Skip to main content

tv   Beyond 100 Days  BBC News  June 12, 2018 7:00pm-8:01pm BST

7:00 pm
you're watching beyond 100 days. a great leap forward or a rehash of a deal the north koreans had made years ago? donald trump says the world will be impressed with the work the singapore summit has delivered. but will the north koreans follow through on the commitments made? it all started with a handshake. kim jong—un speaks of his unwavering commitment to denuclearisation but donald trump makes the first big concession with the promise to stop war games on the korean peninsula. people are going to be very impressed. people are going to be very happy. and we are going to take care of a very big and very dangerous problem for the world. translation: we had a historic meeting and decided to leave the past behind. we are about to sign a historic document. also on the programme... congress takes stock of the summit. lawmakers are hopeful but maximum pressure remains an option. we'll have live reaction. on a day of key parliamentary
7:01 pm
votes over brexit, theresa may's government has conceded mps should have a bigger say in the process, of leaving the european union. get in touch with us using the hashtag — 'beyond—one—hundred—days.' hello and welcome. i'm christian fraser in singapore. jane o'brien is in washington. six months ago, donald trump and kim jong—un were locked in an escalating war of words, in which the north korean leader had threatened to obliterate the united states. today, in front of north korean flags, the american president shook his hand, patted his back, invited him to the white house. it was political theatre unlike anything we have seen before. and a propaganda coup for a man trump had once vilified as "little rocket man." optimists say the summit was a great first step and showed a willingness to make much—needed changes
7:02 pm
to a hostile relationship. but critics say the communique the leaders signed lacks substance and the goal of denuclearisation is no closer. our north america editor, jon sopel, starts our coverage. it was carefully choreographed, dramatically staged, and yet still somehow utterly unbelievable. both men walking stiffly with nervous smiles. the handshake lasted 12 seconds. the president saying it was an honour to meet kimjong—un. has north korea ever been given a platform like this? nine months ago donald trump was calling him little rocket man, and little rocket man was calling trump a mentally deranged dotard. now they are walking together and sharing a laugh. i feel really great.
7:03 pm
we are going to have a great discussion and tremendous success. it will be tremendously successful. we will have a terrific relationship, i have no doubt. from kimjong—un, a rather different rhetorical style. "it hadn't been easy to get here," he said. "the past had acted as fetters on our limbs and old prejudices worked as obstacles but we overcame all of them." the pair met with just their translator initially and were then joined by officials. the talks lasted most of the morning. detractors have said this meeting would be nothing more than a glorified photo opportunity. it is much more than that but there were enough pictures to fill an album. there was the balcony scene, the walk in the gardens, and the boys and their toys moment when chairman kim wanted to see inside the beast — the president's famous limousine. but then came the important moment, the signing of a document apparently committing north korea
7:04 pm
to complete denuclearisation. even if it was rather more on intent than concrete steps to get there. translation: we had an historic meeting and decided to leave the past behind. the document contained four key points — agreeing to establish new relations, joining together to build a lasting and stable peace, working towards the complete denuclearisation of the korean peninsula, and recovering the remains of prisoners of war. seven billion people inhabit planet earth... before donald trump's news conference, the journalists were shown a propaganda—style video produced by the americans, extolling the great denuclearised future ahead. two men, two leaders, one destiny... but missing from it, and the agreement, were two key us demands — that the process must be irreversible and verifiable — and that looked like a negotiating victory
7:05 pm
for the north koreans. and that was a repeated question for donald trump. the north koreans had reneged on promises before, so why would this time be different? you have a different administration, a different president, a different secretary of state. you have people that are, you know... it's very important to them. and we get it done. the other groups, maybe it wasn't a priority. i don't think they could have done it if it was a priority. another victory for the north koreans seemed to be this declaration from the us president — a pledge that took south korea by surprise. we will be stopping the war games, which will save us a tremendous amount of money, unless and until we see the future negotiation is not going along like it should. but we will be saving a tremendous amount of money. plus, i think, it is very provacative. the president lavished praise on kimjong—un, but that brought this question. the man you met today,
7:06 pm
kim jong—un, has killed family members and starved his own people. why are you so comfortable calling him very talented? he is very talented. anybody that takes over like he did at 26 years of age, and is able to run it and run it tough. i don't say it was nice. i don't see anything about it. he ran it. very few people at that age, you could take one out of 10,000, probably could not do it. then donald trump, the former property developer, set out the economic opportunities for a north korea at peace with their neighbours. they have great beaches. you see that any time they are exploding their cannons into the ocean. i think, "wouldn't that make a great condo!" i explained it. i said, "instead of doing that, you could have the best hotels in
7:07 pm
the world right now." from this remarkable meeting ground, where the flags flew side by side, donald trump now sees a future there the us and north korea are working together. the word "historic" is often overused, today it was justified. extraordinary strides have been taken to get to this point. but it is what happens next which is crucial. how do you ensure that north korea keeps its word on denuclearisation? to that question, donald trump said, "well, you are going to have to trust me." jon sopel, bbc news, singapore. there is going to have to be an awful lot of trust on both sides. let's pick up some of this with someone who knows the art of negotiating with north korea well — former us ambassador to the un — bill richardson, whojoins us now from boston. good to have you with us. i know you spoke to the secretary of state for the summit. he was asked ad buys. to think you will be satisfied with what he has got out of this
7:08 pm
negotiation? —— he was after ad vice. he did not get everything he wanted. we wanted a commitment by the north koreans to a process of denuclearisation short—term, that they would dismantle some weapons, they would dismantle some weapons, they would dismantle some weapons, they would free some missiles and do something about conventional weapons aimed at south korea. we didn't get that. instead, we made some concessions, one of them, which i think was unfortunate, the reduction of military or termination of military exercises with south korea. this is typical of the north koreans. i have been negotiating with them. they all say, you go first and then we will go. we went first and then we will go. we went first and then what has to be done next with missile negotiation is very murky. no timelines, no verification. the north koreans, u nless verification. the north koreans, unless you verify and give them
7:09 pm
accountability and inspectors and u nfettered accountability and inspectors and unfettered access to their sites, they are going to run wild over un thatis they are going to run wild over un that is my worry. nevertheless, the summit was positive in that it got the two leaders together. there was talk of diplomacy instead of military options that was good. what can the us do now to keep the north korean is on target, to make them deliver some of the things that, aspirational knee, has been promised in this communique? the president can say, i gave you a platform. you are now a world leader and on a par with the president of the united states. you have to respond and deliver. what does that mean? they should meet again, that technical staff, the secretary of state, right away, take advantage of amendments set up working groups on
7:10 pm
denuclearisation, weapons and missiles and human rights. we did not talk about human rights. that should have been a priority but it pushed aside. we talk about, you wa nt pushed aside. we talk about, you want a peace agreement but we have to ta ke want a peace agreement but we have to take some steps. we gave you two things, the military exercises mention yours is said to kim jong—un, we will give you security guarantees, which means we will not try to depose hugh or knock you off. you give something to us, you deliver something for us. the north koreans wait till the last minute that they do not say yes or no. they do not negotiate like we do, they stall. that is what they have done, made us make the first move. but governor richardson, just on that issue up the military war games on the korean peninsular, that is an essential from the south korean perspective, that is a conventional deterrent. the president said today
7:11 pm
it was an unnecessary provocation. well, the south koreans, the problem was that we never consulted with the south koreans. look at that statement. they are surprised and wa nted statement. they are surprised and wanted clarification on what president trump meant about suspending the military exercise. this is a matter of readiness. we have 28,000 troops in south korea, commitment on a treaty relationship that will defend each other. but this is the president, the way he does diplomacy. he does not consult with allies or he makes a man like the canadians, like the european union, like you british. this is not good diplomacy. people have praised him for his unorthodox style but what has it got us? on north korea, it was good that he met personally with kim jong—un at the highest level. what did we get in return? we
7:12 pm
need some meat on the bones. so far it does not happen. it may happen. we have set up a process of negotiation but we should take advantage of momentum and move fast otherwise you want the president even be part of the negotiations, not participate but push it, instead of going away and thinking he has a photo opportunity and you are onto next issue. governor bill richardson, thank you for those thoughts. and away from the circus of the summit, us lawmakers have had the chance to assess its impact. the bbc‘s rajini vaidyanathanjoins us from capitol hill. what has been the reaction there? the reaction here has been mixed. i will start with the republican leadership, who have praised donald trump for getting to the stage where the singapore summit could even take place in the first place. the speaker of the house, republican paul ryan, tweeting that the decades
7:13 pm
american policy towards north korea has failed. i commend the president for not accepting the status quo. from other republicans it has been more nuanced. a number accept the fa ct more nuanced. a number accept the fact that donald trump has taken the stage in a way that no other president before him has managed, to get that meeting with north korea. they are also extremely concerned that they believe he is doing a deal with a dictator who has a record of human rights abuses. that is very concerning to a lot of politicians here across party lines. the centre thatis here across party lines. the centre that is another senator for florida did not mince his words when he tweeted earlier today. —— the senator for florida. tweeted earlier today. —— the senatorfor florida. he tweeted earlier today. —— the senator for florida. he described president kim jong—un as a total weirdo. no mincing his words. a number of politicians are saying they want congress to be more involved in the process. we have the
7:14 pm
chair of the relations committee insisting that the secretary of state answers to his committee, to give them more details about what exactly give them more details about what exa ctly we nt give them more details about what exactly went on during the summit in singapore. details are also something that the democrats want more of. we have had the democratic leadership here today, saying they believe the summit in singapore was nothing more than a photo opportunity and a handshake. so, really, there is a lot of concern about the process going forward across party lines. remember, we got to this place because of donald trump's unconventional diplomacy. the concern now is where does that leave the process along? that is the big question. nothing that has gone on here over the last two days has been done by accident. they look who is sitting
7:15 pm
where today on the round table, was sitting next to mike pompeo but mr bolton? he is still very much a part of this. i think he is. a month ago, when he came out with the libya model, the summit was off for a period of time. the white house said we are doing the trump model are not the libyan model. there was some concern that he would even come to this visit that he did. he was sitting at the table. the key now is we have a pretty vague declaration with not a lot of meat on the bone and it will be up to the principles to ta ke and it will be up to the principles to take that forward and operationalise that put a framework together. we think he will play a role in that, alongside mike pompeo and others. when kim jong-un went walkabout, apparently he sent word home to pyongyang that the
7:16 pm
economy here was something to copy. is he the total weirdo, or is he an economic reformer? that is a big question. when he came on the world stage in 2011 when his father passed away, stage in 2011 when his father passed any stage in 2011 when his father passed away, many people did not think he would last a year. they thought he would last a year. they thought he would be taken out and was not fit for purpose. he has transformed himself quite remarkably as a bit of an international player on the world stage was there are still issues with human rights and also of things back home but there is a narrative thatis back home but there is a narrative that is he the change agent that north korea is looking for? that is quite extraordinary considering he is the third and his family dynasty to pursue these policies and considering where we work with north korea less than a year ago.|j considering where we work with north korea less than a year ago. i know you're going to stay with us. we will talk lots more about singapore but thanks for the moment. the house of commons is voting today
7:17 pm
and tomorrow on the withdrawal bill, especially on the amendments put forward by the upper house, the lords. tonight, the prime minister has avoided a main feed on one of the votes which would have given mps are decisive say on the final deal that is negotiated with brussels. here to explain it all is clive, who is in westminster for us. explain it all is clive, who is in westminsterfor us. he explain it all is clive, who is in westminster for us. he did explain it all is clive, who is in westminsterfor us. he did have to offer a concession. yes, they did, and a pretty big one. it depends you talk to us to whether the concession will hold. brexiteers are saying it was not really a concession and does not mean anything. remain as saying it is important for them that concession was made. i expect theresa may is breathing a sigh of relief after winning the crucial vote on whether or not mps should
7:18 pm
have a more meaningful say on any future brexit deal if ministers come back from brussels with a no deal. it has been a heated day of debate on all of this in the house of commons with one conservative mp hitting out, saying hardline eurosceptics were seeking to take us over the cliff of a hard brexit. i am getting a little tired of honourable members and right honourable members on the back ventures, in government, even in the cabinet, who come up to me and others in quiet and dark corridors, to british businesses who demand private meetings where they laid bare their despair, but refused to go public. to the commentators who say to me you are doing a greatjob, keep on going, in the face of death threats which mean that one of our number had to attend a public engagement with six armed undercover police officers. that is the country we have created and it has got to stop. you get a sense of how passionate
7:19 pm
the debate has been here in the house of commons and across the country following the brexit vote 18 months ago was that we also heard from antoinette sandbach. she is the tory rebel mp, potential tory rebel mps, who are threatening to vote with the lords on that the that would given parliamentarians here are more meaningful say in constructing and putting forward a brexit process in the event of ministers coming back from brussels with a no deal she says the last—minute concession by the government persuaded her to back theresa may. i want to say how grateful i am that the lords have given the consideration they have to this bill and improved it considerably in sending it back to us. i do accept that the solicitor general has given an important concession today and i would have supported the lords' amendment had that concesession not been made. now, let's get into what the
7:20 pm
concessionaires. the solicitor general, as was just concessionaires. the solicitor general, as wasjust make clear, the solicitor general will be working on behalf of the government and he will put forward a possible motion when this goes back to the house of lords in the next few days, put forward a motion that will potentially give mps, those rebel mps like antoinette sandbach, what they want, which is a meaningful say in the brexit process. some are saying this is just a situation that involves a position of trust on the part of the government and people like antoinette sandbach and other remainders within the conservative party who feel they do not want a ha rd party who feel they do not want a hard brexit, that they are trusting the government that they will put forward that amendment in the house of lords. if you speak to some of
7:21 pm
the brexiteers here, they say they will not be a concession put forward in the lords at all. there has been no concession on the part of the government. still a lot to play for here with the votes that are coming up here with the votes that are coming up tomorrow as well. we will be back with you later in the programme. thank you very much. let's go back to singapore. it is typical of donald trump that an event like the singapore summit descends into something resembling a reality tv show. and perhaps the most bizarre element of the week was the appearance of dennis rodman, who is in the unusual position of being one of the few westerners to have met both donald trump and kimjong—un. the former nba star famously visited the north korean leader several times over the past few years and even calls him a friend. he was also here in singapore for the summit — though not in an official capacity one might add. and in a bizarre tv interview, mr rodman claimed credit for predicting that today's meeting would happen.
7:22 pm
just a warning, there are tears. i knew things would change. i knew it. i was the only one. i have never had no—one to hear me, i never had no—one to see me, but i took those bullets, took all that, took everything. they came at me and i'm still standing. today is a great day for everybody. singapore, tokyo, china, everything. it is a great day. extraordinary scenes. what strikes me about this summit is every part of it seems to have revolved around personalities. it is all about the show by two great showman. dennis rodman putting in a guest appearance. what is interesting is once the lights are off and you have all come home, what role is donald trump going to pay and what role will kim jong—un play?
7:23 pm
trump going to pay and what role will kimjong—un play? will they leave it to their negotiators? yes. that is before we talk about the press co nfe re nce that is before we talk about the press conference which is an extraordinary hour and six minutes. president trump, he referred at one point to the condos we could make on the north korean beaches where they have currently been firing missiles. they have not been firing missiles in the last six months. the idea of heading off to north korea for a beach holiday is an eye razor. then they're were the extraordinary comments he made about people in the gulag is who have come out best in this agreement. when he goes off script in press conferences, there are so many bizarre comments that really need calling out. they do not make sense. sometimes you think, what have i just make sense. sometimes you think, what have ijust watched?! i am someone what have ijust watched?! i am someone who what have ijust watched?! i am someone who agrees what have ijust watched?! i am someone who agrees this is the start
7:24 pm
ofa someone who agrees this is the start of a process. better to be talking to kim jong—un than throwing insults on twitter. if they are able to get something out of this, then surely it isa something out of this, then surely it is a good thing. let's just have a look at these pictures. i was telling you aboutjohn bolton. there isjohn bolton. telling you aboutjohn bolton. there is john bolton. and, telling you aboutjohn bolton. there isjohn bolton. and, it is quite interesting, thatjohn isjohn bolton. and, it is quite interesting, that john bolton isjohn bolton. and, it is quite interesting, thatjohn bolton was there, opposite kim jong—un. interesting, thatjohn bolton was there, opposite kimjong—un. you see him looking atjohn bolton across the table. john bolton almost scuppered the whole thing. with all that talk about comparing north korea to the libyan model, which of course did not end particularly well for colonel gaddafi. we understand that in washington he did get a bit about bawling out after saying that. donald trump was not happy with him and made opinions known and wish that mr bolton had not intervened quite when he did. but it yes, there he is at the table. the decision was only made really in the days, in the
7:25 pm
run—up, to that summit. it was really touch and go whether he appeared at all. but, there we go, he was there. the question remains, do they have enough now to build upon? does this communique, which is very vague, very aspirational, give them enough to actually continue with the process everybody hopes will happen? this is beyond 100 days on the bbc. coming up: the british government avoids defeat on its brexit bill, seeing off a move that would give mps a final say on the deal. all that's still to come.
7:26 pm
iam sure i am sure you have noticed just how much fresher it is outside. it will stay relatively cool over the next few days. the wind will increase as well. tomorrow, the bulk of the day is looking fine. a few light showers. all eyes on the atlantic right now. the powerfuljet stream is pushing in this rather angry looking area of cloud, a developing area of low pressure, the storm in the atlantic. it is making a beeline for us. that means rough weather for northern parts of the uk but not in the short term. some clear spells with temperatures around 10 degrees or so. with temperatures around 10 degrees or so. this is the beginning of the wet and windy weather. that weather front will be sweeping into the very far western fringes of scotland and into northern ireland later on wednesday but ahead of it you can see the weather is not bad at all.
7:27 pm
the wind is like light. temperatures managing to creep up to 20, maybe 22 degrees in one or two spots. let's focus on the area of low pressure. on wednesday night in makes its presence felt. northern ireland, scotland, northern parts of england as well, as well as the spell of heavy rain, some very strong winds. these wins could be damaging for some of us. join the rush hour on wednesday, racing through the lowla nds wednesday, racing through the lowlands of scotland, you could seek justice in excess of 60 mars an hour. —— during the rush hour. that could mean the odd tree down and there could be disruption due to the severe weather sweeping our way. severe gusts across the northern half of the uk. later on thursday, in the afternoon, eventually build winds will ease of still blustery in the south. the afternoon for many of us the south. the afternoon for many of us will be sunny and windy, whether
7:28 pm
we're in the north or the south. the temperatures on both the getting up to around 22 in the south, the mid—teens in the north. it will feel cooler because of the strength of the wind. the weekend is looking a little mixed. out of the two days, i sunday is the best of the two days. -- i think sunday is the best of the two days. —— i think sunday. this is beyond one hundred days, with me jane o'brien in washington — christian fraser's in singapore. our top stories. the world reacts to donald trump's historic summit with kimjong—un — china and japan welcome the talks while iran says, the americans aren't to be trusted. the leaders sign a document which includes a pledge from mr kim to work to rid the korean peninsula of nuclear weapons. mr trump says the us is ending military exercises with south korea as part of the deal. coming up in the next half hour.
7:29 pm
relief for the british government after a move to give mps a decisive say on any final brexit deal is voted down. let us know your thoughts by using the hashtag ‘beyond—one—hundred—days'. if the agreement signed here in singapore today delivers on the commitments that have been made, then soon kimjong un could be on his way to washington or donald trump on his way to pyongyang. but that depends on mike pompeo the secretary of state securing concrete concessions from the north koreans, out of a one page document that so far deals only with process. and at the moment the only concession that appears to have been made — is the american commitment to ending those war games on the korean peninsula. that's a major concession
7:30 pm
to north korea — and appeared to be total news to south korea. so what's been the reaction — not just to this but to the summit in general? our seoul correspondent laura bicker reports her report contains flashing images from the start. it was a stunning moment for south koreans in singapore. they told me their hearts were racing as they watched. full of hope but also relief that these two leaders are talking instead of declaring war. this woman could not wait to phone her mum, who was born in pyongyang. "after seeing this, i suddenly thought how i wanted to go back to north korea before i die," she says. "mum, i want your dream to come true. i want you to step back
7:31 pm
on north korean land." in seoul, moonjae—in admitted he had had a sleepless night but looked jubilant at the meeting, which was partly the result of his careful diplomacy. but donald trump had a surprise for him. he pledged to end what he described as war games, joint military exercises between south korea and the us. they have always angered the north. this will worry neighbouring japan, as will mr trump's suggestion to remove troops from the peninsula in the future. it's a mistake to cancel alljoint us—south korean military exercises. the united states needs to maintain a sufficient level of readiness and preparedness on the peninsula because the north korean
7:32 pm
threat is still there. kimjong—un has now signed two agreements to denuclearise — the first was in april but both lack detail. he has destroyed his main nuclear test site and has promised to dismantle another. but he could be hiding up to 60 nuclear weapons and it is not clear he is letting inspectors in to find them. that is why many will find today's announcement disappointing. kim jong—un is now leaving the island of sentosa, having gained the summit and the status he has longed for. he says the world will change, the problem is, we're not sure what that change may mean. kim jong—un has promised to avoid the mistakes of the past. failed policies in the 1990s led to a famine which killed thousands. his father and grandfather built
7:33 pm
weapons while people went hungry. the missile launches have stopped for now and china appears eager to help — already pushing for sanctions to be lifted. today, north korea took its first tentative steps out of the shadows. butjust how far it is prepared to go is still uncertain. laura bicker, bbc news, singapore. and joining us now with his reaction to today's summit is our political analyst ron christie who formerly served as an advisor to george w bush. this summit illustrates what a to psy—tu rvy world this summit illustrates what a topsy—turvy world we're living in. you had the g—7 where enemies were made a friend were made enemies, we have the summit where he is preventing enemies and he has also managed to accept south korea by
7:34 pm
cancelling these exercises. but that is what he was elected to do, to shake things up and up chinese traditional ways of doing things? absolutely, and that is why he got 63 million people here in america to vote for him. they want him to disrupt the status quo, the status quo of united states for 50 years has been a stalemate on the korean peninsular. he has done what no sitting american president has ever done, to sit down with the north korean dictator to find a way to peace. there has been so much criticism in our press about donald trump andi criticism in our press about donald trump and i will say at least he is not throwing insults and missiles are not being lobbed from the other side. what do you make of the way that negotiations are being handled, many people have said they have not got enough experts and now it is emerging the chinese new that they we re emerging the chinese new that they were going to stop the war games
7:35 pm
before they had signed the document and before it was announced to the press and yet the south koreans, a traditional ally, did not know. my ta ke traditional ally, did not know. my take on this is that we needed to see the two leaders find a way to communicate and i think they did that. the 1—page document now sets the road map for the principle. to work with allies around the world and around the region to put more on this framework. so i'm not surprised the south koreans were not given all the south koreans were not given all the details, the chinese of course are very important for north korea as patrons. but at least they've stopped loving insoles and stopped trying to find a way to go toward together and they are trying to find a way to have a peaceable settlement here which i find encouraging. we have a lot of mixed reaction from congress, the pilot —— republicans as well, how much impact will they
7:36 pm
have in the process or are theyjust happy to let donald trump get on with it because they seem to say little about his performance of the g-7? little about his performance of the 6-7? i little about his performance of the g-7? i expect in a short time the foreign relations committees in the house and senate will bring up administration officials and ask what the plan is specifically, how the administration is going to move forward in the future. congress has a very legitimate oversight role and you can expect the congress to the active in the days and the weeks to come. and i think everyone would like to know what that line is. that is the problem can we just do not know where we go from here. and donald trump himself, his role in it, is he going to leave it tojohn bolton and mike pompeo, wejust do not know. i think what disappoints the academic community, is that there was so much promise and so much expectation raised by the administration and mike pompeo said
7:37 pm
yesterday it was going quicker than they had expected. but looking at they had expected. but looking at the document there's nothing in that, about the verification. we do not know what they have, how much of it there is, where it is. if you can this document to the party talks agreement, it almost looks to be one and the same. so long way to go we have to be open eyed about the commitments donald trump is making. he says it will all be done in a hurry but it is going to take years put up and a lot of work. let's return to our other main story — theresa may has headed off a threatened commons revolt over brexit after offering a last—minute concession. clive myrie is still at westminster for us with more reaction. well we are trying to work out exactly what that concession was to prevent the tory benches from voting
7:38 pm
with the lords amendment which effectively with giving mps in the commons the right to intervene in a much more concerted way if ministers come back from brussels with no deal following discussions of the future relationship between the uk and the european union put up well hopefully to break some of this down and explain that i have the editor of times my box. so too is a may has made it clear to those backbenchers who were going to vote for the lords amendment that we will discuss it later, that is if effectively what she said. there are three parts, the first when they get a deal the comeback and within seven days it needs to be voted on in the commons. ministers have already said they would do that but it was not in law. the second part if we felt that thing down orjust law. the second part if we felt that thing down or just failed law. the second part if we felt that thing down orjust failed to get a
7:39 pm
deal, we get to have a vote by november 30 and then the third part is in february parliament takes over if the government still has no deal. it seems like part one and two have been accepted and they will have a conversation about part three. so the conversation about part three, essentially what i began with, that we will talk about it later. this is theresa may, this is how she operates and the problem comes along and if she can get through to the end of the day and put it off to another day and hope something might turn up, and what happens? is that something does turn up. they can pick upa something does turn up. they can pick up a couple of rebel here and there and we have the bizarre situation of a minister who resigned this morning and then abstain tonight. the whole point of him resigning was he thought he would vote against and be a rebel. so one thing that theresa may has been good at is using time, just gliding down, brexiteers and remainders, just
7:40 pm
getting them to realise that it is a difficult situation and what more cani difficult situation and what more can i possibly do. if you do this, the whole world will come to an end so the whole world will come to an end so using ping—pong with the bill going back and forth to the lords, they might be able to pick up a couple more rebels, find the magic new reason why this cannot possibly work in reality and she has got through to the end of the day with no defeat. that is another win for downing street. every day where she still prime minister is chalked up as women. “ as a still prime minister is chalked up as women. -- as a win. i do not think they needed to govern a compromise, they did seem to have the numbers. it looks like the did not hold firm and they may do the same tomorrow on the customs bill. names like nicky morgan who you would expect, in our signing up to
7:41 pm
some kind of fudged arrangement. what i do not understand, the do not have much more time, if you are not going to rebel now than when. that has always been an argument, people hoping something is going to turn up to public opinion or something catastrophic will happen in negotiations and that will be their moment but timejust negotiations and that will be their moment but time just keeps rolling on. and tonight there is a debate in parliament, remainders claiming victory that they have the prime minister making concession but brexiteers saying it is not a concession. and most of it, most of thatis concession. and most of it, most of that is about perception and he was up that is about perception and he was up or down and how the cabinet, various cabinet big beasts are going to ta ke various cabinet big beasts are going to take it and run in reality if theresa may comes back with a deal, in the autumn, is parliament rejects that in some form, how meaningful the vote is. it does not really
7:42 pm
matter. if parliament rejects that at that is catastrophically bad for theresa may. to come back saying this is the deal i have got and parliament rejecting that. it would be difficult to see her remaining even as prime minister. what happens then strikes me as a kind of second order issue. if she can smack with the deal, she hoped that is when mps will say in the interests of the nation, we have got to back this. —— if she comes back with a deal. what do you think the folk in brussels are thinking about this watching all this today. that will look like a shambles but they have been thinking that all the way through. there is no agreement in the country whatsoever about what people want. no agreement in parliament, no agreement within the political parties. even looking at the blairite wing of labour, there is no agreement within that try in the party. no agreement around the
7:43 pm
cabinet table so this is just party. no agreement around the cabinet table so this isjust more shambles for them to add to the steady conveyor belt of shambles that they see coming from us. and that they see coming from us. and that point about labour, the customs union and the european economic area, those votes tomorrow could be interesting for labour unity or disunity put up well the voting was complicated, you had more tory mps rebelling or abstaining than the government official majority but you had some labour mps backing the idea switching back to the government which makes it even more complicated. tomorrow on the vote on the customs union and the european economic area, you have the labour front bench taking a position in which much of the labour backbench does not agree with. the have this three—way thing, it probably means that as a result nothing will happen and the government will get its way. but it shows although the government looks like the shambles, actually looking at what is happening on the
7:44 pm
labour bench is just as confusing. good to see you both and thank you. if you are none the wiser do not worry, we're going to be here on the news channel to explain those votes tomorrow again. the lords amendments and then back to the commons for mps to vote on them. theresa may had a good day dealing with all that today. how is it going to be for her tomorrow? it all made perfect sense to me! let's move onto some news. a ship carrying more than 600 rescued migrants has yet to begin itsjourney to spain. the aquarius had hoped to dock in sicily. but after italy closed its ports, spain stepped in to offer refuge. two italian ships are expected to take the migrants to the spanish port of valencia but the trip could take up to four days. in the meantime the maltese navy and the italian authorities have sent fresh food supplies on board of the aquarius. brexit campaigner arron banks has said there is ‘no evidence'
7:45 pm
he was involved in a conspiracy with russian officials. mr banks was questioned by british mps after it emerged he met three times with russia's ambassador to the uk ahead of the referendum. but he said he only gave the russian ambassador a telephone number for president trump's transition team. a gunman who had taken two people hostage in central paris, has been arrested. after hours of standoff, the police managed to free the two hostages. the motive for the attack was not immediately clear but incident did not appear to be terrorism—related. this is beyond one hundred days. still to come — as two veteran showmen meet — we'll take a closer look at the body language of donald trump and kimjong un — and try to work out what they're really thinking. six men appeared in uk court today, accused of being members
7:46 pm
of the far—right extremist group national action. one of them, jack renshaw, pleaded guilty to plotting the murder of an mp. daniel sandford reports. jack renshaw, 23 years old, a man accused of being a neo—nazi, who today dramatically admitted planning to kill a labour mp and threatening to kill a police officer. the prosecution say he'd already bought a machete, a kind described by its manufacturers as "19 inches of unprecedented piercing and slashing power. " and christopher lythgoe is the man accused of being the secret leader of the group, who encouraged him to carry out the murder. we let these people destroy us, and they are still destroying us now. along with four other men, they are charged with being members of national action, a group banned by the home secretary as a virulently racist terrorist organisation after it celebrated
7:47 pm
the killing of the mpjo cox. with all six defendants listening intently, the prosecutor, duncan atkinson qc, told the jury that the plan to kill another mp was discussed at a pub in warrington last summer. the group met at this table upstairs in the big window at the friar penketh pub on the 1st ofjuly. the prosecution say that jack renshaw told the group that his plan was to murder his local mp, rosie cooper, take some hostages and then kill a female detective who had been investigating him. the plan to kill rosie cooper was uncovered because the antiracism organisation hope not hate had a mole in the group, robbie mullen, who was also there at the pub that night. according to robbie mullen, jack renshaw wanted to carry out the murder in the name of national action, and that night christopher lythgoe gave his approval. christopher lythgoe denies that and all six men deny being members of national action
7:48 pm
after it was banned. daniel sandford, bbc news, at the old bailey. you're watching beyond one hundred days. it has been a summit — unlike any other. donald trump and kimjong un made history today — the first sitting us president, to meet a north korean leader. the handshake followed by a face to face meeting and the signing of a document, a deal promising a new relationship between the two countries. angela mancini is back with me. how many fortune 500 companies, yunus, are looking at north korea now? more than you would think. even in the run—up to the summit, notjust today
7:49 pm
but in the run—up, questioned around my are opening up, this is one of the last big markets that could open and this could be the time to start contemplating a strategy, perhaps local partner relationships. and our advice is absolutely not, it is too soon. advice is absolutely not, it is too soon. we may see advice is absolutely not, it is too soon. we may see some advice is absolutely not, it is too soon. we may see some investment coming in from the chinese but no framework for this. offering a condo on the beach? i guess we will see what tomorrow will bring. are you a student of body language question mark not entirely. i fancy myself as a bit ofa mark not entirely. i fancy myself as a bit of a student of the language so a bit of a student of the language so you will be my model. tell me what you think this is. this is donald trump. that is the first. what does that tell you? then the pat on the back. clearly that is extremely aggressive but what is ironic and interesting, he is
7:50 pm
someone ironic and interesting, he is someone who ironic and interesting, he is someone who uses ironic and interesting, he is someone who uses these aggressive handshakes but the criticism then is that in the negotiation he gave too much away. what i've also noticed about north korea, i have never heard him speak. but the other thing i've noticed is that he does the over the hand, so he does that. also fairly aggressive move and tells a bit about the way he approaches these things. perhaps a bit more low— key these things. perhaps a bit more low—key but still that's aggressive handshakes. and again you get the concessions that the us did not get. well if you cannot win with a handshake you can win with either the nuclear button, but what about the nuclear button, but what about the cars. take a look at these pictures. this is donald trump, they we re pictures. this is donald trump, they were walking around the complex today and we spotted this. walking down this portico and then he says come and have a look at my wheels.
7:51 pm
he takes over to the car that is known as the beast. so he has a mercedes and he says you want one of these. take a look in the back of this and just watch, kim jong—un just like, i will have a quick look in the back. do you know anything about the beast? i think it travels with him wherever he goes. a p pa re ntly with him wherever he goes. apparently they brought it in on one of those boeing aircraft. all the paraphernalia arriving and then he comes in in this. but there was a lot of that this week, looking back over the summit and when they came from the airport almost competing with those convoys. 43 cars in the convoy for kim jong—un from the airport and that tells you a bit about how committed they wear. they
7:52 pm
did have a very large entourage and they were out about time last night as you know. the half-brother, who he killed, went to the same hotel. that is right and a few months ago he had a reputation and still dies asa he had a reputation and still dies as a pariah state and all the human rights abuses and now getting here, extraordinary. he then goes back to his five star hotel, in north korea they told us that he would leave at two o'clock and finally he checked out, they had to kick out that ten o'clock. and it is the singapore authorities picking up the bill! extraordinary. so as we leave this extraordinary backdrop, what do you ta ke extraordinary backdrop, what do you take away from the summit? just historic day, incredible to see this, certainly better than what we
7:53 pm
had six months ago with the rhetoric but the question is where we will be in six months because again no meat on the bone in terms of the framework. the hardest work lies ahead. up to the working folks now to get something going and you know both leaders are mercurial and temperamental and let's see where we are in six months. let us hope it is not ina are in six months. let us hope it is not in a worse situation. certainly not in a worse situation. certainly no meat on my bones standing here in this heat, i have lost so much weight. come and spend three days in singapore. but i will miss this backdrop, truly spectacular. there is much more on this historic north korea summit — on our website. with all the background and latest analysis from our correspondents who are in place to give you the most up to date developments. including a special live page giving you all the latest on this summit with our analysis and live reporting. that's all at bbc.com/news —
7:54 pm
or you can download the bbc news app. coming up next on bbc world news — ros atkins is here with outside source and for viewers in the uk — we'll have the latest headlines from martine croxall. for now — from christian fraser in singapore and jane o'brien in washington — goodbye. i am sure you have noticed just how much fresher it is outside. it will stay relatively cool over the next few days. the wind will increase as well. tomorrow, the bulk of the day is looking fine. a few light showers. all eyes on the atlantic right now. the powerfuljet stream is pushing in this rather angry looking area of cloud, a developing area of low pressure, the storm in the atlantic.
7:55 pm
it is making a beeline for us. that means rough weather for northern parts of the uk but not in the short term. some clear spells with temperatures around 10 degrees or so. this is the beginning of the wet and windy weather. that weather front will be sweeping into the very far western fringes of scotland and into northern ireland later on wednesday but ahead of it you can see the weather is not bad at all. the wind is light. temperatures managing to creep up to 20, maybe 22 degrees in one or two spots. let's focus on the area of low pressure. on wednesday night it makes its presence felt. northern ireland, scotland, northern parts of england as well, as well as the spell of heavy rain, some very strong winds. these winds could be damaging for some of us.
7:56 pm
during the rush hour on wednesday, racing through the lowlands of scotland, you could see gusts in excess of 60 miles an hour. that could mean the odd tree down and there could be disruption due to the severe weather sweeping our way. severe gusts across the northern half of the uk. later on thursday, in the afternoon, eventually winds will ease but still blustery in the south. the afternoon for many of us will be sunny and windy, whether we're in the north or the south. the temperatures getting up to around 22 in the south, the mid—teens in the north. it will feel cooler because of the strength of the wind. the weekend is looking a little mixed. out of the two days, sunday is the best of the two days. this is bbc news, i'm clive myrie live at westminster. the headlines at 8pm. the ayes to the right: 324. nose
7:57 pm
brought the micro —— the noes to the left: 298. the government avoids a major defeat on its brexit bill after a late concession to rebel mps. i now have confidence and trust in the prime minister that we will have a detailed discussion about what needs to be put into the bill when it goes back to the lords. they will get put back in the lords, and then come back to the commons. it's actually absolutely essential that the decision was taken by the people is a sovereign act of parliament. that gave the people the right to leave, they've done it, and this is a great victory for the government. this is the scene live in the commons where more votes are taking place on the eu withdrawal bill.
7:58 pm
7:59 pm
8:00 pm

41 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on