these situations happen, and we are finding it with face—to—face interpreter is as well, when trainees are delivering and interpreting for convex medical scenarios. that can't be right. —— complex medical scenarios. and just to explain, the deaf community is as varied as the mainstream community, so people are coming in from eastern europe, who are deaf people as well, who don't necessarily use british sign language, which adds an extra complexity to that scenario. in that
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situation you would have a british person working with a sign language interpreter to modify the language to make it very clear for this foreign national that has come into the country using the services. i think we need a lot of awareness and funding fora think we need a lot of awareness and funding for a service that is actually fit for purpose. just you reemphasise, i think my main point on this is for medical bookings. it is complex, it is complicated, we need qualified medical interpreters. and what is the shortage? how many do we need in england and wales? we almost totally short, right across the uk actually. —— were almost certainly short. so the service at the moment is not fit for purpose? no, it isn't. it certainly needs a review. joel, do your interpreters have a code of conduct that they must follow to make sure they are
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only being used inappropriate situations? could they say they don't think it is right to pass on the news through a video link, if you like, to a patient? yes. we work very closely with the nhs. before we go in and provide our service, we explain to them very clearly what we can provide. in terms of our code of ethics, what they work to. i am a deaf person myself and i was born deaf. i have grown up within the deaf. i have grown up within the deaf community. i was there to give the best service possible to what the best service possible to what the deaf community needs. let's look at the nhs. we explain to them what we can provide. we do say to them that it we can provide. we do say to them thatitis we can provide. we do say to them that it is not a replacement for face—to—face interpreters. it's definitely isn't. the nhs is committed to providing what the deaf person wants. they may say to them
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do you want a face—to—face interpreter or sign live interpreter, the online service? if it isa interpreter, the online service? if it is a serious situation, what we would recommend is a face—to—face interpreter. i think it is worth explaining to our audience, agnes, why it is so important to have an interpreter with you rather than over skype or facetime.|j interpreter with you rather than over skype or facetime. i think there are lots of reasons, but to pick a few, i think it is important for deaf people to have the right to choose. that is very important. having that right of choice, it means that the deaf person is immediately more confident in the procedure they are going for, the appointment they are going for. the most important thing, as with anything, is clarity of information. they need to know what they are going in forand they need to know what they are going in for and if it is going to be ongoing treatment, what it will be and what it looks like. my fear
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is that with the interpreting profession, i think there are a lot of interpreters going into the nhs, providing this service, and they are provided by multiple agencies. i don't think we have one overarching regulator for those interpreters in terms of specifically the medical interpreting they are delivering. how much deaf awareness is being given to nhs staff about how deaf people communicate? and actually when it comes to interpreters, you tend to find within the deaf community that there is a network. these are names of people that we recommend, interpreters we recommend. that is fine within the deaf community but that is not necessarily shared with the book as well. as the british deaf association we feel very strongly that we need to support the nhs, that we need to support the nhs, thatis that we need to support the nhs, that is very important, but having multiple agencies bidding for contracts that are generally mainstream lead without awareness of
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specific issues relating to bsl and deafness, that is a real problem. that is when people don't have the right choice, the right to choose their interpreters. what about the deaf blind patients who need tactile british sign language interpretation? what about different groups of deaf people? it is very diverse. as you mentioned in your trial, somebody texted in to say there are regional variations, which there are regional variations, which there are regional variations, which there are across the uk. it is matching the right patient to the right interpreter. thank you. i have a statement to hear. a department of health and social care spokesperson said: "it's unacceptable if deaf patients are not receiving the support they need to access nhs care. we expect trusts to make arrangements to accommodate their needs and we changed the law so that health and care providers are legally required to provide people with a disability or sensory loss with information that they can access and understand." thank you to all of you, joel and agnes, russell and matthew. thank you for coming on the programme. thank you. thank you.
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a woman sexually abused by her stepfather between the ages of four and 16 is challenging a law which stops victims of crime who lived under the same roof as their attacker prior to 1979 from receiving compensation. the woman, known for legal reasons as jt, went to the police in her 40s about the abuse she endured. in 2012 her stepfather was tried and convicted of eight offences including rape and sexual assault and he was jailed for 14 years. whenjt tried to get compensation under the criminal injuries compensation scheme she was refused because of the same roof rule. it denies compensation if prior to 1979 the victim and attacker were living together as members of the same family. there are separate challenges against the same roof rule in scotland and northern ireland, and the independent inquiry into child sexual abuse has recommended that it be scrapped. our legal correspondent clive coleman has met jt and a warning that some of what you
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will hear in this report can be upsetting. i didn't have friends. i didn't go out. from the age of four, until she was 16, the childhood of this woman known for legal reasons as jt was one of almost unimaginable suffering at the hands of her stepfather. he raped me and he sexually abused me. sexual abuse happened on a daily basis. the rape happened every now and again. my mam used to work at a fish shop and she did nights. that's when it would happen. it was the absolute norm. it was every day. it was like getting up and getting your teeth brushed. the worst time was in the loft. i was about 11 or 12. there was a mattress on the loft boards.
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he would put me in the loft on the mattress and have sex with me. he would rape me there. that was when my mam wasn't in. finally, in her 40s, jt found the courage to go to the police. in 2012 her stepfather was tried and convicted of eight offences, including rape and sexual assault. he was jailed for 14 years. whenjt claimed under the criminal injuries compensation scheme, she was refused because of something known as the same roof rule. it denies compensation if, prior to 1979, the victim and the attacker were living together as members of the same family. ijust couldn't believe it. i thought it was wrong. i was absolutely disgusted with the judicial system
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in this day and age. it was like a kick in the teeth. i felt as though i didn't count. it was all right for him to do what he had done. yeah, he got put away for it but that was it. my life still has to go on and i don't have a life. i exist but i don't have a life. the legal challenge that will take place here at the court of appeal argues that the same roof rule is discriminatory. if you were a child before 1979, you couldn't leave the house where your abuser lived so you can't get compensation. any other victim who wasn't living in the house can. the independent enquiry into child sexual abuse has recommended that the same roof rule be scrapped. it's being challenged in the courts in scotland and northern ireland. whatever the outcome, forjt, the pain will not go. i've carried it and it
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is still in my head, as if i was a four—year—old. they reckon i have ptsd. no matter how much counselling i get, it still doesn't go. we're going to talk now to alistair smith who is jt‘s solicitor and chris tuck is a survivor of abuse and member of the victim and survivors consultative panel which is part of the independent inquiry into child sexual abuse, and kim harrison is a solicitor specialising in civil claims for historical sexual abuse. welcome to you all. as jt‘s solicitor, could you explain to our audience what the rationale was for the rule initially? i believe the rationale, when it was originally brought out, when the scheme originally started in 1964, was to
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stop assailants benefiting if they assaulted a partner and then if they try to claim compensation and they we re try to claim compensation and they were still living in the same house. domestic abuse type situations. i don't think it was ever there for the situation that occurs with jt, where there is a child in the house and she is sexually abused. chris, what do you think of the role that is still in place and the legal challenge? i think it is quite disgusting, to be honest. every victim survivor that goes through what they have gone through, it is traumatic enough and they need to be treated fairly through the judicial system, the criminal system, and the criminal injuries compensation syste m criminal injuries compensation system as well. they deserve something to help them rebuild their lives. we are talking about them rebuilding their health through access to specialist support services and we are talking about
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them potentially getting an education or a job because they have been denied that because of the impact the child sexual abuse has had on them throughout their lifetime. what do you make of the fa ct lifetime. what do you make of the fact that this rule is still in place? it is really incomprehensible. it is the double injustice and double trauma for a survivor of child sexual abuse. they have been let down as a child and then let down again by the system thatis then let down again by the system that is supposed to be giving them redress. now that the interim report from the inquiry to child sexual abuse has recommended the government abolish it, it is really fantastic that jt is bringing her case, but she shouldn't have to. she should not have to. victims and survivors should not have to bring legal challenges. the government should do the right thing and abolish the rule with immediate effect. would you agree with that, mr smith? absolutely. i think it has been said
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by kim very succinctly. jt has been immensely strong and is bringing this case is offering back, almost. she struggled since she put in her first application in 2013 and for the last five years, she has struggled with bringing her case and trying to right a wrong, and she is doing her very best but as has been said, she shouldn't have to. the law needs to be changed and changed right now. when your client realised she wasn't entitled to state funded compensation as a victim of crime, what effect did that have on her? at that time the case was being pursued by teesside university. i can't give her direct reaction to that. but i can say that she has been devastated at each and every time she has been knocked back by the appeals process in the scheme, by the first—tier tribunal, and now she is excited,
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nervous, terrified, whatever, about the case going to the court of appeal. and quite incredibly, a relative who was abused by her stepfather in a more minor way, if i can put it like that, has been awarded compensation because she was not living with him as part of the same family at the time. she came in and she went out, that is exactly the case. jt had no choice where she could live. she was living with her mother and stepfather. she couldn't leave until 16 when she did leave and she gets nothing. it is just wrong. kim, tell us the story about sisters both abused in the same family. there was another reported case a few years ago where two sisters were abused by the same perpetrator, a father or stepfather in the same family. one abused prior
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to the cut—off date of the 1st of october 1979 and the other abused afterwards. they both made applications under the scheme for compensation. the one who was abused after the 1st of october 1979 received it, and the one who didn't did not receive the compensation and that was the subject of a legal challenge as well which was unsuccessful. it produces these arbitrary and unfair results which leave people feeling traumatised. i cannot for the life of me understand why the government doesn't abolish the rule. it would not have a massive financial impact because the numberof massive financial impact because the number of victims and survivors that fall into this category would not numberenough, in my fall into this category would not number enough, in my view, to bankrupt the scheme. it would be in the hundreds rather than the thousands, and even if it were it would still be the right thing to do. chris, it is not simply about the money, not simply about the compensation. it is about a recognition of what people went through and the state acknowledging
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that. under the victims code, every victim of crime, especially sexual crime has the right to access compensation and we have got to remember that most child sexual abuse happens within the home. there might be significantly more people coming forward for compensation if they knew about the compensation scheme in the first place. many victims and survivors don't know that it exists, to be honest. thank you all. we will see what happens. thank you for your time. a ministry ofjustice spokesperson said: "the sexual abuse of children is abhorrent and the perpetrator in this case faced a lengthy term in prison. the rules were changed in 1979 so that any future child victims of domestic crimes can claim compensation." if you want further information or help because of issues relating to sexual abuse, you can find our helplines here: www. bbc. co. uk/actionline
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in last few minutes, the us secretary of state mike pompeo has been holding a news conference and this what he had to say. we hope this what he had to say. we hope this summer will set the conditions for future productive talks. this summer will set the conditions forfuture productive talks. in this summer will set the conditions for future productive talks. in the light of how many flimsy agreements united states has made in previous yea rs, united states has made in previous years, this president will ensure that no potential agreement will fail to adequately address the north korean threat. the ultimate objective that we seek from diplomacy in north korea has not changed. a complete, verifiable, irreversible denuclearisation of the korean peninsular is the only outcome that the united states will accept. sanctions will remain until north korea completely verifiably eliminated weapons of mass destruction programmes. if diplomacy does not move in the right direction, and we are hopeful that it will continue to do so, those measures will increase. president
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trump recognises chairman kim's desire for security and is prepared to ensure that the north korea free of weapons of mass destruction is also a secure north korea. the president has also expressed his openness to expanding access to foreign investment and other economic opportunities for north korea if they take the right steps. all the preparations for the summit have come together very nicely. the president met this afternoon with minister lee of singapore. it was an important opportunity to thank him for his partnership and help in making this summer to reality. singapore is home to over 4000 american companies and is a long—standing commercial partner and we thank them for their help in making this summit what it is. the president also had the chance to visit the embassy team in singapore and thank them for their tireless work to make this summit a success. mike pompeo, the us secretary of
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state. stay with us. the news channel will bring more analysis and reaction after this programme. thank you for your messages on the issues to do with deaf people not getting access to face—to—face interpreters for their medical appointments. this text m essa g e for their medical appointments. this text message says... i have just got to swa p text message says... i have just got to swap emails because that one has frozen. as it does regularly, as you know. my sister—in—law is deaf and she had to have a serious operation. when she went to see the surgeon before the operation there was nobody who could sign but there were interpreters for every other language under the sun. thank you for those and thank you for getting in touch today. we are back tomorrow at nine o'clock. have a good day. hello. good morning. we have
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sunshine across many parts of england and wales at the moment. more cloud the further north you are across scotland. through this morning in essex, there has been a bit of cloud which has broken up to give us that sunshine, and sunny spells across the south—east. the risk of some showers across south—west england, wales, the north midlands and into the pennines this afternoon. also showers affecting the far north of scotland but for most of us it is dry, warm and sunny. temperatures getting up to 20 or 24 degrees, but cooler further north. through this evening and overnight, showers clear away. cloud moving in from the north sea, moving gradually south and to the west, but mild tonight with temperatures no lower than ten or 13 degrees. tuesday starts of relatively cloudy. the cloud thins and breaks up to give sunny spells in the afternoon. temperatures into the high teens or
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low 20s. goodbye. this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at 11am: president trump says there's "excitement in the air" as he meets singapore's prime minister ahead of talks with north korea tomorrow. a complete and verifiable and irreversible denuclearisation of the korean peninsula is the only outcome that the united states will accept. north korean state media say the country could "establish a new relationship" with the united states. hundreds of migrants are stranded on board a rescue ship in the mediterranean, as italy and malta argue over who should take it in. more than 5,000 jobs are at risk as poundworld calls
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in the administrators. also, a crash course in becoming a detective. graduates will be offered a 12—week training programme to plug
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