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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  June 12, 2018 6:00am-8:31am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and charlie stayt. the handshake that made history. donald trump becomes the first us president to meet a north korean leader as he holds talks with kim jong—un. after a year of exchanging threats the two leaders come face to face in singapore. we're going to have a great discussion. and i think tremendous success. it will be tremendously successful. we'll have a terrific relationship. i have no doubt. i'm rupert wingfield—hayes live in singapore, where president trump and kim jong—un have just emerged from their meeting. president trump saying it had been a fantastic meeting and there had been a lot of progress. good morning, it's tuesday the 12th of june.
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also this morning: the brexit secretary, david davis, writes to mps urging them not to undermine his negotiations with the eu. midwives get new guidance as they're told that bottle feeding is a woman's right. good morning. the uk's biggest car maker, jaguar land rover, could cutjobs in the west midlands after it announced plans to move some production to slovakia. i'll have more on that just before 7am. and in sport, as england prepare to fly to russia, one of their world cup group opponents belgium win theirfinal warm up game with two goals from manchester united striker romelu lu ka ku. and carol is in the cotswolds with the weather. good morning. good morning, from bourton—on—the—water. it's a cold start to the day, notjust here but gci’oss start to the day, notjust here but across many parts of the uk this morning. it's going to be a cooler today than yesterday with a fair bit of cloud, some sunshine developing
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but also a few showers. i'll have more in 15 minutes. carol, thank you very much. good morning. first, our main story. donald trump and kim jong—un are about to sign a declaration following their historic meeting in singapore. in the past few minutes, mr trump told the waiting media that the talks had gone well so far. they've gone great, a really fantastic meeting. a lot of progress. really very positive. i think better than anybody could have expected. top of the line. really good. we're going right now for a signing. we're going to be announcing that in a couple of minutes. that's happened in the last 20 minutes or so. no details of what they were signing. he said we would get details later. extraordinary what we've seen in the last few hours, the first meeting to be held at when an american president and a north korean leader. —— north korean. the summit marks a dramatic
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breakthrough in relations between the two men who, less than a year ago, exchanged fiery insults and threats of war. karishma vaswani has the story of the night. making history with a handshake. many thought this moment would never come, but when it finally did, it was measured and choreographed. trump: thank you very much. press: thank you. once inside, though, the two men appeared more relaxed, even smiling for the cameras. president trump famously said he would know in the first minute of meeting kim jong—un whether the summit would be successful. and, at first glance, things appeared be going quite well. i think it will be great. i think we're going to have a great discussion and i think tremendous success, i think we'll be tremendously successful. but from kim jong—un, a slightly more reflective tone. he said it hasn't been easy to get here, and that old prejudices have been obstacles in his way, but that he's overcome all of that and that's why he's here today. later at lunch a chance to size each
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other up and they transport kim jong—un to meet the man he'll be facing. this is the new face of kim jong—un. gone are the harsh images of a hostile dictator. in his place, a man thronged by tourists while on tour of singapore's clamorous skyline on monday, and that's what the north korean people will see this morning, a chairman kim they aren't used to. a far cry from the great factories and nuclear sites he normally frequents. but even with this friendlier face, there's still much work ahead. after meeting one—on—one, kim jong—un and president trump proceeded to meet again, this time with their teams, a sign that, perhaps for now, their discussions have gone well. it's an opportunity to meet and i hope we have tremendous success together and we'll solve a problem, a big dilemma, that until this point has been unable to be solved. that big dilemma is how
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far apart these two men are on the issue of denuclearisation. these are two of the most unconventional leaders on the planet, and their entire approach to this process has broken all the rules. whether or not they can bridge the gap between them will determine the fate of this summit. karishma vaswani, bbc news, singapore. things are moving fast. 0ur correspondent rupert wingfield—hayes is outside the summit hotel, and we can speak to him now. good morning. we used to diplomacy moving at a snails pace, not tonight. we don't even know... we know they've gone for a signing but we don't know of what yet? indeed we don't. that sums up the conundrum we are all in covering this summit today. we've seen extraordinary scenes here in singapore at the hotel on sentosa island behind me we re hotel on sentosa island behind me were the two leaders have been meeting. we saw them arrive in their
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limousines, we saw them walk together onto the red carpet with american and north korean flags, a phalanx of them, behind the two leaders as they made that historic first handshake. then went into a one—on—one meeting followed by a wider bilateral meeting with their advisers beside them. then they went for a working lunch. at each stage donald trump in a killer saying he was excited, it was going to be a tremendous meeting, it was going to bea tremendous meeting, it was going to be a tremendous success, talking up the summit from the start. i don't know about what's happened. that's true for everyone outside the room. did they really achieved anything of substance on the breakthrough of the issue of nuclear weapons? he did say we would get news of what they were signing in the next few minutes. that was some time ago so we will bring it to you as soon as we know,
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rupert knows, the world knows what happened. we'll be live in singapore throughout the morning, bringing you the latest pictures and developments as they happen. it is moving fast, we will keep you up it is moving fast, we will keep you up to date on any developments there. theresa may is striving to stave off a possible defeat in a crucial vote on the brexit process after appealing to conservative mps not to undermine her. today is the first of two major days of debate, with the brexit secretary david davis writing to mps urging them to back the government's amended eu withdrawal bill, or risk weakening the uk's negotiating position. 0ur political correspondent eleanor garnier is in westminster this morning. eleanor, talk us through the mechanics of what's happening today, the voting. i think it's far from guaranteed that theresa may is going to get what she wants, even with the support of the democratic unionist party here in the house of commons. the numbers are extremely tight. as few as seven tory rebels could end
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up few as seven tory rebels could end up causing defeat for the government. this piece of legislation is a key bit of brexit legislation. it's designed to ensure the uk has a smooth transition when it leave the eu. there are a couple of bits to look out for. the government has already given ground to the remain side on customs after brexit, that's brought some time for the government —— bought. it's put off some of the remain rebels for the moment. but a tricky moment will come this afternoon over the issue of something called the meaningful vote, that's about giving power to parliament, power to mps over what should happen next if mps reject the final deal that theresa may negotiates with brussels. now, we seem to be saying this every single week at the moment, but this is going to be an extremely tough week for the prime minister. and, last night, she personally appealed to mps ata night, she personally appealed to mps at a special meeting to back the
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government's position or risk undermining her negotiating hand when it comes to going to those negotiations in brussels. eleanor, for the moment, thank you. there are growing concerns for more than 600 migrants, including children and pregnant women, stranded on a rescue ship off the coast of italy. spain has said it will take them in after italy and malta refused. but charities have expressed concern that a lack of fuel and bad weather might make the three—dayjourney to the port of valencia impossible. mothers who decide not to breastfeed shouldn't be made to feel guilty, according to new advice from the royal college of midwives. the guidelines say that if a woman decides to bottle feed then her choice must be respected, but the official advice remains that breast is best. andy moore reports. the medical advice hasn't changed, breast is still best. the world health organization says babies should be exclusively breast—fed for the first six months of their lives.
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research shows those children are less likely to develop diabetes and the obese in later life. but the uk has one of the lowest rates of breast—feeding in europe. at six weeks, less than half of mothers are exclusively breast—feeding. at six months, that drops to about i%. royal college of midwives is now acknowledging that some mothers struggle to start or carry on breast—feeding. the chief executive, jill whalton, said: the organisation says mothers should be given advice on the safe preparation of bottles and how they can develop a close and loving bond with their child despite not breast—feeding. andy moore, bbc news. it's been 50 years since tv comedy classic dad's army first arrived on our screens, and royal mail is marking the occasion by issuing a set of eight stamps. fan favourites captain mainwaring, sergeant wilson
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and corporaljones feature, along with their well—known catchphrases. are those words actually on the stamps? as far as i understand, yes. ian lavender, who played private pike, said that the honour was a lovely surprise. the stamps will be available from june the 26th. 0ne one of my favourites, don't panic! don't panic! i love that. my favourite is... don't tell them your name, pike! i was going to say that one... when being questioned! brilliant! it's one thing to arrive at work and discover you've accidentally worn the same outfit as a colleague, but it's another thing to find you're wearing the same outfit as a piece of furniture. when manchesterjournalist ilona burton had that exact experience, looking like her office carpet, she shared it with the world on twitter and discovered she was not alone. her tweet prompted a number
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of sympathetic responses, including this tablecloth mishap from adriana. allison replied with this example of her blending into a sofa. and this from selina, who found herself dressed as an office chair, a green dress matching the seat, with black arms and legs. the similarity, the greenback and then the arms are black. —— green back. i love wearing red. obviously for the last six years i have not been able to do it sitting on this over. sometimes i do anyway and i look like a floating head. idling, well, people know the rest of me is there somewhere! —— i think. everyone is getting excited, people packing their stuff, the world cup!
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that phrase in your head, passports, tickets, money, the england players doing that? are they there yet? no, listen to this, charlie! so it all starts in earnest for england today, they fly out to russia for the world cup at lunchtime. and they got a bit of a steer about what they'll be up against in group g last night, as their main rivals belgium beat costa rica 4—1 in their final friendly match. wales' women can leapfrog england at the top of their world cup qualifying group if they can beat russia in newport this evening. scotland are also playing in poland. after suggesting last week he might miss the entire grass court season, novak djokovic has signed up to play at queen's next week, his first appearance at the club in eight years. and britain's most successful female paralympian, dame sarah storey, is making her return to competition. eight months after having a baby, she's been selected for the paracycling road world championships in august. that is brilliant to see because
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dame sarah storey is just one of those people whose career has been so inspirational too many women who've taken so inspirational too many women who've ta ken up so inspirational too many women who've taken up sport, particularly cycling. she's come back now after her second baby and she is back on the road. good on her! that's a really lovely to see. we are talking about cycling today, aren't we? issues around the number of women who are happy to cycle on the roads, many, many more men are happy to do that than women. particularly in cities, that's what we're asking. that than women. particularly in cities, that's what we're askingm ita cities, that's what we're askingm it a safety issue? about safety, fears about not looking right, lots of things. we will be talking about why that is and why in other countries it's the same number of men and women as well. curious. i will not be cycling today! go on! you will. i guarantee you will by 9am! see you later on. carol is in the picturesque village
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of bourton—on—the—water in the cotswolds. good morning. it is stunning, as you would expect, in the cotswolds. the birds have just woken up. would expect, in the cotswolds. the birds havejust woken up. it would expect, in the cotswolds. the birds have just woken up. it is a cold start to the day. it will be chilly. the temperature in bournemouth yesterday was 26. today, at best, the south, 2i. bournemouth yesterday was 26. today, at best, the south, 21. cloud in the forecast with some showers. they will be not prolific, but they will be around. going towards the north of the country, the clear skies are cross western parts of scotland. dumfries & galloway, with the rest of scotland, cloudy. is similar in northern ireland. generally cloudy.
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the east, brighter breaks. north—east england, cloud. much of the rest of england, and the rest of wales, it is a cloudy start to the day. do not forget, scattered showers. through the day, some of the cloud will break up. sunny spells will develop. a few showers in southern scotland and northern england, parts of wales in south—west england. isolated ones possible in the east. top temperatures, 21. the evening and overnight, cloud, especially in the north—east. clear skies. overnight, cloud, especially in the north—east. clearskies. however, more cloud showing its hand from the north—west. 0vernight, spots of rain. that is significant because it will bring the start of the changing weather. a westerly tomorrow. it
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will come in from the atlantic rather than the near continent. tomorrow, again, sunshine. cloud is building. the risk of showers. later on tomorrow night we will start to see the change coming in the shape of some strong winds and also some heavy rain, initially to the north. by heavy rain, initially to the north. by the time you get to thursday morning, disruptive wind in scotland in particular. 60 miles per hour is not impossible in the central islands during the rush—hour. —— lowla nds islands during the rush—hour. —— lowlands is. on the chart you can see the wind moving across england and wales. heavy rain moving across scotland. remaining windy for much of the day. if you are travelling late tomorrow night on thursday morning, keep in mind the risk the risk of disruption due to the weather. thank you. we are going to
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singapore. a fast—moving sequence of events this morning. this is the live picture. this is the signing room. we are told any minute now president trump and kim jong—un will emerge. something, some kind of document, will be signed. i am sounding vague, but that is along with the rest of the world this morning. we run clear as to what may have been agreed in only about two hours of instant diplomacy. —— we are unclear. that is during this morning. we know they match and went for a walk. in the last half an hour, president trump and kim jong—un walked off and president trump gave a short statement, saying a lot of progress and very positive. better than anyone could have expected. at the end he said we are
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now going for a signing. as charlie said, no one knows what that is. but this is the signing table. we will stay with the story for the next few minutes. we have a chinese history lecturer. we are used to diplomacy moving at a slow pace. this has been extraordinary. absolutely. mike pompeo the secretary of state, pushing this through, he gave us some information about contours of a joint statement, a policy shift by the us. we are in the vague terrain ofa the us. we are in the vague terrain of a potential massive change, but not understanding the steps north korea may take. even if it has the word nuclear. we willjust keep looking at this picture. i do not know if we can roll some of the
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earlier images, the first meeting. this is a phrase used a lot, history in the making. a moment where you have the us president meeting the leader of north korea. 13 seconds they shook hands for. that is a long time. many people watching the images very carefully. absolutely. the french president and donald trump have a nice history of handshakes, but kim jong—un, trump have a nice history of handshakes, but kimjong—un, the first time eating an american president, a major move on the diplomatic stage. —— meeting. this cannot have been predicted. this rapprochement between the us and north korea, they have flirted with it in the past. even george w. bush in the end. this is the first term ofa in the end. this is the first term of a donald trump presidency. things are moving quickly between the two countries, even since the new year arrived. extreme pace. only a few
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months ago they were trading insults, president trump calling him little rocket man. this is the problem with things going wrong. you will hear many people talking about what is the path forward if things break down? the body language is not that good. there is a statement that is going to be made that may be vague. it may be a segment about a possible peace, perhaps possible reunification of korea. there is still huge tension on the korean peninsula. it is structurally a very tense time, it has been since 19118 and the korean war in 1950. for the us and north korea to turn in this direction is it to marry. just talk about one thing for us. —— extraordinary. some say kim jong—un already has what he wanted, a
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picture of himself shaking hands with the us president as equals. he has what he wanted. so far, and we are looking at the table as they come out for the signing, we do not know what donald trump has gotten out of this. for the north korean state perspective, why have they got this meeting? kim jong—un state perspective, why have they got this meeting? kimjong—un has a nuclear arsenal. they declared it finished and that is why they do not need more testing. they have not tested since the new year. there is a lwa ys tested since the new year. there is always the potential of things going off the tracks that north korea could have another round of testing and re—engage in verbalfisticuffs on both sides. kim jong—un and re—engage in verbalfisticuffs on both sides. kimjong—un is and re—engage in verbalfisticuffs on both sides. kim jong—un is a nuclear power, they want to show each other as equals. think about reagan and gorbachev, mao and nixon.
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this small country has muscled their way to into a relationship with the us. it is extraordinary. we are sitting and waiting. anyone who has watched the news channel, and we will keep you up—to—date through the programme on breakfast as to when they come out, how significant... we do not know what is in this document at all. how significant would it be if they can do some kind of deal for peace in the whole region? these are unorthodox people. the approach of donald trump has been bullying and juvenile. if that structure is put into play, it could change the architecture of the peninsula. a peace treaty, a peace regime, many people, especially the koreans, their president is an important player in all of this, they would be
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pleased. and it may be that perhaps putting the nuclear issue at the top of the agenda always and forever, moving back to decide in a sense may be one of the ways that equation changes. —— to the side. be one of the ways that equation changes. -- to the side. a question. in the last 48 hours we had a curious situation with donald trump this morning, the words he is using, emerging from the talks, walking through the gardens, a little earlier this morning he said, he was asked strolling through on the way to the signing room, how was it going? he said betterthan to the signing room, how was it going? he said better than anyone could expect, top of the line. all smiles with the leader of north korea while he launches his twitter offensive against his allies in the g7. strange times. the north koreans have adapted, putting out more news than normal. it is amazing, the
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united states president is the one bullying the press and his allies. timjoe bullying the press and his allies. tim joe murnan is looking bullying the press and his allies. timjoe murnan is looking like a diplomat. —— kim jong—un. timjoe murnan is looking like a diplomat. -- kim jong-un. stay with us diplomat. -- kim jong-un. stay with us for a little while. a curious position. look at this picture. we may spend a bit of time looking at a door. it will be very symbolic, as we are expecting president trump and kim jong—un to emerge and take their seats and sign a document which we do not know the details of at this point. we have been following the progress through the night and we know that donald trump made a very brief statement. we can listen to it now. we will have a great discussion. tremendous success. it will be tremendously successful. we will be tremendously successful. we will have a terrific relationship, i have no doubt. it took a lot to get
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here. 0ld prejudices have been obstacles in our way forward, but we have always been optimistic. that was when they first met. then they ate together and had a meeting on their own together. after that, president trump came out and had a brief statement to the press, saying a lot of progress and very positive. better than anyone could have it acted. he described it as top of the line, very good, and we are going
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for a signing. that is why we have been watching the door for the last half an hour. we will take a break from this for a moment. it is time to get the news and travel and weather wherever you are waking up this morning. good morning from bbc london news. i'm tolu adeoye. a debt collector who was found dead at a house in basildon had been stabbed multiple times. 49—year—old tina ca ntello was reported missing on friday when she failed to return home from work. police say portem results showed "stab wounds to the chest." a 38—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of murder. a group of london businesses based under railway arches, are sending an open letter to the transport secretary, chris grayling, to try and get him to stop the sale of the arches. network rail wants to raise up to a billion pounds by selling five and half thousand arches in england and wales. it says the money will be put back into the railways. but some campaigners fear rents will rise dramatically and their businesses could be at risk. a community of show people
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who run fairground rides say they will "fight to the death" over plans to re—develop their homes in west london. they've lived on the site in feltham for nearly a hundred years. but the local council wants to build thousands of new homes on the land. i never thought i would have to come toa i never thought i would have to come to a site like this so well—established after 100 years to stop them from losing their homes. hounslow council have told us their plans would provide much needed affordable homes and they are continuing to look for a suitable alternative site for the travelling show people. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on all tube lines this morning. southwestern railway, 30 minutes delays between woking and weybridge because of over running engineering works. turning to the roads, if we look at the camera. traffic is building on the a2
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northbound through eltam just before the kidbrooke interchange. in purley, the one—way system round to the station is blocked by a broken down lorry. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning cloud around at first this morning. feeling cooler than yesterday. the good news is it should brighten up before the sun sets. this morning, low cloud. rather grey. feeling cooler than yesterday. five degrees cooler. 17— 19. the cloud starts to disappear towards the evening. sunshine at least before it sets. 0vernight, cloud is developing. patchy cloud. the minimum temperature, between nine and 11. wednesday, a recovery
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in the temperature. back up in the low 20s. sunny spells as cloud fins and breaks. a south—westerly breeze. wednesday and thursday, the breeze will fall like and will dry out towards wednesday afternoon. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and charlie stayt. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning: we're live in singapore throughout the morning for the breaking news from the historic summit between president trump and the north korean leader kim jong—un. we are expecting a signing... we
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don't know when but we will have it live for you on bbc breakfast. at this point we do not know what they are signing. more information to come. what else is coming up later in the morning: mike love and brucejohnston from the beach boys will be here, to tell us about their new album with the royal philharmonic 0rchestra. kick kick kick, kick kick kick, kicky kick kick kick. and it's the unlikely world cup song that's got the england players dancing. will this track by the cbeebies cartoon character hey duggee be the real winner this summer? good morning, here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. let's go straight to singapore this morning. this is the table where we're told any minute now president trump and kimjong—un we're told any minute now president trump and kim jong—un will sit to signa trump and kim jong—un will sit to sign a declaration, the detail of which we know nothing of at this stage. we know the two leaders urged
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25, 30 minutes stage. we know the two leaders urged 25,30 minutes ago stage. we know the two leaders urged 25, 30 minutes ago from their discussions and president trump described it as fantastic, the talks, top of the line, he said better than anybody expected —— emerged. he said they are going in to do emerged. he said they are going in todoa emerged. he said they are going in to do a signing in minutes. what we are going to do is take you through the night's evidence and how it's all unfolded. donald trump was last to arrive at the sentosa resort at 01:57am, just before 9am local time. with the world's press watching the two emerged from their respective rooms a few minutes later. all eyes were on the body language for the long—awaited handshake. there were not many words said between the two. it is thought kim jong—un has only limited english. they then posed for a photo before the us president suggested the pair move towards the room laid out for the pair's closed door talks. no—one was quite sure how it would work. the press hurriedly followed behind them. inside the room, with just two
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translators present, the us president said the discussion was going to be tremendously successful. not everybody knew what the format would be. the north korean leader said it had not been easy to get here. "there were obstacles but we overcame them," he said. 0 nto 0nto the lockdown, which we were told could be up to two hours. they then talked alone for around 40—50 minutes before the two teams joined together for discussions over a working lunch. effectively at this stage businesses over. donald trump saying everything
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has gone well and they are going to go in and sign some kind of agreement. they then parted and their two teams entered separate rooms, we think to talk through the last details of whatever they are planning to sign this morning. we are awaiting... this table set out, a couple of pens and a couple of seats for them. we were told what donald trump said over half an hour ago that they were going to have this signing and the details we would have in a few minutes. it's been more than a few minutes. we will continue obviously watching exactly what's going on there. it's been an extraordinary night. we can talk to alan cathcart in the studio before we go on to other news. you area before we go on to other news. you are a chinese history lecturer. an extraordinary moment. we are waiting knowing they are going to sign something but nobody knows what it is.
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it could be there's a discussion that's been ongoing about ending the korean war, if they go off the back of the declaration in april when the two korean leaders met there. there have been american diplomats in north korea. they simply could say we wa nt north korea. they simply could say we want to talk more. there have been hints from those around the administration, freudian slips, saying to you in north korea. 0r when the president gets to north korea, excuse me, singapore. it could be something along the lines of exchanging visits, kim jong—un could go to washington, which would be huge. it would be nice for kim jong—un to answer questions from the press as well. alan, you will stay in the studio while we await whatever emerges from that seem so we will keep an eye on that. in the past few minutes corsica has offered to take on a ship carrying hundreds of migrants, including pregnant women, which has been stranded off the coast of italy.
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spain had said it would take them in after italy and malta refused. but charities have expressed concern that a lack of fuel and bad weather might make the three—dayjourney to the port of valencia impossible, prompting the latest offerfrom corsica. the people who run local authority care services in england say that the need to put more money into supporting elderly and disabled people is undeniable and urgent. a survey of directors of adult social care warns that without more funding, they will have to cut the number of people they help. the government says it has provided an extra £2.3 billion this year. mothers who decide not to breastfeed shouldn't be made to feel guilty, according to new advice from the royal college of midwives. the guidelines say that if a woman decides to bottle feed after being given help and support, then her choice must be respected. the official advice remains that breast is best. the other main story this morning is the brexit vote is happening today and tomorrow, crucial times in those discussions. we will catch up with our political correspondent is
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through the morning this morning on that. —— political correspondents. it's been 50 years since tv comedy classic dad's army first arrived on our screens, and royal mail is marking the occasion by issuing a set of eight stamps. fan favourites captain mainwaring, sergeant wilson and corporaljones feature, along with their well—known catchphrases. the wonderful thing about these sta m ps the wonderful thing about these stamps is they do have all their famous little phrases on the stamps. ian lavender, who played private pike, said that the honour was a lovely surprise. the stamps will be available from june the 26th. you are watching bbc breakfast. through the morning ifear we you are watching bbc breakfast. through the morning i fear we will see a lot of this door in singapore, where we expect this signing, just to warn you, at any point in our coverage, if donald trump and kim jong—un appear, we will go live to see what they have to say about this document they will be signing. that's your early warning. maybe they want to see whatjesse lingard has packed in his case for
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the world cup. perhaps, sally, why don't you tell them? dolly dole macdonald, if you're watching, this is where it starts for real —— donald. today's the day when it all starts to feel real for gareth southgate and his england side. they fly out to russia for the world cup at lunchtime, and they finished training in england with a full scale practice match at st george's park. the whole squad was involved, white shirts vs dark shirts, full contact, premier league referee. we've not idea which side won, though. we know that's what they did yesterday. proper final match. but we have been given an insight into what might be in the players‘ suitcases. this is a video posted byjesse lingard as he packed all his essentials. i'm not sure if you can hear much of this. if we can. —— let's see if we can. he is taking two packets of toothbrushes. two packets? obviously
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planning to stay to the very end. the world cup will be taking centre stage very soon but forgive us if we leave for a moment and go back to singapore, as the doors open and the two lea d e rs singapore, as the doors open and the two leaders urge. we are told they are about to sign a document. let's just listen in. —— two leaders emerge. we're signing a very important document. pretty comprehensive document. pretty comprehensive document. and we've had a really great term together, great relationship. i'll be giving a news conference at 2:30pm, which is in a little bit less than two hours, and we'll discuss this at great length. in the meantime, i believe they'll be handing it out on behalf of chairman kim and myself, and we're both very honoured to sign the document. thank you. translator speaks
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translator would you like to say something? translation: today we had an historic meeting and decided to leave the past behind, and we are about to sign the historic document. the world will see a major change. i'd like to express my gratitude to
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president trump for making this meeting happen. thank you. thank you very much. 0k! we're just we'rejust going to we're just going to stay with these images for a moment, the signing taking place, the detail we don't know at the moment. we'll carry on listening in in case there are any more comments. you heard the words from kim jong—un, saying more comments. you heard the words from kimjong—un, saying the more comments. you heard the words from kim jong—un, saying the world will see a major change. . very very quickly, absolutely. inaudible
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you'll be seeing everything in just a little while. the letter that we're signing is very comprehensive, and i think both sides are going to be very impressed with the result. a lot of good well went into this. a lot of work, a lot of preparation. —— goodwill. i want to thank everybody on both sides, secretary pompeo and all of his counterparts, they were absolutely fantastic. translation: translator speaks. translator speaks.
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thank you very much. it's fantastic. applause thank you very much, everybody. we'll see you a little bit later. we're very proud of what took place today. i think our whole relationship with north korea and the korean peninsular, it's going to bea the korean peninsular, it's going to be a very much different situation thanit be a very much different situation than it has been in the past. we both want to do something, we both are going to do something. we've developed a very special bond. so people are going to be very impressed, people are going to be very happy, and we're going to take ca re of very happy, and we're going to take care of a very big and dangerous problem for the world. i want to chairman kimthank. we've spent a lot
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of time together today, very intensive time —— chairman kim. i'd actually say it worked out for both of us far better than anybody could have expected. far better. i watched the various news reports. i'd say far better than anyone predicted. this is going to lead to more and more and more, and it's an honour to be with you. very great honour. thank you, thank you to all your representatives. thank you very much. translator speaks. translator speaks. thank you very much, everybody.
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thank you very much, everybody. thank you. would you invite chairman kim to the white house? absolutely i will. we will stay with those pictures but let's repeat back to you, so many watching this extraordinary moment, donald trump calling it important, calling what they have signed comprehensive, saying they have a great relationship. " we've developed a special bond and we will ta ke developed a special bond and we will take something that's a dangerous problem for all of the world. " we heard kim jong—un speaking there, which is unusual, saying it was an historic meeting, we've decided to leave the past behind, he said, and the world will see a major change. with us is a chinese history lecturer. that moment, donald trump giving us a dialogue while signing. it is important to say we do not
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know the detail, and he did not say what was in it. but he told us how important it was. it will get the attention of many. will there be troop reductions on the peninsula? there are 30,000 us troops. is that a security guarantee north korea wanted? a security guarantee north korea wanted ? and a security guarantee north korea wanted? and then denuclearisation,, they said it was their goal to denuclearise. he said we are taking ca re of denuclearise. he said we are taking care of a dangerous problem. he believes the nuclear issue is moving towards resolution. without specifics, it is hard to know the endgame and the sequence. he has already tweeted north korea has stopped research altogether. is
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there evidence with no inspections and north korea controlling the narrative? while waiting for the detail, was asked would kim jong—un be invited to the white house? he said of course. that is extraordinary. that look of friendship. kim jong—un was reserved, talking about peace and change and things being different. you indicated a lot of work had gone ahead of this. donald trump said there was a lot of good will and work and preparation. without that, you would have no document to sign. no. the fact donald trump cancelled it. and then north korea convinced him to do it. it is unprecedented. it seems with this invitation to the
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white house, it seems that perhaps the details will continue to be worked out as they move forward. thank you for looking at that with us. a couple of things to pick up on. donald trump said a press conference with him in about two hours, quarter to nine, that kind of time. we will get more details presumably. he said in terms of what is in the document, the agreement, he said you will find out shortly. we will look out for that. they will be handed out to journalists as we speak. we will keep you up—to—date with this moving story. it is time for the weather. very beautiful. todayis for the weather. very beautiful. today is different. i am in the cotswolds. even with all of the cloud around, it is beautiful. the
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odd shower and drizzle. cooler than yesterday. yesterday, the top temperature was 26 in bournemouth. today, the south, 21. the forecast todayis today, the south, 21. the forecast today is sunny spells, a fair bit of cloud, and also some showers. this morning, the bright skies will be in the west. western scotland, nine o'clock, dumfries & galloway, the same in northern ireland. we also have some brightness here. north—west england, west wales, south—west england. for the rest of the uk, fairly cloudy. even at nine o'clock cloudy. the odd shower and drizzle in the cloud here and there. however, through the day, you will also notice the cloud will break up and sunny spells will develop. some showers for example in southern scotla nd showers for example in southern scotland and northern england and into parts of wales and perhaps even in the east. temperatures, up to 21.
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down on yesterday. this evening and overnight, some of the cloud will melt away. six cloud in the north—east. —— thick. another band of cloud coming in with spots of rain by the end of the night. temperatures, again, double figures. for some, single figures to be a cool night as well. tomorrow, starting off with cloud. again with sunny spells. more cloud developing through the day. the south of the country, prone to showers. by the end of the afternoon, the cloud is thickening as the change is incoming. by the end of tomorrow night, the start of thursday morning, looking at severe gales possibly in parts of scotland. fairly windy in northern ireland and northern england. windy anyway. for the rush—hour in scotland in
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particular, 60 miles per hour is possible in the central islands, which could be disruptive. bear that in mind if you are travelling. accompanied by rain. the wind and rain is going south—east. more in scotland. don't forget, disruption is quite possible. moving away from england and wales, brightening up, and it will start to abate, the wind, as well. thank you. it is lovely out and about. thank you. jaguar land rover, the uk's biggest car maker, is moving production of one of its most popular models overseas. steph‘s got more on this. yes. this is a company that makes half a million cars in the uk every year at plants in merseyside and solihull. it's owned by india's tata motors and it's got factories in china and slovakia too. yesterday, it said the land rover discovery
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is going to be made in slovakia from next year. that's put 1,800 agency workers in its solihull plant at risk. but it's not all bad news. it said the move is part of a plan to invest in the uk and build a new range of hybrid and electric range rovers. 90% of its cars are currently diesels and sales of diesels have been falling. we can talk now tojim holder, editorial director at haymarket automotive, the publisher of whatcar and autocar magazine. good morning. tell us what is happening. what we are seeing is jaguar land rover diversifying where it makes cars. that could be eventually bad news for workers. it is pledging to reinvest in the plant in the uk and talk it up for the future. it could provide a bright start for the company. it says its other uk plant will get investment
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in the short—term and jobs will be protected because of that. is it something to worry about? potentially. at the moment it is almost good news. but it is troubling for some of the workers. we have to look at the long—term effect, whether it is the start of a trend. the slovakian plant is known to be cheaper. brexit present the huge threat to car manufacturing in the uk, adding massive complexity at a time when it is under pressure. it could be a long—term trend. a time when it is under pressure. it could be a long-term trend. what does this tell us about the uk car industry as a whole? i think what we have seen is the uk car industry booming a few years ago. it was on track to reach record levels of production. that has come to a shuddering halt. the diesel crisis has affected it. the threatened
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implications of brexit are concerning the industry. whatever side you sit on, many have yet to see the upside to manufacturing. it is troubling times for them. they worked ten years ahead. these are massive parts that require massive investment. —— plants. that is why they are diversifying the base. everyone is on tenterhooks. what we know is the levels of investment from a couple of years ago have slowed massively since the brexit decision. the uk car companies and those based in the uk, they are mostly pausing and waiting to see what happens, and they are making plans on the basis that they are looking around. the uk car plants have to be able to produce these
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models and are fighting with other pla nts models and are fighting with other plants all over the world. this does not help, but we cannot see which way it is going to go at the moment. thank you.jim way it is going to go at the moment. thank you. jim holder. that is it from me for now. thank you. we will see you later. coming up in the next half—hour. we'll be finding out about the schools going green for grenfell this friday, as a mark of remembrance one year on from the tragedy. you will know the main story. the historic meeting happening overnight between president trump and the north korean leader, kimjong—un. it started with a handshake at about two o'clock our time this morning and they parted ways ten minutes ago after signing a document. we do not know the contents, but we know what they said about it. donald trump
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said it is important and comprehensive. kim jong—un went on to say they have decided to leave the past behind and that the world will see a major change. we do not know what is in that document yet, asi know what is in that document yet, as i said. but they are calling it comprehensive and are saying there will be a change in the relationship between north korea and america, and they talked about how important it was for the rest of the world. we will bring you up—to—date shortly. first, the news, travel, and weather, wherever you are waking up this morning. good morning from bbc london news. i'm tolu adeoye. a debt collector who was found dead at a house in basildon had been stabbed multiple times. 49—year—old tina ca ntello was reported missing on friday when she failed to return home from work. police say portem results showed "stab wounds to the chest." a 38—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of murder. a group of london businesses based under railway arches,
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are sending an open letter to the transport secretary, chris grayling, to try and get him to stop the sale of the arches. network rail wants to raise up to a billion pounds by selling 5,500 arches in england and wales. it says the money will be put back into the railways. but some campaigners fear rents will rise dramatically and their businesses could be at risk. a community of show people who run fairground rides say they will "fight to the death" over plans to re—develop their homes in west london. they've lived on the site in feltham for nearly a hundred years. but the local council wants to build thousands of new homes on the land. i never ever thought i would have to come to a sit in place for 100 to stop them
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from losing their homes. hounslow council has told us their plans would provide much needed affordable homes and they're continuing to look for an alternative site for the travelling show people. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on all tube lines this morning. turning to the railway. southwestern has 30—minute delays between woking and weybridge because of over running engineering works. there are ten minute delays on southeastern between strood and gravesend because of a signalling problem. 0n the roads: if we look at the camera. traffic is building on the a2 northbound through eltham just before the kidbrooke interchange. lastly, in purley, the one—way system round to the station is blocked by a broken down lorry. at the bankjunction in the city, traffic lights are out. tfl said to approach with care. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. a fair amount of cloud around at first this morning. feeling cooler than yesterday. the good news is it should start to brighten up before the sun sets.
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this morning, low cloud in one or two spots. it is rather grey. feeling cooler than yesterday. some four or five degrees cooler. a maximum of 17—19. the cloud starts to disappear towards the evening. sunshine at least before it sets. 0vernight, cloud is developing. patchy cloud. the minimum temperature, a little bit cooler, between nine and 11. wednesday, a recovery in the temperature. back up in the low 20s. sunny spells as cloud fins and breaks. a south—westerly breeze. wednesday and thursday, the breeze will fall like and will dry out towards wednesday afternoon. i'm back with the latest from bbc london in half an hour. plenty more news, travel and weather on our website at the usual address. details on the screen there. hello, this is breakfast,
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with louise minchin and charlie stayt. history in the making. in the past few minutes, donald trump and the north korean leader kim jong—un have signed a joint document following their unprecedented meeting. after a year of exchanging threats, the two leaders have shared warm words at their summit in singapore. we've developed a very special bond. so people are going to be very impressed, people are going to be very happy, and we're going to take care of a very big and dangerous problem for the world. i'm rupert wingfield—hayes live in
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singapore, where we've seen president trump prepare a compliment suit document signed between him and the north korean leader, kim jong—un, and donald trump said that today the past has been left behind. —— prepare a document. good morning, it's tuesday the 12th of june. also this morning: the brexit secretary, david davis, it's been a fascinating night. we will bring you up to date with all that's been going on between donald trump and kimjong—un that's been going on between donald trump and kim jong—un through the programme. good morning, it's tuesday the 12th of june. also this morning: the brexit secretary, david davis, writes to mps urging them not to undermine his negotiations with the eu. midwives get new guidance as they're told that bottle feeding is a woman's right. poundworld went into administration yesterday, putting another 5,000 jobs at risk. i'll be looking at how the crisis on the high street has hit shop workers across the uk.
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and in sport, as england prepare to fly to russia, one of their world cup group opponents belgium win theirfinal warm up game with two goals from manchester united striker romelu lu ka ku. and carol is in the cotswolds with the weather. good morning from bourton—on—the—water. beautiful part of the world, even though it's pretty cloudy this morning. that's the forecast for many, a cloudy start, also a cool one, a cool day, some sunny spells developing but also a few showers. more in 15 minutes. carol, thank you. good morning. first, our main story. in the last half—hour, donald trump and kimjong—un have signed a joint statement following their historic meeting in singapore. this was the moment they are merged into the room where they signed the document. —— they emerged.
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mr trump told the waiting media that the talks had gone well so far, and more details of their agreement will be announced in the next few hours. their meeting was the first to be held between an american president and a north korean leader. mr kim said the talks had been historic and the world will see a major change. karishma vaswani has the story of the night. making history with a handshake. many thought this moment would never come, but when it finally did, it was measured and choreographed. trump: thank you very much. press: thank you. once inside, though, the two men appeared more relaxed, even smiling for the cameras. we've had a great discussion and i think we'll be tremendously successful. but from kim jong—un, a slightly more reflective tone. he said it hasn't been easy to get here, and that old prejudices have been obstacles in his way, but that he's overcome all of that and that's why he's here today. this is the new face of kim jong—un. later at lunch a chance to size each
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other up and for kim jong—un to get a glimpse of the man he is negotiating with. everything is nice and prepared. beautiful. perfect. this is the new face of kim jong—un. gone are the harsh images of a hostile dictator. in his place, a man thronged by tourists while on tour of singapore's clamorous skyline on monday, and that's what the north korean people will see this morning, a chairman kim they aren't used to. a far cry from the grey factories and nuclear sites he usually frequents. but even with this friendlier face, there's still much work ahead. after meeting one—on—one, kim jong—un and president trump proceeded to meet again, this time with their teams, a sign that, perhaps for now, their discussions have gone well. it's a great opportunity to meet and i hope we have tremendous success and we'll solve a problem,
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a big dilemma, which up until this point has been unable to be solved. that big dilemma is how far apart these two men are on the issue of denuclearisation. these are two of the most unconventional leaders on the planet, and their entire approach to this process has broken all the rules. whether or not they can bridge the gap between them will determine the fate of this summit. karishma vaswani, bbc news, singapore. things moving very fast. from the initial handshake overnight, we know they went and talked, and donald trump after those talks came out and said we're going to go to a signing. we've seen that signing on breakfast in the last half an hour or so and after that signing donald trump called it an important meeting, the document comprehensive, saying they have a good relationship. i think we can hearfrom have a good relationship. i think we
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can hear from donald have a good relationship. i think we can hearfrom donald trump. i think ithink our i think our whole relationship with north korea and the korean peninsular is going to be a much different situation than it has been in the past. we both want to do something, we both are going to do something. we have developed a very special bond. people are going to be very impressed, people are going to be very happy, and we're going to take ca re of very happy, and we're going to take care of a very big and very dangerous problem for the world. i want to thank chairman kim. we've spent a lot of time together today, very intensive time. i would actually say it worked out for both of us far better than anyone could have expected. i think far better... i watched the various news reports, i think i watched the various news reports, ithinkfar i watched the various news reports, i think far better than ever anyone predicted. this is going to lead to more and more and more and it's an honour to be with you, very great honour. thank you, thank you to all of your representatives very much. we can talk to karishma vaswani now.
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a rollercoaster morning in singapore. by my calculations, 1:57am uk time, by 6:45 a.m., everything was done, and the words of kim jong—un everything was done, and the words of kimjong—un ringing out,"we're leaving the past behind". indeed. it has been an extremely historic moment and morning here in singapore and in the last few minutes, as you were saying, both president trump and north korea's leader, kim jong—un, signed president trump and north korea's leader, kimjong—un, signed what they called a comprehensive document. it has to be said, however, it's still not clear what that document was and what kind of detail we are to see in it. we do understand that when president trump was asked about denuclearisation, he said that that is something that would begin very, very quickly. but again, what form would
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denuclearisation take? remember, the americans have consistently said the only form of denuclearisation they would accept is complete, verifiable and irreversible denuclearisation. has kim jong—un agreed to that? it's still not clear. notwithstanding that, however, this morning's pictures, this historic handshake, really extraordinary images on international television and here in singapore a sense that these two men, whojust singapore a sense that these two men, who just until a few weeks ago, it has to be said, were trading insults with one another, now appear to have come to some sort of an agreement, some sort of way forward. it's just not clear exactly what that is. karishma vaswani, thank you very much, reporting for singapore. the scene of the extraordinary diplomacy. we are awaiting, as karishma said, the detail that is yet to emerge. we will keep you up to date on that. we will be getting more analysis soon as well. theresa may is striving to stave
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off a possible defeat in a series of votes on the brexit process after appealing to conservative mps not to undermine her. today is the first of two major days of voting, with the brexit secretary david davis writing to mps urging them to back the government's amended eu withdrawal bill, or risk weakening the uk's negotiating position. 0ur political correspondent eleanor garnier is in westminster this morning. i suppose the question is, how crucial are these votes? they are crucial. i think it's far from guaranteed that theresa may will get her way. the numbers for these votes are incredibly tight, it could take as few as seven tory rebels to inflict defeat. this is a crucial piece of brexit legislation because it's designed to ensure a smooth transition for the uk as it leave the eu. number 10 has already given ground to the remainers when it comes to how customs will work out of brexit, that has bought off some of the potential rebels for
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now. i think a tricky test will come this afternoon on something called the meaningful vote, that's about parliament getting the power to decide what happens if mps reject that final deal that theresa may negotiates with brussels. that vote is looking dicey. we've got opposition mps as well as those tory rebels hopeful of victory. and i know we keep saying it, but this is a tough week for theresa may. she personally appealed to her mps last night to back the government position or risk compromising her hand when it comes to the negotiations. i think having said that, even if there is a government defeat over the next few days, few here in westminster believe that her own position is going to be challenged or threatened. but, with customs and trade bill is coming up next month, there will be plenty more chances for upsets. -- trade bill is. eleanor, thank you. corsica has offered to take in a ship, carrying more than 600 migrants including children and pregnant women, stranded off
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the coast of italy. spain had said it will take them in after italy and malta refused. but charities say that a lack of fuel and bad weather might make the three—dayjourney to the port of valencia impossible. 0ur correspondentjames reynolds is in sicily. good morning to you, james. this is pa rt good morning to you, james. this is part politics, part about the plight ofa group part politics, part about the plight of a group of people in a very small boat. bring us up to date with what's happened. new plan this morning as far as we can tell, those teams and reporters on board the aquarius, which is about 30 50 go miles off the coast of sicily here, have said at the moment the aquarius won't be sailing to spain on its own —— 35 nautical miles. the team say it is too dangerous to make the three to four day journey with the dangerous to make the three to four dayjourney with the boat dangerous to make the three to four day journey with the boat so dangerous to make the three to four dayjourney with the boat so bad and with the weather forecast so dodgy. what they hope for now is for italy
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to provide a couple of ships of its own in order to take some of the passengers, and then a convoy would head off from outside sicily and that, they would take three to four days to get to spain. in other words, italy might have to provide ships of its own —— that, boy would. they might want to do that to make sure the offer of the spanish port is followed through on —— that convoy. bear in mind, italy is still involved in search and rescue operations and we expect in the next couple of days and italian coastguard ship to land here in sicily with several 100 more rescued migrants. james, for the moment, thank you. james reynolds reporting from sicily for us. mothers who decide not to breastfeed shouldn't be made to feel guilty, according to new advice from the royal college of midwives. the guidelines say that if a woman decides to bottle feed after being given help and support, then her choice must be respected. the official advice remains
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that breast is best. it's been 50 years since tv comedy classic dad's army first arrived on our screens, and royal mail is marking the occasion by issuing a set of eight stamps. we can see some of them now with some of the quotes on them. fan favourites captain mainwaring, sergeant wilson and corporaljones feature, along with their well—known catchphrases. " don't panic, don't panic! " being one of my favourites. ian lavender, who played private pike, said that the honour was a lovely surprise. the stamps will be available from june the 26th. those are the main stories this morning. we will have the weather and the sport coming up later on. back to the main story this morning and reflect on the joint statement signed by kim jong—un and and reflect on the joint statement signed by kimjong—un and co in singapore, thejoint signed by kimjong—un and co in singapore, the joint meeting, signed by kimjong—un and co in singapore, thejoint meeting, the historic handshake. let's talk to robert kelly, professor of political science at the south korean pusan university, whojoins us from singapore. good morning to you. we will come to
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what the document... thank you for having me. we will come to the document in a moment, we don't know what's in it... no we don't. tell us about the body language, what they have said, historic they have called it, what do you make of it all? it is progress of a sort. if you judge by what happened last year with fire and fury and the rest of it, at least they are talking in a meeting. most analysts have thought for a long time that talking to north korea is the way to ultimately resolve this, they have nuclear weapons, there's not much we can do about that without talking to them u nless we about that without talking to them unless we strike them and the president has marketed himself as a wheeler dealer for a president has marketed himself as a wheeler dealerfor a long president has marketed himself as a wheeler dealer for a long time. perhaps he has wrangled a good deal out of kim jong—un. but we are still waiting. it would be amazing if the north koreans agreed to major denuclearisation without concessions from us, i'm sceptical but we will have to seek. donald trump said we are going to take care of a very
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big, dangerous problem for the world —— have to see. can it be that? yeah, i would guess that this is probably about one or two things, denuclearisation, a deal about bringing down north korea's total stockpile. i don't think they will go to zero but maybe they will give up go to zero but maybe they will give up something. maybe it's about a peace treaty or shadow peace treaty. i don't know if that is doable here with only these two parties, south korea, china and japan have interest in this and china as a signatory have to be involved in this as well but if i were to guess it's probably one of those things. we will come back to you later, we have some issues with sound, but rank you. let's get the reaction of sokeel park, director of research and strategy from the liberty in north korea organisation. he joins us from seoul. good morning. it has been an extraordinary... we have said this phrase quite a few times this morning... it has been an incredible
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five hours of his three. we are waiting for the detail. —— history. we will have to wait and see what the actual text is. we have heard grand statements and mood music. donald trump said he formed a good bond with kim jong—un. donald trump said he formed a good bond with kimjong—un. we have to wait for the substance. the phrase from kim jong—un was it was an historic meeting leaving the past behind. yes. isjust the pictures on the video and some of these comments, they are setting it up to be historic. —— evenjust there. this will play amazingly around the world. but without seeing the paper, it is difficult to give it a full judgement. if you. .. it is difficult to give it a full judgement. if you... donald trump made some specific reference to it,
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he said we are taking care of a dangerous problem for the world. that is obviously talking about nuclear disarmament. if north korea took steps in that direction, they will want something in return. yes. it is really difficult to know effectively how the united states can geta effectively how the united states can get a security guarantee and give it to north korea, whether it is them keeping some element of the nuclear weapons programme. some a nalysts nuclear weapons programme. some analysts think they will agree to full denuclearisation but will never get there in the long—term. a lot of showmanship at this stage without perhaps forgetting to 100% solution. talk to us about, for north koreans, we know the access to the media and other events is very limited. do you think any of this will make a
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difference to the lives of north koreans? there are many questions about human rights and all sorts of issues in north korea and north korean life. i did not think this will make any kind of immediate and significant difference to the lives of north korean people. we may see if china stops enforcing sanctions, that may help the north korean economy to recover. it has been getting more difficult for ordinary north koreans and those who are richer in the last two months. sanctions relief will be the first stage. that will be part of the long—term process of north korea normalising and opening and having trade with the outside world and respecting human rights more as well. this is the start of that process and we do not know how far we would get into it. thank you. from liberty in north korea. reflecting on the signing of the
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document. we are waiting for the details. we have seen the document literally being signed this morning. sometimes they give us details through other agencies and wires. that has not emerged yet. he said they will do a press conference at quarter to nine out time. the weather. good morning from the cotswolds. 0ften weather. good morning from the cotswolds. often referred to as the venice of the cotswolds. look at these little bridges. a very attractive part of the world, even in this cloud. a chilly start to the day. a lot more cloud than yesterday. the forecast is cloud breaking with sunny spells developing. showers in the forecast as well. if you are stepping out,
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bear that in as well. if you are stepping out, bearthat in mind. as well. if you are stepping out, bear that in mind. the forecast from 9am. moving to scotland, the bright skies are in the west. dumfries and galloway. northern ireland, the best is in the east. the rest is cloudy. south—west england and southern counties of england, seeing some sunny spells again through the course of the morning. for the rest of the uk at this stage, fairly cloudy. you may feel the odd spot of drizzle. showers in the forecast. through the day you will find sunny spells developing. showers in southern scotland, northern england, north wales, and south—west england. the east, the odd shower. isolated. temperatures are well down on yesterday. highs at best of 24. this evening and overnight, cloud will melt away. still a lot in the east.
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thick enough for drizzle. cloud in the north—west overnight with the odd spot of rain. temperatures are in single figures for some, just in double for others. a cool night for many of us. tomorrow, starting off with sunny skies. cloud in the north—east. through the day, cloud will build. tomorrow, the southern half of the country will see showers. by the end of the day, thick cloud coming in through scotla nd thick cloud coming in through scotland and northern ireland. this heralds a change through the course of the night. by the end of the night on thursday morning, severe gales, especially with exposure, in scotland. central lowlands, rush—hour, 60 must grow is possible. that could lead to disruption. —— miles per hour. windy in northern ireland and northern england. strong winds. for the rest of us, windy. as well as the wind, heavy rain will
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push across us. it will cost us all quickly, getting into the south—east. —— cross. more rain in scotland. remember, early on thursday morning, watch out for the disruption, especially in the northern half of the country. back to you. thank you. lovely. this friday, schools and community groups across the country are being encouraged to go ‘green for grenfell‘, to help mark the first anniversary of the tragedy which occurs this week. the grenfell community also wants to see people fundraise for good causes in their area. breakfast‘s graham satchell has been to meet some of those taking part. 0ne one year 0ne yearon and one year on and memorials are weatherbeaten, but the message on the tower itself is clear, loved ones will never be forgotten. nick
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burton was on the 19th floor when the fire started. he lost his wife, his home, everything. the fire started. he lost his wife, his home, everythinglj the fire started. he lost his wife, his home, everything. i still do not think it is my life. it is like i am outside and looking into this world where i am just on this treadmill going 100 miles an hour and so many things have happened, you know, my friends and my neighbours and my wife, my dog, my home... i still have not come to terms or slowed down to think, you know, this is... this is me. the shock, the trauma, here, is still raw. in a community centre next to the tower, local residents are making flowers, badges, carina heights, for the anniversary. -- green heights. how can you make sense of this tragedy when you do not have the answers and you have no justice? when you do not have the answers and you have nojustice? it is almost when you do not have the answers and you have no justice? it is almost as if the whole system collapsed on the
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15th ofjune, and we are trying to understand why people lost their lives, why couldn't they be in suitable, safe accommodation? survivors of the fire want the country to go green for grenfell this week. hundreds of miles away in cornwall, that is exactly what the school children are doing. they are pa rt school children are doing. they are part of a scheme called cornwall hugs grenfell. they will bring people down to cornwall for respite to make new memories. brought nearly 20% of the survivors here and they say it has been healing to be with the cornish people. i felt really sad for them because there are lots of people who have lost people, especially children. it means helping them and giving them lots of like memories and just making sure
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that they know that we have not forgotten them. there are painful memories this week, and with it,. the lessons have not yet been learned. there are still tower blocks today with combustible cladding. the whole world is watching. this cannot happen again. it isa watching. this cannot happen again. it is a ticking time bomb where the possibility is still high, and i am scared, iam possibility is still high, and i am scared, i am truly scared, for those people, how can they sleep at night, children and adults and everybody and their families, they all know that, you know, within half an hour, their tower could go up just like g re nfell their tower could go up just like grenfell did. on new wrong, the call is the same, for action, change, justice. ——1 year on. graham satchell, bbc news. 0ur our thoughts with those caught up in that. we have a special programme on
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thursday to mark the anniversary. it is 726. we will get more from what is 726. we will get more from what is going on in singapore. coming up in the next half—hour: kicky, kicky, kick, kick. it's the unlikely world cup song that's got the england players dancing by the cbeebies cartoon character, hey duggie. we'll also take a look at songs from tournaments gone by. it seems to be a song in the loosest sense of the word. dancing as well. look at that. there have been some classic world cup songs. time to get the news, travel, and weather, wherever you are waking up this morning. good morning from bbc london news. i'm tolu adeoye. a debt collector, who was found dead at a house in basildon had been stabbed multiple times.
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49—year—old tina ca ntello was reported missing on friday when she failed to return home from work. police say post mortem results showed she was stabbed in the chest. a 38—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of murder. a group of london businesses based under railway arches, are sending an open letter to the transport secretary, chris grayling, to try and get him to stop the sale of the arches. network rail wants to raise up to a billion pounds by selling five and half thousand arches in england and wales. it says the money will be put back into the railways. but campaigners fear rents will rise dramatically and their businesses could be at risk. a community of show people who run fairground rides say they will "fight to the death" over plans to re—develop their homes in west london. they've lived on the site in feltham for nearly a hundred years. but the local council wants to build thousands of new homes on the land. i never ever thought i would have to come to a well—established site like this after 100 years to stop
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them from losing their homes. hounslow council has told us their plans would provide much needed affordable homes and they're continuing to look for a suitable alternative site for the show people. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on all tube lines this morning. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. there's a fair amount of cloud around at least at first this morning. it is feeling a bit cooler than yesterday. the good news is it should start to brighten up before the sun sets. for this morning, yes, low cloud in one or two spots. it is rather grey. it's feeling cooler than yesterday. some four or five degrees cooler. a maximum temperature of 17—19 celcius. the cloud starts to disappear towards the end of the afternoon into the evening. some sunshine at least before it sets. 0vernight, cloud is
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developing here and there. so, some patchy cloud. the minimum temperature, a little bit cooler, between 9 and 11. wednesday, a recovery in the temperature. back up in the low 20s. a bit more in the way of sunny spells as cloud thins and breaks. change afoot. a south—westerly breeze. a bit of overnight rain on wednesday and thursday. eventually, the breeze will fall lighter and will dry out towards wednesday afternoon. i'm back with the latest from bbc london in half an hour. plenty more news, travel and weather on our website. hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and charlie stayt. let's have a reminder of this morning's momentous events in singapore, donald trump and kimjong—un have signed a joint statement following their historic meeting. let's go through the events this morning as they happened. donald trump was last to arrive at the sentosa resort at 1:57am, just before 9am local—time. it started with a handshake. 13
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seconds we are told. many people reading a lot into that early body language at the first encounter. there were not many words said between the two. it is thought kim jong—un has only limited english. we did here earlier this morning. —— we did hear it. they then posed for a photo before the us president suggested the pair move towards the room laid out for the pair's closed door talks. you can see them there, behind them are there to translators, they were the only people allowed into that room. “— the only people allowed into that room. —— two translators. they then talked alone for around 40—50 minutes before the two teams joined together for discussions over a working lunch. the us president said the discussion was going to be "tremendously successful". the north korean leader said it had not been easy to get here, "there were obstacles but we overcame them," he said. they then parted and their two teams
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entered separate rooms, and talked through the last details of whatever they are planning to sign this morning. fast forward around 45 minutes to an hour and the eyes of the world were on the signing room in the hotel. president trump told reporters "a lot of progress" had been made, and that he would soon attend a signing ceremony with kim. which theyjulie goodwin. we waited for them to come out —— which they june lead did. i think our whole relationship with north korea and the korean peninsular is going to be a very much different situation that it has in the past. we both want to do something, we both are going to do something, we both are going to do something, we both are going to do something, and we have developed a very special bond. people are
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going to be very impressed, people are going to be very happy, and we're going to take care of a very big, very dangerous problem for the world. i want to thank chairman kim. we've spent a lot of time together today, very intensive time. and i would actually say it worked out for both bus far better than anybody could have expected. i think far better... i watched the various news reports, i think far better than anybody even predicted. this is going to lead to more and more and more and it's an honour to be with you. very great honour. thank you, thank you to all your representatives. thank you. we had an historic meeting and we wa nt we had an historic meeting and we want to leave the past behind and we are about to sign the historic document. the world will see a major change. i would like to express my
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gratitude to president trump for making this meeting happened. mr kim said the talks had been historic and the world will see a major change. we know they have signed the document but none of us know what's in the document. donald trump said he would give a news conference in just over an hour, and as soon as we get information we will bring it to you here on breakfast. let's bring you here on breakfast. let's bring you up to date with the rest of the day's news now. corsica has offered to take in a ship, carrying more than 600 migrants including children and pregnant women, stranded off the coast of italy. spain had said it would take them in after italy and malta refused. but charities have expressed concern that a lack of fuel and bad weather might make the three—dayjourney to the port of valencia impossible, prompting the latest offerfrom corsica. the people who run local authority care services in england say that the need to put more money into supporting elderly and disabled people is undeniable and urgent.
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a survey of directors of adult social care warns that without more funding, they will have to cut the number of people they help. the government says it has provided an extra £2.3 billion this year. mothers who decide not to breastfeed shouldn't be made to feel guilty, according to new advice from the royal college of midwives. the guidelines say that if a woman decides to bottle feed after being given help and support, then her choice must be respected. the official advice remains that breast is best. coming up on the programme, carol is out and about in the cotswolds with the weather and sally is here. there's a world cup just around the corner. to distract you from other world events that have been happening this morning, getting real for gareth southgate and this team at the moment. i imagine they are checking their backs, checking their passports. do you think all those players have their passports with them or do you think one person has
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fo rg otte n ? them or do you think one person has forgotten? what do you think? i know they aren't children but... normally in one large group of people one person forgets. they've all been checking them but it surely won't happen today! today's the day when it all starts to feel real for gareth southgate and his england side. they fly out to russia for the world cup at lunchtime and they finished training in england with a full scale practice match at st george's park. the whole squad was involved, white shirts vs dark shirts, full contact, premier league referee. we've not idea which side won, though. but we have been given an insight into what might be in the players‘ suitcases. this is a video posted byjesse lingard as he packed all his essentials. let‘s have a listen.
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i love that! he's got happy socks as well! " is it hot in russia?" it will be hot in some of the places they are playing. how moneyed toothbrushes does he need? two packets of toothbrushes —— how many toothbrushes. there could be in a variety of locations. they are moving around. so in theory... would you not pack your toothbrush in your wash bag? we will find out. all still to come. meanwhile, the main threat to england in their group is belgium. they finished off their world cup preparations with a convincing 4—1 win over costa rica. manchester united striker romelu lukaku scored two of the goals and set up another. it wasn‘t all good news though, eden hazard limped off in the second half. plenty of teams have already arrived in russia. the 5—time winners and joint favourites brazil amongst them. £200 million—man neymar led his team as they were given a musical reception at their hotel in sochi. they begin their campaign against switzerland on sunday. and we all agree that nigeria have the best kit
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at the world cup, they‘ve also got the best travel outfits too. these are exceptional. the hats, the wings, the slip on shoes. it all works. looks so good! so stylish. that is the nigerian travel outfit. all the fuss over the football shirt, that beats it any day. nice loosefitting clothing for travelling, which is practical. and great hats. we love that, we approve of that! swansea city have a new manager who they hope will take them back to the premier league. they‘ve hired graham potter from the swedish side 0stersunds. it‘s the englishman‘s firstjob in the uk after taking 0stersunds from the fourth tier of swedish football to the europa league where they won 2—1 at arsenal. noval djockovic has confirmed that he‘ll play at queens next week. djokovic suggested he might skip the grass court season altogether after being knocked out of the french open last week, but that was probably disappointment talking.
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its the first time in 8 years djokovic has been at queen‘s, and it means 17 of the world‘s top 30 will compete there ahead of wimbledon. johanna konta says she‘s feeling positive about the grass court season after disappointment at the french open. she went out in the first round at roland garros, and turns her attention this week to the nottinham 0pen ahead of wimbledon. i‘m definitely coming into this period of the season in a slightly different position to where i was last year, but i think i‘m equally excited and i think i‘m in a really good place right now in terms of my development and just might clarity on how i want to be playing and how i want to be doing my career really. britain‘s most successful female paralympian dame sarah storey is making her return to competition. eight months after having son charlie she‘s been selected in a 20—strong british team for the paracycling road world championships in italy in august.
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i don‘t know if we can get a picture of what‘s behind you. that is luis suarez, he plays for uruguay. what is he drinking, louise? it is a kind of tea, it is called mate, they drink a lot of it in uruguay and south america. it could be the secret weapon. lots of spurs players especially have been drinking it, brought in by pochettino. have you tried it before? take a little sniff. go on. have you just had a sip? am i having a sip? it doesn‘t really taste of anything. normally you have it in
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there and it is properly packed with leaves, tea leaves, mate leaves, then you drink it through a metal straw. it is like that but multiplied by 100. have a look inside the pot, it doesn‘t look nice. it doesn't taste very strong, it tastes more like tea. linnell messy? it tastes more like tea. linnell m essy ? we it tastes more like tea. linnell messy? we have a shot of them —— and lionel messi. well, if it works for him! -- lionel messi. well, if it works for him! —— lionel messi. lionel messi. well, if it works for him! -- lionel messi. i'm not liking the outfit, though! i didn't realise it is packed full of something i love, caffeine. that's why i'm not going to have to much of it, could be dangerous! honestly i don‘t think it tastes very nice. i quite like it. let's see how the rest of the programme goes, let‘s see if it changes your performance. pressure‘s on now! thanks very much. there could be
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some people at the moment who need a lift, exam time, all that kind of thing! over the past few months we‘ve been following the progress of our very own naga, tim and jayne as they‘ve prepared to take their maths gcse. to take their maths gcse. they sit their final paper today, along with thousands of other students. in recent days, some teenagers have taken to social media in floods of tears, saying their exams were the hardest ever. this video shows youtube vlogger jade bowler moments after coming out of her a—level biology exam. i have never in my entire life felt this badly after an exam. i didn‘t a nswer this badly after an exam. i didn‘t answer about four of the questions. i feel so, answer about four of the questions. ifeel so, like, answer about four of the questions. i feel so, like, disheartened. answer about four of the questions. ifeel so, like, disheartened. i put in so much time into it and the examiner is going to read my answers
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and think! examiner is going to read my answers and think i don‘t know the content because i was rushing my time at the end. so, yeah, that‘s how the day‘s gone. try to stay positive but we‘ll see, you know? just so you know, she knows we are playing that, she wanted to talk to us on playing that, she wanted to talk to us on bbc breakfast, she is fine budget has an exam this afternoon so that‘s why she‘s not here but clearly extremely emotional —— but she has. we‘re joined now by anna krala from childline. anna, welcome a graphic illustration. it is a stressful time? it is quite upsetting to see a young person so upsetting to see a young person so upset and so stressed. it sends out a very clear upset and so stressed. it sends out a very clear message upset and so stressed. it sends out a very clear message that there are a very clear message that there are a lot of young people who are struggling at this time of the year. what words of wisdom can you pass on? it is easy to fall into the cliche of saying everything will be ok cliche of saying everything will be 0k in the long run, all those things, it doesn‘t help them in the
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moment, does it? it doesn't but the most important thing to remember is exams are important, they are important to us, but there are ways of dealing with the stress and one of dealing with the stress and one of the most important things to remember is to talk about that beforehand, you know? let somebody know that you‘re struggling. you have to go through the exams, and to do the best you can, and, you know, it‘s about thinking about yourself, how are you going to do that? and give yourself that reassurance and talk to somebody and say, i am struggling, i‘m going to struggle, how can somebody help me go through that? probably a bit late for people right now but there will be people watching us this morning going into exams this morning or this afternoon or tomorrow, how would you cope with that last minute feeling? some people will have really anxious moments before going in, won‘t they? how do you cope with that? how do you cope with that? we have got
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techniques where you can just ground yourself, you can think about... you can do this, have that, kind of, look, i‘m going to do the best i can, this is here, i‘m going to step into the room and i‘m going to do the best. take some deep breaths. for me i always think i‘m going to come out of this at the end of this, i‘m going to walk out of this door and say i did that and have that kind of reassurance of yourself that you‘re going to go through that. deep breathing. think about yourself. try not to think about anybody else because everybody is different. this is about you. can you remember those feelings? can you remember what those feelings were like? i‘m feeling them now. it doesn‘t go away. like? i‘m feeling them now. it doesn't go away. it doesn't, it ta kes you doesn't go away. it doesn't, it takes you right back to the moment and that‘s a message for children, it‘s perfectly normal to feel like that. that is a good point we all worry
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about getting through stressful times. as adults, we learn to do that. we have had time to do that. young people have not. it is a stressful time. a testing time in many ways for them. it is natural and normal. it is about how you manage those feelings and where you get support from. wise words. one moment in time, one exam, it will not define your life. sometimes you can really worry everything is going to fall apart if something is not how you imagined. things work out in the long—term. thank you. and good luck to anyone taking exams. if you are feeling stressed
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about exams and would like details of organisations which offer advice and support, go to bbc.co.uk/actionline. good luck. you‘re watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: president trump and kim jung—un have emerged from their unprecedented talks in singapore. mr trump said the meeting had been fantastic and a lot of progress had been made. mothers who decide not to breastfeed shouldn‘t be made to feel guilty, according to new advice from the royal college of midwives. carol is out and about this morning. she is in the cotswolds being careful not to step too close to the water. absolutely right. it is stunning. you can see the river beside me. there is an interesting
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tradition, a game of football is played here on bank holiday monday. they get in the water! worth seeing! they get in the water! worth seeing! the weather this morning, it is pretty chilly this morning. especially when you compare it to recent days. the forecast for today is cloudy with showers. through the day, some of the cloud will break up and some sunny spells developing. this morning at nine o‘clock, the west has the best. argyll and bute, dumfries and galloway, and for the rest of scotland, cloudy. northern ireland, the east is the best. cloud in the west. north—west england, bright skies. north—east england, cloud. wales in south—east england, the best breaks. the rest of wales and the rest of england, fairly cloudy. the cloud is thick enough to
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create drizzle. the odd shower here and there. through the day, the cloud will break. some sunny spells. showers in southern scotland, england, parts of wales, south—west england, parts of wales, south—west england, and perhaps isolated ones in the east. today, the top temperature is likely to be about 21. through this evening and overnight, clear skies. lots 21. through this evening and overnight, clearskies. lots of cloudy in the north—east. thick enough for drizzle. by the end of the night, more cloud coming in across the north—west. starting to see the first signs of spots of rain heralding the change in weather. tomorrow, starting off sunny. through the day, a bit more cloud developing. the southern half of the country, prone to seeing showers, east anglia, southern england, south—west england and wales. by the end of the day, the thick cloud in
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northern ireland in scotland will herald the arrival of rain and strengthening winds. by the end of the night, strong winds. thursday morning, if you are travelling across scotland in particular, gales, possibly severe gales, with exposure. the lowlands will have up to 60 miles per hour winds which could prove to be disruptiveireland in northern england, strong winds. the rest of england and wales, a windy day. pushing through quite quickly. behind that, england and wales, northern ireland, fine and dry. fresh, and more rain for scotland. the afternoon, quite indeed. some disruptive weather tensely on the cards in the north on thursday. —— potentially. someone behind you is on this phone in the river! perhaps it is training for
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the football. i am always up for a challenge. perhaps the next time we come to you could be in the water! roll up your trousers. in your dreams. thank you. just an idea. the doom and gloom for the retail sector continues with more jobs on the high street at risk. steph has more on this. yesterday i was on the sofa talking aboutjob yesterday i was on the sofa talking about job losses yesterday i was on the sofa talking aboutjob losses at the likes of house and fraser. now another one. the latest casualty was poundworld. yesterday, it went into administration, putting 5,000 jobs at risk. it‘s a very worrying time for shop workers. and a lot of you have been getting in touch with me about it on social media. tracey‘s been made redundant after working in retail for 20 years. kevin says no—one needs stockroom workers any more. and jaqueline tweeted to say she‘s
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found people are a bit snobby if you‘ve been working in retail. thank you for getting in touch. we cannot get through all of them. those are your stories. tom hadley is director of policy and professional services at the recruitment and employment confederation. thank you. it is a tough time. we are constantly getting headlines of shop closures. if you work for a store at risk, it is a worry in time. a difficult time for short. we track all sectors. —— worrying. retell is the only sector we have seen a decrease in demand. ——
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retail. if you have a passion for customer service, you are looking for other sectors you can transfer your ability. call centre staff as well. there are manyjobs where that experience can be transferred. it is great to have a recruitment sector which can help. what would your advice be for people in this situation? if you want to stay in retail, look at differentjobs in retail, look at differentjobs in retail, like internet business, less customer focused. jobs are changing. you might talk about driverless cars in the future and logistics. many people are looking at career transitions. that is one of the changes we are seeing. working in different sectors. it might be a
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time to look at other sectors. talking to career professionals is a good way forward. as i have mentioned, demand for staff is huge across mentioned, demand for staff is huge a cross m ost mentioned, demand for staff is huge across most sectors except for retail. part of the problem is if the rascal closures, and thousands ofjobs go at once, many people will be going for the same jobs. —— there are store be going for the same jobs. —— there a re store closures. be going for the same jobs. —— there are store closures. how do you stand out? the government needs to look at how we do this. we have low unemployment. we need to find a mechanism, notjust unemployment. we need to find a mechanism, not just now, unemployment. we need to find a mechanism, notjust now, in the future, how do we gear up to give extra support? we have the right advice in this country? we have a vibrant temporary advice in this country? we have a vibra nt temporary market. advice in this country? we have a vibrant temporary market. you can tryjobs in other vibrant temporary market. you can try jobs in other sectors vibrant temporary market. you can tryjobs in other sectors to see how it goes. having temp experience gets you back into work quickly and enables you to test different
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sectors to see if you like it. you mentioned hospitality where skills are transferable. what else is there? the leisure sector is one. behind the scenes. packing for internet businesses. there is still a need for retail analysis. administration. many different areas with opportunities. if you have a passion for customer service, there arejobs out there. passion for customer service, there are jobs out there. the care sector as well. that is about helping people. there is huge demand in the ca re people. there is huge demand in the care sector. there is huge demand. you should go and talk to people and local agencies in these areas to see what you have to do to make the next move. you talked about how jobs are changing. how do you make sure to keep your skills up—to—date? some people are worried than i can only do myjob and i do not know if i can do myjob and i do not know if i can do those ones. part of that is to
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get the message over to future generations of workers that the job market will continue to evolve. society will change because of technology. there is a mindset among the future generation of workers they will need to keep brushing up on skills. perhaps we need a career doing many different things. starting young is part of it and the second way forward is to correct all age careers and network on the lookout governmentjobs to make sure we provide that the advice is there. thank you. we would love to hear your stories. get in touch with e—mail or social media. just search for bbc breakfast. we will definitely do more on this and we wa nt to definitely do more on this and we want to tell your stories as part of it. that is it from me for now. thank you. we will bring it details from the historic meetings in singapore injust from the historic meetings in singapore in just a few minutes‘ time. —— bring you the details. it
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is time to get the news and travel and weather wherever you are waking up and weather wherever you are waking up this morning. good morning from bbc london news. i‘m tolu adeoye. a debt collector who was found dead at a house in basildon had been stabbed multiple times. 49—year—old tina ca ntello was reported missing on friday when she failed to return home from work. police say post mortem results showed she was stabbed in the chest. a 38—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of murder. a group of london businesses based under railway arches, are sending an open letter to the transport secretary, chris grayling, to try and get him to stop the sale of the arches. network rail wants to raise up to a billion pounds by selling five and half thousand arches in england and wales. it says the money will be put back into the railways. but campaigners fear rents will rise dramatically and their businesses could be at risk. a community of show people who run fairground rides say they will "fight to the death" over plans to re—develop their homes in west london. they‘ve lived on the site in feltham for nearly a hundred years. but the local council wants to build thousands of new homes on the land. i never, ever, thought i would have
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to come to a well—established site like this, in place for 100 years, to stop showpeople from losing their homes. hounslow council has told us their plans would provide much needed affordable homes and they‘re continuing to look for a suitable, alternative site for the show people. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. there‘s still a good service on all tube lines this morning. turning to the railway, greater anglia are running a revised timetable in and out of liverpool street that‘s due to a track fault. there are 10—minute delays on southeastern between strood and gravesend because of signalling problems. 0n the roads, if we look at the camera. traffic is slow on the marylebone
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flyoverfrom paddington. in palmers green, the north circular is blocked off westbound by an accident at the clockhouse interchange. in purley the one way system round to the station is blocked by a broken down lorry. finally the traffic lights are out at the bankjunction in the city. so the advice is to approach with care. let‘s have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. there‘s a fair amount of cloud around at least at first this morning. it is feeling a bit cooler than yesterday. the good news is it should start to brighten up before the sun sets. for this morning, yes, low cloud in one or two spots. it is rather grey. it‘s feeling cooler than yesterday. some four or five degrees cooler. a maximum temperature of 17—19 celcius. the cloud starts to disappear towards the end of the afternoon into the evening. some sunshine at least before it sets. 0vernight, cloud is developing here and there. so, some patchy cloud. the minimum temperature, a little bit cooler, between 9 and 11. wednesday, a recovery in the temperature. back up in the low 20s. a bit more in the way of sunny spells as cloud thins and breaks. change afoot. a south—westerly breeze. a bit of overnight rain on wednesday and thursday. eventually, the breeze will fall lighter and it will dry out as we head through wednesday afternoon. i‘m back with the latest from bbc london in half an hour.
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now, though, it‘s back to louise and charlie. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and charlie stayt. history in the making. donald trump and the north korean leader kim jong—un have, in the past few hours, signed a joint document following their unprecedented meeting. after a year of exchanging threats, the two leaders have shared warm
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words at their summit in singapore. people are going to be very impressed. be very happy and we are going to take care of a very big and very dangerous problem for the world. translation: we had a historic meeting and decided to leave the past behind and we are about to sign a historic document. the world will see a major change. iam i am live in singapore where president trump and kim jong—un have signed a document committing themselves to a new relationship and themselves to a new relationship and the complete denuclearisation of the korean peninsular. good morning, it‘s tuesday, 12th june. more on all of that coming up
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shortly. also this morning... the brexit secretary, david davis, writes to mps ahead of crucial commons votes urging them not to undermine his negotiations. midwives get new guidance as they‘re told that bottle feeding is a woman‘s right. the retailer new look has announced a big drop in sales — it‘s the latest bit of bad news to hit the high street. i‘ll be looking at how retail workers are feeling about the sector. and in sport, as england prepare to fly to russia, one of their world cup group opponents, belgium, win theirfinal warm—up game with two goals from manchester united striker romelu lukaku. # i #iam # i am picking up good vibrations... # they created the sound of ‘60s california, but the beach boys are swapping surfing for strings in a new orchestral collaboration. they‘ll be here to tell us more.
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and carol is in the cotswolds with the weather. good morning. beautiful location, quite clouded this morning, as it is across much of the uk, but it will brighten up through the day, but showers in the forecast and a change in the weather to come. more in 15 minutes. thank you. first, our main story. this morning, donald trump and kimjong—un have signed a joint statement following their historic meeting in singapore. after talks with the north korean leader, president trump told the waiting media the talks had gone well so far. details just detailsjust beginning details just beginning to emerge of that agreement which they have signed in the last hour and a half. the meeting was the first to be held between a sitting us president and a north korean leader. let‘s have a reminder of this morning‘s momentous
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events in singapore, looking at how events unfolded overnight. the long handshake. the handshake over, pose for the photographs, a couple of minutes later, donald trump ushers the north korean leader towards their destination. shall we go to the room for a bit of a chat? and they went into the room, we understand, with two translators, who were just understand, with two translators, who werejust behind understand, with two translators, who were just behind them. donald trump ushering kim jong—un who were just behind them. donald trump ushering kimjong—un into the room, they were in the room together and only the translators for some 40-50 and only the translators for some 40—50 minutes, discussing we know not quite what although they have said it was important, comprehensive, great relationship, quotes from donald trump. kim jong—un said it was historic. they
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have decided to leave the past behind. 50 minutes, we were told, they spoke to one another. then they emerged into the gardens and they had a little walkabout, you can see president kim, a lot of smiles ahead of the negotiations, they emerged into the gardens. this is the point at which the talks are effectively over, a couple of comments from donald trump, saying top of the line, the talks had gone well, fantastic, and in the next few minutes, this was approximately 6:45am, the two made the historic signing of a document, details yet to emerge. that is the two leaders as they walked into the room and you will see in a moment the giant table set out for them and it was at that point we heard from both leaders as
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to what they made off what they had achieved. i think our whole relationship with north korea and the korean peninsula is going to be a very much different situation than it has in the past. we both want to do something, we both are going to do something, we both are going to do something, we both are going to do something, and we have developed a very special bond. so people are going to be very impressed, people are going to be very happy, and we are going to be very happy, and we are going to take care of a very big and very dangerous problem for the world. i want to thank chairman kim, spent a lot of time together today, very intensive time. and i would actually say it worked out for both of us far better than anybody could have expected, i think far better... i watched the various news reports, far better than anyone predicted. this will lead to more and more and more and it is an honour to be with you, a very great honour, thank you, thank you to all of your representatives very much.
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translation: we have had a historic meeting and we have decided to leave the past behind and we are about to signa the past behind and we are about to sign a historic document. the world will see a major change. sign a historic document. the world will see a major changelj sign a historic document. the world will see a major change. i would like to express my gratitude to president trump to make this meeting happen. let us go straight to our correspondent who is in singapore. we were told by president trump i think in the next half an hour, a press co nfe re nce , think in the next half an hour, a press conference, but you have one or two details for us. i have the four main points contained in that document signed by president trump and kim jong—un. we document signed by president trump and kimjong—un. we should say, that sounded to me like some really good american salesmanship from mr trump because i will just american salesmanship from mr trump because i willjust run through the bullet points of what they have
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signed up to. the united states and north korea will commit themselves to improving establishing a new relationship in accordance with the desire of the peoples of the two countries for peace and prosperity. a second point, the countries during in efforts to build a lasting u nsta ble in efforts to build a lasting unstable peace regime on the korean peninsula and the third point, the two countries declared their commitment to work towards the com plete commitment to work towards the complete denuclearisation of the korean peninsula. those are very fine sentiments and there was absolutely nothing wrong with those commitments, but i think what the critics who are waiting in the... on the sidelines, they will say quickly it is very, very vague, no specific commitments, no time frame for denuclearisation, no commitment by kim jong—un to open up nuclear sites or declare what nuclear weapons he has but a vaguely worded commitment to build a new relationship, to
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build peace on the korean peninsula and two sometime down the line the nuclear or is the korean peninsula. what does it mean? we don‘t know —— denuclearisation. this is crucial, on the issue of denuclearisation, going into the talks, the americans had said the crucial issue in the longer term will be verification, how do you check if anything has changed? how do you check if anything has changed ? the how do you check if anything has changed? the problem that president trump now faces, because everyone will be poring over the wording of this in the coming hours and tearing it to pieces and expressing opinions on both sides, those who support president trump doing this and think it could lead to a new relationship and those who have been sceptical and those who have been sceptical and said president trump has come here and given kim jong—un a huge amount of face and a huge amount of dignity and statesmanship on the
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international stage but has got nothing in return. the problem is, we don‘t know. this potentially is the beginning of a new relationship, these two men may be sincerely committing themselves to entering a process that will go on for perhaps yea rs process that will go on for perhaps years to come and could lead to these things that they have put down in writing. but without any specifics, we do not know. nevertheless, it is very clear president trump and kim jong—un will walk away claiming it is a historic breakthrough and a win for both of them. north america editorjon sopel is at whether press conference is expected to be from donald trump in the next half an hour. a similar question to you, details are emerging of this document, how significant do you think it is? well, it is a start. rupert wingfield—hayes is right when he says, this is not a complete
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comprehensive document, plan of action, of what is going to unfold. that is what we will see over the coming weeks and months. i suppose you have to pause and before pouring buckets of cold water all over it, you have to say, hang on, it is pretty remarkable, we have seen kim jong—un shaking hands with the us president, the reclusive leader of a pariah state that was a few years ago being referred to as the axis of evil now on the world stage talking about complete denuclearisation, the devil will be in the detail. but we should not play down just what a significant first step has been taken. it has been extraordinary watching overnight and you have been watching overnight and you have been watching the president for years now, the speed at which this has happened is something else.|j now, the speed at which this has happened is something else. i mean, it was nine months ago, let us rewind, nine months ago, donald
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trump was calling kim jong—un little rocket man, kim jong—un was calling donald trump a mentally deranged... it was three months three days ago that kim jong—un extended an invitation to donald trump for talks which an awful lot of people thought, that is never going to happen. here we are, the talks have taken place, any moment now, donald trump will come out and try to sell what he has achieved and say, look, it isa what he has achieved and say, look, it is a big step forward for peace. people are right to have doubts but there are some steps that have been taken that people weeks ago would have thought would have been unimaginable. it is interesting and even before journalists like you and the rest of the world got details of the rest of the world got details of the document, the sale began with the document, the sale began with the president saying, we will take ca re of the president saying, we will take care of a very big dangerous problem for the world. yeah, and i think donald trump has one eye and peace
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and he sees it as a historic moment for himself and the world, this could be his moment in history if peoples it off and there is some kind of comprehensive denuclearisation programme —— if he pulls it off. he is also looking at american public opinion, the midterms in november, potential of a second term. if this turns into a big victory for donald trump and he will sell it like crazy and he is the master salesman, it augurs well for his political future. he was somewhat of a veteran of donald trump press conferences. —— you are somewhat. what is it going to be like? will it start on time? who knows. he wants to get back to washington later tonight. he will be
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keen to get on with this. the form of it, i think he will want to claim a great victory and i think he will be irritated if the questions are doubting, saying, why haven‘t you got that? we heard about this phrase, denuclearisation had to be complete, irreversible, verifiable. in this document that has come out, note mention of irreversible or verifiable. —— no mention. people will say kim jong—un will be going back laughing, seemed on the world stage as unequal to donald trump, given very little ground, probably alleviated a lot of pressure from china on sanctions. isn‘t kim jong—un the winner? if that is the line of questioning, we might see donald trump being a little bit testy. jon sopel, thank you. whether press co nfe re nce testy. jon sopel, thank you. whether press conference is going to take
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place, the president said it would ta ke place, the president said it would take place in about half an hour. thank you very much indeed. we will keep you up—to—date. theresa may is striving to... theresa may is striving to stave off a possible defeat in a series of votes on the brexit process, after appealing to conservative mps not to undermine her. today is the first of two major days of voting, with the brexit secretary, david davis, writing to mps urging them to back the government‘s amended eu withdrawal bill, or risk weakening the uk‘s negotiating position. 0ur political correspondent, eleanor garnier, is in westminster this morning. alan 0‘connor set the scene? people might be slightly weary of the negotiations and discussions about brexit. —— eleanor garnier, set the scene? but this is significant? brexit. —— eleanor garnier, set the scene? but this is significant7m is farfrom scene? but this is significant7m is far from guaranteed that theresa may will get away. the numbers are incredibly tight when it comes to the voting and it could take as few as just seven tories rebelling to
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inflict a government defeat. this is a key piece of brexit legislation designed to ensure that the uk has a smooth transition as it leaves the eu. david davis, the brexit secretary, leaving home this morning, looked seemingly confident but number ten has already given ground to remainers on how customs should work after brexit. that has kept some of the rebels at bay for the moment. a tricky test could come this afternoon on something called the meaningful votes, giving parliament the power to decide what happens if mps reject that final deal that theresa may negotiates with brussels. that vote is looking da cey. with brussels. that vote is looking dacey. —— dicey. this will be a tough week for theresa may with the
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votes, but i think even if there is a government defeat it does not mean her position this week will be challenged. but we have the customs and trade bill is coming up, there will be plenty more opportunities for upsets next month. thank you very much, eleanor garnier. it is 60 minutes per state. carol is in a rather beautiful location. —— it is 16 minutes past eight. who is yourfriend, carol? lovely chris packham is here. good morning. you are filming spring watch near here. on the sherborne park estate, just up the road. have you found anything unusual? we have had highjinks you found anything unusual? we have had high jinks with some little owls, they are nesting in the same banners and blackbirds. they have already predated two of the blackbirds‘ young. these little owls
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have been stealing the young. and there will be recaptured the badgers, we have known them since last spring. we will bring back story to its conclusion. and my colleaguejulian story to its conclusion. and my colleague julian is in story to its conclusion. and my colleaguejulian is in the west country looking at the marine ecosystems. it is the usual hijinks tonight on springwatch. everything isa tonight on springwatch. everything is a little bit later this year? we have had a very unusual spring, down to you and your weather. but not just in the uk, the weather in europe and south of the sahara. so many migrant swallows and swifts have been very laid—back. last night we introduced a great tips‘ nest with young in it. it has been a highly unusual spring for breeding birds. a pleasure as always, chris. we will be watching tonight. 8pm, bbc two! it is really cloudy here. everybody has told me how beautiful it was here yesterday, as in many
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places. even with the cloud it is very beautiful, the forecast is the cloud will thin and bright, sunny spells will develop but still some showers. this morning it is the west seeing the brightest skies. in the west of scotland, argyll & bute, ayrshire, dumfries & galloway are where we have the brightest skies. the east of northern ireland has the brightest skies, north—west england, west wales, south—west england again looking at the sunniest starter. fairly cloudy for the rest of us, the cloud enough for the odd spot of drizzle and the odd shower. through the course of the day, slowly we will see some of the cloud thin and break and some others will see sunny spells. showers across southern scotland, northern england, parts of wales, south—west england and maybe an isolated one in the east. temperature is nothing like yesterday, the top temperature was 26 in bournemouth, today at best we are looking at 21. through the
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evening, some of the cloud will continue to thin and it will be across the northeast that we hang on to the clouds overnight, with drizzle coming out of it. more clouds coming and across the north—west with the odd spot of rain. this will herald the change. it will turn fresher. tomorrow we start with a fair bit of sunshine, through the day more cloud will build and the southern half of england and wales are likely to see some showers, fairly well scattered but some around. by the end of the day, more clouds, rain and stronger winds will start to come across the northwest. by the end of the night, first thing on thursday morning, it will be extremely windy across scotland. looking at gales and severe gales with exposure. for the rush hour across the central lowla nds we rush hour across the central lowlands we could have gusts of 60 mph, that could prove disruptive. we will have heavy rain moving south as well. strong winds across northern
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ireland in northern england, windy across the rest of england and wales. the rain moves across as quickly. for england, wales and northern ireland, sunshine. even into the afternoon it will be quite windy across scotland. bear that in mind, especially if you are travelling. what a treat it was to see chris, charlie and louise. studio: a little update on the owls situation, we like that! she will not say anything else. louise is not here right now, she has gone outside to do a piece about cycling, we will see her in a minute. steph mcgovern will tell us about new look. yes, their results have come out and they have not been good, to be honest. they have set their sales were down 11%. quite a big drop. their revenues are down. what is interesting as online sales are also down nearly 20%. lots of
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people are thinking it is all about the high street, we do not go into stores a ny the high street, we do not go into stores any more and we‘re buying anything online, not necessarily for new look at the moment. they say they have had a really tough year and it is both external issues, things like what is happening with prices because we are paying more for things being imported, but also the fact we are not spending as much. the other side is their own internal problems. they do not say what they were but they say they are turning things around. this comes at a really tough time for retailers. yesterday poundworld announced they we re yesterday poundworld announced they were going into administration, 5500 jobs at risk. there have been something like 28,000 jobs lost in retail since the start of this year, which is a staggering number. sarah said she was made redundant from two retailers over three years. then she has been an different retailers since. she does not work in retailany
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retailers since. she does not work in retail any more and say she would not go back unless it was her only option. tracey says that before christmas she was made redundant from wilkos, she had never been through that before never wants to again. we spoke to a recruitment experts earlier, he said lots of the skill to retailer transferable and although retailers struggling, areas like health care, hospitality and leisure are looking for people with the skills that people who work in retail have, so it is worth looking about. people who have got in touch with good news about theirjobs, the owner of the wally wine shop says they were made redundant in 2008, set up an independent wench update yea rs set up an independent wench update years ago and it has gone from strength to strength, they say there can bea strength to strength, they say there can be a positive ending, although retailers always a challenge. jenny was made redundant around ten years ago, say she went for a job with the nhs and loves it. it is good to hear
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positive stories, it feels like it is slightly relentless. ultimately this is people‘s lives, it is good to hear sometimes. you want to know at this point that there are other opportunities, it can be very scary. we wa nt opportunities, it can be very scary. we want people to get in touch, i will definitely carry on digging into this. always interested in growth areas. we will talk about driverless cars. we‘re told that driverless cars will be the future of motoring — but how will they actually work? manufacturers are being warned that words like "autonomous" and "autopilot" are lulling some drivers into a false sense of security. motorists may think that they have self—driving cars when that‘s not actually the case, as our technology correspondent rory cellan—jones explains. so the autopilot system is on. this is not a self driving car, but the tesla has some features to automate the driving process and car insurers
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are worried about how they are described. we have something called autopilot, i think it is misleading, it suggests it is doing it itself. this car does not do it itself, it only supports the driver and so we should use the word assisted. in april a british tesla driver who a p pa re ntly in april a british tesla driver who apparently believed his car was self driving lost his licence when he was filmed on the motorway sitting on behind the wheel but in passenger seat. on the thatcher research track where they conduct safety tests for car insurers we are trying out the autopilot system, following another car which comes across a queue of traffic. and automatically it has come to a halt. the autopilot system works pretty well. the danger is it lulls the driver into a false sense of security. now let‘s try another scenario. this time the car we are following will change lanes at the very last moment. and with the driver not concentrating, the autopilot does
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not brake in time. fortu nately not brake in time. fortunately this was just a dummy car. tesla told us our communications are very clear about the functionality of autopilot and does not make the car self driving. we have continuously educate customers on the proper use of autopilot, reminding them they must remain alert and be prepared to take control at all times. i‘ve got my hands off the wheel because i am on a test track, but it will tell me every 15 seconds, put your hands on the wheel. this bmw has assisted driver features and faction prefers the way they are labelled. but the car‘s lane hugging technology fails to cope with this very tight bend. bmw says it is very clear its driving assistant feature does not replace the driver. 0verall, does not replace the driver. overall, the insurers want more clarity for motorists. i think there is a problem with vehicle manufacturers trying to introduce technology and the consumer not being ready for it, not
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being sure is it automated, do i have to keep watching? you want it very clear, either you are driving, assistance, or you are not driving, automated. tesla, bmw and others are racing to develop fully self driving cars, but on the way to the autonomous future, there could be dangers ahead. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. slight changes in the weather today. this morning, more cloud compared to yesterday morning. with the northerly wind, feeling cooler. i am hopeful that by this afternoon, there will be sunnier spells. some
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sunshine this morning in south—west england and west wales, becoming more widespread this afternoon. the risk of showers in central and southern scotland, northern ireland, perhaps later in wales and southern areas of england. for most of us, a dry day. temperatures down a little bit compared to yesterday. through this evening, not a lot going on. plenty of dry weather, showers fizzling away, cloud floating around, plenty of clear spells. into wednesday, higher pressure still dominating things across england and wales, but in the north and west, area of low pressure, lots more cloud, outbreaks of rain moving in on wednesday towards northern ireland, the north and the west of scotland. eastern and southern scotla nd scotland. eastern and southern scotland stinging dry and dry for england and wales on wednesday, the odd shower in the south—west ——
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staying dry for england and wales. for thursday, quite a deep area of low pressure moving in, look at the ice bath, white lines, close together, indicative of strong winds, quite unusual to see this deep area of low pressure in mid—june —— look at the isobars. gusts of potentially 60—70 miles per hourin gusts of potentially 60—70 miles per hour in central areas of scotland. trees may be coming down. travel disruption is quite likely thursday morning. stay tuned to the forecast. this is business live from bbc news with ben thompson and sally bundock. the summit of the century takes place in singapore. the president of the united states and the north korean leader sign a historic deal, but the world awaits the details of the agreement. live from london, singapore and
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seoul for this special edition on tuesday, 12 june. seoul for this special edition on tuesday, 12june. a very warm welcome to the programme. we will keep you across what has been quite a day in singapore, events have been unfolding. after a year of exchanging threats, the leaders of the united states and north korea have met for an historic summit in singapore.
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