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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  June 12, 2018 9:00am-11:01am BST

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hello, it's tuesday, it's 9am, i'm chloe tilley, welcome to the programme. donald trump and kim jong—un have made history. they've signed a document committing themselves to a complete denuclearisation of the korean peninsula. but how substantial is it? and we are very proud of what took place today, i think our whole relationship with north korea and the korean peninsula is going to be a very much different situation than it has in the past. in the next few minutes, president trump will hold of press conference. we'll run it in full and have expert reaction throughout the programme. also, it's a crucial couple of days for theresa may. over the next 48 hours, mps will vote on what sort of brexit the country will get. the prime minister herself has met conservative mps and warned them she will be weakened if they don't vote with her. we'll be speaking to labour and tory mps in the next hour. leave campaigner arron banks is to be questioned by mps this morning about claims linking him to russia.
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he met russia's uk ambassador three times, discussing brexit and donald trump's election. so, is it fake news, as he claims? hello, welcome to the programme. we're live until 11 this morning. we will be bringing you the live donald trump press conference, live from singapore. what do you think about the summit? is it a masterstroke of diplomacy from president trump? or are you more cynical? or maybe you're korean and living in britain. we wa nt we want to get a sense of what you think this morning. do get in touch on all the stories we're talking about this morning. it will be dominated by these talks, this is the press room, a few empty chairs, normally means it will be a few minutes before it is going to
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start. we are expecting donald trump to give us more details about the document signed in the last couple of hours between kimjong—un document signed in the last couple of hours between kim jong—un and donald trump. if you want to get in touch with us about anything we are talking about this morning... use the hashtag #victorialive. and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. the world is about to see a major change. those are the words of kim jong—un, on this historic day. in the last few minutes, mr kim has left sentosa island in singapore. this is his motorcade leaving just moments ago. it followed a handshake and the signing of a document with president trump. all thisjust nine months after the us president called the north korean leader little rocket man and mr kim was threatening nuclear war. america's goal is denuclearisation. and chairman kim desperately needs the lifting of economic sanctions. time will tell what will actually come to pass. but already, kim jong—un is now centre stage, on the world stage, which can only help cement his place as supreme leader.
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a short while ago, the two leaders signed a joint statement, which committed the us and north korea to little more than a number of general principles. the pair appeared relaxed together. mr trump said that the talks had gone well so far, and more details of their agreement would be announced in the next few hours, while mr kim said they had decided to leave the past behind. we are very proud of what took place today. i think our whole relationship with north korea and the korean peninsular is going to be a very much different situation than it has in the past. we both want to do something, we both are going to do something, we both are going to do something, we both are going to do something, and we have developed a very special bond. people are going to be very impressed, people are going to be very happy, and we are going to be very happy, and we are going to take care of a very big and dangerous problem for the world.
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i want to thank chairman kim, we have spent a lot of intensive time together today and i would say it has worked out far better than anybody could have expected. i watched the various news reports, i would say far better than anyone predicted. this will lead to more and more and more and it is an honour to be with you are a very great honour. thank you, thank you to all of your representative is very much. if you have but meat not been up since the small hours —— if you have not been up since the small hours, let us film you in on what has happened. karishna vaswani reports from singapore. making history with a handshake. many thought this moment would never come, but when it finally did, it was measured and choreographed. thank you very much. once inside, the two men appeared more relaxed, even smiling for the cameras, president trump famously said he would know in the first minute of
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meeting kim jong—un whether this summit would be successful. at first glance, things appear to be going quite well. we are going to have a great discussion, tremendous success , great discussion, tremendous success, tremendously successful. but from kim jong—un, a success, tremendously successful. but from kimjong—un, a slightly more reflective tone. he said it has not been easy to get here and old prejudices have been obstacles and he has overcome that and that is why he is his today. this is the new face of kim jong—un, gone are the harsh images of a hostile dictator. in his place, a man thronged by tourists while on tour of singapore's clamorous skyline and that is what the north korean people will see this smalling —— glamorous. a far cry from the grave factories and nuclear sites he usually frequents. but even with this friendly face, there is still
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much work ahead. after meeting one on one, kim jong—un much work ahead. after meeting one on one, kimjong—un and president trump proceeded to meet again, this time with their teams, a sign that perhaps for no other discussions have gone well. it is a great honour to be here. we will solve a big problem, the big dilemma. that big dilemma is how far apart these two men are on the issue of denuclearisation. two of the most unconventional leaders of the planet and their entire approach to this process has broken all the rules, whether or not they can bridge the gap between them will determine the fate of the summit. our correspondent, rupert wingfield—hayes, is in singapore. it has been absolutely fascinating, the theatrics of this, the body
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language, and seemingly two men who appear to get on. yeah, it has been, absolutely amazing day in singapore, watching the first meeting, watching the handshake at the beginning, the body language between kim jong—un and donald trump, going into a meeting by themselves, only their translators. kim jong—un looking nervous to begin with, but coming out later and looking much more relaxed, walking through the gardens of the hotel with president trump after the summit, and moving on to signing this agreement between them. all the way through that, both have been extremely upbeat, extremely positive. president trump in particular using the sort of hyperbolic language we are used to, talking about it being a terrific relationship, great success, selling this agreement very hard. he is a salesman. we know that. he is certainly selling this agreement as history making. whether it is, i think that is a much bigger question
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because we are now starting to see the detail of what they signed in the detail of what they signed in the agreement and it is hard not to describe it as extremely vague. let us describe it as extremely vague. let us talk about that. which side has got what? we know there was always talk from the us of talking about verifiable and irreversible denuclearisation, that is not in the agreement, is it? no, it is not. the wording of the agreement is pretty much identical when it comes to nuclear weapons to the agreement signed between kim jong—un and the south korean president in april. in fa ct, south korean president in april. in fact, it is word for word for the same commitment which is commitment to the denuclearisation of the korean peninsular, there is no reversible, there is no verifiable. the verifiable as the most important word. irreversible is hard. we expected to see something about
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verifying denuclearisation which means allowing in inspectors, declaring what you'll nuclear programme is, how many nuclear weapons and facilities you have, none of that, just a one sentence commitment to the denuclearisation of the korean peninsula. very hard to know what it means. it is just the start, a commitment to something down the line. in that sense, would you say kim jong—un down the line. in that sense, would you say kimjong—un has down the line. in that sense, would you say kim jong—un has achieved more and got more out of this and donald trump? both sides will want to walk away from this, they already are in fact, claiming a victory, and i think the wording of the document makes it very clear they have agreed to both call it a victory for both countries, using the word epocal. donald trump will say, i got him to make this commitment in writing to me that he will do these things. if one stands back a bit and says, from where we stand now, not in months
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and years ahead, who has got the most out of the summit? very difficult not to see it as a very big win for kim jong—un. difficult not to see it as a very big win for kimjong—un. he difficult not to see it as a very big win for kim jong—un. he was a few months ago at the end of last year, facing threats of military action. he was under the tougher sanctions he had ever had on the economy. pushed into a corner. his relations with his closest ally china ina relations with his closest ally china in a terrible state. now he has been fated in singapore, on the world stage, he will be able to go back home with incredible images of him meeting the us president and go to china and south korea and say, i am now committed to a process, time to start lifting sanctions. is it clear what we will get from a press conference which we are expecting in the next few minutes? well, i expect president trump to come out and give a very hard sell of what he has achieved here. clearly, he want the message to go out, we heard him in his statement saying a lot of the
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news media has been extremely cynical and the agreement will be much more than they ever expected. i have to say, a lot of the news media and specialists remain sceptical because of the wording. he will come out and want to sell it and talk directly through the international media to the american people and say, no one else could do this, i have achieved something, an extraordinary breakthrough, sell it really ha rd. extraordinary breakthrough, sell it really hard. we will be back with rupert wingfield—hayes later in the programme. looking at the room, where we are expecting us president donald trump to come and speak to reporters waiting, they are watching a video which would suggest it is not going to be that long, it has slightly slipped, we were expecting it at 9am. i expect in the next few minutes, we will see that coming live and we will bring it to you fully. interesting point here, north korean state tv have not at all mentioned this agreement, this meeting. they have been looking at
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his tour around singapore last night, the sites, but it is not unusual, they started broadcasting at 7am, they often do not report these kinds of incidents, but some are suggesting it might happen because it is such a historic meeting with us president. we will bring you the press conference live. in the meantime, the latest news from the bbc newsroom. two days of crucial debate and votes on brexit legislation begin today. the brexit secretary, david davis, has written to conservative mps urging them not to back amendments passed by the lords. he warned that the uk's whole approach to negotiations with the eu could be undermined by the changes. leading brexit campaigner arron banks is to appear before mps this morning to answer allegations that russian money played a part in the referendum campaign. the founder of leave.eu is accused of having more meetings with kremlin officials than previously disclosed and was offered the chance to take part in a business deal involving
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siberian gold mines. mr banks insists it's all nonsense. a decision by spain to take in a migrant rescue vessel stranded in the mediterranean has been hailed by the italian interior minister as a victory for his government's immigration policy. italy and malta had both refused to allow the rescue ship aquarius, which was carrying more than 600 migrants, to dock at any of their ports. it's now been decided that the migrants will be transferred to other vessels before being taken to spain. the man who founded poundworld says he hopes to buy back a number of its stores after the company went into administration, putting more than 5000 jobs at risk. chris edwards — who sold poundworld for £150 million in 2015 — said he was in talks with the administrators, deloitte, to try to save the stores mothers who decide not to breastfeed shouldn't be made to feel guilty, according to new advice from the royal college of midwives. the guidelines say that if a woman decides to bottle feed, her choice must be respected,
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but the official overall policy hasn't changed. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 9:30. do get in touch with us throughout the morning — use the hashtag #victorialive. this morning, things are dominated by the historic meeting between president trump and kim jong—un. if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. just before the press conference... let's get some sport with hugh woozencroft. iam not i am not sure anybody has mentioned but the world cup begins this week. most of the teams are going to their final preparations. the england boss gareth southgate puts his team through a full game, even down to the detail of having premier league referees. that was behind closed doors, with gareth southgate not
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giving tambe much away about the first game against tunisia and the line—up. he is clearly keeping his players getting before they begin their journey to players getting before they begin theirjourney to russia later today. they make theirjourney to a town which is a 45 minute drive from st petersburg which was chosen by the fa due to its size. we have back to you, chloe. us president donald trump has just walked out to the podium, he will speak in singapore about that historic meeting. that is about that historic meeting. thatisa about that historic meeting. that is a great, great place. it has the potential to be an incredible place between south korea, if you think about it, and china. it has tremendous potential andi china. it has tremendous potential and i think he understands that. and he wants to do what is right. it is my honour today to address the people of the world following this very historic summit with chairman kim jong—un of north very historic summit with chairman kimjong—un of north korea. spent a
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very intensive hours together and i think most of you have gotten the signs document, or you will do very shortly. it is very comprehensive, it is going to happen. i stand before you as an emissary of the american people to deliver a message of hope and vision and a message of peace. let me begin by thanking our incredible hosts in singapore, especially prime minister lee, a friend of mine. this is a country of profound grace and beauty and we send our warmest wishes to every citizen of singapore, who really made this visit is so important and so made this visit is so important and so pleasants made this visit is so important and so pleasa nts despite made this visit is so important and so pleasants despite all of the work and long hours. i also want to thank president moon of south korea. i will be speaking to him right after we finished. and prime minister abe
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ofjapan, a we finished. and prime minister abe of japan, a friend we finished. and prime minister abe ofjapan, a friend of mine, just after our country. he wants to do what is right forjapan and for the world. he is a good man. and a very special person, president xi of china, who has really closed up that border, maybe a little bit are so over the last couple of months, but thatis over the last couple of months, but that is ok. but he really has, he is a terrific person and a friend of mine and really a great leader of those people. i want to thank them for their efforts to help us get to this very historic day. most importantly, i want to thank chairman kim for taking the first bold step towards a bright new future for his people stop allerton president of meeting, the first between an american president and a leader of north korea, proves that real change is, indeed, possible. my meeting with chairman kim was
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honest, direct and productive. we got to know each other well in a very confined period of time under very confined period of time under very strong, strong circumstances. we are prepared to start a new history and we are ready to write a new chapter between our nations. nearly 70 years ago, think of that, 70 years ago and extremely bloody conflict ravaged the korean peninsular. countless people died in the conflict, including tens of thousands of brave americans. yet while the armistice was agreed to, the war never ended. to this day, it never ended. but now we can all have hope that it will soon end, and it will soon end. the past does not have to define the future. yesterday's conflict does not have to be tomorrow's war. and as history has proven over and over again, as
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the cerys can indeed become friends. we can honour the sacrifice of our forefathers by replacing the horrors of battle with the blessings of peace, and that is what we are doing and what we have done. there is no limit to what north korea can achieve when it gives up its nuclear weapons and embraces, is —— and embraces commerce and engagement with the rest of the world, which really wants to engage. chairman kim has an opportunity like no other before him, to be remembered as the leader who ushered ina remembered as the leader who ushered in a glorious new era of security is parity for his people —— security and prosperity for his people. chairman kim and ijust signed a joint statement in which he reaffirmed his unwavering commitment to will arise asian at the korean peninsular we also agreed to vigorous negotiations to implement
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the agreement, as soon as is a budget his unwavering commitment to denuclearisation of the korean peninsula. this is not another administration which never got it started and never got it done. chairman kim has told me that north korea is already destroying a major missile engine testing site. that is not in your signed documents, we agreed to that after the agreement was signed. that is a big thing. the site was going to be destroyed very soon. site was going to be destroyed very soon. today is the beginning of an arduous process, our eyes are wide open, but peace is always worth the effort, especially in this case. this should have been ten years ago, it shouldn't be resolved a long time ago. but we are resolving it now. chairman king has the chance to
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seize an incredible future for his people. anyone can make war but only the courageous can make peace. the current state of affairs cannot endure forever, the people of career, north and south, are profoundly talented, industry as an gifted —— the people of korea. they share the same heritage, language, customs, culture and destiny. but to realise their amazing destiny, to reunite their national family, the menace of nuclear weapons will now be removed. in the meantime, the sanctions will remain in effect. we dream ofa sanctions will remain in effect. we dream of a future where all koreans can live together in harmony, where families are reunited and hopes are reborn and where the light of peace chases away the darkness of war. this bright future, this is what is happening. it is within our reach.
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it is going to be there, it is going to happen. people thought this could never take place, it is now taking place. it is a very great day, it is a very great moment in the history of the world. and chairman kim is on his way back to north korea, and i know for a fact as soon as he arrives he will start a process which will make a lot of people very happy and very safe. it is an honour to be with everybody today. it is a big gathering of media, i will say. it makes me feel very uncomfortable! laughter but it is what it is, people understand this is something very important to all others, including yourselves and your families. so thank you very much for being here, we will take some questions. wow, lots of questions go ahead. nbc. reporter: two questions, if you don't mind. first, the man u met
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today, kim jong—un, as don't mind. first, the man u met today, kimjong—un, as you know, has killed family members, start his own people, is responsible for deaths. why are you so comfortable calling him very talented? well, he is very talented. anybody that takes over a situation like he did at 26 years of age and is able to run it, and run it tough. i didn't say he was nice or anything about it. very few people at that age, you can take one out of 10,000, probably, people at that age, you can take one out of10,000, probably, could people at that age, you can take one out of 10,000, probably, could do it. otto is a very special person, and he will be for a long time in my life. his parents are good friends of mine. i think without auto, this would not have happened. something happened from bad day. it was a terrible thing, it was brutal, but lots of people started to focus on what was going on, including north korea. i really think that otto did
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not die in vain, i told this to his pa rents. not die in vain, i told this to his parents. a special young man, and, i have to say, special parents, special people. otto did not die in vain. the second question was on the security questions you talked about in your statement, what assurances are you willing to give to kim jong—un? does that involve reducing military capabilities? we are not reducing anything. at some point, i have to be honest, i used to say this during my campaign, as you know probably better than most, i want to get our soldiers out, bring them back home. we have right now 32,000 soldiers in south korea. i would like to be able to bring them back home, but that is not part of the equation right now. at some point i hope it will be, not right now. we will be stopping the war games, which will say there's a tremendous
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amount of money. unless and until we see the future negotiation is not going along like it should. but we will be saving a tremendous amount of money. plus i think it is very provocative. yes? john, go ahead? i'm sorry. i thought you werejohn roberts! you look much better, right? reporter: we are frequently confused, mr president. mr president, thejoint statement confused, mr president. mr president, the joint statement does not talk about verifiable or irreversible denuclearisation, is that a concession on the part of the united states? know, if you look at it hit said we are going to... let's see here, it will be gone... i don't think it can be any more plain than what we are asking. issues related to the establishment of the new ust pkl relations. —— then the new us/
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dpkr. we talk about the company denuclearisation of the korean peninsular. did you discuss with chairman kim methods to verify either with the united states or international organisations that very process? we did, and it will be verified. about how will that be achieved? by verified. about how will that be achieved ? by having verified. about how will that be achieved? by having lots of people via. as we develop a certain trust and we think we have dummett, secretary pompeo has been doing a fantasticjob. we will have lots of people there and we will be working with them on lots of other things, but this is complete and it will arise asian of north korea and it will be verified. —— this is com plete will be verified. —— this is complete denuclearisation. it will bea complete denuclearisation. it will be a combination, we have talked about it. be nice. go ahead? be
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respectful. reporter: iwill about it. be nice. go ahead? be respectful. reporter: i will be about it. be nice. go ahead? be respectful. reporter: iwill be very respectful, sir. what did kim jong—un say to you to give you the confidence that for once in the history of north korea they are not cheating the system and is gaining the world and gaming that people who will have to give up their arsenal? they have proceeded down a path in the past and as you know, nothing was done. in one case they took billions of dollars during the clinton regime, billions of dollars and nothing happened. that was terrible. he brought it up to me. and he said we have never gone this far, i don't think they have ever had the confidence, frankly, any president that they have right now, for getting things done and having the ability to get things done. he was very firm on the fact that he wa nts to was very firm on the fact that he wants to do this. i think he might
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wa nt to wants to do this. i think he might want to do this as much as or even more than me, they see a very bright future in north korea. you never know, right? but we signed a very comprehensive document today and i think most of you have been given that, we signed a very, very comprehensive document and i believe he will live up to that. when he lands, which will be shortly, i think he will start the process right away. i do. i can only say that i know him really well, it has been very rhetorical, as you know. i think without the rhetoric, it would not have happened. i think without other things going along, the establishment of a new team was very important. we have a great team. but ido,i important. we have a great team. but i do, i think he wants to get it done, ifeel i do, i think he wants to get it done, i feel that very strongly. there isjohn. done, i feel that very strongly. there is john. you done, i feel that very strongly. there isjohn. you two guys look a light when the light is on, let me see who has better hair! he has
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pretty good hair. reporter: it is the angelic glow of the backlighting which makes us look so similar, mr president. the denuclearisation of nuclear weapons and biological weapons and whatnot is one problem in north korea, and the huge problem is that horrible human rights record. was that discussed at all, is that something you will tackle? it was discussed, it will be discussed more in the future, human rights. what was also discussed in great detail, john, was the fact that we have... and i must have had cou ntless that we have... and i must have had countless calls and letters and tweets, anything you can do, they wa nt tweets, anything you can do, they want the remains of their sons back, their fathers and mothers and all of their fathers and mothers and all of the people that got caught into their really brutal wall which took place, to a large extent, in north korea. —— really brutal war.
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place, to a large extent, in north korea. —— really brutalwar. i place, to a large extent, in north korea. —— really brutal war. iasked for it today, we got it. that was really last—minute. the remains will be coming back, they will start that process immediately. even during the campaign, so many people said is there anyway you can work with north korea to get the remains of my son back? or my father back? so many people this question. i said, look, we don't get along too well with this particular group of people. but now we do, and he agreed to not so quickly and so nicely, it was really a very nice thing. he understands it. for the thousands and thousands, i guess way over 6000 that we know of, in terms of the remains, it will be brought back. the pow mia issue is clearly very important. especially to lots of people. what do you expect kim jong—un to do about the human rights record regarding the north korean people?
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it was discussed relatively briefly compared to denuclearisation, that is where we started and ended. they will be doing things, i think he wa nts to will be doing things, i think he wants to do things. you would be very surprised. very smart, very good negotiator, he wants to do the right thing. he brought up the fact that in the past they took dialogue, they never were like we all, there has never been anything like what has never been anything like what has taken place now, but they went down the line, billions of dollars we re down the line, billions of dollars were given and the following day, the nuclear programme continued. but this is a much different time and a much different president, in all fairness, this is very important to me. one of the reasons i perhaps campaigned on this issue, however those people are, i cannot see you with all the lights, you do not look like either of the two... go ahead.
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thank you. first of all, congratulations. i appreciate it. touching on that issue of the peace treaty and also will you travel to pyongyang at any time soon? at a certain time, i will. that is the date i very much look forward to at the appropriate time and i also will be inviting chairman kim at the appropriate time to the white house. i think it is really going to be something that would be very important. and he has accepted. i said, at the appropriate time. we wa nt to said, at the appropriate time. we want to go a little bit further down the road. what we signed today was... a lot of things included. and then you have things that were not included that we got after the deal was signed. i have done that before in my life. we did not put it in the agreement because we did not have time. most of you have been handed out the agreement or soon will. you
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have not? if you could have the agreement is passed out? wejust finished them a little while ago. you will see what we are talking about. go ahead. congratulations, president. what part did japan play and did the abduction issue come up also? the fate of the christians? when will you be doing an interview with japanese tv? 50,000 american troops are in japan. it is true. 50,000 great troops. abduction, it did. as prime minister shinzo abe said, other than the whole denuclearisation subject, certainly i would say his main point and i brought it up absolutely and they will be working on that. we did not put it down in the document, but it will be worked on. christians, yes, we brought it up very strongly. franklin graham spent and spends a
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tremendous amount of time in north korea, very close to his heart, and it did come up, things will be happening. thank you. great question. yes, john, go ahead? thank you, mr president. the question of human rights, you spoke very powerfully on the issue in your state of the union address, you showed you had the defector in the first lady's box who escaped, you said north korea has more brutally oppressed its people than any other regime on earth, do you still believe that is the case having sat down with kim jong—un and as he believed to change that? it is a rough situation, no question about it, and we did discuss it had pretty strongly. knowing what the main purpose of what we were doing is, denuclearisation, but we discussed
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ita denuclearisation, but we discussed it a pretty good length. we will be doing something. it is rough in a lot of places, by the way, notjust there. we will ultimately agree to something. but it was discussed at length outside of the nuclear situation, one of the primary topics. do you think that needs to change to bring on this glorious new era you talked about?” change to bring on this glorious new era you talked about? i think it will change. it probably has to, but i think it will. thank you. steve, right there. thank you. what timetable do you envision for the denuclearisation and in the meantime, are you thinking about using any sanctions? scientifically, i have been watching and reading a lot about this and it does take a long time to pull off complete denuclearisation, it takes a long time. scientifically, you have to wait certain periods of time, a lot of things happen. but despite that,
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once you start the process, it means it is pretty much over, you cannot use them. that is the good news. that will start very soon. i believe. we will do it as fast as it can mechanically and physically be done. and the sanctions? the sanctions will come off when we are sure that the nukes are no longer a factor, sanctions have played a big role, but they will come off... i hope it will be soon. as you know and as! hope it will be soon. as you know and as i have said, the sanctions right now remain. i look forward to taking them off at a certain point and they will come off when we know we are down the road, not going to happen, nothing is going to happen. yes, go ahead, please? thank you. congratulations on this historic summit. thank you. congratulations to everybody, by the way. congratulations to everybody. you signed a document with kimjong—un,
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essentially a piece of paper, yesterday we had a briefing from the secretary of state mike pompeo and he said the following. many presidents previously have signed off on pieces of paper only to find the north korea is either did not promise what we thought they had or they renege on those promises. what makes this time different? you have a different administration, different president, different secretary of state. you have people that are that the. it is very important that we get it done. the other groups, maybe it was not a priority. i do not think they could have done it if it was a priority, frankly. it would have been easier but then, for me, it would have been much easier if this was ten years ago, five years ago, and i am not just blaming president obama, this goes back 25 years, this should have happened. i was given a very tough hand, i was given this, the iran deal, and plenty of other problems,
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but we are doing really well and the iran deal, i have to be honest, i did it because nuclear is always number one to me, nuclear is number one. but on the iran deal, i think iran isa one. but on the iran deal, i think iran is a different country now than three, four months ago, i do not think they are looking so much to the mediterranean, not looking so much at syria like they were with total confidence, i do not think they are so confident right now. but i hope with that being said that at the appropriate time, after the sanctions kick in and they are brutal, what we have put on iran, i hope that they will come back and negotiate a real deal because i would love to be able to do that. but right now, too soon for that. you also talked about establishing diplomatic relations. exchanging ambassadors. how long before that happens? good question. hopefully soon. happens? good question. hopefully soon. but we will have to get things
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moving first. a little bit early for that. we have to get things moving. go ahead. can you clarify when you said you were stopping war games, you are stopping the military exercises over south korea ? you are stopping the military exercises over south korea? we have done exercises for a long period of time working with south korea and we call them war games and i call them war games than they are tremendously expensive, the amount of money we spend on that is incredible. south korea contributes but not 100% which is certainly a subject we have to talk to them about also. and that has to do with the military expense and also the trade. we are doing that. we actually have a new deal with south korea in terms of the trade deal but we have to talk to them and many countries about treating us fairly. the war games are very treating us fairly. the war games are very expensive and we paid for a big majority of them, we fly in bombers. when i first started, i
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said, where do the bombers come from? guam. how far? six and a half hours. a long time for them to be flying to south korea to practice and drop bombs and go back to guam. i know a lot about aeroplanes, very expensive. i did not like it. what i did say is and i think it is very provocative, i have to tell you, jennifer, a very provocative situation, when i see that and you have a country right next to... so under the circumstances we are negotiating a very comprehensive com plete negotiating a very comprehensive complete deal, i think it is inappropriate to be having war games. number one, we save money, a lots. and number two, it really is something that i think they very much appreciate. does north korea give you something in return?” much appreciate. does north korea give you something in return? i have heard that. some of the people
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that... maybe they really mean it, i don't know, i do not always want to go against the press, especially not today, this is too important. i notice some people say the president has agreed to meet, he has given up so has agreed to meet, he has given up so much, i gave up nothing, i am here, i have not slept in 25 hours, but i thought it was appropriate to do because we have been negotiating literally around the clock with them and with us and withjohn and mike and with us and withjohn and mike and a team of very talented people. but we have not given up anything other than, you are right, i agreed to meet. and i think the meeting was every bit as good for the us as it was full north korea. but ijust wrote down some of the things we got. they got a meeting, but only a person that dislikes donald trump would say that i have agreed to make
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a big commitment. sure, i have agreed to take a period of time and come here and meet and that is good, but it is great for us as a country and it is good for them. but what did they do to justify this meeting? secured a commitment for complete denuclearisation. that is the big thing. they secured the release of three american hostages. they already gave them to us two months ago. these people now living happily backin ago. these people now living happily back in their homes with their families and it was pretty rough for them. to put it mildly. secured a commitment to recover the remains including... these are all fallen heroes. and they are giving a commitment, they are starting it immediately, to recover the remains, andi immediately, to recover the remains, and ijust immediately, to recover the remains, and i just went through how immediately, to recover the remains, and ijust went through how many people asked me about it, i was amazed, so many people asked me, is
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it possible? at that time, we had no relationship through chairman kim or anyone else in north korea, a very closed society. so we are getting the remains back, secured the halt of all missile and nuclear tests. for how long has it been questioned at seven months that you have not had a missile girl, no nuclear tests, no nuclear explosions. —— for how long has it been asjim at a nuclear event took place, 8.8 on the richter scale. i heard on the radio, they announced a massive uptake took place somewhere in asia. and then they said it was north korea and they said it was north korea and they found out it was a nuclear test. i said, they found out it was a nuclear test. isaid, i never heard they found out it was a nuclear test. i said, i never heard of the richter scale in the high 8s. no missile launchers. they have blown up missile launchers. they have blown up their missile area, that will ta ke up their missile area, that will take place, that has not been
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written into the contract, we will give you the exact details. but they secured a halt of all missiles and all nuclear tests. they secured the closure of their single primary nuclear test site, all three of them, in an area that is common around each other, they secured the closure. they secured the commitment to destroy the missile engine testing site, that was not in the agreement, i got that after we signed the agreement. i said, do me a favour, you have got this missile engine testing site, we know where it is, because of the heat, it is incredible the equipment we have, to be honest. i said, can you close it 7 we be honest. i said, can you close it up? we maintain the ability to continue to apply sanctions, so we are applying sanctions. i had 300 sanctions i was getting ready to put on last week and i said, i cannot put on sanctions when i am eating, i
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thought it would be very disrespectful, 300 very big ones, powerful ones —— when i am meeting. jennifer, when you look at all of those things we got, we got our hostages back, i did not pay 1.8 billion in cash like the hostages that came back from iran which was a disgraceful situation, what took place. we have got a lot, so when i hear someone in the media say, president trump has agreed to meet, it is not a big deal to meet. i think we should meet on the lot of different topics, notjust think we should meet on the lot of different topics, not just this think we should meet on the lot of different topics, notjust this one. i believe a lot of great things can happen. go ahead. reporter: sir, you just listed off a lot of things you say you got in this meeting, it was not too long ago that you said you to find the success of this meeting by north korea giving up its nuclear weapons. that is what they are
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doing. can you talk about... that is what they are doing. for a complete verifiable, irreversible... can you say why you did not secure those details in this agreement? because there is no time, i am here one day, we are together for many hours intensively but the process will now ta ke intensively but the process will now take place. i would be surprised, mike, if they haven't started already. they have started, they blew up their testing site. i will say he knew prior to coming... this was not a surprise, it was not like we never discussed it. we discussed it. mike discussed it very strongly with his counterpart in north korea. let's say they didn't agree to it, i couldn't sign any agreement, there was no agreement, they understood that. it was not a big point today. really this had been taken care more
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than any other thing, it was all about this. this has been taken care of before we got here. when we brought that up today, you see the language is very strong, it is the document. yes, ma'am? reporter: can you talk about the military consequences the north korea if they do not follow through? that is a tough thing to talk about, i don't wa nt to tough thing to talk about, i don't want to be threatening. they understood that. you have seen what was perhaps going to happen. and, you know, seoul has 28 million people. we think we have big cities, new york is 8 million people, we think it is a big city. feel —— seoul has 28 million people and it is right next to the border, it is right next to the dmz. it is right there. if this hadn't happened... i think you could have lost 20 million
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people, 30 million people. this is really a n people, 30 million people. this is really an honour for me to be doing this, potentially you could have lost, you know, 30, 40, 50 million people. the city of seoul, one of the bigger cities in the world, is right next to the border. you once spoke about fire and fury, is that no longer the case? at that point we need about. we could not have allowed back kind of capability from the standpoint of the united states, certainly japan was not the standpoint of the united states, certainlyjapan was not going to allow it. japan is right next door. mr president, could you tell us about the video you showed before this? when you showed that two came, what was the goal? i hope you liked it, i thought it was good, i got was interesting enough to show. -- when you showed that two to kim. one in english, one in korean. we had it made up. i showed it to him today toward the end of the meeting. i think he loved it. we didn't have a
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big screen like you have the luxury of having, we didn't need it because we had it on a cassette. an ipad. and they played it. about eight of their representatives were watching it and their representatives were watching itandi their representatives were watching it and i thought they were fascinated. i thought it was well done. i showed fascinated. i thought it was well done. ishowed it fascinated. i thought it was well done. i showed it to you because that was the future, that could very well be the future. the other alternative is not just well be the future. the other alternative is notjust a very good alternative, it is not very good. i showed him because i really wanted to show him something. i believe he wa nts to to show him something. i believe he wants to get it done. go ahead? how is staten island ferry doing? ok? he wrote the best story about me with the staten island ferry, after that he has never written a good story. i do not know what happened, it is a long time ago. reporter: it has been a busy week on the international stage, you are leaving the summit in
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singapore having determined kim jong—un is a talented man, you left the g7 a few weeks ago —— days ago in canada determining that prime minister trudeau is weak and dishonest. what do you say to america's allies who worried you might bejeopardising america's allies who worried you might be jeopardising our long—term alliances aren't too worried that you might be treating our historic friends as enemies and our historic enemies as friends? i think it is a very fair question. i had a very good meeting with the g7, and i left the meeting and, i'll be honest, we are being taken advantage of by virtually every one of those countries very, very seriously. because of bad management at the top, because a president that did not care about trade or understand it or whatever reason, for many yea rs it or whatever reason, for many years with china being obviously the most successful at it and the european union second, 151 billion we lost, they were estimating, we are being taken advantage of on trade. canada does have very big
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advantages over us in terms of trade deficits. we have a big trade deficits. we have a big trade deficit with canada. it is not a surplus, it is either 17 rick could be 100. i don't know if you saw the document they put out, they did not wa nt document they put out, they did not want me to see it. —— it is either 17 or it could be 100. it is close to $100 billion a year loss with canada. they do not take many of our farm products, they charge what was 270% but somebody told me a few months ago they raised it to 295% for dairy products and it is very unfairto our for dairy products and it is very unfair to ourfarmers for dairy products and it is very unfairto ourfarmers and for dairy products and it is very unfair to ourfarmers and the for dairy products and it is very unfair to our farmers and the people of our country, the workers, farmers, the companies. we are not able to trade. they have tremendous barriers and tariffs up. when i put ina barriers and tariffs up. when i put in a countervailing terrorist to get us in a countervailing terrorist to get us up in a countervailing terrorist to get usupa in a countervailing terrorist to get us up a little so the balance is not so us up a little so the balance is not so much, it is like this: they say it is terrible —— when i put in a
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countervailing tariff. even if it is not complete, we have to have a little balance. i say this with many countries. anyway, we finished the meeting, everybody was happy, and i agreed to sign something. i demanded changes and those changes were made. the picture with angela merkel, who i get along with very well, where i am sitting like this, that was as we we re am sitting like this, that was as we were waiting for the document, i wa nted were waiting for the document, i wanted to see the final document as changed by the changes i requested, but was very friendly. i know it did not look it and it was reported like nasty both ways, i was angry at her, she... actually, we werejust talking, the whole group, about something unrelated to everything, very friendly, waiting for the document to come back. anyway, i left and it was very friendly and when i got onto the plane i think justin probably did not know our force one has about 20 televisions,
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he was given a news conference about how he will not be pushed around by the united states. i said pushing around? we just shook hands, the united states. i said pushing around? wejust shook hands, it the united states. i said pushing around? we just shook hands, it was very friendly. countries cannot continue to take advantage of others on trade. the numbers are right, over the last couple of years and over the last couple of years and over the last many years, but over the last couple of years, this country has lost $800 billion on trade with other countries, the biggest being china. $800 billion. 151 billion with the european union. they do not take our agricultural products, barely, they do not take a lot of what we haven't yet they said mercedes into us, bmws by the millions. it is very unfair and very unfairto our millions. it is very unfair and very unfair to our workers, and i will straighten it out and it will not even be tough. thank you. go ahead. go ahead. reporter: (inaudible)
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. i would like to involve congress, yes. i have a good relationship with justin trudeau. i really did. other than he had a news conference that he had because he assumed i was in an aeroplane was not watching. he learned. bubble cost a lot of money for the people of canada. you can do that. —— cost a lot of money. i had a good relationship withjustin, i have a very good relationship with angela merkel. but our nato, we are paying 4.2%, she is paying 1% of a much smaller gdp than ours. we are paying 4.2% on a much larger. we are paying 4.2% on a much larger. we are paying for... anyone can say from 60 to 90% of nato, protecting countries of europe. and then they kill us on
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trade. you can't have it that way, it is unfairto trade. you can't have it that way, it is unfair to our taxpayers and people. but i have a good relationship with justin people. but i have a good relationship withjustin and i think a very good relationship with chairman kim right now, i really do. i hope it is good, if it is, we will solve a very big problem. i think we have gone a long way to solving it today. shall we keep going for a little while? : yes! it is up to the legendary sarah huckabee sanders? shall we keep going? we'll go. i don't care. just means we get home a little late in the evening, right? ahead, sure. reporter: hi, mr president. how are you? i am good. welcome to singapore, i hope you enjoyed our food. beautiful country, idid. enjoyed our food. beautiful country, i did. you describe this as a process , i did. you describe this as a process, what is the immediate next step? is there some ongoing dialogue? we are getting together
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next week to go into the details. secretary pompeo. .. next next week to go into the details. secretary pompeo... next week, with john bolton or the entire team, to go over the details and get this done. we want to get it on, he wants to get it done. we are working also very much with south korea, with china, toa very much with south korea, with china, to a lesser extent, but we are working with china. you would come back to singapore? gladly. your prime minister was fantastic, we we re prime minister was fantastic, we were with him yesterday. he has done a greatjob. he was very welcoming and it probably made a difference, it isa and it probably made a difference, it is a great place. thank you very much. reporter: thank you, mr president. what was it about the first interaction with chairman kim this morning that made you decide not to walk away after you said you would know in the first minute if he was in cor? i have said that about relationships, about people. i was generous, i said five seconds, but in the first second in some cases.
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sometimes that does not work out. but sometimes it does. from the beginning, we got along. there has been a lot of groundwork. it was not like we went and started talking, as you know, about these very complex objects that have been going on for 70 years. we have been discussing this for months. once the rhetoric stopped, once they did a great thing... north korea did a great thing... north korea did a great thing by going to the olympics. the olympics, and president moon will tell you, the olympics was not exactly doing great. people did not feel like being bombed out of the opening ceremony, they were not exactly selling tickets. and as soon as chairman kim said let's participate in the olympics, it sold like wildfire and was a great success as an olympics. he did a
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great thing. but pretty much since that time, because, as you know, the delegation came from south korea, who just met with north korea, delegation came from south korea, whojust met with north korea, they came to the white house and told me lots of things including the fact they would be willing to de—nuke, once that started we have been talking about that from the end of the olympics when the whole delegation came to say various things, including de—nuking.m delegation came to say various things, including de-nuking. ifi make ona things, including de-nuking. ifi make on a second question. in the document you send, north korea agreed to commit to denuclearisation. to borrow a phrase you used to criticise your predecessors political opponents, how do you ensure north korea is not all talk, no action? can you ensure anything? can i ensure you will be able to sit down properly when you sit down? you can't insure anything. all i will say is they want to make
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a deal. my whole life has been deals, i have done great at it, that is what i do. i know when somebody wa nts to is what i do. i know when somebody wants to deal and when somebody does not, lots of politicians don't. it is not bad thing, it is my thing. this really could have been done a long time ago, i think. —— it is not of their thing, it is my thing. i feel very strongly. my instinct, my ability or talent, they want to make ability or talent, they want to make a deal. making a deal is a great thing for the world, and also for china. i can't imagine china is happy with somebody having nuclear weapons so close. happy with somebody having nuclear weapons so close. china was very helpful. i think he wants to make a deal. can anybody be certain? we will be certain soon, the negotiations continue. thank you very much. go ahead. reporter: you mentioned you have raised extensively the issue of human rights with chairman kim. i wonder
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what you would say to the group of people who have no ability whatsoever to hear or to see this press co nfe re nce , whatsoever to hear or to see this press conference, the 100,000 north koreans kept in a network of gulag is? have you betrayed them by legitimising the regime in pyongyang? no, ithink no, i think i have helped them. all ican do no, i think i have helped them. all i can do is do what i can do. we have to stop the nuclear reservation, that is a very important thing —— nuclear reservation. at a certain point, i really believe he is going to do things about it. i think they are one of the great winners today, that large group of people you are talking about. ultimately, they will be one of the great winners, as a group. go ahead. would you ever consider removing the sanctions without significant improvement in the human rights situation no. i
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wa nt the human rights situation no. i want significant improvement. once you start that process, there will bea you start that process, there will be a point at which even though you will not be finished for a while because it cannot happen scientifically or mechanically, but you cannot go back, and when we reach that point, i will give it serious thought. go ahead. how is north korea going to foot the bill with the crippling sanctions remaining in place best i think south korea and japan will help them, i think they are prepared to help them, they know they will have to help them, i think they will help them greatly. the us has been paying a big price in a lot of different places. south korea, which obviously is next door, and japan which is essentially next—door, they will be helping and i think they will be doing a very generous job and a terrificjob, so doing a very generous job and a terrific job, so they doing a very generous job and a terrificjob, so they will be helping them. go ahead. thank you,
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mr president. i would like to follow up mr president. i would like to follow up on steve's question, he asked how long it would take to denuclearise the korean peninsula, you said a long time, what does that mean?” think we will do it as fast as it can be done scientifically, as fast as it can be done mechanically. i have read horror stories, 15 year process , have read horror stories, 15 year process, assuming you wanted to do it quickly, but i do not believe that. whoever wrote that is wrong. but there will be a point at which when you are 20% through, you cannot go back. i had an uncle who was a great professor for i believe 40 yea rs great professor for i believe 40 years at mit and i used to discuss nuclear with him all the time. he was a great expert, a great, brilliant genius, doctorjohn trump, at mit, head of the mighty sent me a book on my uncle. we used to talk
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about nuclear, a very complex subject. it is notjust like, get rid of the nukes, it takes a period of time. the main period of time i am talking about is the first period, when you hit a certain point, you cannot go back, very hard to go back. how long will that take? we don't know but it will go pretty quickly. i wanted to ask again on the sanctions campaign, you alluded at the very beginning that the chinese are not doing as greatjob securing the border as they were before, you expressed doubts when kim went to see president xi, the russian foreign minister said there should not be sanctions, and the south koreans are talking about restoring some form of trade. with all of those players appearing to be moving towards eroding sanctions, how can you keep the sanctions regime in place. what leveraged do
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you have on these countries?” regime in place. what leveraged do you have on these countries? i think we have a lot of love rich, tremendous leveraged. i do believe china, despite my relationship with president xi, a man i have great respect for and i liked him a lot, we are having very tough talks on trade and that probably affects china somewhat but i have to do what i have to do. over the last two months, the border is more open than when we first started. but that is what it is, we have to do it. we have a tremendous, tremendous deficit in trade. commonly known as a trade deficit. tremendous deficit in trade with china, we have to do something. we cannot continue to let that happen. i think that has had an impact on my relationship in terms of the border. i do not think it has a relationship... i do not think it affects my feeling or relationship with president xi. when we first
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started, we were not ready to go that route and as we started preparing and getting ready to do that, i think that has had an impact on, frankly, the border, which is a shame, but i have to do it, i have no choice, for our country, i have to do it. south korea will do anything necessary to get a deal. they are definitely... if they think and they would do this with our concurrence, if they think they can do some work because we are very far down the line, we are actually... that document, when you read it today, that is far down the line. that is not something thatjust happen to be put together, this was done over months. and again, the rhetoric was important and the sanctions were important, i do not know which was more important, they we re know which was more important, they were both important. go ahead. mr president, new york times. i'm just wondering if you could give us some sense of whether chairman kim told
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you how many nuclear weapons he believes he has made, whether he is willing to turn those over first, and then whether in your mind you need to do more than was done in the iran dealfor actually need to do more than was done in the iran deal for actually dismantling both the uranium and the plutonium processors and whether or not you had a sense that chairman kim really understood what that involves and had a timetable in his own mind of shutting that? well, david, i can tell you, he understands. he understands it so well, he understands it so well, he understands it so well, he understands it better than the people doing the work for him. that is an easy one. as far as what he has, it is substantial, very substantial. the timing will go quickly. i believe you will see some good action. as an example, one of the things with the missile site, you will probably surprised to hear that, the throw in at the end. but i
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really believe, david, that it will go really quickly. i believe it will go really quickly. i believe it will go fast. it is a very substantial arsenal, no question. i used to say that maybe it is all talk and no action, but we have pretty good intelligence into that, although probably intelligence into that, although pro ba bly less intelligence into that, although probably less than any other country. you understand that may be better than anyone in the room. but we have enough intelligence to know that what they have this very substantial. this is why i always say that you should not have taken place so late into the process. it would have been better if it was five years ago, 20 years ago, 15 yea rs five years ago, 20 years ago, 15 years ago, when we did not have to worry about not having a successful meeting like today. and i still love my first interview with you, david. i still have that interview, actually. go ahead. thank you. inaudible
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if there is a second summit with chairman kim, will it be in pyongyang? we have not set that up. we will probably need another summit, we will probably need a meeting, we can use a different turn, we will probably need another one. i did not think... i have told people, i did not want to build up people's hopes. i told people i thought this would be a successful meeting if we got along, we developed a relationship, and we could have maybe cocked at this point in three, four months from now, but it really happen very quickly —— we could have maybe got to this point. a lot of that was because of the foundation before we met, a lot of things happened really fast. as an example, bringing back the remains, that was not one of the things on our agenda today, i brought that up at the very end because so many people had talked to me about it and i brought it up at
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the very end and he was really very gracious, saying, let us talk about at the next time, but instead of that he said, it makes sense, we will do it. they know where many of those incredible people are, where they are buried, along roads, highways, usually, because our soldiers were moving back and forth rapidly. it is very sad. but he knew. that was brought up at the very end. really great that he was able to do it. a lot of people will be very happy about that. yes, go ahead, please. thank you, mr president. american news. congratulations. thank you. i appreciate it, what you do, really beautiful. and now i will probably get a killer question.” beautiful. and now i will probably get a killer question. i do want to talk about the future of north korea, specifically the people, kim jong—un is saying he wants a
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brighter future with prosperity, jong—un is saying he wants a brighterfuture with prosperity, yet we know they have lived under oppression. you showed him the video of what the future could be like, but you have an idea specifically of the model that he would like to go towards bastion economically, is he open to more economic freedom? a good question. —— go towards? open to more economic freedom? a good question. —— go towards7m open to more economic freedom? a good question. -- go towards? it was done at the highest level of future development. i told him, you may not wa nt development. i told him, you may not want this, you may want to do a much smaller version of this, you are going to do something, but you may wa nt to going to do something, but you may want to do a smaller version. you may not want that with the trains and everything, everything at the top. and maybe you will not want that. it will be up to them, up to the people what they want. they may not want that. i can understand that too. that was a version of what could happen. they have great beaches. you see that whenever they are exploding the cannons in the ocean. look at that, wouldn't that
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make a great condo. i said instead of doing that, you could have the best hotels in the world. think of it from a real estate perspective, south korea, china, they own the land in the middle, it is great. i told him, i said, land in the middle, it is great. i told him, isaid, you may not want told him, isaid, you may not want to do what is there, you may want to doa to do what is there, you may want to do a smaller version, that could be. although i tell you what, he looked at that tape, he looked at that ipad, iam at that tape, he looked at that ipad, i am telling you, they really enjoyed it, i believe. go ahead. couple more. three more. time magazine. am i on the cover again this week? entirely possible. do you now see kim jong—un as an equal? this week? entirely possible. do you now see kim jong—un as an equal7m what way? you just showed a video
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that showed you and kim jong—un on equal footing discussing the future of the country? i do not view it that way. i will do whatever it ta kes to that way. i will do whatever it takes to make the world a safer place. if i have to say i am sitting ona place. if i have to say i am sitting on a stage, understand what you're getting at, if i have to say i am sitting on a stage with chairman kim and that is going to get us to save 30 million lives, could be more than that, i am willing to sit on the stage, i'm willing to travel to singapore very proudly, very gladly. again, other the fact that it is taking my time, they have given up a tremendous amount, they have given it up even before and even to add the olympics to it, to the question, they went to the olympics, it was going to be a massive failure, maybe it would have not even opened, they made it a tremendous success by
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agreeing to participate. at that the list of things they have done, so if ican list of things they have done, so if i can save millions of lives by coming here, sitting down, and establishing a relationship with someone, establishing a relationship with someone, who is a very powerful man, got firm control of the country, and that country has very powerful nuclear weapons, it is my honour to do it. are you concerned the video you have just showed could do it. are you concerned the video you havejust showed could be used by kim jong—un as propaganda?” you havejust showed could be used by kim jong-un as propaganda? i am not concerned at all. we can use that video for other countries. go ahead. in the year 2000, president clinton got a request from kim jong—il to travel to pyongyang and meet him and clinton refused and he sent the secretary of state, madeleine albright. he spent $3 billion and got nothing and started making nuclear weapons. you on the
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other hand got the request and right away went here to meet him and do you understand the people who say you understand the people who say you gave him the ultimate president present, legitimacy, without ongoing process, before you as the us president, leader of the free world meat, shake hands, with this leader of north korea who is perceived to be oppressing brutally his own people? do you understand?” understand it much better than you do. go ahead. thank you very much. politico. you mention a couple of specific concessions you got from kim, the return of remains and the destruction of the nuclear site and i know you said... and much more. the last thing you said was an add—on, he gave you his word. if he
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does not follow through on these things, what are you prepared to do in response? will you lose faith in this process? no, ithink in response? will you lose faith in this process? no, i think he will do it, otherwise i would not be doing this. it was really the engine testing site in addition to all of the other things that they have agreed to do, they have a very powerful engine testing site that we are able to see because of the heat it in its —— it emits. i'm very happy with those two points. you might be referring to the thing not m, might be referring to the thing not in, the engine testing site. honestly, i think he will do these things. i maybe wrong. i may stand before you insert the months and say, i was wrong. i do not know that i will never admit that. i will an excuse! reporter: thanks, mr president.
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thank you. i am from china and i would just like to know when you called chinese president xi when you come back to dc to discuss the achievements you made to date with chairman kim? —— would you call?” will. and what you think about china ‘s to accelerate the process towards long—term peace? ‘s to accelerate the process towards long-term peace? my expectation about china is that china is a great country with a great leader, and a friend of mine. and i really believe he is happy that we have made this kind of progress. i will be calling him very shortly, maybe even before iland. i him very shortly, maybe even before i land. i have to say that the united states is a great country, and we have set records economically, over $7 trillion in net worth addition to what we have. we are almost twice the size the economy, the united states, nobody
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talks about this, because you hear a lot about china, rightfully so, but the united states is almost twice the united states is almost twice the size of the economy of china. we have a great country and we run a correct path. one more and that will be it. whereas south korea? i think you deserve... you deserve one. go. you deserve one. i have two questions for you, mr president. you mentioned earlier you would talk with south korean president moon jae—in over the phone, what do you plan to discuss? i plan to tell him about the meeting, he will be very much involved in the final negotiation. a very, very fine gentleman, also a friend of mine, andi gentleman, also a friend of mine, and i look forward to forward to speaking to him. i have already sent word to him about what happened, i sent to the document to him, and all of the document. i will be talking to him very shortly. in signing the
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peace treaty, do you plan to walk this out with chairman kim of north korea only, what do you think about the involvement of south korea and china as the signatories?” the involvement of south korea and china as the signatories? i would like them involved. there is a question about whether we are supposed to war legally have to, i do not care, i think it would be great to have china involved, also south korea. reporter: (inaudible) .do south korea. reporter: (inaudible) . do they have a transcript? they probably have a rough transcript. they did not record it. i don't think they recorded it! are there any recordings? i wish there were. it is interesting stuff. say it? we probably have some notes or something, they have detailed notes, i would imagine. something, they have detailed notes, iwould imagine. we
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something, they have detailed notes, i would imagine. we had a great conversation, it was very heartfelt. reporter: (inaudible) . i don't have to verify, i have one of the great memories of all time, so of the great memories of all time, soi of the great memories of all time, so i don't have too. ok? reporter: (inaudible) . year, but i don't want to discuss it. but what we did, we have had numerous discussions, we have had very important relationships established at mikeapple other levels. a couple of people, as you know, i hear from levels. a couple of people, as you know, i hearfrom north korea in the room. “— know, i hearfrom north korea in the room. —— are here from north korea. we did not going cold, we went in with tremendous relationship and tremendous knowledge and i think thatis tremendous knowledge and i think that is why we got it done. i will head back, i don't know about you folks, but it has been a long time since i have taken it easy, so now we can take it a little bit easy and
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the work begins again. i appreciate everybody being here, i hope we have a nswered everybody being here, i hope we have answered your questions. and thank you very much. and sort of congratulations to everybody, to me, it isa congratulations to everybody, to me, it is a very important event in world history and to be really true to myself, i want to add that i want to myself, i want to add that i want to get it completed. so the whole tea m to get it completed. so the whole team has to get together and get it completed. we have done a good job, but if you do not get the ball over the goal line, it does not mean an. thank you and congratulations to everybody. appreciated. —— if you do not get the ball over the goal line, it does not mean anything. studio: us president donald trump concluding that press conference live from singapore. he has spoken for well over an hour. he said i singapore. he has spoken for well overan hour. he said i had singapore. he has spoken for well over an hour. he said i had honest, direct and productive meeting with chairman kim. he said we got to know each other well. it is a new history and a new chapter. he said we
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reaffirmed unwavering commitment to denuclearisation of the korean peninsular and he said that would happen as soon as possible, that is of time specific as the us president was. he said sanctions remain in effect right now that he interestingly said they would stop the war games, as he described them. he described them as very provocative. that is the annual military manoeuvres around south korea, with south korea. he said this will be verified, it is not in the document but it will be verified, we have lots of people by. —— lots of people there. he said sanctions will come off when we know the nukes are not effective. lots of things to get into with the panel, but we have some breaking news from bbc political editor laura kuenssberg. the government minister doctor philip lee hasjust kuenssberg. the government minister doctor philip lee has just announced he is resigning from the government so he is resigning from the government so you he is resigning from the government so you can he is resigning from the government so you can speak out against what he describes as the detrimental policy of brexit. speaking to a think tank this morning he said sometimes governments have to act to protect
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—— to protect our citizens from the decisions of the majority if they are negative for the country. we will speak to our political guru norman smith about that in the next few minutes. but first let me introduce you to my three guests to discuss that historic meeting between kim jong—un and donald trump. we can speak now to drjohn nillson—wright — an east asia specialist from cambridge university. also to andrea berger — a nuclear policy expert — and correspondent. thank you for your presence. what are the big things you would like to pick out? there are so many. where do you start? this seems an extraordinary performance, as we might expect from donald trump, the spin doctor par excellence, but i did not know that i was listening to the snake oil salesman, an evangelical preacher. the sense of total faith that this would all work out, get in terms of the document,
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thejoint declaration out, get in terms of the document, the joint declaration from this very important meeting, we have seen essentially a repeat of what was agreed in the north/ cut south summit, total denuclearisation, but the president gave is no timeline, no specificity in terms of what would be agreed to anti—trust scam and —— would be agreed to, and he trusts chairman kim, and we should ta ke trusts chairman kim, and we should take it on faith. i think it is extraordinary. andrea? about it is extraordinary. andrea? about it is extraordinary. asjohn extraordinary. andrea? about it is extraordinary. as john mentioned, the declarations as to what north korea have agreed to is extremely general and vague and does not put a lot new on paper from existing agreements. the existing details which have come out in the press conference are what i am looking forward to hearing more about. the united states seems to have committed, at least verbally, to north korea, to refrain from war
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games. which is crucialfor north korea? absolutely, they have been asking for that for ages and it has not been that you have had a formal commitment from the us to refrain from those exercises, so to go through that step now would be quite a change in us policy. you have to conflicting narratives, the performer in chief and an extraordinary performance of bravado. for people in the us, when he is talking to that audience, the people who supported him and loved him, there is the district in chief. he has thrown out the old rules, he has said the 70 years this has been a stalemate which no president has broken through, look what i have done. he can rightly take credit for doing something unattainable by previous administrations. we are
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absolutely right to be sceptical about where this leads. but he is covering himself, saying six months from now if it does not work out, i tried this is a man who never likes to admit failure. but you have to give him credit, for all his wacky bravado, for actually getting to the table and getting this far.” bravado, for actually getting to the table and getting this far. i think they liked each other? yes. diplomacy is not traditionally done this way. there are holes in his argument like swiss cheese, all of thatis argument like swiss cheese, all of that is true, but he got this far. and he kept telling us things that happened in the meeting, when has this ever happened that something so high profile, he kept saying chairman kim brought this up, he mentioned this. we did get an insight into the conversations, they got through a lot in a very short period. some elements are not in the
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document, he referred to the north korean decision to suspend this testing site and he sees that, i think, as a major concession. whether or not it is is another concession. it is an easy win for the north koreans. i think chairman kim has come away from this meeting deeply encouraged, i would imagine, from the acknowledgement and recognition he is negotiating with the american president as an equal, the american president as an equal, the optics have been great for north korea's perspective. i think it will be an interesting question about america's allies. one other really significant thing in what he said, he was pushed on this question of the us commitment to the defence of south korea, he made the cost very clear, the financial exposure the americans have in supporting 28,500 us troops on the peninsula, supporting south korean efforts to adherents. he seemed to indicate this might be discussed later. which will be a worry for south korea? huge worry, and for the japanese,
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who will be concerned about the decoupling of relations. where do we go from here? that was a press conference by donald trump, we have now heard very much from chairman kim at alland now heard very much from chairman kim at all and we know it is not really being reported at this stage in north korea —— we have not heard very much from chairman kim. chairman kim will want to accomplish something, he has done what his father and grandfather could not, he has opened up dialogue, he has stood on level ground with the president of the united states and he clearly has an opportunity to change things. it isjust not clear what can be accomplished. this is a massively impoverished, brutal dictatorship with huge systemic failure. how do you move that from 19522020? it is an incredibly difficult thing. think
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about trying to open up... the opening up of east germany and the reunification of germany. —— how do you move that from 1950 two 2020? it isa you move that from 1950 two 2020? it is a really, keita pavard. we are simply talking about denuclearisation at the moment, but kim has to change the regime. the issue of human rights were skated over very comfortably by trump who, let's face it, these days seems much happier in the company of dictators and despots that democratic leaders. he really likes these guys, putin and kim, he is not so sure he likes the g7 leaders. andrea, he was talking about timelines people were saying at what point do you say enough has been done to ease sanctions? was talking about timelines of a very long time, maybe decades. is that right? he has quoted some of the research done by really prominent experts in the field to suggest the process of
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denuclearisation we speak so much about is really long. sommer says it could take 15 years. i think that perhaps donald trump has not fully grasped that it is not quite as straightforward in the early process of rolling back north korea nuclear capability to ensure there is a point at which north korea will no longer have a functioning nuclear arsenal, it is not quite that easy. it seems to me he has the expectation here that there will be this moment he can declare victory, that will come much sooner than that 15 years. this is why my main concern going forward is really that we have been on this roller—coaster of expectation mismanagement to bring as here and i do not think that right is done yet, and that can bring this all down and collapse it quite quickly, if those lofty expectations donald trump has communicated just very apparently are not met. that is donald trump
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the politician looking ahead to the midterms, who thinks i have the momentum, the great visuals, and i need to sell this in a way that will allow my base back home to think this is working. he will only have to revisited. i think it is interesting he said six months down the road, well after the midterms are out of the way. he can soberly look back and reflect and perhaps readjust. we will see. he is very much playing to the domestic audience. he behaved, he was not in transient, he was not childish, and he seemed very much in command. we will see how it plays out at home, i am sure. it was a kind ofjohn wayne performance, that swagger and comfort. he let this go on and on, over an hour. a long time, i'm gratefulfor you for hanging on, it has eaten up a lot of
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your morning, thank you forjoining us for your analysis. there's more trouble for theresa may over brexit this morning. in the last hour, a government minister in thejustice department — philip lee — has resigned so he can speak out on the issue. his resignation comes at the start of a critical two days of debate in the house of commons, as mps hold a series of votes which will shape exactly how the uk leaves the eu. this is what philip lee had to say. if it comes to it, my parliamentary collea g u es if it comes to it, my parliamentary colleagues and i will have to ask ourselves whether we can vote in our own parliament, that bastions of liberty, freedom and human rights, in favour of something that we would rightly criticise elsewhere. for me, the answer will be i cannot. that is why i urge our government to do the right thing and amend the legislation to ensure that parliament is properly able to exercise its duty to constituents and our country by ensuring
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we're not stuck with a bad deal or no deal. it is hard to be part of the government that would countenance a breach of such fundamental principles. and it is important that individual ministers and parliamentarians should be able to speak up. but effective government in our country also relies on the important principle of collective responsibility. so i am very sad to have to announce that i feel i must resign as a minister so that i can properly speak out for my country and my constituents. norman smith is at westminster now and we can speak to him. first of all, significance?
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we have talked about the fact it would be a difficult week for theresa may, the prime minister. how damaging is this? it is damaging because although dr philip lee is not a household name, a minister in the justice not a household name, a minister in thejustice department, not a household name, a minister in the justice department, probably most people have no idea who he is, but he is the first minister to quit over brexit. he thinks it will be detrimental to the country, and more broadly, he thinks the government has got its strategy wrong. in his resignation statement, he talks about how they need to buy more time by extending the article 50 process. he wants parliament to have a meaningful vote. and then he suggest they should be a confirmed —— there should be a second referendum, in effect, where they can vote on the deal that mrs may negotiates and parliament has approved. what is
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significant is, not just parliament has approved. what is significant is, notjust here we have a government minister saying, this is going badly, we need to think again, but whether his action emboldens other like—minded mps and ministers also to make a stand. what has been striking up until now is amongst the remainers, they have talked a lot, but they have not really done much. the question is whether this puts some spine in their backbone, whether they think, he is prepared to walk the plank, ok, i will put up too. that is what iimagine ok, i will put up too. that is what i imagine government whips and mrs may's aids will now be trying to find out, whether it could be a triggerfor a broader revolt find out, whether it could be a trigger for a broader revolt by remainers. thank you. norman smith, our political guru. let's talk now to simon clarke, conservative mp for middlesbrough and east cleveland. and phil wilson, labour mp for sedgefield. he plans to go against his leader, jeremy corbyn, and vote for the lords' amendment on the european economic area. thank you both forjoining us. your
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reaction first of all, simon clark, to the decision by dr philip lee to stand down. i regret his decision, i think we have got very clear responsibility on us in the days ahead to deliver brexit and to make sure we have a withdrawal agreement allowing us to transition seamlessly to our new status outside the eu. allowing us to transition seamlessly to our new status outside the sum also has a responsibility to be true to himself and speak freely. all mps in the end have to be responsible for their own actions. i disagree with him, i think everyone will the way he has felt he needs to do this. the point is, i'm very clear, i think the huge majority of collea g u es think the huge majority of colleagues are very clear, it is our responsibility to step up to the plate and deliver a withdrawal agreement allowing the laws to function on day one after brexit and thatis function on day one after brexit and that is what i fully intend to do today and tomorrow.” that is what i fully intend to do today and tomorrow. i want to ask you about the eea, the european economic area, you represent a
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region that clearly voted for brexit. and yet you believe that we should remain part of this european economic area, how do you sell that to your constituents? it is not about damage —— it is about damage limitation. we have to look at the best way of limiting the damage to the economy. the economy in the north—east of england, 60% of it is trade with the rest of the eu. the best way of getting the best deal, i believe, is being part of the european economic area. we have got thousands ofjobs european economic area. we have got thousands of jobs reliant european economic area. we have got thousands ofjobs reliant on that and i'm really concerned that if we do not get this right, it will be their livelihoods that will be brought down. but your constituents do not want that, they want to get away from the european restrictions and european legislation, you are not listening to them?” and european legislation, you are not listening to them? i am basically listening to their concerns because i basically listening to their concerns because i think ultimately what they are really concerned about is what happens to their economic well— being after brexit. is what happens to their economic well-being after brexit. you know
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better than them ? well-being after brexit. you know better than them? i am saying i do not think they voted to make themselves poorer. i want to make sure that does not happen. i think the best way of doing that at the moment is by staying in the european economic area. simon clark, you were ata economic area. simon clark, you were at a meeting with theresa may yesterday when she was essentially begging mps to back her because otherwise it puts her in a really wea k otherwise it puts her in a really weak position negotiating with the eu. there was a meeting of the parliamentary party yesterday's there was broad agreement we need to get on with the job of delivering brexit. if we stay in the single market and the customs union, we cannot take control of the borders, the laws, trade. both of our seats voted heavily to leave the eu and i think we need to respect that decision and get on with it rather than trying to get in the way. but the government has agreed to report to parliament by october on efforts to parliament by october on efforts to negotiate a customs arrangement. that is kicking it into the long grass and delaying it further. when we left and voted, however long ago,
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june, last year, to leave the eu, we knew there would be these issues, why are we still in the situation in 2018? the most significant and complex negotiations has been in since the end of the second world war. it would be very responsible if asjeremy war. it would be very responsible if as jeremy corbyn war. it would be very responsible if asjeremy corbyn suggested we triggered article 50 on day one after the referendum result. no one is keen to leave the eu than i am but i'm equally clear we need to get this right and if it takes until october, it takes until october, this is about the next 50, 100 yea rs, this is about the next 50, 100 years, and nothing matters more than having a functioning trade relationship than after brexit. the so—called meaningful vote, very complex, but essentially, if mps are not happy with the deal the prime minister comes back with, they can have a vote and send her back to brussels and say, get a better deal. the idea being it stops, this is a
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deal or no deal? i do not back that. it is for government to negotiate on the uk, parliament cannot negotiate with 27 eu governments. but parliament can say it is a bad deal? parliament can say it is a bad deal? parliament can say it is a bad deal? parliament can have a say, there will be primary legislation brought before parliament, parliament will have a vote, but to take how it would work in principle if the eu believe that they can get a better deal out of our parliament than out of our government, what incentive does it have for them to offer us a decent deal in the negotiations? it doesn't, it undermines the government at every turn. -- at every turn. the big argument on brexit was to take back control and sovereignty and parliament is sovereign, it should be parliament that has a say. the referendum was two years ago. forgive me. 2016. since then, we have had a general
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election whether prime minister has lost her overall majority and that campaign was fought on a hard brexit andl campaign was fought on a hard brexit and i think the people turned around and i think the people turned around and said, no. now what we have got to do is take it into consideration and look at what actually brexit means when it comes back, what is the deal on the table, and... you will be supporting the meaningful vote ? will be supporting the meaningful vote? obviously i will be supporting the meaningful vote. i do have respect for leave voters, i voted to trigger article 50, but things have appeared on the agenda and brexit that were not apparent two years ago, we did not know we would have to pay £40 billion for a divorce bill, we did not know podcast...m was never going to be free —— we did not know... . what i believe we have got to do now is limit the damage to what brexit will bring and that is why it is important to remain part of the european economic area. thank you to both of you. back down to the
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main story. the historic summit between donald trump and kimjong—un. the world is about to see a major change. those were the words of kim jong—un. and in a press conference a few minutes ago, president trump said there was no limit to what north korea could achieve when it gives up nuclear weapons and embraces commerce. so how has all of this gone down with north korea's closest neighbour, south korea? we can speak now with one south korean citizen in the capital, seoul, whojust happens to be a journalist. how is this going down? it is all going down hopefully for the korean people. we have been watching the summit all day long and i think it is safe to say everyone is a very hopeful mood. in a very hopeful mood, that is good to hear. more on that in a moment, let us bring in tim marshall, foreign affairs
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writer. an incredible press conference, for a start, not to mention all of the pictures we have seen mention all of the pictures we have seen overnight, what are your reflections ? seen overnight, what are your reflections? what he said he was going to do ten days ago in washington when kim jong—un's negotiator when there, he said, this is the start of a process, singapore is the start of a process, singapore is the start of a process, singapore is the start of a process, managing expectations. i think there will be some pushback against president trump, people will say he got nothing, but when ronald reagan met the carjoe walsh off in the mid—80s, he did not solve the nuclear crisis... —— when ronald reagan met gorbachev. a lot saying they have faith in him. that is to get you to move forward. the the detail, in the press conference, when president trump said, yes, i have agreed we will row back on military exercises, a big deal from north korea. he got in return moving
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forward the process and maybe kim will go to washington. this process started 30 years ago, bush, clinton, obama, no one would meet kim jong—un because they did not trust him. maybe he cannot be trusted, maybe it will go nowhere, but crucially, over that 30 years, this was exactly the period of time in which north korea managed to build a nuclear weapon, why not try something new?” managed to build a nuclear weapon, why not try something new? i want to pick upa why not try something new? i want to pick up a point with you, soyeon, the decision by donald trump to say, we will abandon the so—called war games, as he calls it, saying it is provocation. the annual military manoeuvres which are clearly significant to south korea. how do you think that will go down?” significant to south korea. how do you think that will go down? i think that will also actually be one of the things that people will have
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very opposite opinions on. while the progressive people believe that this isa progressive people believe that this is a very positive thing economically and politically. conservative people are probably going to be concerned that the military practices. . but i think the younger generation will be looking forward to actually talking about peace instead of war —— the military practices will stop. do you think the lack of detail is a problem? they could have been more detail about low hanging fruit in the diplomatic negotiations. they could have agreed to open diplomatic missions in each other's capitals, they do not recognise each other, so you could have had some concrete thing like that, but there are hints within the joint communique that suggest that they are moving towards
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beneficial declaration at the end of the korean war, an armistice and technically still a war. i was surprised how little detail there was, i was not expecting very much, but we only got a very small amount. again, it does not mean you have to look at this negatively. it is potentially progress. what is still behind all this, supposing one of them had walked out today, that would have been an utter disaster because the moment this breaks down acrimoniously, till war option come straight back to the top of the agenda. —— the war option. some people loathe trump so much for many reasons, it clouds their understanding. he said x, y, z is disgusting, but you have to leave that to one side when you are looking at relations between the north korea and the us, all the stuff he said about mexicans and women, it is not relevant. he is the
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disrupted in chief. i regard this as progress. six months ago, there was a second us aircraft carrier stationed off north korea. that is progress from where we were then. one of the other points made was about the cost of denuclearisation. it will not be met by the united states. he was very clear on that. south korea will have to foot is a significant part of the bill. was that expected? yes, i think so. based on the things that president trump has said in the past, i think i was to be expected. i think for the people who find this very positive, i think it will come as pa rt positive, i think it will come as part of the price they have to pay for the reunification. and who do you think has come out best out of
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this? do you think more concessions have been made by president trump and chairman kim? yes, quite possibly. but i am notjust looking at today, if i am looking at the la st at today, if i am looking at the last year, his fire into fury, his pressure, is what i believe has brought kim to the table. he has threatened him with war, that terrible, bellicose language we do not like, but i think that is one of the reasons we have got to where we are. most of us are not talking about the hideous dictator that years and the incredible human rights, there is this nuclear issue as well. —— the hideous dictator that he is. he shows that the population back up something but he has told him, and his dad and grandad told them, they are the greatest nation on god's earth, equal to the united states, and now he has proved it so it sure up his position back home. i think that is a very small thing to give away, his
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position was quite strong anyway. the bigger prize is denuclearisation. they remain on that extraordinarily bumpy track, and at some point if trump is thinking in terms of two years and kim is thinking in terms of 20, it will hit the buffers. but you had to go on that track, that is where they are. when you talk about equal prominence, so many people on social media in the us are very unhappy with the north korean flag and the stars and is being put intermittently next to each other, but it is a very powerful image for chairman kim to take back to north korea? it may have been a while since it has been discussed, as mr trump has alluded to — but the egregious human rights abuses of kimjong un's regime were not on the negotation table during last night's meeting in singapore. he said they briefly discussed it,
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but his priority was denuclearisation. but was it right to ignore this issue in order to secure this ground—breaking meeting? last week we played you testimony from two ordinary citizens living inside north korea, which we'd spent months obtaining. they spoke to us about the enormous amount of power and control the state holds, and some of the abuses that allegedly take place. to protect the identities of those we spoke to we've changed their names and voices, and have taken steps to ensure their continued anonymity. michael cowan reports. the state security department are known as the bowibu to north koreans. they are the iron fist of the regime. they are known for demanding outrageous bribes for small infractions, as well as policing everyday citizens for signs of dissent. dissent in north korea includes things like criticising the regime, trying to defect, or making contact with anybody outside the country. these crimes can result in detention in a hard labour camp known as the gulag or, in extreme cases, public execution. punishment isn't restricted to the accused. in north korea, three generations of the family can be
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sentenced as retribution for one person's actions. sometimes people get caught by the state security department for saying the wrong things. people do suddenly disappear. it has not happened here recently. sometimes the state security department get people by calling them spies for their own result. they make up stories for their own gain. they make people say that they were planning to go to china and then deport them. many people do go to china officially, but they are sent there. they are told not to be influenced by capitalism. i myself do not know what happens in the camps because the bowibu deal with them.
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we cannot talk about them much. when a neighbour disappears, we just say he went to low town — meaning south korea. defection does not happen here much. i heard it happens a lot in the border areas. here there are a lot of government captures. people are arrested and taken away. people shouldn't commit crime. people cannot survive in the prison camps. they beat you. they starve you while doing extreme labour. once you go there, you are no longer a citizen. i think this terror is what keeps society going. taking questions from the world's media after the meeting, president trump was asked what he expects kim jong—un to do
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about the human rights record regarding the north korean people. it was discussed, it was discussed relatively briefly compared to denuclearisation, obviously that is where we started and ended. but they will be doing things. i think he wa nts to will be doing things. i think he wants to do things. you would be very surprised, a very smart, very good negotiator, wants to do the right thing. he brought up the fact that in the past they took dialogue... they never were like we are, there has never been anything like what has taken place now. they went down the line, billions of dollars was given and the following day the nuclear programme continued. but this is a much different time and a much different president, in all fairness. this is very important to me. foreign affairs writer tim marshall
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is still with me in the studio. what do you make of the absence of discussion about north korea's human rights record ? discussion about north korea's human rights record? it is a pattern, this particular president has never put human rights towards the top of his agenda, whether china, russia or anybody else. it is also a pattern in other western countries. once the money runouts in 2008 and everybody was looking to trade deals, human rights suddenly reduced massively. —— wants the money run out. he did say they did bring it up. it is considered rude by the other side to bring it up, our country will do what i like. he says it was brought up. when he says he thinks will... things will happen, he will not tell us what they are but i am a bit more sceptical. i think that if, and this isa sceptical. i think that if, and this is a huge shift, there will be breakthroughs with the denuclearisation, there will come economic assistance. and the opening up economic assistance. and the opening up of the economy. i think that is just as likely to lead to a
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reduction in human rights abuses of mrtrump reduction in human rights abuses of mr trump lecturing reduction in human rights abuses of mrtrump lecturing him. reduction in human rights abuses of mr trump lecturing him. one of the last points made by president trump in his press conference, he said there has been a significant improvement in human rights before we lift sanctions. that is problematic? forgive me, i had not spotted that bit of detail. he can lift sanctions in stages, you can denuclearisation stages, but if he will not lift a single sanction until he gets something, what? you cannot suddenly open the gulag, there are hundreds of thousands of prisoners, but there is a way of massaging these things. a little newspaper allowed to open which is actually really controlled but is allowed to open. there are ways of having little things on the table. baby having little things on the table. ba by ste ps having little things on the table. ba by steps all having little things on the table. baby steps all the way to being a big groan of deal. thank you very much, tim marshall. our correspondent marika oi is at the hotel where the north korean delegation is staying. have we heard anything else from kim
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jong—un? we have that incredibly long press conference from president trump, but anything from kim jong—un? trump, but anything from kim jong-un? no, i'm afraid not. just about three and a half hours ago we saw an entourage of kim jong—un coming back into st regis hotel following the historic summit between him and president trump, but we have not seen much movement since then. there were reports in local south korean media that he was going to leave in the afternoon, but it seems like there is now one report that he might leave at around 9pm local time. he appears to be making the most of this five star luxury hotel bang in the centre of singapore's very popular shopping district known as orchard road. give mea district known as orchard road. give me a sense, you can see the sheer number of media behind you. how much
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has this brought singapore to a standstill? i have to say, we all thought it was just going to standstill? i have to say, we all thought it wasjust going to be a nightmare. traffic jams everywhere and so on. it was quite efficient, i have to say. the singapore government did quite well, especially given they were practically only given two weeks to set this up and the summit was on and then found them back on. despite all that they managed to pull this off quite well. of course there are criticisms about how north korean leader kimjong—un, when criticisms about how north korean leader kim jong—un, when he went on a tour with singaporean ministers, they were taking selfies and tweeting about it and the singaporean crowd was cheering the north korean leader who, of course, is accused of killing his own stepbrother and his own uncle and has a horrible human rights abuse record. so opinions are split whether he should have been treated like a vip, like a celebrity. but at
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the same time, in terms of logistics, the government here did quite well. thank you very much. worth saying $15 million, that cost, for singapore to host that meeting over the last couple of days. something they have paid for. they are paying for kim jong—un to stay five—star hotel. before you go, tim, you were talking about baby steps going forward. what is the next step? do we even know? we can guess. a baby step would be officially writing we will cancel next year's military exercises. an official one would be most of north korea's troops are between the capital, pyongyang, and the frontier, serve. if you could reduce them by 5%. little things like that, open up a diplomatic mission. but keep your eye on the big prize, forward progression. the moment it stops, thatis progression. the moment it stops, that is when we need to be really
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frightened. so let's keep going. thank you for coming in, tim marshall. victoria will have a special programme tomorrow marking the one year anniversary of the grenfell fire. join us for that. bbc newsroom live is coming up next. thank you for your company today. have a good day. good morning. we have got quite a bit more cloud this morning compared to yesterday. that cloud will thin, in places. already we have seen some of our weather watchers showing us we have some holes in the cloud to give us in brightness. that process will continue into the afternoon across many parts of the uk. drive for many of us, some showers could crop up across parts of southern scotland, wales and the south—west of england. they will be very
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isolated. a fairly quiet weather picture for most of us. cooler compared to yesterday, temperatures about 15 to 17 degrees in the east, potentially up to 20 or 21 further south. this evening and tonight, little going on. a bit of cloud floating around. overnight temperatures down to around seven to 12 celsius. for england and wales on wednesday, relatively quiet. some sunny spells, the odd shower, it will turn quite wet and windy across scotland, northern ireland, later in the day. this is bbc news
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and these are the top stories developing at 11. an historic handshake in singapore and a joint promise to build lasting peace on the korean peninsula. the war never ended to this day, it never ended, but now we can all have hope that it will soon end and it will. it will soon end. the past does not have to define the future. the two leaders sign a four—point agreement after 40 minutes of one—to—one talks. the us president promises that "a bright future is within reach" if north korea gives up its nuclear weapons. chairman kim has told me that north korea is already destroying a major missile engine testing site. that's not in your assigned document. we agreed that after.

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