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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  June 12, 2018 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy in westminster. today at 2pm... making history with a handshake — us president donald trump and north korea's kimjong—un meet in singapore. the leaders later signed a document which included a pledge from mr kim to work to rid the korean peninsula of nuclear weapons. people are going to be very impressed, people are going to be very happy and we are going to take care of a very big and very dangerous problem for the world. a series of crunch votes for mps on brexit begin later as thejustice minister philip lee resigns to speak out against the government's brexit policy. an alleged member of a banned neo—nazi group has admitted plotting to murder an mp and threatening to kill a police officer. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport with hugh and gareth southgate has been explaining his world cup selections. yes, gareth southgate and his squad
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on their way to brush head of the world cup beginning later this week. thank you. and with all the weather, matt taylor. i certainly have, lots of wet and windy weather to come in 2a hours, but in the meantime the dry weather continues. i will have all of the details later. also coming up, the multi—millionaire businessman and brexiteer, arron bank, tells mps that he gave russian embassy officials the telephone numbers of president trump's transition team. hello, everyone, this is afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy in westminster, where theresa may faces what could be a difficult afternoon as the government faces a series of debates and crunch votes in the commons on brexit. but first let's go to singapore with
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christian fraser. at the end of the meeting we had a i—page document signed by kim jong—un and meeting we had a i—page document signed by kimjong—un and president trump, and the us diplomats will be attempting to build on it. this is it, it's just over one attempting to build on it. this is it, it'sjust over one page long. you can see donald trump's signature. is that the first time we have seen kim jong—un‘s signature on a document? the text has a firm unwavering commitment to denuclearisation on the north korean side, and from the americans those security guarantees so donald trump has already spoken in interviews today and said they will cease the military exercises in south korea which he has dismissed as provocative, including the flights from guam, and the north korean side
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saying they will retain the return of fine us soldiers, and an agreement to destroy the engines of the missiles, which they say they will destroy when they return to north korea in the coming weeks. as i say, the theatre entirely gripping. making history with a handshake. many thought this moment would never come. but when it finally did, it was measured and choreographed. once inside, though, the two men appeared more relaxed, even smiling for the cameras. we had a great discussion and it was a tremendous success. tremendously successful. but from kim jong—un, a slightly more reserved tone. he said it hasn't been easy to get here, and that old prejudices have been obstacles in his way, but that he's overcome all of that, and that's why he's here today.
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later at lunch, a chance to size each other up. and for kim jong—un to get a glimpse of his adversary across the table. getting a good picture, everybody, so we look nice and handsome. beautiful. perfect. then a short stroll in the gardens before, in typical trump style, an unexpected announcement. a lot of progress. really very positive. i think better than anybody could have expected. top of the line. really good. mr president... we're going right now for a signing. some confusion initially as to what they were going to sign, but when they put pen to paper, donald trump called it a comprehensive document that would see the process of denuclearisation begin very, very quickly. he's a worthy negotiator. negotiating on behalf of his people. a very worthy, very smart negotiator. and then another handshake to seal the deal. but who was this a better deal for?
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no details, no mention of whether this denuclearisation process will be verifiable or irreversible. one might wonder what's actually been achieved at this summit. there's also no timetable for denuclearisation, although president trump has said that international observers will go into north korea at some point. president trump did clarify, though, that sanctions would remain in place on the north. well, thank you very much, everybody... but in another surprise, revealed during a media briefing, that the us would stop war games with south korea and that us troops could one day be removed from the peninsula. i want to get our soldiers out, i want to bring our soldiers back home. we have right now 32,000 soldiers in south korea and i'd like to be able to bring them back home. but that's not part of the equation right now. at some point i hope it will be, but not right now. we will be stopping the war games, which will save us a tremendous amount of money. meanwhile, after meetings with the
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north korean delegation, president trump showed that he is always the businessman, even in this unusual context. as an example they have great beaches, you see that when they explode their cannons into the ocean. i said, "look at that beach. wouldn't that make a great condo behind?" isaid, "instead of doing that, you could have a the best hotels in the world right there." for kim jong—un, seen here leaving the summit, this has been a far more positive outcome for north korea than many had originally expected. this is what he's been working towards for so long, gaining international legitimacy whilst making very few concessions. and for president trump, ever the showman, this summit achieved what he was after too. this was always about the optics, the chance to show american greatness in the region even if it means nothing substantial has been achieved as a result. karishma vaswani, bbc news, in singapore. condos on the beaches in north
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korea, we may be some way away from that but there is the beginnings of a personal relationship here and we area a personal relationship here and we are a long way on from where we were six months ago. mike pompeo said just the other day that if the men got on that would be a framework to build, and already donald trump has said somewhere down the line is open to the idea of kimjong—un travelling to washington and he's open to the idea of going to pyongyang. let's take a look at the diplomatic reaction around the region. a new dawn, or a false dawn? what have we just witnessed in singapore, and what happens next? a few months ago, a summit would have been inconceivable. north korea was racing towards a full nuclear capability. donald trump was issuing threats and insults. he is a sick puppy.
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little rocket man. but the dynamics have changed, thanks in part to the efforts of south korea's president, moonjae—in. his highly symbolic meeting with kim jong—un setting the stage for today's summit. there were gestures, too. north korea destroying tunnels once used to test nuclear warheads, and allowing three american citizens held in the north to go home. but the prelude is over. the real talks have now begun. what are we to make of the first signed document? donald trump and kim jong—un have agreed to establish a new relationship. they say they will join their efforts to build a lasting and stable peace. and north korea agrees to work towards the company to work towards the complete denuclearisation of the korean peninsula. this is no treaty of versailles, and having only a few weeks to prepare it, it never was going to be. it's headings under which they are going to have to agree some substance.
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0n denuclearisation, on a peace agreement, on the remains of the prisoners of war. interestingly, it doesn't mention economics and sanctions, but the president said in his press conference that they were going to try and help north korea grow economically. and interestingly he also said they would end the military exercises, something north korea's been seeking for a very long time. president moon seems delighted by today's images, but the south korean leader says this isjust the beginning. there may be many difficulties ahead. china, too, seems pleased. beijing will need to play a crucial role as this process unfolds. translation: today, that the two countries' highest leaders can sit together and have equal talks, has a very important and positive meaning. donald trump giving his new—found friend a glimpse inside the presidential limousine. where are the two men heading now? almost certainly for a long and bumpy ride. paul adams, bbc news. we have heard from sergey lavrov,
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the russian foreign minister, talking in positive terms, similar positive tones from theresa may, but what about the capitals in the region? i have been spoken to my correspondent in beijing. he continued yet again to heap praise on donald trump, whose leadership he believes has been decisive and powerful, and frankly president moon has brought about this summit. he met kim jong—un on two occasions in the last six months, he had the secret office of a sit face—to—face meeting and that is the author donald trump accepted, and now we find ourselves with what we had in singapore today. the reality is it looks like not just the us forces here in korea but also the us forces here in korea but also the people at the blue house, the seat of the presidency here, didn't know what was coming in terms of the commitment to end the war games. the
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statement said they had no updated guidance, resident moon 's spokesman said in the hour or so afterwards they were looking to assess the intention, the meaning of what donald trump was saying. and this is a big deal, it looks like a key concession to the north because kim jong—un hate these military exercises. they remind him of the threat of what he sees as invasion from the south, but for many here in the south they see them as a show of strength and a reminder as wealth of the resilience of the alliance that stretched back so many decades. now the president has said those exercises will end. he said they are provocative, and also wants to talk to president moon about chipping into the cost of those exercises. many people here will find it unsettling and mike pompeo has said he arrives tomorrow to begin what he has described as the long process, dealing with the hard work involved in the framework of the talks going
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forward but more than anything he will have to deal with reassuring the south koreans first and at the moment we understand in the last hour that trump and moon had been on the phone speaking. let's go to beijing, maximum pressure will stay, trump said, but he also gave away the feeling that the border is already starting to open up, the chinese are already starting to relax sanctions. donald trump may say they will be no relief on the sanctions but that doesn't seem to be the view in beijing. there are two different types of sanctions, there are united states imposed sanctions and united nations imposed sanctions, and the foreign ministry this conference today, a spokesman said that those un resolutions have provisions in them for a relief on
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north korea if it starts to go along with what those sanctions are supposedly put in place for. so now, the chinese foreign ministry seems to be suggesting it will go along to the un and start to argue for some sort of relief on north korea and thatis sort of relief on north korea and that is because it wants the un to encourage the current diplomatic process that we have seen in singapore. steven mcdonald in beijing. kim jong—un has singapore. steven mcdonald in beijing. kimjong—un has now met the american president, he's met the chinese president twice, the south korean president twice, and also the prime minister in singapore. the odd man out to speakjapanese prime minister but he has welcomed the meeting between donald trump and kim jong—un, but he raised the issue of the abduction issues of japanese citizens. translation: i welcome the us north
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korea summit as a step forward towards a comprehensive resolution of the issues surrounding north korea. because it confirmed leader kim jong—un‘s will to commit to com plete kim jong—un‘s will to commit to complete denuclearisation of the korean peninsular. of course, regarding the issue of abductions, i have made up my mind thatjapan needs to meet with north korea face—to—face and resolve it between oui’ face—to—face and resolve it between our two countries. concerns then about the abductees and concerns within the human rights community as well about the thousands of people in the gulags in north korea, and they didn't like some of the references president trump made about those people. he said the people in the gulags other biggest winners out of this agreement and
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things have been rough for them. some people would use stronger language, in fact the un has previously described north korea as the harshest regime in the world so there will be a focus going forward on whether this human rights abuse in north korea formulate part of the agreement. you are watching bbc news. i'm simon mccoy in westminster where we are seeing the ongoing debate of the eu withdrawal bill. ken clarke is on his feet. the issue will be crucial this afternoon, he's already told the house of commons he never wa nts to told the house of commons he never wants to have to live through an important referendum such as the one we have been through. let's hear from him now. i assume that will be a continuation of negotiations but make house would demand its approval was sought for the next term in negotiations, the directions they we re negotiations, the directions they were going to go to satisfy the
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objections. i regard that as a perfectly serious proposition. i think the public debate on the whole question of tracks it has largely been ridiculous, notjust in the daily express but in many other areas, but in this place we do actually need to take seriously what we are doing not only to the future prospects for generations of our citizens, but for the constitutional position of this house. we have already given up all kinds of things that i've always taken for granted. i've never known such a weak parliament, allowing things to get by ending with the last timetable resolution. but to actually take the government's amendment will be the ultimate. it will set out, they have had to accept the decision of the
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house when we successfully defeated them before because they have had to come back and set out a better process of parliamentary approval before ratification. the big question is what, if the government rejects it, what if there is no deal? in the house of lords, the minister was quite clear in resisting this. and the meaningful votes going to be deal or no deal? takeit votes going to be deal or no deal? take it or leave it, says my honourable friend behind make. that's what he wants. so you may not like the deal. vote against it, and all you get is no deal. whatever deal they come forward with, only a handful of my honourable and right honourable friends would vote against it because they don't want any deal at all but i think they are any deal at all but i think they are a tiny minority in this house of
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commons. what does the government say in its amendment at the house should be faced with? within 28 days, a written statement will be produced amongst the piles of written statements we have every day. and dare i suggest not every member of parliament bothers to go through the piles of written statements. obviously i am exceptionally negligent in not doing so. exceptionally negligent in not doing so. what is a written statement going to say? it could say well in that case there is no deal, we are leaving. it could say well we are going to do this and that's it. it might as well say, "house of commons, get lost!" and that is a wholly inadequate response to the votes we had before parliament.
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there's two more points, i really am now going to be very brief. the argument we are undermining the prime minister's position in the negotiations is equally ridiculous. it is based on the proposition that out there, on the continent, they don't know there are divisions in the cabinet. they don't know what the cabinet. they don't know what the situation is here in the house of commons. and actually, were a whisper to get out with some slightly unusual votes in the house of commons, this would undermine my right honourable friend ‘s and make it much weaker position for them. i expect on the continent at the moment they are utterly bewildered by the anglo—saxons, we —— they are
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waiting for us to make up our minds. to decide what we wish to negotiate before negotiations start. all the other governments have got to get the approval of 27 national parliaments. what they are watching is an attempt by the real zealots in this house to stop this parliament playing any part in the process, which is totally unacceptable, and i think the time has come to say that all government policies on any subject, great or small, all government policies on any subject, great orsmall, depend all government policies on any subject, great or small, depend on the ability to command a majority in the ability to command a majority in the house of commons on the key principles and the direction into which the country is going. and i certainly, mr speaker, will vote on that basis, and i hope the government regrets it rather
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intolera nt government regrets it rather intolerant response under the pressure it has been applying on my right honourable and learned friends... soap ken clarke, very much underlining the point i was making that the real flash point expected today is over this meaningful vote, with ministers seeking to overturn the lords amendment which would give parliament extensive powers to direct ministers how to proceed if a deal is rejected by mps or indeed no deal is rejected by mps or indeed no deal is rejected by mps or indeed no deal is reached at all. dominic grieve tabled a late change motion to that last night, but the mps will not be voting on that because it does not have government support so it isa does not have government support so it is a clear divide and vote we are expecting has been pushed back a bit. we are expecting that later this afternoon. all of this as theresa may is coming under increasing pressure as mps prepare for the crucial votes on the withdrawal bill. that is today and
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tomorrow. thejunior withdrawal bill. that is today and tomorrow. the junior minister, phillip lee, resigned this morning to speak out about the government policy on brexit. this report from alex forsyth. no brexit, no racist eu exit. on the streets of london last night, protesters made their feelings clear, and anti—brexit vigil. the question, whether some mps are prepared to make a similar stand today. this morning, the brexit secretary was chipper, despite the possibility of a difficult day ahead. laughter. he knows not all of his party agrees with the government's brexit plans, including this minister, who today quit his job so he could speak out against brexit. i believe the evidence now shows that the brexit policy our government is currently pursuing, on the basis of the 2016 referendum,
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is detrimental to the people we are elected to serve. his resignation could spark further rebellion as mps start voting on crucial legislation. this bill is about the process of leaving the eu. on some aspects, like the future customs arrangements, the government has compromised to try to get the support it needs. but on others, it's still under pressure, particularly on how much power parliament should have if mps don't like the final brexit deal. a good result today is holding the government to account and making sure that we can keep doing so in the future. and that means winning the amendment on getting a meaningful vote. so the point at which we know what the full deal is on brexit, the house of commons can then have its say. some tories agree that denying it would tie the prime minister's hands. she's going to negotiate our future deal with the eu. this is about the process by which we try to ensure the maximum number of safeguards as we go through it. it doesn't affect her ability to negotiate a deal at all. but theresa may, heading
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to the commons, has warned her mps if they don't support this legislation it would undermine negotiations in brussels, and she's backed by some brexiteers. when we pass this bill, send it back to the house of lords again and say, forget about it, let's have this through. when that is done, she goes to the council injune in a strong position. if this is defeated and these amendments succeed, it's as though you have literally sent her out to bat without handing her the bat or the pads as she goes out. opinion is sharply divided and today the brexit battle ground will be inside parliament. alex forsyth, bbc news, westminster. our chief political correspondent vicki young is in parliament's central lobby. and talk us through the timings, what are we expecting to happen and
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when? the debate is well under way, with already had david davis the brexit secretary outlining why the government opposes some of these amendments and changes from the house of lords, saying that putting parliament in control really ties the hands of the government so the votes will start at ii:15pm, it's never entirely clear how many will get voted on but there will be plenty to say as the afternoon goes on. to discuss this more i'm joined byjohn penrose and stephen gethin is. firstly, john penrose, resignation of the conservative minister today who clearly feels extremely strongly about this and wa nts to extremely strongly about this and wants to speak out because he believes parliament must have a meaningful vote on any final deal. absolutely, and i know phillip lee, i rather respect him, good to see someone i rather respect him, good to see someone going with their principles. i disagree with the conclusion he reached, i voted i disagree with the conclusion he reached, ivoted remain i disagree with the conclusion he reached, i voted remain two years ago but you've got to respect the fa ct ago but you've got to respect the fact he's at least going with his principles. people are rude about
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politicians for not doing so, let's at least give him that respect. the ideal think he's wrong on a meaningful vote, surely it's right that sovereignty was —— parliament has a say on the final deal? we had a meaningful vote, it was called a referendum. secondly there will be an act of parliament, with masses of debate in the chamber about the eventual deal, so really the thing that worries people like me is that this is code for let's see if we can avoid leaving at all and see if we can sabotage brexit, and that would be very dangerous given the referendum democratic decision that was taken. that is the argument, isn't it? there were people in the lords that called the amendment the stop exit amendment, and people in some ways are pretending this is about a meaningful vote but actually they don't want to leave the european union. that is complete nonsense. we are about to take one
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of the most devastating decisions we can take. analysis shows we will be economically much worse off and that's one of the reasons for the ministerial resignation this morning. this will impact everyone of us onjobs morning. this will impact everyone of us on jobs and economy in the united kingdom. that's why parliament, which is meant to represent people across the uk, should be getting into the nitty—gritty and should have a say. let's not forget, and i don't blame john for this, but leaders did not produce a manifesto, they had a blank piece of paper —— leavers. produce a manifesto, they had a blank piece of paper -- leavers. the withdrawal bill is about making sure we have laws in place when we leave, so this vehicle is not the right one to do that? let'sjust make sure we are not to do that? let'sjust make sure we a re not left to do that? let'sjust make sure we are not left with no deal scenario, leave open the customs union. that is compromise we have put forward about staying in the customs union
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and the single market. no way have done that. this is for exploring the least worst option. people at home might think this is all about fight in parliament, it is not. i know from farmers who cannot get seasonal work, this is biting now and impacting onjobs work, this is biting now and impacting on jobs now work, this is biting now and impacting onjobs now and parliament has a responsibility to step up to the plate and stop the worst excesses happening. and it is the case in parliament and the house of commons there is no majority for a no deal situation. i don't know, is the short answer to that. i think it depends on what the alternative is will stop if the negotiations went so will stop if the negotiations went so badly wrong that you ended up with something which is dramatically worse than a world trade organisation set of choices, then actually the world trade organisation choices would be the better of the choices on the table so we better of the choices on the table so we obviously don't want to get to that situation, we want to have the kind of close relationship with the re st of kind of close relationship with the rest of europe once we have left, but we need to keep options open as
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an insurance policy even though none of us want to take it. briefly, do you think the government could be defeated this afternoon?” you think the government could be defeated this afternoon? i hope so will stop we have one government minister has gone, and he said as a matter of conscience, knowing this will impact us for generations to come to our detriment so i hope conservatives and others alike will join think in voting for these government proposals. —— against them. and the vote will get under way at about 4:15pm this afternoon. there is full interrupted coverage of the eu withdrawal bill debate on bbc parliament. that will be a lot less uninterrupted than what we are hearing here, which is quite a demonstration building up. there has been a demonstration and they are gathering not far from been a demonstration and they are gathering not farfrom here been a demonstration and they are gathering not far from here so apologies for the noise but anyway, let's talk about the weather. matt, yesterday you were saying it's going to be dried today and it's been
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raining here! it's because you aren't there, simon! where is your umbrella? i cannot hear a word you are saying but i'm sure it's very funny. hilarious as always. there are one or two showers around at the moment but for most it is dry. where we have sunshine breaking through the cloud in parts of the west midlands, it is feeling very pleasant. temperatures into the mid—20s but that the vast majority it is dry and that is a big thing across western scotland at the moment. stone away and other parts of western scotland it is the 22nd consecutive day without rain. —— stornaway. but things will look a lot different. it comes courtesy of an area cloud out in the atlantic at the moment. it is aided and abetted
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bya the moment. it is aided and abetted by a strongerjet the moment. it is aided and abetted by a stronger jet stream the moment. it is aided and abetted by a strongerjet stream and that will push towards us during the next 21: will push towards us during the next 2a hours. at the moment high—pressure and most places are dry. things are cooler than yesterday. we have seen showers in the south of england and one or two in the west. they will fade away tonight. cloud will depart with clear skies and after a fresher day, a cooler night. temperatures away from the towns and cities dropping back into single figures. it will be a cooler start to tomorrow morning but it should be sunny for most. after a sunny start to wednesday, pliable bubble up and showers will threaten most southern areas. then we have the arrival of the rain with gusty wind as well. temperatures taking a knock but across england and wales it will be a warm day than today. it is to wednesday into
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thursday morning the low pressure pushes in and we could see between 25 and 50 millimetres across western scotland. the rain clears away by first light. it is the win that strengthens through the morning which could have greater destruction. gusts of maybe up to 50 miles an hourand destruction. gusts of maybe up to 50 miles an hour and that could cause travel disruption for thursday morning rush hour. stay with us for the latest forecast. the rest of thursday not looking too bad. showers through most areas in the morning and then sunny skies and then only one or two blustery showers in the afternoon. feeling fresh as the showers go through but pleasa nt fresh as the showers go through but pleasant enough in the sunshine across eastern areas and for some it feels warmer than it has done over the past few days. we continue with more cloud and a bit more breeze and a few showers on friday into the weekend. this is bbc news —
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our latest headlines: making history with a handshake — president trump hails his talks with kim jong un as ‘tremendous'. the leaders signed an agreement committing themselves to de—nuclearisation on the korean peninsula. thejustice minister, philip lee, resigns from the government so he can speak his mind over brexit as mps renew their debate on leaving the eu, with a series of close votes expected. the businessman arron banks, who donated millions of pounds to the leave.eu,campaign has told a committee of mps there's no evidence of any conspiracy with russia. he accused the committee of being "remainers" seeking to discredit "vote leave" an alleged member of the banned neo—nazi group national action, has admitted plotting to murder the west lancashire mp rosie cooper. 23—year—old jack renshaw also admitted threatening to kill a police officer. and uk employment reaches an all time high with the unemployment rate falling by 38,000 between february
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and april to 1.42 million. sport now on afternoon live, with hugh woozencroft. so england are on their way to russia after a straightforward qualifying campaign the pressure will now increase! ? well, england will land in st petersburg before about a 45 minute drive to repino and it's there as they see their home for the next 16 days at least, that the reality and the size of the task ahead will hit them. they were in very happy and relaxed mood as they boarded their plane at birmingham airport, all smile and thumbs up and cuddles. there's a full week of course before the first game against tunisia, but that will see them travel over 1000 miles to play. now previous england tournaments have seen players tell stories of boredom. former captain alan shearer doesn't think that should be the case. forget the boredom, you get
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everything done for you, you don't have to pack your socks or your pa nts. have to pack your socks or your pants. forfour have to pack your socks or your pants. for four weeks of your life you cannot afford to get bored. you get given games and books, what ever you want is provided on a plate. you are here to play football, for a month of your life, that is not too it's on the coast of the gulf of finland and inhabited by around 2,500 people and although there will be a lot of travel involved, the town is temperate and a little rainy. similar conditions to the united kingdom, so it may well suit gareth southgate's team. sports news correspondent david is there for us. much to ask. there is plenty going on inside the hotel, some leisure facilities. england have invested in
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a swimming pool here to bring it up to scratch. gym facilities and they are bringing their own chefs over. i don't think we will see any kind of fa nfa re don't think we will see any kind of fanfare around the hotel. no one is here apart from a fewjournalists. but st petersburg, not too far from here if they want a day trip and thatis here if they want a day trip and that is where many of their families will be staying. they then go training tomorrow for the first time at the local base is not too far from he which will be open to the media, two dignitaries and local schoolchildren as well. and then the hot at the head of the first match against tunisia on monday. former world heavyweight champion, david haye, has announced his retirement from boxing. it follows his defeat to tony bellew last month, for the second time in succession. in a post on social media, the former unified cruiserweight world champion said it's the right time to end his career. as of 12thjune 2018, i am no longer a professional boxer. something i've been since the age of ten. it's a strange thought, but it's a thought i'm very comfortable with. as i've reviewed my life and my physicality, and it's not what it needs to be to compete at world level as a heavyweight.
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staying with boxing and deontay wilder says he has agreed terms with anthonyjoshua's team over a unification bout in the uk. wilder holds the wbc heavyweight belt, the only title that joshua doesn't have. england's one—day captain eoin morgan says his side will be trying to take the positives from their defeat by scotland at the weekend. his team take on australia at the oval tomorrow and morgan says they still have a lot to learn ahead of next years world cup. we need to expose some of our weaknesses. in order to be in contention for the world cup this time next year. we cannotjust keep cruising along and doing ok orjust about getting over the line. we want to learn as we go along between now
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and next year and there is still a lot to learn. british number one johanna konta says she's feeling positive about the grass court season after going out in the first round at the french open. in the build up to wimbledon she turns her attention to this week's nottingham open, where she plays japan's kurumi nara in the first round this afternoon. heather watson's already through having beaten american danielle lao. i'm definitely coming into this period of the season in a slightly different position to where i was last year, but i think i'm equally excited and i think i'm in a really good place right now in terms of my development and just might clarity on how i want to be playing and how i want to be doing my career really. that's all the sport for now. we will have more in the next hour. thank you very much. we are expecting the england squad to arrive in russia and when they do, we will show you the pictures. the government is facing increased
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pressure from pro—eu conservatives as mps prepare to vote on a number of house of lords amendments to the eu withdrawal bill. the first of two 3—hour brexit debates is underway now. and juniorjustice minister, phillip lee, has resigned, saying that governments had to protect citizens from the decisions of the majority even if they were negative for the country. i'm joined now byjill rutter from the institute of government and the broadcaster and political documentary maker, michael cockerell. have you had many days like this when we talk about crunch moments? there have been more crunch moments on this whole brexit process than i can remember on any other subject. but standing here, i can remember back when ted heath brought in the build to take us into the common market. 40 years ago. 40 years ago and one of the people involved in that was asking questions in the house to david davis and that was
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ken clarke. he was one of the tory whips who was persuading labour rebels, led by royjenkins, to vote for the government. in those days, the conservative government was in favour of us going in and most of the labour party was against, apart from the europhiles led by roy jenkins. it is rare to have one of those moments where we just don't know what will happen. do you think? because we are in a minority parliament and there are so many... the whips cannot use their whipping skills in the way they do at other times. all the bribes or the hopes ofajob, times. all the bribes or the hopes of a job, they are the people who are the old and the bold who have nothing to lose. they are sort of the mad and the sad and all these
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are people who have to be accommodated and it isn't that easy. the procedure today is very dry, we're waiting for a number of the bates followed by boats. but there is one particular vote we need to keep an eye on? the crunch vote is the so—called vote on the meaningful vote. the government's initial idea was basically parliament didn't have very much role at the end of this process. it has been pegged back on that. it was the only defeat it suffered in the commons on the withdrawal bill when it went to the commons stages with the dominic grieve amendment. it went to the lords where it was toughened up a bit and they said you have to have a motion on the deal. parliament tell you what to do afterwards and that is what the government is trying to resist. the government has offered an amendment saying a minister will come and make a statement and say what we are going to do next. up to
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28 days later? up to 28 days later, and that isn't good enough for parliament. dominic grieve, a repeat start of this process, has tabled what we're seeing is a compromise amendment the government would go for, which basically lightens up parliament's for, which basically lightens up pa rliament's role for, which basically lightens up parliament's role than the lords. he made it clear if the government didn't go for this, he would back the lords. that is where the debate is, does parliament do enough? conservative rebels go with the dominic grieve version? we have been told there isn't time for them to vote on that and because it doesn't have government backing, it is off the table. we are in for a take it or leave it? dominic grieve said if his amendment didn't pass he would support the version of the bill that
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came back from the lords. the government is trying to reverse that. if it succeeds it goes back to the lords in this process called ping—pong. the lords are looking bad and saying there was a compromise on the tabled the government timed out. we will probably send it back again. it is interesting, the lords see themselves as a very important role in protecting what they see as the rights of parliament. we have some very vocal protesters here and passions are aroused. some contemplated by the way the newspapers covered this this morning it was either abeid great britain or an act of disloyalty, from one newspaper. a couple of newspapers. they say they are feeling bullied about this? mps have had death threats and some mps are afraid to show their remain credentials
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because one mp said she had had 500 death threats. it has become extraordinarily toxic and nasty with papers like the sun, the telegraph and the daily mail calling people saboteurs. on the basis that you haven't already, what would you give to have cameras with theresa may following her every moment, certainly over the last few days and over the next 24, 48 hours? if we had cameras following her every moment, it wouldn't necessarily be the most exciting thing. she's not very good at taking decisions, she likes to consider all sides and she is very cautious. it might feel like slow motion before she makes a decision. it is great to see both, thank you for coming and talking about that. that debate is under way. let's get a flavour of what is
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going on, we can go into the house of, is. it has been said, we voted 6- of, is. it has been said, we voted 6— transferred this decision from ourselves, uniquely, in our history, to the people. they decided to leave. the decision has been made and then we voted overwhelmingly, virtually every single labour and conservative member, not only to do that, to accept the results and then implement article 50. we have taken the decision, we have made to be but we have given the decision to the people. passions aroused, sir edward leigh. we will keep an eye on that debate going on right now. there's full uninterrupted coverage of the eu withdrawal bill debate on bbc parliament.
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we are expecting that votes, but it keeps getting pushed back. we expect to hear the results of the meaningful vote, which is the one eve ryo ne meaningful vote, which is the one everyone is talking about. other news now: an alleged member of a banned neo—nazi group has pleaded guilty to preparing acts of terrorism — in relation to a plot to kill a labour mp. jack renshaw, who's 23, admitted buying a machete with the intention of killing rosie cooper, and making threats to kill a police officer. he's one of six men who deny being members of the group national action. our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford reports. jack renshaw, 23 years old, a man accused of being a neo—nazi, who today dramatically admitted planning to kill a labour mp and threatening to kill a police officer. the prosecution say he'd already bought a machete, a kind described by its manufacturers as "19 inches of unprecedented piercing
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and slashing power. " and christopher lythgoe is the man accused of being the secret leader of the group, who encouraged him to carry out the murder. we let these people destroy us, and they are still destroying us now. along with four other men, they are charged with being members of national action, a group banned by the home secretary as a virulently racist terrorist organisation after it celebrated the killing of the mpjo cox. with all six defendants listening intently, the prosecutor, duncan atkinson qc, told the jury that the plan to kill another mp was discussed at a pub in warrington last summer. the group met at this table upstairs in the big window at the friar penketh pub on the 1st ofjuly. the prosecution say that jack renshaw told the group that his plan was to murder his local mp, rosie cooper, take some hostages and then kill a female detective who had been investigating him. the plan to kill rosie cooper was uncovered because the antiracism organisation hope not hate had
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a mole in the group, robbie mullen, who was also there at the pub that night. according to robbie mullen, jack renshaw wanted to carry at the murder in the name of national action, and that night christopher lythgoe gave his approval. christopher lythgoe denies that and all six men deny being members of national action after it was banned. daniel sandford, bbc news, at the old bailey. in a moment the business news with rachel horne. president donald trump and chairman kimjong—un make history, with a handshake — as the two leaders "write a new chapter" in relations between the us and north korea mps will cast crucial votes on brexit later, as thejustice minister philip lee resigns to speak out against the government's brexit policy. an alleged member of a banned
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neo—nazi group has admitted plotting to murder an mp — and threatening to kill a police officer. unemployment fell by 38,000 to 1.42 million in the the three months to april — but wage growth also fell. that slowdown is likely to dampen expectations of an interest rise in august. new look is continuing to cut prices as it tries to turn around its business — it wants 80% of its clothes to sell for less than £20. the price cuts come amid falling sales which were down nearly 12% in the year to march. website sales were down 19%. new look is one of many retailers that struck a company voluntary agreement or cva this year — which aims to give the company time to sort out its debts. taxi app company uber has applied for a patent to use artificial intelligence to determine how drunk potential passengers might be. the app used to summon rides
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could also feed other information to the driver, including a passenger's location, how accurately they are typing and even the angle they are holding their phone at. it could help drivers who do not want to pick up inebriated riders. but critics said it could also be used to identify vulnerable passengers. it may have hit the headlines but the historic meeting between us president donald trump and north korean leader kimjong—un, has really had little impact on the financial markets. the ftse in london, the german dax and the cac in france are all trading down this afternoon despite the fact the us president donald trump says his talks with north korean leader that ended in a joint agreement, were "tremendous". chairman kim has told me north korea is already destroying a major missile engine testing site. that is
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not in your signed document, we agreed to that after the agreement was signed. it is a big thing. let's go straight to kim gittleson our correspondent on the floor of the new york stock exchange — kim have we had much reaction on us markets? the summit was telegraphed for many weeks in advance and investors got used to the idea that something would come out of the meeting. now they feel what has come out is short on details and it is difficult to trade on the news. you have to think about what companies might make money out of an open north korean economy. right now it is hard to figure out so investors seem to be taking a wait and see approach to the summit in case more details come out but could impact the companies that trade here. there has been
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another big story coming out of america, at&t and time warner. the telecoms operator and the media firm wa nt to telecoms operator and the media firm want to merge. we should be hearing a ruling from a federaljudge on whether or not that plan can go forward. is there much support for it? it is a huge case when it comes to mergers and acquisitions at corporate america. it is valued at $85 billion £64 billion. the main thing that is centred at the heart of this case is whether a merger should be allowed to proceed. historically, this is something the government here in the united states have never had a problem with. that is because at&t and time warner don't compete with each other. time warner is known as a big television and movie firm here in the united
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states. so the idea of the us government has looked to intervene in the merger has raised a lot of eyebrows, because president donald trump cited his on and off again relationship with cnn as one reason why the government might be seeking to block this merger, saying it might consolidate power in too few media companies. investors are anxious to see what the judge will rule in this case, if he allows it to proceed we could see more merger and acquisition activity happening here on the new york stock exchange. thank you. lets see what the markets are getting up to. they are not reacting to that summit between donald trump and kim jong—un. the focus to that summit between donald trump and kimjong—un. the focus is on the interest rate decisions coming from the federal reserve and the meeting
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with the big central banks. and chris nicholson house—builders down blaming flat house prices and bp is down and the oil sector has had a strong run. iwill down and the oil sector has had a strong run. i will be back with more throughout the afternoon. the multi—millionaire businessman who founded the leave. eu campaign, arron banks, has told mps that there is "no evidence" he was involved in a conspiracy with russian officials and claimed to be the victim of a witch hunt. he admitted he gave the russian embassy phone numbers for president trump's transition team, but says that's the only information he ever passed on. the sunday times wrote four pages on the back of the fact that i had lunch with the russian ambassador initially. that was after we had
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seen mrtrump, initially. that was after we had seen mr trump, president trump and the infamous golden apartment doors. soi the infamous golden apartment doors. so i would have thought, given we had met the russian ambassador, he said come back and see me. did you share any political information? what political information? the only thing we gave in the second meeting was the telephone number of the transition team because the russians wa nted transition team because the russians wanted to get hold of the transition team. we have been to visit trump tower, it was utter chaos. there were 40,000 demonstrators outside trump tower and we were locked in there for six hours i think. the russians were there for the same length. and then we were
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askedif the same length. and then we were asked if we wanted to see the boss. isaid, of asked if we wanted to see the boss. i said, of course we do. headlines coming up, but first let's catch up with the weather. western scotland, including stornaway, today is the 22nd consecutive day without rain. that will change in around 24 hours. this area of cloud in the atlantic is getting picked up by a vigorousjet stream. that will develop into a low pressure system to spin in into thursday. we have a ridge of high pressure, most staying dry through the afternoon. cloud across eastern areas, but when the sun is out it is very pleasant. when the cloud is in play, temperatures mid to high teens. some of the cloud melts away tonight and clearer skies across the country. they will be fresher than
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recent nights. many part away from towns and cities, dropping down into single figures. it will be a lovely start to tomorrow morning, cloud here and there are parts of central and eastern scotland especially. best of the sunny spells, in eastern scotland. most places avoiding the showers and then the cloud thickens up showers and then the cloud thickens up later to bring outbreaks of rain in the west. temperatures tomorrow will be up on today but they will drop across western scotland and northern ireland. that is as this area of low pressure pushes in the biggest impact will be on the northern half of the uk. we go from northern half of the uk. we go from no rainfor northern half of the uk. we go from no rain for over 22 days to two inchesin no rain for over 22 days to two inches in the space of 24 hours. rain inches in the space of 24 hours. ra i n clears into inches in the space of 24 hours. rain clears into thursday morning but the winds could be of note, 50 to 60 malan but the winds could be of note, 50 to 60 mal an hour gusts and may be more likely across parts of northern ireland, northern england and scotland. there could be some travel disruption around. we will keep you
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updated. the wind is not a strong further south but more blustery than we have been used to. the wind coming in from a westerly direction bringing showers and outbreaks of rain in the morning. clearing through and sunny spells into the afternoon. for all you will feel fresher in the westerly breeze. but tempered by the return of some afternoon sunshine. as for the end of the week and into the weekend, another spell of rain the northern areas on friday but some sunshine but a few showers as well. hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 3... president trump and chairman kimjong—un make history, with a handshake signifying a "new chapter" in relations between the us and north korea. the leaders later signed a document which included a pledge from mr kim to work to rid the korean peninsula of nuclear weapons. people are going to be very impressed, people are going to be very happy and we are going to take care of a very big and very dangerous problem for the world. mps will cast crucial votes on the eu withdrawal bill later,
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as thejustice minister philip lee resigns to speak out against the government's brexit policy. an alleged member of a banned neo—nazi group has admitted plotting to murder an mp and threatening to kill a police officer. coming up on afternoon live — all the sport with hugh. and england expects. yes indeed, and the england squad playing should land shortly in saint petersburg before gareth southgate and his side go to see their new home for the next few weeks. also coming up, the multi—millionaire businessman and brexiteer arron bank tells mps that he gave russian embassy officials the telephone numbers of president trump's transition team. hello, everyone — this is afternoon live.
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i'm simon mccoy in westminster, where theresa may faces what could be a difficult afternoon as the government faces a series of debates and crunch votes in the commons on brexit. we'll have all the twists and turns from here. but first donald trump and kimjong—un have held a historic meeting — the first between a sitting us president and north korean leader in singapore. christian fraser is there. a very good evening from singapore. it is after ten o'clock local time here, president trump has already left singapore, we are still waiting for the departure of kim jong—un so let's ta ke for the departure of kim jong—un so let's take you to the hotel of the north korean delegation and show you the live pictures. you will see that outside there is a huge convoy waiting to go. they tell me there we re waiting to go. they tell me there were 43 vehicles in that convoy when
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it came from the airport to the hotel. we don't know what the delay has been for kim jong—un hotel. we don't know what the delay has been for kimjong—un but hotel. we don't know what the delay has been for kim jong—un but clearly he's enjoyed his time here. last night we saw him walking around the waterfront gardens area and tonight he will leave aboard the air china 747 that brought him here. the residents on the main island have been told to prepare for some major traffic jams as they been told to prepare for some major trafficjams as they escort him back to the airport. at the end of it all, what do we have? it has been two days of the most unconventional diplomacy, but the theatre of the day as donald trump met kimjong—un will be remembered for some time to come. this is a copy of what they signed, there you see their signatures, it is just over one signed, there you see their signatures, it isjust over one page in length. some analysts are saying it doesn't commit north korea to more than it has committed to before and from the north koreans' point of
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view it is suitably vague but the americans say this is the platform on which to build in months to come. there is a firm and unwavering commitment from kim jong—un to denuclearisation and a concession from the american side. they have given security guarantees and will hold for the time being at least the military gains in south korea including the overflights from guam which mr trump dismissed as provocative. let's look at some of the pictures. making history with a handshake. many thought this moment would never come. but when it finally did, it was measured and choreographed. once inside, though, the two men appeared more relaxed, even smiling for the cameras. we had a great discussion and it was a tremendous success. tremendously successful. but from kim jong—un, a slightly more reserved tone. he said it hasn't been easy to get here, and that old prejudices have
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been obstacles in his way, but that he's overcome all of that, and that's why he's here today. later at lunch, a chance to size each other up. and for kim jong—un to get a glimpse of his adversary across the table. getting a good picture, everybody, so we look nice and handsome. beautiful. perfect. then a short stroll in the gardens before, in typical trump style, an unexpected announcement. a lot of progress. really very positive. i think better than anybody could have expected. top of the line. really good. mr president... we're going right now for a signing. some confusion initially as to what they were going to sign, but when they put pen to paper, donald trump called it a comprehensive document that would see the process of denuclearisation begin very, very quickly. he's a worthy negotiator. negotiating on behalf of his people.
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a very worthy, very smart negotiator. and then another handshake to seal the deal. but who was this a better deal for? no details, no mention of whether this denuclearisation process will be verifiable or irreversible. one might wonder what's actually been achieved at this summit. there's also no timetable for denuclearisation, although president trump has said that international observers will go into north korea at some point. president trump did clarify, though, that sanctions would remain in place on the north. well, thank you very much, everybody... but in another surprise, revealed during a media briefing, that the us would stop war games with south korea and that us troops could one day be removed from the peninsula. i want to get our soldiers out, i want to bring our soldiers back home. we have right now 32,000 soldiers in south korea and i'd like to be able to bring them back home. but that's not part of the equation right now. at some point i hope it will be, but not right now.
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we will be stopping the war games, which will save us a tremendous amount of money. meanwhile, after meetings with the north korean delegation, president trump showed that he is always the businessman, even in this unusual context. as an example they have great beaches, you see that when they explode their cannons into the ocean. i said, "look at that beach. wouldn't that make a great condo behind?" isaid, "instead of doing that, you could have a the best hotels in the world right there." for kim jong—un, seen here leaving the summit, this has been a far more positive outcome for north korea than many had originally expected. this is what he's been working towards for so long, gaining international legitimacy whilst making very few concessions. and for president trump, ever the showman, this summit achieved what he was after too. this was always about the optics, the chance to show american greatness in the region even if it means nothing substantial has been achieved as a result.
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karishma vaswani, bbc news, in singapore. donald trump certainly in a buoyant mood as he left singapore but i wonder if he will reflect on whether he got enough out of this document that he signed with kim jong—un because it doesn't test the commitments of the north korean leader. there is no timescales and none of the verification that mike pompeo so wants out of the north koreans. all of that detail will have to be set out in the weeks and months ahead. so how did the reaction go down in the rest of the region among the south koreans, the japanese and the chinese? paul adams has been taking a look. a new dawn, or a false dawn?
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what have we just witnessed in singapore, and what happens next? a few months ago, a summit would have been inconceivable. north korea was racing towards a full nuclear capability. donald trump was issuing threats and insults. he is a sick puppy. little rocket man. but the dynamics have changed, thanks in part to the efforts of south korea's president, moonjae—in. his highly symbolic meeting with kim jong—un setting the stage for today's summit. there were gestures, too. north korea destroying tunnels once used to test nuclear warheads, and allowing three american citizens held in the north to go home. but the prelude is over. the real talks have now begun. what are we to make of the first signed document? donald trump and kim jong—un have agreed to establish a new relationship. they say they will join their efforts to build a lasting and stable peace. and north korea agrees to work towards the complete denuclearisation of the korean peninsula.
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this is no treaty of versailles, and having only a few weeks to prepare it, it never was going to be. it's headings under which they are going to have to agree some substance. on denuclearisation, on a peace agreement, on the remains of the prisoners of war. interestingly, it doesn't mention economics and sanctions, but the president said in his press conference that they were going to try and help north korea grow economically. and interestingly he also said they would end the military exercises, something north korea's been seeking for a very long time. president moon seems delighted by today's images, but the south korean leader says this isjust the beginning. there may be many difficulties ahead. china, too, seems pleased. beijing will need to play a crucial role as this process unfolds. translation: today, that the two countries' highest leaders can sit together and have equal talks, has a very important and positive meaning. donald trump giving his new—found friend a glimpse inside the presidential limousine. where are the two men heading now?
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almost certainly for a long and bumpy ride. paul adams, bbc news. let's just take you back to those live pictures from outside the hotel of the north korean delegation. we are still waiting for kim jong—un to depart. the number of cars, i was talking about at the top of the programme, tells you how big the north korean delegation is. do we read into that that they are committed to this process? his head of foreign affairs, some of his most senior staff, and of course the korean representative that went to washington was with him as well. so there is this relationship building between the us side and the north korean side but a lot of this detail in the document that was signed todayis in the document that was signed today is based on trust and around the personal relationship. donald trump said today he would be quite willing to invite kimjong—un
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trump said today he would be quite willing to invite kim jong—un to washington further down the line, he stressed, and he would be quite prepared to visit pyongyang as well but maybe the first step before that, and this is what we were looking for, is to establish liaison office in pyongyang and perhaps one in washington so we can get more of the verification. donald trump says it will happen quickly but i think we have to be wide—eyed about that, that it we have to be wide—eyed about that, thatitis we have to be wide—eyed about that, that it is a complex process. first they have to ascertain what it is and stop the alliteration so some of that material going to other countries, then they have to decide whether they will leave them with some nuclear infrastructure. it is fiercely complex and you have to pity mike pompeo that he goes to south korea without much on paper having to build on the expectation that has been created by donald trump. does that mean this was a waste of time? far from it. trump. does that mean this was a waste of time? farfrom it. donald trump has gone further than previous presidents and let's hope from this
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personal relationship something more can develop. that is the hope around the world. south korea said today it was the beginning of a new chapter of peace and cooperation. russia's foreign minister welcomed the deal but said the devil would be in the detail. iran warned donald trump would cancel the agreement at any time. and north korea's closest ally, china, appears to have no details about what they were agreeing before they were made public to the rest of the world and that's because on two occasions before the north koreans met mike pompeo of course kim jong—un went to meet the chinese president. from beijing, here is steven mcdonnell. said there should be encouragement
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of the diplomatic process. there are two different types of sanctions on north korea, those imposed by the us, those imposed by the united nations. beijing seems to be suggesting it will go along to the un security council and argue that there are provisions under those sanctions that have been agreed upon at the un security council for them to bt staff as a sort of recognition that north korea has gone some way down the road towards behaving in the way it showed when it comes to denuclearisation. the other really interesting things to come out of the press briefing from the chinese foreign ministry today is that regime knew before donald trump announced it that the us and south korea were going to hold those joint
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military exercises. we know this because at that same press briefing, the spokesman said this is proof that china as micro suspension for suspension or proposal not only worked but had been enacted. he said this and we were like, what do you mean it's already in place? sure enough, two hours later, donald trump was talking about the fact there was going to be a suspension of these war games, these us south korean war games, of these war games, these us south korean wargames, in of these war games, these us south korean war games, in exchange for north korea suspending its nuclear programme. either the trump or the kim team has told beijing about this. either way it is very good news when it comes to the governments in beijing and john —— pyongyang. joining me from washington isjohn
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park, good to see you. it would be easy to be cynical about this document because if you put it next to the document that came from the talks in 2005 it looks pretty similar butare talks in 2005 it looks pretty similar but are you optimistic they can build on this? i think optimism, a little too early for that, but it is an important beginning. from the perspective of momentum what the singapore summit and this joint statement creates is the momentum and political space for other mechanisms to start going forward. the mechanisms i'm talking about here are the permanent peace mechanism and also this inter—korean transportation infrastructure development mechanism. it's a mouthful but these are the core elements that out of the declaration between the two koreas so there is a linkage and it's an important point to consider. so you are saying there is this time an economic imperative that brings came to the table? ——
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brings kim jong—un to the table? that brings came to the table? —— brings kim jong-un to the table? kim jong—un had a game plan, and the key component on the nuclear development side, clearly he's established that as mission accomplished, but on another component he needs help. getting relief on sanctions as a coping mechanism. the critical element, this idea of mutual prosperity. he's not looking for hand—outs. these are the elements that we will potentially seek the pathway if he makes that denuclearisation process. obviously kim jong—un has had denuclearisation process. obviously kimjong—un has had huge propaganda value out of this meeting and i said at the outset, if you look at the document it is suitably vague for the north korean side and i think what disappoints the analyst community is that after all of the
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promises, there is nothing about the verification here. there is nothing about the detail of the north korean programme. in a way, i think that is a function of looking at the track record. previous agreements have floundered... inspections record. previous agreements have floundered. .. inspections i record. previous agreements have floundered... inspections i should say, on verification. to have the principles laid out in the statement and build on it i think is one way to create the confidence along the way but also of avoiding setting the bar high and being unable to me that. we are going to see some steps designed to create this confidence. dismantling of north korean facilities, the united states creating some of these concessions, but the old phase game plan is something we will see more details of in the weeks and months to come. john park, very good to get your thoughts. it is a building block
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process. donald trump says kim jong—un is going back to north korea and will destroy an engine plant, mike pompeo is going to south korea, and at the end of the week you will be in beijing. it is the beginning of the process but there is at least some promised things are starting to turn a corner. you are watching bbc news. you arejoining you are joining floss—macro here at westminster. —— you arejoining us here at westminster. theresa may is coming under increasing pressure as mps prepare for a series of crucial votes on the eu withdrawal bill today and tomorrow. anna soubry is giving it both barrels, let's hear from anna soubry is giving it both barrels, let's hearfrom her. anna soubry is giving it both barrels, let's hear from her. they have plotted and connived, got rid of leaders and anything that has
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stood in their way and will continue to do so. and they will do what they have had a life's ambition to do am which is to take us over the cliff and into the hard brexit which my constituents didn't vote for and i will continue to represent my constituents. we reckon 52% voted to leave, and the 48% who voted to remain have been put aside in this process and that has to stop. we have to come back together and do the right thing. mr speaker, i know andi the right thing. mr speaker, i know and i understand how difficult it is for many of my colleagues to go through lobbies and vote against their party but i say this... i am getting a little tired of honourable members and right honourable members on the backbenches, in government, evenin on the backbenches, in government, even in the cabinet who come up to
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me and others in quiet and dark corridors, to british businesses who demand private meetings where they lay bare their despair but refuse to go public. to the commentators who say to me, you are doing a great job, keep on going, in the face of death threats which mean one of our number had to attend a public engagement with six armed undercover police officers. that is the country we have created and it has got to stop. to the journalists who fight nobly for every cause but on this, the most important of issues, are mute. it has got to stop, everybody has to stand up and be true to what they believe in. finally, mr speaker, there were some great words spoken. give me time if i make to find them and read them out, and i have probably lost them. the house is made up of 651 individuals whose position gives them a powerful stake in what the executive can and cannot do. the powers of the house are
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sovereign and have the ability to upset the best laid plans of government. they were true then, they are true now, they were spoken by the secretary of state for exiting the european union. thank you. mr chris leslie. the honourable lady spoke with passion and clarity but above all about courage and putting our country first. i would like to particularly at this moment a tribute to the honourable gentleman the member for bracknell who has done just such that thing today because at personal sacrifice today because at personal sacrifice to himself, and potentially he knows what the electorate may do in the future, but he's using hisjudgment, making an assessment about what is the best interests for his constituents, and i find that something to be greatly respected. i
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was fascinated, mr speaker, to hear the exchange between the right honourable member for beaconsfield and the government front bench a moment ago. it seems to me that the obvious solution here would be for the government to signal that it is accepting the amendment tabled by the right honourable member for beaconsfield. no, i'm not going to give way. to accept the amendment because in doing so, if the house approves that as it would because it would be done so by consensus, that issue would then go to the house of lords, where through the discussions that might then subsequently take place, there would then be the opportunity if those discussions wanted to amend or week it in a certain way for it to be sent back here for final confirmation. if the right honourable member for beaconsfield were to not do that, andl beaconsfield were to not do that, and i understand taking the word of ministers and so forth, the leverage
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of this house would potentially be lost if those discussions came to nothing. chris leslie there, responding to those comments from anna soubry. as you can see, passionate debate under way as they repair for that crucial vote, particularly on this eu withdrawal bill. that is today and tomorrow. today has not gone well for the prime minister with the resignation of thejuniorjustice prime minister with the resignation of the junior justice minister, phillip lee, who resigned to speak out against the government's brexit policy. alex forsyth reports. no brexit, no racist eu exit. on the streets of london last night, protesters made their feelings clear, an anti—brexit vigil. the question, whether some mps are prepared to make a similar stand today. this morning, the brexit secretary was chipper, despite the possibility of a difficult day ahead. laughter.
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he knows not all of his party agrees with the government's brexit plans, including this minister, who today quit his job so he could speak out against brexit. i believe the evidence now shows that the brexit policy our government is currently pursuing, on the basis of the 2016 referendum, is detrimental to the people we are elected to serve. his resignation could spark further rebellion as mps start voting on crucial legislation. this bill is about the process of leaving the eu. on some aspects, like the future customs arrangements, the government has compromised to try to get the support it needs. but on others, it's still under pressure, particularly on how much power parliament should have if mps don't like the final brexit deal. as they sat down to debate, a
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warning... no member of this house, whatever opinion he or she holds, should be threatened because of it. mps didn't seem to be holding back. some suggesting the government was trying to stop parliament having a say. is it not the case that his amendment to that lords amendment 19 gives his government a passport to ta ke gives his government a passport to take this country out of the european union with no deal, with this house having had no say on it whatsoever. there was some support on the tory benches for that view. from those who want mps to have a greater role in the process. in the past, any suggestion that parliament should hand over absolute discretion to any government to handle such things would have entreated with absolute outrage. but others in the same party disagreed, backing the government's position. it is not the
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problem that all of these amendments proposed by my right honourable friend the member for beaconsfield and others make no deal more likely because they give every incentive to the european commission not to agree toa the european commission not to agree to a deal and therefore they bind the government and we will end up with the worst possible result, therefore they should be resisting. my right honourable friend goes to the heart of the problem, but we have to consider anything done in this house and done in the other house, anything past, will actually have a very serious effect on the negotiating strategy of the other side. so it's not only outside parliament where opinion is sharply divided but inside too, and what happens here, today and tomorrow, will shape the next steps of the brexit process. our chief political correspondent vicki young
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is in parliament's central lobby. this was always going to be a difficult day for theresa may but the resignation of phillip lee doesn't help. yes, and that's partly because there are people walking around here, looking around and thinking is there going to be another minister who might resign last remark because there are several who probably agree with what anna soubry is saying in private and that was her point there, passionately made, that there are people coming up to her in the corridors saying we are really behind you. but they themselves cannot do it unless they resign, which is why although people won't have heard of phillip lee, it is significant because he wouldn't be able to live with himself if he didn't do the right thing is he saw it, as he put it. in the last few minutes it seems that we might be edging towards some kind of compromise. i think the government are fearful they might not win this vote on a meaningful vote. remember,
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this is all about the say parliament has over what happens in the next few months. what is upsetting to many in the house of commons is the idea there might be no deal scenario, that the uk willjust leave the eu with no deal whatsoever. they want to stop that happening and that's what they are talking here today so we have had some exchanges between government ministers and rebel back benches on the tory side trying to inch towards some kind of compromise to stop that defeat happening. it is unclear at the moment whether that will be enough but remember, we have been hearing today from dominic grieve, a senior conservative on the backbenches. he wanted the proposal brought forward which would mean the government has to come to the house of commons within seven days of no deal scenario happening. they would have to lay a motion and there would bea have to lay a motion and there would be a vote. the government has refused to accept that but in the last few minutes they said they will talk to dominic grieve tomorrow about that, tomorrow incidentally
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and not today. they are willing to carry on a dialogue to maybe accept some of that before it goes back to the house of lords. we will find out in the next couple of hours whether that miss, their word, is enough to stop conservatives rebelling. but in the meantime, they could well lose the meantime, they could well lose the vote. that's clearly what they must think might be happening because they wouldn't be offering concessions if they thought they had it in the bag. several are saying to me this could come down to the labour side. we talk a lot about the splits on the conservative benches. on the labour side there are some who are very pro—brexit. there could be eight or nine of them. in the past they haven't voted that way with the government, today the signs are that maybe there will be more labour mps possibly willing to back the government on this over brexit. if they do, that could swing things the way of the government but of course if you are the government
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party managers, that is not really good enough. you don't want to be relying on the opposition to get your stuff through the house of commons. what time do we need to be watching for this vote? we are looking at 4:15pm for the votes to start. you are never quite sure how many will be voted on so it could be the first vote we hear is the meaningful vote once, it could be later the napa pretty much for 15 pm. let's pick up on this and i'm joined by andrewjenkins mp. how confident are you that the government will win this later, because as vicky was explaining, there is a chance the government is saying to dominic grieve we may talk about the proposal that we can't talk about today. it was different from last night in the 1922. last night i was
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areassured, there was ministers there, brexiteer and remains. areassured, there was ministers there, brexiteerand remains. last night was a rare show of unity. i'm surprised that these reports are coming out. we have a resignation. philip lee resigning does not help. absolutely. i can't say anything about resigning, i resigned from my pps position. i respect philip, he isa pps position. i respect philip, he is a great guy and i respect anybody who sticks with their principles. but we did stand on that manifesto last year, which you know, ensured that the will of the british people, we would make sure brexit happened. the issue of the meaningful vote, the irony, some would say the hypocrisy of people saying, when we decide as a government what we will do with our negotiations, we will not give mps a final say. there are
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those who say, where is the we will ta ke those who say, where is the we will take our country back and make our decisions. where's that argument gone? well, we can't leave by consensus. we're in a democracy though. but at the end of the day, the public voted, more than a million people voted for break the deadlock than remain. so we have got to —— voted for brexit than remain. they trusted the conservatives to ta ke they trusted the conservatives to take us forward. we didn't win a majority, but you know they trusted us more than labour to deliver it. we have got to damn well got on with it. we have been talking for two yea rs, it. we have been talking for two years, you say we must get on with it. there will be hollow laughter saying, politiciansjust it. there will be hollow laughter saying, politicians just aren't getting on wit. we don't seem to be moving forward at all. i'm as frustrated as anybody. it is complex. the difficulty is our prime minister, theresa may, she has a difficult job, minister, theresa may, she has a difficultjob, whoever was in this position at the moment as prime minister has a difficultjob,
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because look at the maths of it, we have more people who actually in parliament, both sides, of opposition and conservatives, who are more remain supporters, it does not necessarily echo what the public vote for. that is where it is difficult. she has a difficultjob. but this is why i resigned from the... from being a pps, iwant to concentrate on the brexit committee. there is 21 mps on the committee and all the reports from there are negative. i think it is about time we started talking things up and had a positive vision for our country. you talk of positive visions, you look at a couple of newspapers and we have heard others in the house today, saying they feel threatened by the mood that there is. this is turning very nasty. i think it's
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a lwa ys turning very nasty. i think it's always been nasty. i get the same opposite things attacking me on social media. we know it's been very divisive from the referendum,pain, people are passionate and quite rightly so, which ever side you sit with the argument, but the fact is the public, 17.4 million voted to leave. we must get on with it. everybody should be brexiters now. it was a democratic vote. if the government losing this afternoon... i don't think we will. i was confident at the 1922 yesterday and i have met labour people, labour mps throughout the day, who are telling me they're going to vote with the government. fair play to them. that is very brave of them. they're listening to their constituents. i wish all mps would do the same. listening to their constituents. i wish all mps would do the samem they lose, if they do, how damaged
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is theresa may? i think she will brush off and just carry on in the way... the spirit that we have got to have when you're a prime minister. thank you. plenty more to come and we are expecting that vote later on today. lots more reaction. i'm speaking to vince cable later now time for the sport and hugh, i guess with start with football? well england will land in st petersburg before about a 45 minute drive to reppina — and it's there as they see there home for the next 16 days at least — that the reality and the size of the task ahead will hit them. they were in very happy and relaxed mood as they boarded their plane at birmingham airport. all smiles and thumbs up and cuddles. you don't have to pack your socks
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and pants, you get everything laid out for you. forfour and pants, you get everything laid out for you. for four weeks of your life you can't afford to be bored. whatever you want is provided for you. you are here to play football for a month of your life. that is not much to ask. that is the message from former captain alan shearer. saying the players won't be bored. well repina seems a lovely place i have to say simon but there may not be a lot to do. it's on the coast of the gulf of finland and inhabited by around 2 and a half thousand people and although there will be a lot of travel involved, the town is temperate and a little rainy. similar conditions to the united kingdom, so it may well suit gareth southgate's team. sports news correspondent david is there for us. there's plenty going on inside the hotel set up for them w games rooms
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and leisure facilities. england have invested in the swimming pool to bring it up to scratch and gym facilities and not far from here bring it up to scratch and gym facilities and not farfrom here is the coast. they could take a walk down to the beach. i don't think we will see any fan fair around the hotel. st petersburg not far if they wa nt hotel. st petersburg not far if they want a day trip. that is where many of theirfamilies want a day trip. that is where many of their families will be staying. then train at the local base not far from here, that will be open to the media and local school—children and then the preparations hot up ahead of the first match with tunisia on monday. scotland's women's bid to stay in the running to qualify for the world cup isn't going well. they're1—0 down to poland at half—time. they sit second in the group and
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only the top team will go through. former world heavyweight champion david haye has announced his retirement from boxing. it follows his defeat to tony bellew last month — for the second time in succession. in a post on social media, the former unified cruiserweight world champion said it's the right time to end his career, as of 12thjune 2018, i am no longer a professional boxer. something i've been since the age of ten. it's a strange thought, but it's a thought i'm very comfortable with. as i've reviewed my life and my physicality, and it's not what it needs to be to compete at world level as a heavyweight. staying with boxing and deontay wilder says he has agreed terms with anthonyjoshua's team over a unification bout in the uk. wilder holds the wbc heavyweight belt, the only title that joshua doesn't have. england's one—day captain eoin morgan says his side will be trying to take the positives
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from their defeat by scotland at the weekend. his team take on australia at the oval tomorrow and morgan says they still have a lot to learn ahead of next years world cup. we need to expose some of our weaknesses in order to be in contention for the world cup this time next year. we cannotjust keep cruising along and doing ok orjust about getting over the line. we want to learn as we go along between now and next year, and there is still a lot to learn. that's all the sport for now. england arriving in russia. we should see them leave the plane shortly. thank you very much. so what exactly is the house of commons debating, and what could the significance of today be? chris morris from our reality check team explains. so the eu withdrawal bill — the domestic legislation that will formalise uk exit from the european union — is back in the house of commons for further consideration, after the government was defeated
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15 times in the house of lords. now it wants to reverse 14 of those votes on things such as specifying the time and date of exit, or on the eu's charter of fundamental rights — either outright or through new amendments which have been proposed by the government or by backbench mps. and these are the three votes that will be most closely watched — on what's called a meaningful vote in parliament, on a customs union and on the european economic area. let's have a look at them one—by—one. first the issue of a meaningful vote. this is about the withdrawal agreement the uk is negotiating with the eu. the government has suggested that a vote on the deal, later this year or early next, will be take it or leave it. either accept it or see the uk leave the eu with no deal at all. the lords amendment would give parliament the power to stop that, and give the house of commons the right to decide
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what happens next if the withdrawal bill is rejected. compromise language has been suggested but if the government loses this vote, it will show that parliament is asserting more control over the brexit process. then there are two amendments about the uk's future economic relationship with the eu. the lords amendment on a customs union is a little woolly — requiring the government to show parliament by october 31st this year that it has tried to negotiate membership of a customs union. prospects of a government defeat appear to have receded with the tabling of a compromise amendment with even vaguer language about a customs arrangement. so the real test may come with amendments to the new trade and customs bills which are due back in the commons next month and are much more explicit about staying in a customs union. there's also an amendment on the european economic area. which would force the government to make remaining in the eea,
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and therefore in the single market — a negotiating objective. it won't pass, partly because labour is telling its mps to abstain. but dozens of labour backbenchers could vote for it anyway, as will some tory rebels. that will give an indication of the strength of support for single market membership in further parliamentary battles to come. this isn't the last word by a long shot. but the eu withdrawal bill, which will probably receive royal assent next month, is a crucial part of the brexit process. and this is one of parliament's opportunities to have its say. thank you. i want to take you to russia, because that is where the england football team have just arrived. we're getting pictures of them. you can see the door is open. look at the timing of this, as they start disembarking the plane. our correspondent is watching the pictures. these are, unedited
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pictures, so forgive the odd angle change. hugh, there is increasing anticipation, despite the youth of the team ? anticipation, despite the youth of the team? yes there is. they're led off the plane. the players at least led off the plane by their captain, harry kane. you saw a few faces. there is danny rose, the spurs left back. on his phone, patiently waiting on that flight, the england players have been taking off from birmingham, looked in relaxed mood. you can see rahim sterling, trailed by trent alexander—arnold. you can see rahim sterling, trailed by trent alexander-arnold. dele alli andjamie by trent alexander-arnold. dele alli and jamie vardy. it seems they're getting a good reception in st petersburg. there was a big team waits on the tarmac. they will have
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a further journey to waits on the tarmac. they will have a furtherjourney to get their base about a 45—minute drive ahead of them. then they should be used to these flights, because there will be a lot of travel for england over the next 16 days. their first game a lot of travel for england over the next 16 days. theirfirst game is in volvograd. the second game is over a thousand mileses away. so they should be used to some long journeys before their games. they don't play for a week. so they have some time to settle in before their next journey. be if they go all the way and win, something all the england fa ns and win, something all the england fans are hoping for. they will travel well over 9,000 miles. you can see them transferring on to a bus. i'm sure they will be going through customs in a moment. you can see the england captain, harry kane there. i'm sure he will be doing a
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few interviews shortly. but england have arrived in st petersburg for the world cup. thank you for that. we are going to pull away and take you to the house of commons just a moment ago, philip lee, who resigned as minister this morning, was on his feet. let's hear from as minister this morning, was on his feet. let's hearfrom kate hoey. people want to see brexit being done well. brexit being done well means leaving the european union and leaving the european union and leaving it properly. getting out of the single currency, out of the single market, not being in the custom union. if we stay in, we are not really leaving the eu. now, the lords amendment i want to say a few words, i want to very clearly urge this house to send amendment 19 back to the house of lords. i spent a very, i was going to say
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interesting, but not particularly interesting, but not particularly interest bg, few hours reading through entire house of lords debate. i'm sure most of the collea g u es debate. i'm sure most of the colleagues have. i regret that many of the leading lords made it very clear that they wanted to stop brexit. i believe that in this amendment dressed up as it is in the words of parliamentary democracy and using parliamentary democracy as the key to why it's been put, is actually not right. and not true. and if that means being disingenuous, if that the word we have to use, i would say it is disingenuous. i would like to say a stronger word. but i will give way. did she knows the honourable gentleman talked of the rights of parliament and didn't talk of the duties of parliament and the duty of this parliament is to implement the
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wishes of the british people. this parliament is to implement the wishes of the british peoplelj agree with the honourable member and i think the lord's amendment, the people will see that this is really, noi people will see that this is really, no i won't. this is really about actually trying to go back on brexit. they can say what it is, but what they want to but it is actually about reversing it. because the reality is that we want to take back control, but taking back control was about the people of this country taking back control. and it was about complying with our constitutional duty as a parliamentary democracy and that means, and! parliamentary democracy and that means, and i just find parliamentary democracy and that means, and ijust find it absolutely amazing that anyone would think that the european union commission, that we have seen trying to be as negative as possible, as difficult as possible, that they would really think that once we start negotiating, knowing that if at the end of the day, we are going to, whatever deal it is, and if we don't
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manage to get a very good deal, we say no, that then we would be sending it back to renegotiate. do you really think, that the european commission would actually give us a better deal knowing that if they don't give us a good deal and the more objective they are, the more likely it is that it would be sent back to them to renegotiate. the reality is the european union commission do not want us to leave. they do not want to give us a good deal. they want to punish us and this amendment if it goes through, i believe, actually is a recipe for the eu to actually try to get a no deal so we will then have go back cap in hand and ask for changes. and what they really want is those
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changes to stay in the single market, stay in the customs unions, still have the court ofjustice, to keep paying our money and paying more and more and to reverse the decision. so mr speaker i think what ever is said today, this is really about whether we believe that we give the people the right to have their say. we said it in the let hear the went to everyone costing a huge amount of money, this is your decision, the government will implement what you decide. i will give way to the member. kate hoey there. let's talk about what is going on. i'm joined now by lucy fisher who's the political reporter for the observer and jack blanchard, editor at politico's london playbook. what did you make of the argument that what we're seeing is a replay of the referendum. there is a lot of frustration. yes the eu withdrawal
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bill is the flagship legislation, we need to enshrine eu law into the uk. this needs to be done properly. we have had a hundred hours of debate in the commons and in the lords and today we are coming down to the crunch time. there did seem to be some confidence yesterday in the government about the vote. you feel it going away with the wind? yes, it is wavering. there are 15 amendments being discussed. the government was confident that the two sticky ones on the the customs arrangements and the meaningful vote, they got the numbers on both, but that is not the case that we are seeing today. and extraordinary scenes earlier as robert buckland, the solicitor—general was negotiating with dominic grieve who, tabled his own compromise amendment, right in fronts of mps. it is an interesting
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time. we're talking about the conservative rebels, but other parties will make a difference in the vote? that's right. you may see ironically the government is saved bya numberof ironically the government is saved by a number of labour leave supporters like kate hoey who vote with the government. but it is on a knife edge and the scenes are amazing. we're watching, you can't see it, but the chief whip is scurrying back and forwards, going up scurrying back and forwards, going up to rebels, suggesting things, coming back down. everyone is on their phones. there is horse—trading going on all the time. it is not often that parliament is exciting but it is today. the dominic grieve amendment that was suggested, the government said we can talk to dominic grieve maybe tomorrow. it gives the impression they may expect to lose this. they are certainly worried and doing anything they can
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to pick off even one two of the rebels. every vote makes a difference, which is why the resignation of the minister makes a difference. you may find a compromise is done or a way of kicking the can down the road. they are will starting soon. lucy, that resignation, that changed the atmosphere here? that's right, there was a reasonable confidence from no ten before we entered the commons today and an unexpected resignation from philip lee, a pro—remain minister. a lot of talk so far has been about brexiteers resigning. it was a shock and may have given courage to those conservative mps inclined towards remain who may be thinking about rebelling on the meaningful vote amendment. we have been describing this as a crisis, a critical day for theresa may. if she loses this vote, how damaged is she?
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massively damaged. there is a lot of votes going to happen today and tomorrow and maybe next week. but one vote matters is the issue of the meaningful vote f if this goes through, theresa may has lost control of the brexit process. it has never happened to a government before in a such a big negotiation. if that happens, all bets are off. i don't know where we go from there. i was spoking to one of clerks of commons, he said it would be unprecedented for this to happen. thank you. it has turned very cold here. we are still wait fogger that vote. it has been pushed back by about half a hour. but around a quarter to five. that critical vote will be, the meaningful vote, we should get the result for that then. let's talk to vince cable, leader of the liberal democrats, thank you for
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joining us. you were watching, how do you sense the mood in there?|j do you sense the mood in there?” think the dynamics have changed today. there was a reasonable confidence in the government that they would get things through. it is very obvious that people are unhappy with the way ministers are handling the idea of a meaningful vote and there could be a substantial rebellion. i think the resignation this morning of the government minister, dr lee, on the basis that we should be pursuing a public vote on the final deal, i think that again has undercovered the fact that beneath the leadership in both tory and labour parties there is a lot of unhappiness with the way government is sliding towards a disastrous outcome. as a government the last thing you need is a ministerial resignation. yes, he is not major figure in government, but he has timed his exit effectively. the
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people of his constituency will be pleased with the way their mp has made his voice felt. the issue of the meaningful vote, why is it so important? because we need to have a mechanism in parliament to handle the situation where if negotiations break down and we're left with no deal and a chaotic situation, the government has accepted the principle that parliament needs to have a vote on the outcome. it has not determined what we do in that scenario. nobody is suggesting that 650 mp5 scenario. nobody is suggesting that 650 mps should set out then to negotiate with the eu. that is almost what the suggestion is. aren't you undermining the negotiations. no, neither of those are true. parliament will give a directive to government as to how to proceed. it is not clear that the government's negotiating position is weakened. the eu governments have their own parliaments to consider. they know there are bitter and deep
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divisions in the uk and in the government. that doesn't change anything. i we all we are trying to ensure is if there is a break down, there is a mechanism where parliament can assume authority. two yea rs parliament can assume authority. two years after that referendum vote, ten months until we leave, where is your assessment as to where we are with this? it is a mess. partly because the government is internally divided, as is the labour party. i think the government went too quickly when they were not ready and set out too concretely in the lancaster house speech the decision that we would leave the customs union, the single market. they didn't have to do that. that could have been part of negotiating process. they're now in difficulty and the scenario of a no deal or a messy and the scenario of a no deal or a m essy ba d and the scenario of a no deal or a messy bad outcome is now all too real. even whatever position you
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have, i think we want this to be done well. you're voting against are you? in terms of meaningful vote.” shall be voting against the government and proposing that the public should have a say on the final deal. at the moment, despite the resignation of dr lee, there isn't a majority for that. i think as time passes people will realise thatis as time passes people will realise that is the only way of dealing with it. what do you say to people who say, just get on wit. i hear some of that. but the problem is it is a complex process. those people who promised at the outset that this was simple and we could do it overnight we re simple and we could do it overnight were just simple and we could do it overnight werejust dreaming simple and we could do it overnight were just dreaming or dishonest. simple and we could do it overnight werejust dreaming or dishonest. it is very ce kated and the more —— complicate ed and the more people
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are recoiling from the whole exercise. thank you. more from westminster and the latest from singapore. first the weather with matt taylor. cloudier and fresher today, but eastern scotland warmer. and sunny spells in the afternoon for many. temperatures more typical for many. temperatures more typical for the time of year. some showers in the south and westing. —— west. staying dry for most tonight. the cloud disappears and with a fresher air mass it will be a cooler night, temperatures down into single figures. a pleasant start to tomorrow. the commute should come with some sunshine in central and eastern areas. england and wales the odd shower. most places staying dry and feeling warm. scotland and northern ireland however best of sunshine in the morning, clouding
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over with rain, strengthening wind. that rain comes with some stormy winds to take us there i the night into thursday morning and there could be some travel disruption in the north. in hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 4pm: mps will vote on the eu withdrawal bill in the next hour. earlier thejustice minister philip lee resigned to speak out against the government's brexit policy. iurge my i urge my parliamentary colleagues to follow my lead, give our constituents that how it needs to leave our children a legacy of which
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we can all be proud. a handshake in history, donald trump and kim jong—un start a "new chapter" in relations between the us and north korea. ajoint—declaration included a pledge from mr kim to work to rid the korean peninsula of nuclear weapons. people are going to be very impressed, people are going to be very happy and we are going to take ca re of very happy and we are going to take care of a very big and very dangerous problem for the world. a 23—year—old man has admitted plotting to murder an mp with a machete. he is among six men who deny being members of a banned far—right group. coming up on afternoon live all the sport with hugh. england have arrived in saint petersburg, they are making their way to their base camp for this summer ‘s world cup and captain harry kane has just said they are stepping into unknown territory. more from him later in the hour. and continuing the theme of unknown
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territory, what is going on with the weather? most are dry, the story continues now but by the end of tomorrow some unusually wet and windy weather heading our way. details later. also coming up. we will have more on what is happening here at westminster and i will be talking to somebody in singapore about the importance of what happened earlier today. that's still to come. you can see in the background even other local demonstrators, forgive me if! other local demonstrators, forgive me if i get drowned out at some point this afternoon but i think it is on the card is given the level of interest is in our broadcasting position. this is afternoon live —
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i'm simon mccoy in westminster — where we are waiting for what could be one of the most crucial votes in the brexit process. mps are arguing right now about how big a say parliament should have on the eventual outcome of the negotiations with brussels. as you might expect passions have been running high — earlier todayjustice minister phillip lee resigned his post so he could speak his mind. mps are expected to vote in the next hour or so, and in the end it will come down to how many conservative mps decide to vote against theresa may. alex forsyth has been following the debate so far. no brexit, no racist eu exit. on the streets of london last night, protesters made their feelings clear, an anti—brexit vigil. the question, whether some mps are prepared to make a similar stand today. this morning, the brexit secretary was chipper, despite the possibility of a difficult day ahead. laughter. he knows not all of his party agrees with the government's brexit plans, including this minister, who today quit his job so he could
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speak out against brexit. i believe the evidence now shows that the brexit policy our government is currently pursuing, on the basis of the 2016 referendum, is detrimental to the people we are elected to serve. his resignation could spark further rebellion as mps start voting on crucial legislation. this bill is about the process of leaving the eu. on some aspects, like the future customs arrangements, the government has compromised to try to get the support it needs. but on others, it's still under pressure, particularly on how much power parliament should have if mps don't like the final brexit deal. no member of this house, whatever opinions he or she holds, should be
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threatens because of it. mps didn't seem to be holding back, some suggesting the government was trying to stop parliament was having a say. is it not the case that his amendment to that lords amendment 19 gives his government a passport to ta ke gives his government a passport to take this country out of the european union with no deal, with this house having had no say on it whatsoever? there was some support on the tory benches for that view whilst others in the same party disagreed. meanwhile the government warned its own mps that boarding against this legislation would undermine negotiations in brussels. we have two consider anything done in this house and done in the other house will have a very serious effect on the negotiating strategy. and then perhaps fearing a loss the government give some ground midway through, promising to reconsider
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parliament's role through, promising to reconsider pa rliament‘s role in through, promising to reconsider parliament's role in the final brexit deal. by indicating my position on a key part of it i am indicating that the government is willing to engage positively ahead of the lords stages. it wasn't clear if that was enough to stop tories rebelling. if the house makes the concession of allowing the dialogue to continue and i can see the merit of that happening, it's got to be donein of that happening, it's got to be done in good faith. inside extraordinary tussles in the tory party played out in public while outside the debate raged. opinion over brexit is a sharply divided as ever. that debate is well and truly under way. passions have been getting heated in the last half—hour. we had a very strong argument from anna soubry who was talking earlier
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saying she was getting fed up with people who she knew would be voting with the government today but were saying to her in private they wanted her to continue with her campaign. as you can see the debate continues. i will keep an eye on that for you. our chief political correspondent vicki young is in parliament's central lobby. it's getting very passionate and there are, there is an awful lot at sta ke. there are, there is an awful lot at stake. yeah, all sorts of toing and froing going on. it's very like the vote back in december back when there were tory rebels expecting a concession from the government. it did not quite come, it was not given, then the government was defeated. very similar things going on, we heard in the chamber at the government are trying to make concessions to the rebels. in the last few minutes most of them had
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left the chamber, it seems like the representatives for the prime minister are talking to them about what happens next and remember this is all about what happens if there is all about what happens if there isa no is all about what happens if there is a no deal scenario. there are many people in the house of commons who don't want to be forced just to accept it. they want to have some say in what happens in the circumstances and what happens beyond that. we've ended up in a position now where the government has said it's willing to have tomorrow, not today, tomorrow with some of the conservative rebels about making some changes which could then go to the house of lords. that would be good enough for some, they say they don't want to have to just take it on trust, they want the government to accept what dominic grieve the former conservative attorney general is suggesting, what he wants is a promise, something written down that the government will except his amendment that within seven days of a no deal happening there will be a motion put
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before the house of commons by the government on which there will be a vote. this is all about parliament wanting to not be cut out of the process if we end up any no deal scenario. we'll have to see whether that's going to be good for those conservatives. we know of course earlier today the resignation by a former minister, he will be looking behind him and saying i have given up my behind him and saying i have given up my misty the career progress, what are you guys doing? you have talked a lot about rebelling and getting safeguards in the bill, now ‘s the time to do it. he will look to see how many will follow him and at the moment it's not entirely clear. but there is no question that the government whips are extremely anxious, they cannot be sure they have the numbers. they will not be giving concessions at the last minute, they would not be walking up and down the steps whispering to various people on their own sides if they thought they had this in the bag. they certainly don't and that is why as ever with minutes to go until the first beginning of the sports we still don't know what's
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going to happen. the lib dem brexit spokesman is on his feet at the moment, let'sjoin him and then we will come back to you. the brexiters are so scared at the concept of testing the will of the people. we've heard a lot about the will of the people and i must say it is in fact now the only reason the government can deployed for supporting brexit. if we look at economic grounds we know from the impact assessments it is going to do is damage. diplomatic grounds are friends despair with what we are doing. security grounds we hear threats and counter threats about not delivering on the security agenda. savings, we know there will not be any because amongst other things the government will have to set upa things the government will have to set up a whole series of parallel institutions doing the same thing as the eu ones. and on trade do we think we will get a huge boost from trade when trump is there as a protectionist president? so 19 a
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provides the people with the opportunity to have their views known on this subject against a background in which much has changed since the referendum vote two years ago. it will give them a same on the final deal, something they are entitled to, that they deserve and i think would put this issue to bed once and for all. the key difference between the lords on the government amendments is that in the event are no deal scenario the government amendment requires a statement whilst the lords amendment effectively grants parliament power toissue effectively grants parliament power to issue negotiating directions. it looks attracted to say that the government cannot deliver the commons should be able to step in. but on these procedural amendments i do see the other side of the argument. its government than negotiate treaties under the terms of the royal prerogative and it is the executive which governs and i would not wish to undermine this
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concept except in the most extreme circumstances. and that mr speaker is what i have been weighing up over re ce nt is what i have been weighing up over recent days. i also recognise the government proposal precedes the lord's request that parliament should gain a legal right to veto an international agreement. i would should gain a legal right to veto an international agreement. iwould be the first time this is allowed in law in the uk. it moves into line with the european parliament. so it would be fair to say that in the la st would be fair to say that in the last few days government has gone some way to address concerns on this issue. in my considerations i have been influenced by the prime minister who i sincerely believe once the best deal possible for the uk and who is asking to go to the june meeting with the freest hand possible. but if the prime minister gets the deal this country needs, even gets the deal this country needs, even with the government concession, there is still no plan b if parliament were then to reject the deal which is why i think the new compromise tabled last night by my right honourable friend moves towards the balance required to
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retain both constitutional integrity and practical requirements. i was very pleased therefore to hear the secretary of state say that this issue would be looked at again in the lords and the solicitor general to reinforce that. there has been two great dramas being played out, the father of the house said how do we asa the father of the house said how do we as a representative system of government implement a referendum result? but there's been a drama on this side of eyes as well. two thirds of labour constituencies voted to leave. one of our great problems, i'm notjust, i'm not disputing, if you want to give way and give me another minute, give me another minute. i'm not trying to impute anybody‘s motives. but when we came to sign up for the referendum we normally have four
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sides of a four paper, additions to the vote. i give way. i am grateful to the honourable gentleman, can i just say with regard to the issues we've been discussing, that i and the government are looking very carefully at amendments which might be tabled in the other place and that will of course be the product of any discussion i have with the right honourable gentleman in the memberfor right honourable gentleman in the member for beaconsfield. for the referendum, a small telephone directory of people who generally talk about in a disdainful way as saying they have nowhere else to go. my saying they have nowhere else to go. my real concern is what happens to representing those key labour interests ? representing those key labour interests? i hope there is going to be these further discussions and to die in the process of coming to a good resolution and making sure the majority of the two thirds of the labour constituencies are well represented, may i be part of any of
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those private discussions.” represented, may i be part of any of those private discussions. i want to say how grateful i am the lords have given the consideration may have to this bell and improved it considerably in sending it back to us. i do except that the solicitor general has given an important concession today and i would have supported the lords amendment had that concession not been made. i will give way. i think it would be helpful to the house if she could speu helpful to the house if she could spell out in a whiteboard detail exactly what the consensus is? time is up. order. we are all governed by the programme motion. which the house voted to agree. i don't vote in these matters, the house adopted the programme motion. i must now
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bring to a conclusion proceedings on the first group. the question is that this house disagrees with the lords in their amendments 110, as many have that opinion is a aye. and of the contrary no. clear the lobby! mps now go to vote. it was interesting hearing from the because while everyone talks about conservative rebels, labour mps will play a crucial role in how this goes. frank field is one of those very pro—brexit, he will certainly vote with the government on all of this but i think more significantly right at the end, in the dying moments of that debate, antionette sandbach who has been a thorn in the side of the government over brexit has pretty much said she is swayed by the government's concession given
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this afternoon. i think if she is happy it will bring over a lot of conservative rebels so it might be after a lot of toing and froing all afternoon, right at the last minute, we know the prime minister's support of the private secretary took out some of those remainders on the tory side, went out and had a chat and it could well be the government have managed to avoid defeat. we will have to wait and see that i think right at the end a crucial intervention by a leading conservative rebel saying that she seems to be happy the government has given enough ground. we will have to see how many on her side feel the same. in the first vote you can see lots of people running around. there are many conservative labour mps, they are all here today, almost all of them, 650, voting for the next
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couple of hours, running around behind me. this is the first vote, not one we expect the government to be defeated on. it's pretty technical about giving power to a committee of mps's rather than the government having power over secondary legislation. each vote ta kes secondary legislation. each vote takes about 15 minutes. the significant one we think will come third, in about half an hour or so. interesting, i spoke to her only this morning, sarah williston has said on twitter at she wanted to back the dominant breed amendment that he put through last night, she has just that he put through last night, she hasjust said on that he put through last night, she has just said on twitter she has decided to back the government, she has been persuaded by the argument they are making that they will have further discussions on this. as you we re further discussions on this. as you were just saying that would seem to suggest that this is swinging the government ‘s way. suggest that this is swinging the government 's way. if sarah williston and antionette sandbach say they are happy, to me that will be pretty definite the government
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will win. there could still be some rebels but it feels as if the government, because they have conceded a certain amount, they might get through this unscathed. what they have conceded is they will have formal official talks tomorrow with people like dominic grieve to bring forward some changes in the house of lords. do not forget this is what we talk about, ping—pong. the house of lords putting something into the bill, the house of commons will take it out again and what the government are saying is they are willing to put something back in when it goes back to the house of lords, to give mp's and meaningful vote. that's what they will talk about, they will decide on the wording and it will go to the house of lords. it might sound like the tory rebels are just giving in here, they have a fallback position of course because if some reason the government decides they will not do that, we won't have the talks
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tomorrow, the house of lords then still has the option of changing it and putting it back in. so they have and putting it back in. so they have a fail—safe if you like. but it seems the government again at the last minute, because they simply didn't have the numbers, have had to concede something and we will know exactly what that is in the coming days. is now a good time to go and do other news? yeah, i think so! thank you! it was a summit — quite like any other. donald trump and kim jong—un made history today — the first sitting us president, to meet a north korean leader. the first handshakes were followed by a face to face meeting — culminating with the signing of a document, promising a new relationship between the two countries. the agreement included a pledge from kim jong—un to work to rid the korean peninsula of nuclear weapons. later, president trump said, the us would suspend its military exercises, that have infuriated north korea.
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karishma vaswani reports. a new dawn, or a false dawn? what have we just witnessed in singapore, and what happens next? a few months ago, a summit would have been inconceivable. north korea was racing towards a full nuclear capability. donald trump was issuing threats and insults. he is a sick puppy. little rocket man. but the dynamics have changed, thanks in part to the efforts of south korea's president, moonjae—in. his highly symbolic meeting with kim jong—un setting the stage for today's summit. there were gestures, too. north korea destroying tunnels once used to test nuclear warheads, and allowing three american citizens held in the north to go home. but the prelude is over. the real talks have now begun. what are we to make of the first signed document? donald trump and kim jong—un have agreed to establish a new relationship. they say they will join
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their efforts to build a lasting and stable peace. and north korea agrees to work towards the company to work towards the complete denuclearisation of the korean peninsula. this is no treaty of versailles, and having only a few weeks to prepare it, it never was going to be. it's headings under which they are going to have to agree some substance. on denuclearisation, on a peace agreement, on the remains of the prisoners of war. interestingly, it doesn't mention economics and sanctions, but the president said in his press conference that they were going to try and help north korea grow economically. and interestingly he also said they would end the military exercises, something north korea's been seeking for a very long time. president moon seems delighted by today's images, but the south korean leader says this isjust the beginning. there may be many difficulties ahead. china, too, seems pleased. beijing will need to play a crucial role as this process unfolds. translation: today, that the two countries' highest leaders can sit together and have equal talks, has very important
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and positive meaning. donald trump giving his new—found friend a glimpse inside the presidential limousine. where are the two men heading now? almost certainly for a long and bumpy ride. paul adams, bbc news. let's show you the pictures of the historic handshake in singapore earlier, the first time a sitting us president has met the dictator leader of north korea. a moment of history, the significance of which was being pointed out by paul adams there, we
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cannot yet gauge. but the fact that these two are meeting would have been unthinkable just a few months ago when these leaders were swapping insults rather than handshakes. more from singapore later on. other news now: an alleged member of a banned neo—nazi group has pleaded guilty to preparing acts of terrorism — in relation to a plot to kill a labour mp. jack renshaw, who's 23, admitted buying a machete with the intention of killing rosie cooper, and making threats to kill a police officer. he's one of 6 men who deny being members of the group national action. our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford reports. jack renshaw, 23 years old, a man accused of being a neo—nazi, who today dramatically admitted planning to kill a labour mp and threatening to kill a police officer. the prosecution say he'd already bought a machete, a kind described by its manufacturers as "19 inches of unprecedented piercing and slashing power. " and christopher lythgoe is the man
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accused of being the secret leader of the group, who encouraged him to carry out the murder. we let these people destroy us, and they are still destroying us now. along with four other men, they are charged with being members of national action, a group banned by the home secretary as a virulently racist terrorist organisation after it celebrated the killing of the mpjo cox. with all six defendants listening intently, the prosecutor, duncan atkinson qc, told the jury that the plan to kill another mp was discussed at a pub in warrington last summer. the group met at this table upstairs in the big window at the friar penketh pub on the 1st ofjuly. the prosecution say that jack renshaw told the group that his plan was to murder his local mp, rosie cooper, take some hostages and then kill a female detective who had been investigating him. the plan to kill rosie cooper was uncovered because the antiracism organisation hope not hate had
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a mole in the group, robbie mullen, who was also there at the pub that night. according to robbie mullen, jack renshaw wanted to carry at the murder in the name of national action, and that night christopher lythgoe gave his approval. christopher lythgoe denies that and all six men deny being members of national action after it was banned. daniel sandford, bbc news, at the old bailey. before we get a weather update lets go into the house of commons which is filling up, saw david davis, top left of the screen with dominic grieve, two central figures of the last 24 hours. the government heading to this crucial vote on the meaningful vote as its call. as vicki young was saying, the mood music has changed with the suggestion that those tory rebels
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who this morning were saying they would fought against the government, two of them at least have said in the last few minutes they are now minded to side with the government. so we will keep and ion that and we will be going there for the crucial vote results but now i think it's time for the weather. good afternoon, a few showers down in westminster but it's been dry up the road at broadcasting house and many it's another dry day. colour across the country but pleasantly in the sunshine. let's take you to northern france during last 24 hours because here we have seen record—breaking rainfall. the wettest 24 period for some parts, towards paris, rain lingering threat. they have had our wet weather while we have been com pletely weather while we have been completely dry. across some parts of
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western scotland, stornoway in particular, 22 days without rain. but we are about to switch things around and at last somewhere it weather on the way. the satellite imagery from this afternoon, this strip of cloud developing bump in it as well, it's all being fed by a jet strea m as well, it's all being fed by a jet stream overhead which will wind it up stream overhead which will wind it up intoa stream overhead which will wind it up into a big area of low pressure, for the time being a ridge of high pressure, where you have got showers today they will fade away into tonight. most places becoming dry and clear as the clouds departs. after a fresh data night will be cooler, temperatures down into single figures for many as we start wednesday morning. sunny starred for the vast majority. cloud gradually increasing, further south it could bubble up to produce showers. sunshine tanning hazy in eastern scotla nd sunshine tanning hazy in eastern scotland but western scotland and northern ireland turning grey. the wind picking up but that arrival after three weeks of rain into west
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of scotla nd after three weeks of rain into west of scotland in particular. temperatures tomorrow high across england and wales but it will feel cooler in the west of scotland and here will have the wettest weather into wednesday night. rain in the initial feature but then as that clears and into showery conditions on the back age, we will see the strongest winds. m2 thursday morning showers rattling across england and wales, showers returning to scotland and northern ireland, northern england gets the strongest winds. 40-60 england gets the strongest winds. 40—60 potentially more in other sports. thursday morning rush hour could be difficult. transport disruption, we'll keep you updated here. the winds elsewhere will be quite blustery. after some morning showers it brightens up with most places becoming dry. further showers for the north but most with sunny spells. warmer than it has been of late across eastern areas, fresher in the west, plenty of cloud and occasional rain into the weekend. goodbye for now. this is bbc news — our latest headlines.
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mps have begun a series of crucial votes on brexit — earlier the justice minister phillip lee resigned his government job so he could speak out against the government. in the last few minutes, two potential rebels have said they will vote with the government. making history with a handshake — president trump hails his talks with kim jong un as ‘tremendous". the leaders signed an agreement committing themselves to de—nuclearisation on the korean peninsula. the businessman arron banks, who donated millions of pounds to the leave the eu,campaign has told a committee of mps there's no evidence of any conspiracy with russia. he accused the committee of being "remainers" seeking to discredit "vote leave" an alleged member of the banned neo—nazi group national action, has admitted plotting to murder the west lancashire mp rosie cooper. 23—year—old jack renshaw also admitted threatening to kill a police officer. and uk employment reaches an all time high with the unemployment rate falling by 38,000 between february and april to 1.42 million. but wage growth has unexpectedly
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fallen. the government's won the first vote. we were expecting that. i'm keeping an eye on what is going on. but now the sport. hugh has that and england have landed? yes, england have arrived in st petersburg and are making their way to repino. a 45 minute drive. here are the players arriving in st petersburg. looking pretty relaxed before that drive to their new home. the manager gareth southgate and the captain har kane spoke to the media. we like the town. we like st pee tursburg and we hope the players and theirfamilies will tursburg and we hope the players and their families will have the opportunity to go into st
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petersburg. we like the fact we can ta ke petersburg. we like the fact we can take the hoteljust for ourselves. that is good for the balance of work and players being able to relax and have some time for themselves. we are pleased with the base and we are looking forward to getting the meet the community there. the town of repino is inhabited by only 2,500 people. there will be a lot of travel involved. alan shearer thinks they should be kept occupied. forget they should be kept occupied. forget the boredom, you get everything done for you, you don't have to pack your pa nts, for you, you don't have to pack your pants, you get everything laid out for you. forfour weeks of pants, you get everything laid out for you. for four weeks of your life, you cannot afford to get bored. you get given games, books, whatever you want is provided on a plate for you. you are here to play football for a month of your life. that is not too much to ask. there
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has been a memorable 100th captain for the captain of scotland. they beat poland and only the top team in each group can gain automatic qualification for the world cup in france. real madrid have appointed the spain manager as their new coach to replace zinedine zidane. the frenchman led the club to three premier league titles. the new manager will take over his newjob just after the world cup ends. former world heavyweight champion, david haye, has announced his retirement from boxing. it follows his defeat to tony bellew last month, for the second time in succession. in a post on social media, the former unified cruiserweight world champion said it's the right
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time to end his career. as of 12thjune 2018, i am no longer a professional boxer. something i've been since the age of ten. it's a strange thought, but it's a thought i'm very comfortable with. as i've reviewed my life and my physicality, and it's not what it needs to be to compete at world level as a heavyweight. staying with boxing and deontay wilder says he has agreed terms with anthonyjoshua's team over a unification bout in the uk. wilder holds the wbc heavyweight belt, the only title that joshua doesn't have. england's one—day captain eoin morgan says his side will be england's women have set south africa a target of 132. there were two centuries for england south africa are yet to start their reply. but they lead the series 1—0. zwr
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england's one—day captain eoin morgan says his side will be trying to take the positives from their defeat by scotland at the weekend. his team take on australia at the oval tomorrow and morgan says they still have a lot to learn ahead of next years world cup. we need to expose some of our weaknesses. in order to be in contention for the world cup this time next year. we cannotjust keep cruising along and doing ok orjust about getting over the line. we want to learn as we go along between now and next year and there is still a lot to learn. that is all the sport for now. thank you. our chief political correspondent vicki young is in parliament's central lobby. the first vote has gone the government's way? yes, none of them
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we re government's way? yes, none of them were expected to be close apart from the one for a meaningful vote. this vote was about giving a committee of mps scrutiny over what the government does. the news on the timings is that labour seem to be pushing a lot of extra votes. we thought the crucial one on the meaningful vote would be in about 20 minutes or half an hour. that is no longer the case. we think now that that could be pushed back until more like half past five, quarter to six. we will have to wait and see. but the big news is that the government seem to be offering concessions to the conservative rebels about giving parliament more of a say if there is ano parliament more of a say if there is a no —deal scenario. about giving parliament more power, so deck tait what happens in the circumstances. —— to dictate what happens in that event. the reason they can do that is because this bill has to go back to the house of lords. this is the
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ping—pong between the two, because the house of lords made changes, the house of commons has rejected the changes. there is another opportunity. if the government were to go back on their word and not come up with enough for the rebels, they have the option of the house of lords reinstating what they want. we will see the detail if you like of what they're offering after those talks, with people like dominic grieve tomorrow. the meaningful vote is the meaningful vote today. the vote tomorrow is the issue tomorrow is the customs union. there seems to be an agreement that the government says means they will hopefully win that vote as far as they're concerned tomorrow. we were hearing from oliver letwin who said there is no harm in kicking these things down the road. but with ten months to go, there is a lot of cans appearing and not much road left? that is the
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issue that a lot of mps have. particularly those enthusiastic brexiteer who don't like the way this is going. theirfear is all these things are being delayed, because the government reach a compromise. they're worried it is looking as they would call it a soft brexit where, the uk stays closely aligned with the eu. they want a cleaner break, where the uk can take advantage of the opportunities as they see it. particularly in trade. the reason why there will be an easier day for the government tomorrow is they have promised to bring back the trade and customs bill that will give mps the opportunity to scrutiny ise that and the point about the customs unit has not been decided by the cabinet. so theresa may will have another
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gathering of ministers at chequers to thrash out even what they're going to ask the eu for and then they will have to wait and see if they will have to wait and see if the eu wait for it. they have said lock the doors, does that mean there is another vote. i'm not sure you will be interested in this one, i don't think. the more exciting ones are to come later. if you want to hear it just are to come later. if you want to hear itjust for are to come later. if you want to hear it just for the drama, are to come later. if you want to hear itjust for the drama, go ahead. let's just. .. hear itjust for the drama, go ahead. let'sjust. .. how long hear itjust for the drama, go ahead. let'sjust... how long will it take? it could be a while. you can see they walk in, you have tellers from both sides, they're the people who have counted the votes. you can tell which ones won, because the ones that stand on the opposition side are the ones that have won the vote. we expect the government to win this one. we could be, ithink government to win this one. we could be, i think we could be another minute away. i could be accused of cruelty to you if we stick to this. i will come back to you later. that all—important i will come back to you later. that
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all—importa nt vote, the i will come back to you later. that all—important vote, the meaningful vote result, we are still waiting for. possibly up to an hour away. we will pull away from the house of commons. is that theresa may who has just walked in? yes. what do you think, you make the decision? go on then. it is exciting. it is all about... sifting of secondary legislation. i know you will want to hear it. the point being, yes, the prime minister is here and she will be here for hours. this is still coming down to close votes. there is no reason why coming down to close votes. there is no reason why even coming down to close votes. there is no reason why even though there has been a concession, what somebody has said it is quite important, if it is a close vote, on that meaningful vote, that gives a sign to the lords to continue with the way that they we re to continue with the way that they were going. so it is still important. the prime minister is here. i think we have worked out that almost all of 650 mps who should be here if you like are here today and they are going to be
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trooping through the lobbies hour after hour. we think possibly for three hours. this is the point where probably think you should have electronic vote bg. but it is not as much fun is it? you're right. the interesting thing is how important this figure of dominic grieve has become over the last 24 hours. even longer than that. he cannot be accused of being a rebel in any other sense. he has been a very loyal conservative mp over the years and he is a former attorney general and he is a former attorney general and a legal eagle. he is looking at this. he was an arch remainor. but what is interesting about his views is that he thinks that the lord's amendment isn't quite right. that is wloo i he wanted to table his —— thatis wloo i he wanted to table his —— that is why he wanted to table his own version. he thought it was ant good thing for the government and needed to be more subtle. so he has come forward with his own version.
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for technical reasons that didn't get selected. so there was no vote on that. but he has tried to force the government to accept it any way. he was hoping the government would think, actually, we are probably going to lose, so it is better to accept that. and it looks like they may be willing to accept parts of what he came up with. he in his courteous way, the way he has been throughout all of this, has become the leader really of the gang, the leader of the rebels. they sit in the corner on the back couple of benches of the house of commons, they sit there chatting and come under a lot of scrutiny from their own side, wanting to know what they're going to be up to in every vote, to know if they're going to rebel or even sit on their hands. abstentions can also be important in these votes if they don't back the government. there was one conservative mp who said he was
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still undecided, which will guarantee you a lot of scrutiny from the party whips as they cajole and try and persuade them to vote. i think the other interesting thing later on down the line and in some of these votes as well, will be to see what philip lee does. he is the minister that resigned this morning. here we go. let's listen in. the ayes to the right, 325. the noes to the left 304. thank you. the ayes to the left 304. thank you. the ayes to the right, 325. the noes to the left, 304. so the ayes have it. the ayes have it. unlock. order. we now come colleagues to lords amendment 37. motion to disagree with lord's
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amendment 37. the question is this house disagrees with the lords in theiramendment no 37. house disagrees with the lords in their amendment no 37. as many of that opinion say aye. of the contrary no. division. clearthe lobby. we are getting used to this, once again and no surprise with the result of that particular vote. we await more results. just looking at what is a relatively full chamber, how would you assess the mood of those that are walking past you in the lobby? is it, as we were predicting over the previous few days, as crucial as we were thinking? yes, i think it can be very fractious, when you talk to a
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lot of conservative rebels and people like dominic grieve, he doesn't want to be in this position. he is not out to cause trouble. but he is scrutinyising the legislation and thinking there are problems with it. although there may not be a government defeat, that is because the government has conceded. what we don't know until we see the wording is, it could be on important moment where the government have conceded that principle that if we get to no deal that parliament has a greater say than they would have done. that is what, i have been speaking to somebody from the snp, that is what they think will happen, that the government has had to give ground. although a ministerial resignation may have looked like there was no point, because the rebels backed down. if they have backed down it is because the government has conceded a lot of points. it could still be seen as a significant moment if further down the line we get to the situation where the deal is either
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voted down or there is no deal. david davis earlier, the brexit secretary, whose job it david davis earlier, the brexit secretary, whosejob it is david davis earlier, the brexit secretary, whose job it is to get a deal thinks that is never going to be the scenario. he thinks there will be a good deal. the other thing worth mentions if we get to october and we have the scenario where theresa may comes back with a deal and puts to it the house of commons and puts to it the house of commons and they reject it, then i bets are off. that is a situation in political terms, that is a complete disaster for the government and for her and at that point, you can't possibly know what is going to happen. you could ends up with a scenario of her being ousted o'er or a general election. it is worth bearing in mind the political reality of where we will be if that we re reality of where we will be if that were to happen. what this is about is making sure that it is water tight. that the house of commons is
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not going to be forced into accepting a bad deal or no deal at all. ok. we will pull away. because we have seen that procedure and those, that voting is under way. further voting on the lord's amendment. we will return to you later. in a moment all the business news. first the headlines. mps have voted on the eu withdrawal bill —— earlier thejustice minister philip lee resigned to speak out against the government's brexit policy. a handshake in history — donald trump and kim jong—un start a "new chapter" in relations between the us and north korea. a 23—year—old man has admitted plotting to murder an mp with a machete. he is among six men who deny being members of a banned far—right group. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. yahoo uk has been fined £250,000 for a cyber—attack in november 2014 that may have breached more than eight
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million uk accounts. yahoo, which is now owned by verizon, said in 2016 that at least 500 million accounts worldwide had been hacked two years earlier. the information commissioner's office said it focused on the uk accounts that london—based yahoo uk services oversaw as a data controller. taxi app company uber has applied for a patent to use artificial intelligence to determine how drunk potential passengers might be. the app could also feed other information to the driver, including how accurately a passenger is typing and even the angle they are holding their phone at. it could help drivers who do not want to pick up inebriated riders. but critics said it could also be used to identify vulnerable passengers. europe's highest court has backed christian louboutin in its battle to protect its distinctive red shoe soles. europe's highest court has backed christian louboutin in its battle to protect its distinctive red shoe soles.
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in 2012, louboutin sued rival firm van haren for selling high heeled shoes with scarlet soles. the luxury brand said it "warmly welcomes" the judgement. it may have hit the headlines but the historic meeting between us president donald trump and north korean leader kimjong—un, has really had little impact on the financial markets. the ftse in london, the german dax and the cac in france have all been trading down this afternoon — why? well it seems their focus is elsewhere. in london traders have been looking at unemployment and wage growth figures — now they showed unemployment still falling — in the three months to april they fell by another 38,000 to 1.42 million people unemployed, but usually when unemployment falls the fact that there are less people looking for work would lead to wage increases, as employers offer higher wages to try and attract new workers, but that hasn't been happening. in fact in those three months to april wage growth actually fell from 2.9% to 2.8%. and we have more bad
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new from the high street. new look — one of the many high street names that has entered a cva or company voluntary arrangement this year in a bid to buy them more time to deal with their debts — reported falling sales. on the flip side their online only rival boohoo reported sales of it's brands up 53%. let's starts there with tom stevenson, investment director at fidelity worldwide investments. tom this can'tjust be a tale of online versus high street — because nnew looks online sales have also fallen — what's the difference between the 2 brands? yes, new look‘s yes, new looks like for like sales we re yes, new looks like for like sales were down 12%. but their web sales we re were down 12%. but their web sales were down 12%. but their web sales were down 19%. so there is more to this than the onslaught on the the high street. boo hoo is a more
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targeted retailer and focus on the 16 to 24 age group. new look is trying to address a wider range. you can't do that and please everybody. they are laying off workers and closing stores and you know they're ina pit closing stores and you know they're in a pit of trouble. looking at financial markets in general, we had that very historic meeting between the us president and the leader of north korea and an agreement signed at the end, would you have expected the markets to react more. they didn't take much notice did they? no, it was a bit of a shrug by the markets. we did see a bit of positive reaction in the asia equity markets as it was happening. by the time people had thought about it and it got to the european open, investors were not that fussed. they saw there was less to this than meets the eye. i think donald trump has given a lot away. to kim
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jong—un. and in return, kimjong—un has really given some vague assurances of working towards denuclearisation, but nothing serious. so investors are focussed on the g7, trade wars and of course interest rates, we have got the federal reserve announcing their decision tomorrow. uk unemployment figure out today and the number of people unemployed continues to fall, you would expect wages to rise as employers try to use higher wages to attract workers. why is that not happening? yes, that is the normal equation, unemployment goes down and wages go up. i think there are a few reasons why it is not working that way. i think productivity is poor. and that means companies are not making the profits they need to pay higher wages. we have had pay restraint in the public sector. we
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have had that 1% pay cap. and i think collective bargaining is on the way, the trade union membership is lower than it was, there are more part—time workers and zero hours contracts and that is not good for wage growth. thank you. lot's going on tomorrow. in the uk we have cpi — consumer price index — inflation figures out for the month of may. the figure for april was 2.4% — down from 2.5% in march. the government's target is 2%. it's also the wpp annual general meeting — the first one without sir martin sorrell, the company founder and chief executive, who left the business in april this year. and from the us we should hear the us interest rate decision, followed by quarterly press briefing with fed chairman, jerome powell — his second presser since taking over the job. expecting rates to be
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increased by 0.25%. the fomc decided at its last meeting in may to leave the cost of borrowing in the range of1.5to1.75% we will see tomorrow in new york what is happening with the interest rates. that is it from me. thank you. we are still waiting for that crucial vote at westminster. in the last few minutes, sarah woollaston, the mp who was originally going to rebel against the government, she then decided to back dominic grieve's attempt to that vote. he tabled that last night. in fact that has not been voted on, because it didn't have government support and the speker the speaker said there wasn't time for it to be voted on. what sarah woollaston has said, the
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promised further amendment in the lords must resemble dominic grieve's amendment or lords likely to bring that forward and that to be passed. so it would appear she is expecting to have the promise at least of a dominic grieve—like amendment within the next 24 hours. it would suggest she and other rebels will vote with the government and take theresa may into a second day of difficulty here at the house of commons. but it is that meaningful vote that would cause problems if she loses that later. full coverage here on the bbc news. c myrie will be here. now the weather with matt taylor. it is a
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bit cloudier and fresher in some parts. but for the majority another dry day. that includes some in western scotland, where for the likes of stornoway, today is the 22nd consecutive day without rain. that however will change in around 24 hours. this area of cloud out in the at llan atlantic is getting picked by the jet stream. for the time being thejet picked by the jet stream. for the time being the jet stream picked by the jet stream. for the time being thejet stream is picked by the jet stream. for the time being the jet stream is absent and we have high pressure, most staying dry. some cloud, particularly in eastern areas. but some breaks in that and when the sun is out. some clearer skies tonight and it will be a fresher night. many parts away from towns and cities dropping into single figures. it will be a lovely start to tomorrow morning. some cloud in central and eastern scotland. sunny elsewhere. a
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few showers in southern counties of england and wales. most places avoiding them. and the cloud thickens up later to western scotla nd thickens up later to western scotland and northern ireland to bring rain in the west. temperatures tomorrow up on today in england and wales. but they will drop across western scotland and northern ireland and that is this low pressure pushing in. the biggest impact will be in the northern half of the uk. so we go from no rain to about two inches of rain in 24 hours. sunshine on thursday morning. but the wind could be of note. up to 60mph and maybe more in thorn northern england and scotland and northern ireland. some there could be some travel disruption. we will keep you updated. the winds not as strong further south. but much more blustery than of late. the winds from a westerly direction, bringing rain in the morning. sunny spells in
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the afternoon and one or two showers still. but for all it will feel fresher in that westerly breeze. but tempered by the return of some afternoon sunshine. for the end of the week more rain on friday. the weekends some sunshine, but some showers too. today at 5. .. we're at westminster, where mps are holding a series of crucial votes on the eu (withdrawal) bill. the government has already won several votes but passions are running high over moves to give parliament a greater say in the brexit process. we have to consider anything done in this house and done in the other house, if passed, will actually have a very serious effect on the negotiating strategy of the other side. what they are watching is an attempt by the real zealots in this house to stop this parliament playing any part in the process. this is the scene live in the commons.
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we'll bring you the very latest on those votes, and all the reaction. the other main stories on bbc news at 5... making history with a handshake.
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