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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  June 13, 2018 11:00am-1:00pm BST

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this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at 11. pressure on the prime minister to stick to assurances made to pro—remain tory mps that parliament will get a bigger say on any final brexit deal. it's very clear, it's notjust relying on assurances in the house of commons, this is a personal assurance from the prime minister that she understands the concerns and wants to build them into the amendment. we have given a real assurance for collea g u es given a real assurance for colleagues that these issues are being looked at seriously, carefully. dixons carphone is investigating a huge data breach involving millions of payment cards and personal data records saudi—led troops in yemen have begun a major assault to force houthi rebels out of the key port city of hudaydah. also: also a landmark ruling at the supreme court. a plumber has won a legal battle for workers' rights that's expected to have huge ramifications for freelance workers.
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the red squirrel and the wildcat are among 12 species of wild mammalfacing a high risk of extinction in the uk. good morning. it's 13th june. welcome to bbc newsroom live. theresa may may have avoided an embarrassing brexit defeat in the commons, but the pressure remains firmly on the prime minister this morning from members of her own party. conservative rebels backed the government's brexit plans yesterday after striking a last—minute deal with ministers. but they're now warning the prime minister that she has to stick to her side of the bargain — and honour "assurances" she's given that parliament will get a bigger say on any final brexit deal. a series of further votes
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will take place today. let's cross to westminster and our assistant political editor norman smith is there for us. norman, the rebellion was seen off yesterday but the pressure has not gone? the key question is, what price has theresa may paid for buying off the tory remain rebels last night with that final deal conducted, it seems, face—to—face, behind the speaker ‘s chair when theresa may spoke to the rebels and seems to have reassured them that she was prepared to give ground to their demand for parliament to have a big say but only now for suggestions that actually nothing has been promised or is on the table beyond talks, conversations, dialogue. this has alarmed many of
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the remain campaigners who insist theresa may gave them a personal assurance she would compromise. have assurance she would compromise. have a listen to one of them, who was at the meeting with the prime minister, nicky morgan. the prime minister was very clear that we absolutely should trust, and we do. we didn't have a chance, because as ever in westminster these things came down to the wire in the last 15 minutes to the wire in the last 15 minutes to go through the wording in detail but it's very clear, it's notjust relying on assurances in the house of commons, it's a personal assurance from the prime minister that she understands the concerns and wants to build into the amendment. so what have the government offered? they insist there is no specific promise on the table and they talk about engaging positively with the remain rebels, but there are no details. this morning the solicitor general said he could make no guarantees about what would happen when the legislation went back to the lords, probably on monday. we can't prejudge what the lords
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will do. if an amendment is tabled, the lords will be free to amend it, debated, vote the something different. i can't prejudge what the other house will axe and i cannot judge how the debate will go. but what we have done is give an assurance to colleagues from all parties that this is being looked at seriously, carefully, but the underlying principle that the government's and should not be tied by parliament in the way envisaged by parliament in the way envisaged by pa rt by parliament in the way envisaged by part of the amendment has to be at the heart of this. now why this matters is that if the remain rebels feel they have been stitched up by the prime minister then the risk is when this legislation comes back to the commons they will be in no mood to compromise, increasing the danger that the prime minister is defeated on the issue of a meaningful vote. i am joined by on the issue of a meaningful vote. i
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amjoined by sir on the issue of a meaningful vote. i am joined by sir desmond swain leading brexiteers. do you think that the minister should have offered a compromise? it was wise of her two offer to talk to the potential rebels. george or is a lwa ys potential rebels. george or is always better than war war, and that is proper. and we understand the rebels wanting to maximise their influence —— jaw jaw. rebels wanting to maximise their influence ——jawjaw. but rebels wanting to maximise their influence —— jawjaw. but it will in the end be determined by what is actually conceded and it's too soon to tell. my fear, however, is that the damage frankly has already been done. white dee you say that? because the strength —— why do you say that? because the strength of the negotiation is concentrating their mind on negotiating seriously and coming up with a deal that is mutually advantageous. it is always the ability to say actually we can
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go without a deal that will force them to concentrate on the best deal for them and the best deal for us. by for them and the best deal for us. by showing through this parliamentary process how difficult it is for a government to get anything on brexit through the house of commons, we are effectively signalling to our negotiating partners, actually, we can't walk away because parliament would not letters, and that is the danger. and has, even if mrs may wanting to compromise on the issue of a meaningful vote before any no deal, evenif meaningful vote before any no deal, even if she wanted to compromise on that, could she, given the views of brexiteers like yourself in the conservative party? the difficulty is actually from the other side. it is actually from the other side. it is the other side threatening to rebel. my own position is i frankly wa nt rebel. my own position is i frankly want to leave the european union underany want to leave the european union under any terms. of course i want
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the best terms but my bottom line is leaving. but do you see, as some of your colleagues in to believe, that this attempt to ensure a meaningful vote is actually cover either fall significantly delaying brexit or even scuppering it?|j significantly delaying brexit or even scuppering it? i am certain thatis even scuppering it? i am certain that is the objective of many. i don't believe for one moment it is the objective of the rebels. i think they are perfectly honest and open, andl they are perfectly honest and open, and i understand their wish to see parliament have an influence over the shape of the future relationship with the european union. i understand that. but i think it is an impossible way to negotiate. but lam an impossible way to negotiate. but i am convinced there are many in parliament who see this as a potential opportunity, in some circumstances, in the event of no deal, to stop the process. impossible to negotiate and reach a
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compromise on? i am certain there is always room for compromise, and i'm pretty certain that a compromise will be brought forward. my fear is that the whole processes has demonstrated an inability of the government to negotiate from strength, which, frankly is what the election a year ago was about. thank you very much. we are told that sir robert buckland will be meeting with some of the leading remain rebels if they can find time because of course they can find time because of course the withdrawal bill is back in the commons and it might slip until tomorrow and the expectation is that the bill will return to the lords on monday. however, there are suggestions that that may have to be delayed if there's going to be enough time to find a compromise. norman, thank you very much. prime minister's questions from midday later on. dixons carphone has admitted
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a huge data breach. hackers tried to access 5.9 million credit and debit payment cards and 1.2 million personal data records. the company says details of 105,000 cards without chip—and—pin protection had been leaked, and says it has no evidence that any of the cards had been used fraudulently following the breach. our technology correspondent rory cellan—jones is here. huge numbers involved here. tell us what the potential risks are. bad news and good news, as it were. the bad news is, when you hear about one of these data breaches, the companies say a lot of personal information has been leaked, but no worry no payment information. at this time 5.9 billion came —— payments cards —— 5.9 million payments cards —— 5.9 million payment cards have been accessed and it seems that the hackers started to do this injuly last year and
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they've only discovered it last week. that is pretty serious. dixons is saying don't worry because 5.8 million of the cards, nearly all of them, were chip and pin cards which is the system across europe, and the hackers did not get access to the chip and pin information. they don't have the pin codes so they are useless. that leaves 100,000 cards which are presumably mainly from american customers where they did not until recently have the chip and pin system looking vulnerable. again, dixons says they have seen no evidence of fraud so far. but it does look like a serious breach. the information commissioner is already investigating and wanting to ask why it has taken so long to come to light and maybe there is a connection with the previous incident because carphone warehouse, and they came together with dixons a few months ago, but they had a data breach in 2015 and it was fined
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£400,000 so breach in 2015 and it was fined £a00,000 so there will be a lot of questions about whether their systems a re questions about whether their systems are robust enough, whether they brought together different systems and, frankly, there holes in them and the hackers are getting through. you said there would be serious questions about why this was going on so long and it does seem extraordinary that this is a breach that began in july extraordinary that this is a breach that began injuly last extraordinary that this is a breach that began in july last year. extraordinary that this is a breach that began injuly last year. has it been persistently going on with records being trawled ? been persistently going on with records being trawled? it's difficult to know. sadly this is often the case. hackers get in and they are not noticed immediately. they may be quietly working in the background and nobody has actually had money stolen and there's been no attempt, visibly to use the data. it just might not have been noticed. it does raise questions about how they are looking over the system and have tied the defences are and how easy it is to spot when there is a problem —— how tight the defences are. all of these big systems are
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under attack all of the time. their attem pts under attack all of the time. their attempts on computer systems on a daily basis. it's the fact that they did not notice it was happening. just explain how the chip and pin gives protection online. you do not use your pin when you put in your details on—line to pay for something. but you do have to put in the three number code as well. they a p pa re ntly the three number code as well. they apparently would not have that. dixons are saying that they have been talking to the banks and they have said they've seen no evidence of fraud but there is advice to people who are worried to contact action fraud who are handling this if you think your card might have been compromised. thank you, rory. it's a conflict that has led to the deaths of thousands and caused humanitarian misery for countless others, and now the saudi—led coalition and forces loyal to the former president hadi have launched an assault on yemen's main port city of hodeidah, one of the remaining humanitarian
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lifelines in the war. it follows the rebels rejection of an ultimatum and refusal to surrender the city by the end of tuesday. rebel positions are being bombarded from the air and sea. the port is the main entry point for humanitarian aid on which over seven million yemenis depend. 0ur middle east correspondent, martin patience is in beirut. what is happening in hodeidah? we know that the battle began by land, sea and airand know that the battle began by land, sea and air and we know there are naval frigates in the area providing cover and bombardment. we also know that air strikes have been carried out and we also been told that yemeni forces are massing on the ground, so they will be pushing into the city although it's not clear whether that will happen today or later in the week. the situation is very serious there and that saudi
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coalition says this could be a turning point in the war. this is a war that has dragged on for three yea rs war that has dragged on for three years now, the civil war and it's beenin years now, the civil war and it's been ina years now, the civil war and it's been in a stalemate but the crucial point is that hodeidah is the lifeline of the country and one concern is the people trapped in the city. all of the imports from yemen comes through the port. the people of yemen, millions on the point of starvation will not receive that. tell us more about the implications of that. 80% of imports go through the port, and with so many dependent on age, how much aid is in the country and how long will supplies last? how long could this have an impact? aid agencies are warning
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that the battle has exacerbated an already catastrophic humanitarian situation. the reason the saudis say they are blockading the port and have moved in to take it from the macro—2 rebels, they say the houthi are backed by iran. the houthi deny that. but the aid agencies have withdrawn their staff and they say much—needed aid with millions on the brink of starvation will simply not get into the country and it is an already awful situation which could become even worse. the headlines on bbc newsroom live. dixons is investigating a huge data breach involving millions of payment cards and personal data records. saudi—led troops in yemen have
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begun a major assault to force houthi rebels out of the key port city of hodeida. some astonishing news on the eve of the world cup. the 2010 champions spain, have sacked their manager julen lopetegui. let's speak to lee foster in moscow. it was announced that he would join real madrid to replace zinedine zidane after the tournament, and we will try to speak to 0llie. are you there? what is the latest on this? yes, ican there? what is the latest on this? yes, i can hear you. you use the word astonishing and it really is just that. we knew yesterday that lopetegui, the well—regarded spanish head coach with his team, head of the world cup, playing portugal on friday was going to be joining the world cup, playing portugal on friday was going to bejoining real madrid. he used to be the back—up
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goalkeeperfor madrid. he used to be the back—up goalkeeper for them madrid. he used to be the back—up goalkeeperfor them and madrid. he used to be the back—up goalkeeper for them and was also back—up goalkeeperfor goalkeeper for them and was also back—up goalkeeper for barcelona. he is the man who was going to be taking over from zinedine zidane. is the man who was going to be taking overfrom zinedine zidane. we had this statement from the spanish football association just confirming that his contract would be cancelled however far spain that his contract would be cancelled howeverfar spain got, that his contract would be cancelled however far spain got, but then there was a news conference and it's been confirmed that he's been sacked with immediate effect just been confirmed that he's been sacked with immediate effectjust a day before the world cup opener. spain we re before the world cup opener. spain were one of the favourites are not making it past the last 16. it has been felt that spain have been moving in the last —— right direction and were right up there as one of the favourites, thought to go along way in the tournament starting tomorrow. so spain absolutely rocked by this. those players who he has brought together, so many cliques before in the spanish dressing room, and lopetegui, who was very, very
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successful coming through the age groups with spain and had fantastic success with the age—group sides and they promoted from within spain as they promoted from within spain as they looked to try and make their way on the international stage and he was certainly the man to have got them to russia. he has been sacked with immediate effect just them to russia. he has been sacked with immediate effectjust a day or so away from their opening match against the portuguese. it's of developing story and we will get more and more out of this about what the thinking from the spanish fa is behind it. another big piece of news coming out of moscow today as well, the twenty20 six hosts will be decided —— the twenty20 six hosts. we thought that would be the big news until the big news came out of spain and we have sat through a lengthy fever congress. -- fifa.
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they are voting on whether it will be morocco or a united bid from the us, canada and mexico to host the 2026 bid. they are both putting their cases forward. the magic number is 104. there are 206 eligible votes and they will all vote to see who will host 2026 and we should find out in the next 20 minutes or so. thank you very much for joining minutes or so. thank you very much forjoining us. more through the afternoon. england have trained for the first time since arriving in russia. their first game isn't until monday but they've already decided to get the travel out of their legswith a busy looking session in repino. sports news correspondent david 0rnstein is there for us. it seems gareth southgate has one
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injury concern. he does, marcus rashford of manchester united who picked up a slight knock to his knee ina behind picked up a slight knock to his knee in a behind closed doors friendly at the training base on monday and he is not training with the squad who you might be able to see behind me going through their paces in front of the media and local schoolchildren and some dignitaries as well. marcus rashford, the only name on the 23 missing, and that would raise a question about his participation in the first match in volgograd against tunisia on monday. the only concern is strapping on the file eric dier of tottenham but otherwise all looking good. david, thank you very much —— on the thigh of eric dier. that's all the sport. the supreme court has ruled that a plumber who was hired as a self employed worker should be treated as a worker with employment rights. gary smith, who had worked for pimlico plumbers, claimed unfair dismissal
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after he had a heart attack. he had argued he should be entitled to holiday and sick pay as he had been working a minimum number of hours per week. the case will be seen as highly significant for the growing numbers of people working in the gig economy, required to be highly flexible and treated as independent contractors employing themselves. joining me now from central london is charlie mullins, owner of pimlico plumbers. thank you forjoining us. there have been several court rulings previously in his favour and you have appealed again and again and it's gone through the supreme court, and he has one. he hasn't won. it's been referred back to the tribunal that the case is not over. there was an opportunity here for the judges in the highest court in the land to update their employment law and bring into the 21st century but they have missed the opportunity. we still need clarity on it and
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hopefully the government can get involved and maybe i can work with them to find out exactly what we can do to improve this situation. why would it take employment law into the 21st—century? would it take employment law into the 21st-century? if a company can have workers without giving them rights and benefits? let's be honest, it crystal clear that our company has self—employed subcontractors. he wanted workers' rights and basically wanted us to pay him twice and we weren't prepared to do that. he was taken on fairly and honestly and in three yea rs fairly and honestly and in three years he earned over half £1 million. it has been tested in the courts and there have been a number of court rulings that said he was right and the supreme court has upheld those rulings. he might say well, actually, your company was trying to have its cake and eat it in taking him on and having his
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services but not giving him the rights that he wanted.|j services but not giving him the rights that he wanted. i don't think you've got the full facts of the story. this guyjoined the company asa story. this guyjoined the company as a self—employed plumber and worked happily for six years and earned half £1 million in three yea rs earned half £1 million in three years and claimed every benefit as being self—employed, claimed for his wife working for him, and office, he was vat registered and supplied his own materials and uniform. he took every advantage possible, filled in tax forms indicating he was self—employed. if we have got it wrong then hm rc need to look into whether this has been a fraudulent claim from his point of view. we are not exploiting a worker, we are trying to look at the bigger picture and this is going to affect 4.6 million subcontractors across the country and it will affect the economy and thousands of businesses could go out of business because of
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this situation. what will you do now? we will be talking to the lawyers and get their advice and it can go to the next stage of the european court of justice can go to the next stage of the european court ofjustice we will fight till the end because i know the truth on this matter and it needs to get clarity. hopefully the government will step in and get involved now. it is obviously costly to you either way, the costs of fighting this and the costs if you lose because it won'tjust be him, it will be other workers' rights as well. of course, that this isn't about the money it's about the wider picture. this is about the future of nearly 5 million subcontractors in the country and we need to clarify it. it goes to prove that alec employment laws are not worth the paper they are written on. —— our employment laws. thank you charlie mullins of pimlico plumbers. and we'll be hearing from the lawyer to gary smith who brought this action later on this morning.
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more now on the situation in yemen. saudi—backed forces have begun an assault on the key port of hudaydah, which is held by rebels. hudaydah is the main point of entry for aid in yemen's three—year civil war and agencies have warned of a humanitarian catastrophe if it is attacked. iolanda jaquemet is the icrc middle east spokesperson and shejoins me now from geneva. thank you forjoining us. how concerned are you about the humanitarian situation? extremely concerned and the concerns are twofold. first we speak of a city of 600,000 people so we are concerned about their fate, but as you mentioned, hudaydah is the lifeline for the yemen, the main port through which most imports and humanitarian aid arrives and this will affect millions of people. we speak of a country of 29 million people and literally three quarters of them depend on humanitarian aid following three years of armed conflict. how
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vital is it that this situation is dealt with. how much time is there to sort this out and make sure that aid is able to continue to be delivered to those who need it? i'm afraid there is very little time. first of all we ask them to spare civilians in hudaydah. i mean hospitals, electricity systems, and those who might want to look for safety elsewhere who want to flee the city to do so safely. this is an obligation under international law. but secondly, we speak of a population that has been brought to its knees by this conflict. we speak of8 its knees by this conflict. we speak of 8 million people who are on the brink offamine, of 8 million people who are on the brink of famine, who need food to be brought to them by humanitarian organisations so any hampering of these imports that will continue
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over days will have an immediate impact on the most vulnerable amongst the population. children, the elderly, pregnant women and so on. i appreciate you are a nonpolitical organisation, but what would you say to countries who are allies of saudi arabia about the sort of pressure that they might bring to bear in this situation? this is actually a message that we have conveyed to all of those that have conveyed to all of those that have an influence in this conflict. according to the geneva conventions, states are according to the geneva conventions, states a re not according to the geneva conventions, states are not only obliged to respect the law when they fight but also obliged to ensure respect. so there are a number of states who have an influence on the various parties in this conflict and we keep repeating to them that they have an obligation to use their influence. thank you very much forjoining us. the headlines are coming up
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on the bbc news channel. in a moment we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. first, we leave you with for a look at the weather. the met office, sorry, the irish met 0ffice have named the storm hector coming through the north—west later today and into tomorrow that will bring a unseasonably strong winds as we move through tonight and into tomorrow. first of all we have seen good spells of sunshine across england and wales and maybe in a bit more in the way of cloud and a bit more in the way of cloud and a bit more in the way of rain pushing in from the west for northern ireland and scotland and temperatures at a maximum of 22. through tonight we see low—pressure working in through the west and we see heavy rain in northern ireland, northern england and also some strong winds and gales around 60 or 70 mph and a possible 55 or 65 mph further south and in
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north—west wales as well. this is bbc news, our latest headlines. debate on the eu withdrawal bill continues in the commons, with pressure mounting on theresa may following a last—minute concession to a group of tory rebels. dixons carphone reveals a data breach involving 5.9 million payment cards and 1.2 million personal data records. a worker has won his legal battle against pimlico plumbers at the supreme court in a ruling expected to have huge ramifications for freelance workers. and 12 species of wild mammal facing a high risk of extinction in the uk, including the red squirrel. donald trump has arrived back in the united states after his historic summit with north korean leader kimjong un and says that pyongyang no longer poses a nuclear threat. north korea's state run media is claiming that president trump agreed to lift sanctions during the meeting in singapore. it comes as the us secretary of state mike pompeo arrives on the korean peninsula
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for a round of meetings with leaders to explain the agreement reached on tuesday. president trump has been talking to us media about the summit and the invitation to washington which he extended to mr kim. i think that the right time he will absolutely be coming to waitrose. we have been very... it has been a very intense relationship, short and very intense relationship, short and very intense and before that it was pretty rhetorical. it was not a pretty rhetorical. it was not a pretty thing. people were very worried but without that i don't think we would be here today. one of the things i am very happy about, we will not play the war games any more, and you'll have extensive that is. bringing these mess of bombers and for practice for one. i said how far is guam, they said six and a half hours. that is a long way for bombers times 20, so we will not be
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doing the war games as long as we're negotiating in good faith. let's get the very latest on this — from our correspondent in seoul, robin brant. since landing, donald trump has tweeted to say just since landing, donald trump has tweeted to sayjust landed, a long trip but everyone can feel much safer than the day i took off, there is no longer in a clear threat from north korea. meeting with kim jong—un was an interesting and positive experience, north korea has grey potential for the future. both sides talking about what is in this agreement. he said immediately afterwards there was a lot of stuff talked about and agreed that wasn't in the agreement that was published. what is your sense of how binding all of this is and how much detail was agreed? you can put your name to copy heads of agreement that is a page and have long that includes four bullet points, but when several of those points, but when several of those points are things that north korea has already agreed to then some
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people think it was essentially shrouded in ambiguity. perhaps that is the reason for its success, why both parties can sign up, because it lacks detail. there is no escaping that hard work needs to start now involving the south koreans and make pompeo, he described the meeting as establishing a framework for clocks went forward. that is what has happened and they must now make things happen. it is talk about the tweet. this is quite something coming from the president. there is no longer in a nuclear threat from north korea says president trump. japan is not far from north korea says president trump. japan is not farfrom here, nor is sold, that may be the judgment of the president having had a few hours with kim jong—un but the president having had a few hours with kimjong—un but north korea retains those missiles that many states believe can carry and nuclear warhead to mainland united states. it retains the intelligence community thinks, 20, 30, 40 nuclear devices, and it retains as well kim
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jong—un, third in line of the dynastic leaders in charge of that country whose dream and ambition it has been to develop these weapons so there is no change in the capability of north korea at the moment. no change has been forced upon it from the meeting in singapore and yet the president can claim and is claiming that the set has gone away. so what are the potential triggers and deadlines? as you say it is shrouded in ambiguity. we don't have the detail. but when we hear north korea saying that, said sanctions would be lifted and he said he was like that to happen but it will happen immediately, and also the war games stopping and then you have south korea saying we don't not the detail of that. however things going to unfold? there are no triggers, there are no deadlines at the moment, that is formike are no deadlines at the moment, that is for mike pompeo and the president of south korea and others around kim
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jong—un to work out going forward. that is where the hard work is going to be in the coming weeks and months and years. what we got yesterday was and years. what we got yesterday was a reaffirmation from the north to continuous commitment for the deed accreditation in the whole of the korean peninsula, not just accreditation in the whole of the korean peninsula, notjust north korea, but it includes south korea and the united states military forces present here. let's talk about the war games. the joint military exercises that happened twice a year. large—scale 20,000 us military personnel here. the north hate him because it sees these exercises as incendiary and provocative and a reminder that the military mightjust a few miles over the border, but for many human self it is confidence building and remind them of the military alliance they have and i think it is clear the south korean leader did not know about this announcement stopping the exercises was coming yesterday and we asked for a statement in the hash—mac and we were told they were trying to work out what the intention was. a lot of work to be
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donein intention was. a lot of work to be done in terms of keeping the us south korea alliance together going forward. the south korean president wa nts forward. the south korean president wants peace, he won the de—escalation to continue and want things to get much better with the north, and eventually reunification but there is a question of trust, confidence building along the way and prices being paid on both sides as they try to advance that process. what is the mood as you would assess it in south korea? we have heard that tweet from donald trump. he is bullish and upbeat and feeling confident and like he has full trust. how would you describe the mood in the south? his south korean counterpart is very optimistic about the peace talks, he described the outcome is possible being miraculous before president trump and kim jong—un sat down, and any de—escalation of tension is good. it is positive. any further efforts to
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bring these two parties closer together, the north and south whether that is about military lies on recovering the remains of fallen soldiers from that war of 1950 in 1953, all of these things are positive but the south korean leadership appears were not prepared for this announcement yesterday. that will be surprising and unsettling. we spoke to a few people on the street, not a scientific survey but they expressed surprise that this sudden halt in military operations. the military operations are highly symbolic and it shows the south korean people that the us remains there as the security umbrella. they talked about needing to make concessions and copper mines along the way. everyone wants peace but it is a question of trust. thank you. an italian coastguard ship has docked in the sicilian port of catania, with hundreds of rescued migrants on board. it comes after italy refused to take in another rescue boat, the aquarius, run by a franco—german organisation. the move has provoked a diplomatic
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row, with france accusing italy of being irresponsible and the italian foreign ministry summoning the french ambassador to explain the comments. italy's new populist government has said that ports will now only be open to italian rescue boats, as james reynolds, who's in catania, explains. the arrival of this italian coastguard ship carrying around 900 rescued migrants is a rather vivid illustration of the congregated nature of italy's new migration policy. it seems that this country and its ports remain open to rescued migrants so long as they are brought in on ships which carry the italian flag and as you can see up there the coastguard is an official italian ship, so it gets to land here. italy's restrictions imposed by the new populist government appear to
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apply only to foreign flagged ngo boats have been coming and going in recent yea rs boats have been coming and going in recent years and remember on sunday italy restricted the arrival of the aquarius and set it off eventually to spain. but for now if you get in on an official italian ship you will get to land in italy like these migrants, many of them from africa, and they are being looked after by the authorities. that leads to a second question. what happens to them when the here? previously they we re them when the here? previously they were spread out around italy, causing a lot of uncertainty. the new government has promised to try and deport people as soon as possible but of course those who are arriving, many of those will apply for asylum and will have the right to have their cases heard in the new government will find it is difficult to deport people as quickly as it might want. tomorrow marks 52 weeks since the fire in london's grenfell tower, the worst fire in the post war history of this nation, a fire that has caused grief on a huge scale. and anger too about why it happened and what has happened since. among the families still
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in emergency accommodation are the rasouls, dad, mum, an elderly and disabled grandfather, and two young children. 0ur chief correspondent matthew price spent the day with them to find out about life a year on from the fire. 0ne one year to the day after the fire and little zara is still waking nortel bed. her brother and she has spent 12 months of their young lives crammed ina spent 12 months of their young lives crammed in a room with their pa rents. crammed in a room with their parents. i have a big belly? i know. i'm waiting you. no kitchen table, no kitchen. you might wonder why they are still here. they asked to be rehoused close to the tower, home on the ground floor suitable for a zara's disabled grandfather who has dementia. he lives with them in an
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adjoining room. he signed the original tenancy agreement for their empty mac flat but his illness means he cannot sign a new lease. it slowed the whole process. they have been told their new home will not be ready until november. we thought it would be maybe a few weeks or a few days. days turned into weeks. and then weeks turned into months and obviously months have turned into a year. yeah. one third of the g re nfell year. yeah. one third of the grenfell families are still in hotels, but have found permanent homes but moving in has been delayed for so many bureaucratic reasons. so the morning commute takes them out through reception to the school drop—off. and sometimes to the remains of the terror in which
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mohammad russell was born. these people... bereaved survivors, they are already traumatised. people who have lost family and already had to grief ina have lost family and already had to grief in a completely abnormal way. having to have their loved ones returned to them in pieces, in fragments, bird fragments, in most cases. and then to bury them months down the line. some families were buried ina down the line. some families were buried in a single grave. this group of people are having to deal with all of this kind of pressure on their shoulders and still have to fight. to get the truth out, to get basic rights met. it should not be like that. no way. it is not fair at all. nearby at the local mosque, mohammed's wife spends most of her afternoon. we opened up the kitchen
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here to give the people of grenfell summer to cook for their families. but still the pressure shows. life is not comfortable and we do not know when it will be comfortable. but again, we eat, we sleep. when the kids question you the answer if you can, or just the kids question you the answer if you can, orjust turn around and start crying. it makes you feel better. for now they are left with the daily walk back along the hotel corridor, 365 days and counting, waiting for a new place to live. and ina in a moment a summary return home. in a moment a summary of the business news. but first the
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headlines. pressure on the prime minister to stick to assurances made to remain tory mpsthat parliament will get a bigger say on any final brexit deal saudi—led troops in yemen have begun a major assault to force houthi rebels out of the key port city of hodeida. a plumber has won a legal battle for workers' rights that's expected to have huge ramifications for freelance workers. in a moment: 12 species of wild mammal are under threat of extinction in the uk with the red squirrel, what role in wildcat among those most at risk. hello, and in the business news... dixons carphone has admitted a huge data breach involving 5.9 million payment cards and 1.2 million personal data records. it is investigating the hacking attempt, which began injuly last year. the company says so far there is no evidence that any of the cards have
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been used fraudulently. dixons carphone shares were down more than 3% this morning. the cost of living in the uk has held steady for the month of may. the cpi inflation figure released by the office for national statistics remained at 2.4% as many had expected, although fuel prices increased by the biggest monthly amount since january 2011, rising by 3.8%. and we start with the inflation story. it's costing us more to fillup ourcars, but less to buy computer games, that's the latest assessment from the office for national statistics on the cost of living. they released the cpi or consumer price index inflation figure for may this morning, and it held at 2.4%, the same figure as april. joining us now is silvia dall‘angelo, senior economist at hermes investment management —2.4% -2.4%
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was the figure many were expecting but there was an interesting line that fuel prices increased by the biggest monthly amount since january 2011, rising by 3.8%? why was that? first of all, overall uk inflation did not really provide much of a surprise this month, so there were some crosscurrents, basically offset each other. as you mentioned gasoline prices were up by almost 4% on the month and that trip hash—mac that reflect developments in international markets for oil prices. which are up by around 12%. but as i said, other components provided an offset, so food inflation came in on the weak side this month and also a range of core
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goods as i mentioned, games, toys, hobbies, where actually week this month. and in my mind that reflects the impact from the past. we saw wage growth figures, they were down slightly and it is now down to 2.8%, that are still ahead of the inflation figure of 2.4% but it is not ahead by much. ellen mac that is right, so inflation was down, in april, still holding between 2.5 and 3%. this is likely above consumer inflation but nonetheless inflation is likely positive a few months ago, and it was the consumer who had to suffer.
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the squeeze from high inflation from last year. after these figures were released we saw sterling slipped against the dollar. why would we see that? i guess financial markets and general economists were looking for a modest increase. well instead inflation moved sideways. but more fundamentally in the last few days we have seen a set of very mixed data on the uk economy. so earlier this week production came in very weak, it contracted in april following a fairly underwhelming q1 performance. on the other side we had the markets yesterday which were fairly solid so on balance that are more reasons for the bank of england to stay on hold in august rather than hiking rates, and financial
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markets are taken into account the development. thank you. in other business news, grave warnings over the future of the uk car industry today from the confederation of british industry. the cbi claims sections will face extinction unless the uk stays in the eu customs union. and say there is ‘zero evidence' that trade deals outside the eu would provide any economic benefit to britain. the government has said it is ‘focused on delivering a brexit that works for the whole of the uk'. toyota is investing $1bn into the singapore—based ride—hailing app grab. the investment by the japanese company is the largest—ever by a carmaker in the global ride—hailing sector. grab was launched after it bought the regional business of uber. the plan is to expand grab's range of services, to food delivery and digital payments. wetherspoons plans to replace french champagne with other sparkling wines and sell more drinks from the uk and non—eu manufacturers in the run—up to brexit.
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from july 9th the pub chain will start replacing champagne with uk and australian sparkling wines. let's have a look at the markets. the city is up almost half a percent at the minute, and let's look at some of the followers. just eat down because delivery have announced a shift in their strategy. investors are worried that they will take some of the just eat market share and you can see it wobbling there. dixons car you have been hearing about that huge data breach, investors losing confidence, down almost 4%. and as you can see everywhere discussing whether economist, the pound slipping against the dollar after those inflation figures, less reason for the bank of england to increase interest rates so the pound slipping against the dollar. i am back with more business throughout the afternoon. slightly—raised blood pressure in middle age could lead
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to an increased risk of getting dementia in later life, according to a new study. researchers at university college london analysed the medical records of almost nine thousand civil servants. they found that 50 year olds with higher than average blood pressure have a 45 per cent greater risk of dementia than someone with a lower measurement. let's go to the announcement for world cup 2026. we can take your life to moscow where we are expecting to hear the results. for the 2026 fifa world cup the member associations of canada, mexico and usa have been selected by the fifa congress to host the 2026 fifa world cup. thank you. there you have it, thejoint bid
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from the united states, mexico and canada as won the bid to host the 2026 world cup. it was a choice between them and morocco, morocco had support from africa to take the event back to africa but in the event back to africa but in the event as we are just taking their from moscow that the delegates from 207 nations attending the fifa congress in moscow came down on the side of thatjoint bid from the united states, canada and mexico. the model established stadiums and well—developed transport links were cited as being in their favour. well—developed transport links were cited as being in theirfavour. so thatis cited as being in theirfavour. so that is where football fans will be looking to in 2026, other changes
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for that tenement, 40 teams will ta ke for that tenement, 40 teams will take part in the world cup 2026 compared with 32 taking part in 2018. and there is the breakdown of the results, that united bid getting two thirds of the vote. 30 what is being said. the photos back to you mr president. in thanking very much the whole delegation who did a extraordinary job the whole delegation who did a extraordinaryjob for morocco, i would like to give the four to one or two or three orfour or would like to give the four to one or two or three or four or five representatives of the united bid. sorry, it is a bit emotional for us today. thank you, president
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infantino. fellow presidents, general secretary sent everyone in our fifa family. 0n general secretary sent everyone in our fifa family. on behalf of our united bid, canada and mexico in my country the united states, thank you so country the united states, thank you so very very much for this incredible honour. thank you foreign trusting us with this privilege, the privilege of hosting the fifa world cup in 2026. we want to convey an appreciation as well for the fifa ministration and your staff, president infantino, especially the task force who worked so hard over this and higher process. let us also salute her friends from morocco at, at the end of the day we are all united in football. that is the spirit of the world cup, the beautiful game transcends borders and cultures. football today is the only victor and in that spirit we wish our russian hosts and all the teams competing here the very best
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of luck. thank you all again very much. applause that is the leader of the joint bid saying he was emotional at the news that they had won. they said previously it is not about geopolitics, it is about football and what is fundamentally at the end of the day in the best interests of football and football community and he was just saying that football is the only victor. disappointment from morocco, they have tried and failed for times that try and host the world cup but they have lost out again this time to thatjoint bid by the united states, mexico and canada which will host the world cup 2026. more now on the decision about self employed workers at the supreme court. the court has ruled a plumber who worked solely for pimlico plumbers is entitled to workers rights such as holiday and sick pay jacqueline mcguigan is the lawyer for gary smith — who brought the action
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against pimlico plumbers. your site has had victories of the way, but it has been appealed and gone all the way. victory today. how do you react? we're absolutely delighted, it has been a very long time and we have been litigating since 2011 so that seven years. this is the fourth process and we have won comprehensively at each process. each court have said that mr smith isa each court have said that mr smith is a worker. there is no denying that. just explain for anyone who is not familiar with the different towns because it is congregated, isn't it? he was there technically asa isn't it? he was there technically as a freelancer but he wanted the work right. that is different again from the planet right. it is extreme copper traders, particularly as gary
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smith himself believed he was self—employed. so when giving evidence at the london tribunal he himself as self—employed, he paid vat, but when we actually applied the legal tests, when i applied the legal tests he was a worker because he was in an extremely controlled by pimlico plumbers, he had to wear the uniform and drive the van and he could not substitute instead internally with other pimlico plumber operatives. the difference if you are genuinely self—employed oran if you are genuinely self—employed or an independent contractor, you run your own business, your entrepreneur, you have your own clients and customers and do your own thing. the line where you become a worker is where the business exerts control over you. saw charlie mallon super michael plumbers was an earlier tommy about this and he is not at all happy and he said he will be looking at potentially going to
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the european court of law over it. he said thejudges the european court of law over it. he said the judges missed the european court of law over it. he said thejudges missed an opportunity to update employment laws. it would be in —— an acknowledgement of the reality of the 21st 60 that workers like the property were representing should not have the right thereafter. you, it is not the law that is the problem that is the abuses that the employers are applying to get around the law. so the judges as i said all the law. so the judges as i said all the way through have been comprehensive in their decisions, it is the complex set of circumstances that the organisation set up to try and make him look self—employed when in reality you're not. we are out of time. thank you very much. it is because we're expecting prime minister ‘s any moment so let'sjoin prime minister ‘s any moment so let's join with prime minister ‘s any moment so let'sjoin with sir prime minister ‘s any moment so let's join with sir martin weather update. storm hector bringing some unseasonably windy weather as he moves through tonight, italy for parts of scotland, northern england
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and northern ireland through tonight and northern ireland through tonight and into tomorrow. you can see that here in the chart, this second area of low pressure brings heavy rain but also some very strong wind, you can see the tight isobars they're working their way in from the west. through today some good spells of sunshine across england and wales, the risk of one or two showers and turning wet from the west with cement bricks of rain moving into scotla nd cement bricks of rain moving into scotland and northern ireland. temperature today at a maximum of 22 degrees. as we go through this evening and overnight we see heavy persistent rain working its way in from the west, across scotland northern ireland, into england and patchy at the further south you go and there will be strong winds. the strong list of those four parts of northern ireland in north—west scotland, looking at costs of around 70 most of our. elsewhere costs 55 around to 60 mph in the north. this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at midday. pressure on the prime minister to stick to assurances made to pro—remain tory mps that parliament will get a bigger say on any final brexit deal. it's very clear, it's notjust relying on assurances in the house
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of commons, this is a personal assurance from the prime minister that she understands the concerns and wants to build them into the amendment. what we have done yesterday is give a real assurance to colleagues from all strands of the party that the issues looked seriously, carefully. dixons carphone is investigating a huge data breach involving millions of payment cards and personal data records. saudi—led troops in yemen have begun a major assault to force houthi rebels out of the key port city of hodeida. also a landmark ruling at the supreme court. a plumber has won a legal battle for workers' rights that's expected to have huge ramifications for freelance workers. and the 2026 world cup will be held in the united states, mexico and candada. good afternoon.
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i'm joanna gosling. welcome to bbc newsroom live. prime minister's questions is about to get underway in the house of commons. 0ur assistant political editor norman smith is in westminster for us now. thanks very much. every time i say jeremy corbyn will not go on brexit, he does. i calculate he's gone on brexit three out of the last 4pm queues and has actually done much better on brexit than people might have expected. skewering theresa may over when she might publish the brexit white paper and plenty of him to go on today on deal or no deal, and what theresa may promised the tory rebels. and other issues he might choose to pick up, we might hear more about grenfell tower. we
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had the apology from theresa may for not visiting the families and relatives in the aftermath and labour saying that half of those affected in grenfell are still living in temporary accommodation, or he could seek to pick up support from the tory benches by going on the rail, the real issue for many mps on all sides with the continuing grief on northern rail and go via thames link. and to add some spice, chris grayling will be addressing the 1922 committee of tory backbenchers and we expect him to get a pretty rough ride there. one other thing that might be worth looking out for is the scottish national party in terms of brexit because with the big muhaarar over the meaningful vote —— the big muhaarar over the meaningful vote there was not much time to debate northern ireland and devolution which was scheduled to have three hours of debate but then the end they got 15 minutes and there was a
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lot of unhappiness amongst the snp that they did not get a decent crack. ian blackford will raise that there is real anger of —— the issue was shoehorned out of the way so those are some of the things that might come up. the whole thing with brexit, it's been messy for a really long time and leaders of political parties are struggling through a long time to keep their party is united. and really nothing has changed for theresa may and jeremy corbyn who both have difficulties. the reason i say he will never go on brexit is because he has his own real problems over brexit with deep divisions in his own party more which might bubble to the surface this afternoon. in the second day of the withdrawal bill debate they will debate the single market and there are many labourmps debate the single market and there are many labour mps who want to try and crowbarjeremy corbyn into supporting continued membership of the single market. we know that last week he put it into touch ordering
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his mps to ab stain on the vote. why thatis his mps to ab stain on the vote. why that is interesting is because we can expect a maybe a number of maybe 50 or 60 to rebel, sojeremy corbyn is facing his own rebellion today over the single market and on the conservative side, some of the rebels have said that they are going to rebel against the government over the single market and the reason for thatis the single market and the reason for that is that they feel safe in rebelling because they know there is no chance of the government being defeated because jeremy no chance of the government being defeated becausejeremy corbyn has ordered his mps to abstain. not as explosive day as yesterday but plenty of roles and spills on brexit and maybe during pmq ‘s. i notice there are not many tory mps are listed with questions today, so the speaker, i'm pretty sure, we'll be picking out the tories and inevitably he will go to those who
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think might have interesting things to say, often hardline eurosceptics or tory rebels. let's see what will happen. here we go. mr speaker, tomorrow marks one year on from the grenfell tower fire. i know members from all sides of the house willjoin me in saying that this unimaginable tragedy remains at the forefront of our minds. 0n monday i had the privilege to attend a very moving vigil in memory of those who were lost that night and i was honoured to take part in an iftar with members of the local community. let me reassure the house that we are making sure that the survivors of grenfell get the homes and support they need and the truth and support they need and the truth and justice they deserve. mr speaker, i'd also like to take the opportunity to wish the england men's football team the best in the upcoming world cup. this morning i had a meeting with ministerial
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collea g u es had a meeting with ministerial colleagues and others in addition to my duties in this house i will have further such meetings. my duties in this house i will have further such meetingslj my duties in this house i will have further such meetings. i and i'm sure the whole house will want to join the prime minister in her amens about the grenfell tragedy 12 months ago and my constituents will want me to echo her good wishes to the england football team. can i ask the prime minister, last year the top five co—operatives in our country paid more than four times the corporation tax of amazon, facebook, ebay and starbucks. the prime minister will want to raise the patriotism of those who have signed up patriotism of those who have signed up to the fair tax mark campaign but might this not be an opportunity to encourage the department for business and the treasury to take a more proactive and supportive interest in the growth of cooperative and mutual businesses? cani cooperative and mutual businesses? can i thank the honourable gentleman for his comments about his constituency and the support and
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thoughts that they have for all of those affected by the grenfell tower fire. 0n the issue of taxation, you may have noticed that hmrc has required the larger companies referenced to pay more tax and ensure we get the tax from them and they look fairly across all types of institution that operate in the country. one of the key reasons why people voted to leave the european union was to get back control of immigration policy so we can welcome people to our country based on their skills and their talons, not based on the country from which they are from. you cannot stay in the european economic area without continuing with free movement of people, so can i urge the prime minister to stick to our policy of leaving the single market and not
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listen to the labour voices who want to continue with unlimited migration from the european union. can i say that i am brittle that —— absolutely agree with him. the labour party used to say that they wanted control of the borders but now what they wa nt of the borders but now what they want is free movement. we will take back control of our borders. i wish the england team all the best in the tournament in russia and hope it goes really, really well. this week, mr speaker, and that england win! this week is national carers week andi this week is national carers week and i want to take this opportunity to pay tribute to those thousands of usually unpaid carers whose commitment to family and friends too often goes unrecognised. as the prime minister pointed out, tomorrow marks one year of the anniversary of the grenfell tower fire and be
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meeting families tomorrow at the silent march but the sad truth and reality is that many of them are still waiting for the security of a permanent home one year on from that disaster. when this —— prime minister met donald trump last week did she do, as the foreign secretary suggested, and ask him to take over the brexit negotiations? whooping. mr davies, you are a senior and supposedly cerebral member of the house. ina leap
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in a leap year, anyway. you must attempt to recover your composure, man, i attempt to recover your composure, man, lam attempt to recover your composure, man, i am worried about you and worried for you. the prime minister. thank you, mr speaker, on the brexit negotiation i might remind the right honourable gentleman that before december labour cast doubt on whether we would get a joint report agreed and we did. before march he cast doubt on whether we would get in fermentation period, and we did. but i want to, mr speaker, to respond to the comment is the right honourable gentleman made about the very important subject of providing those who were the victims of the g re nfell tower those who were the victims of the grenfell tower fire with permanent homes. just so that i can make clear to the house, 203 households were in need of a new home and every household has received an offer of temporary or permanent accommodation. 183 have accepted an offer of a permanent home. ijust
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wa nted offer of a permanent home. ijust wanted to say this, because it isn't just about the buildings, it's not just about the buildings, it's not just about the bricks and mortar of a home. people who suffered that night are having to rebuild their lives, many of them lost somebody, members of their families with whom they had been living and making a home for years. they lost all their possessions and their mementos. they lost anything that reminds them of the person they love. they will be restarting their lives. and i wanted to pay tribute to all of the victims of the grenfell tower fire for the strength and dignity they have shown. i too paid tribute to the families and victims of grenville, but the reality is some of them of
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not got a permanent home to go into. it is important for the mental well—being of everybody that they know they can call somewhere home and it is their home. last week the prime minister confirmed we would leave the european union in march 2019 and the transition would end in december 20 20. we now know that the government is working on the basis that transition can go on until 2021. could she be clearer today, which december are we talking about? the right honourable gentleman is wrong. let me be clear to the house. what he is trying to talk about is the backstop arrangement we have agreed. let me be clear what this backstop is. this is an arrangement that would be put in place in the circumstances in which it is not possible to put the future new customs arrangement in place by the
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1st of january 20 21. and it is there to ensure that those new customs arrangements were not in place, we would be able to continue on the basis there would be no hard basis between ireland and northern ireland and we would be working to make sure the future customs arrangements overall deal with ensuring no hard border between northern ireland and ireland. we do not want the backstop to be necessary. we are working to ensure that we can have a future customs arrangement in place onjanuary 2021. i'm not really sure if it is a backstop or a backslide she is talking about. last week i asked the prime minister, and i'm sorry to bring the subject up again, because it's probably quite painful, but when is the government's brexit white paper going to be published? because she did say it would be published before thejune eu council summit. is that still the case?|j
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didn't actually say that. i said the white paper would be published and we would be publishing it and bringing ministers together... just calm down. we will be bring the ministers together after the june council and the white paper will be published thereafter. mr speaker, it gets ever more confusing, because at the weekend the cabinet office secretary told the bbc that it would not now be untiljuly. can i offer a solution? instead of worrying about this white paper on which the cabinet would have to agree, how about making it a green paper in which all the green —— disagreements are in the open and we can all make are in the open and we can all make a comment on it? but if the government does not, as looks likely, have its detail proposals ready for the june summit, surely the prime minister can't be going to brussels without anything to negotiate on? so is she going to
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seek a delay to that summit while the government decides its position actually is? perhaps i could just help the right honourable gentleman. thejune help the right honourable gentleman. the june european help the right honourable gentleman. thejune european council is not a summit about the brexit negotiations. there will be many issues that the european union leaders will discuss, including the important issue of sanctions against russia. i will be pressing to make sure we maintain sanctions against russia because the minsk agreements have not been put in place, and indeed i think there are areas where we should be enhancing the sanctions regime. he says that my right honourable friend the chancellor of the duchy of lancaster said the white paper would be published in july and that is different from what ijust said. i have to say july and that is different from what i just said. i have to say to july and that is different from what ijust said. i have to say to him after the june european ijust said. i have to say to him after thejune european council is july. but if he wants to talk about
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differences of opinion, i will tell him what division really is. it is labour members. it is all very well the deputy leader pointing like that, but division is members of the labour party circulating instruction manuals on how to deselect all the labour mps that do not agree with them. mr speaker, you've got to face them. mr speaker, you've got to face the fact that there may now be a meltdown. mr speaker, they are not actually my
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words, but those of the foreign secretary. even as his fellow cabinet ministers are preparing people for the government negotiations which he clearly thinks are going to end in disaster. last week he also took aim at the treasury, sitting absolutely next to him, calling them the heart of remain. he criticised them, saying what they don't want is friction at the borders, but they don't want any disruption to the economy. so does the prime minister back the foreign secretary in wanting more friction and more disruption to the economy? let's talk about the positions on this issue. labour said they wanted to do new trade deals. labour said they wanted to do new trade deals. 0rder, order. iwant they wanted to do new trade deals. 0rder, order. i want to hear both the questions and the answers and as the questions and the answers and as the record shows, and i don't
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require assistance in the matter, as the record shows that will always happen however long it takes. there's a lot of noise and much gesticulation from members on both sides of the house but i want to hear the questions and the answers. the honourable member for hear the questions and the answers. the honourable memberfor bolsover is right, we are in government, not labour. and we have set out our position on the border. but what we see is a labour party that said it wanted to do trade deals and now wants to be ina do trade deals and now wants to be in a customs union that will. that. they said they wanted to control our borders are now they want free movement. they said that they would respect the referendum. and now they will not rule out a second referendum, and that is the difference between us. the conservative party in government are going to deliver on the will of the british people. mr speaker, in the
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parallel universe inhabited by the foreign secretary, you are a p pa re ntly foreign secretary, you are apparently not respecting the referendum result unless you want friction at the borders and disruption of the economy. mr speaker, the cabinet is divided and our briefing against each other. they are even whispering during prime minister's question time. and the prime minister has been left with no white paper on which to negotiate. last week the transition period was delayed by a year in the space of 24 hours, and yesterday a deal with her backbenchers was reneges on within hours. meanwhile, the economy is weakening, industry is increasingly alarmed that the sheer ineptitude of the government. how much more damage is the prime minister going to do to this country before she realises the importance of getting a deal for the people of
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this country, not one to appease the clashing giant egos of her cabinet? it is the labour party in opposition that are trying to frustrate brexit. it is the labour party that are trying to stop is getting a deal for the british people. this government will deliver on brexit, a brexit for jobs, a brexit that is good for britain. and if he wants to talk about the economy, if he wants to talk about the economy, the last labour government left office with half a million more people out of work than when they went into office. what's happened under the conservatives? we have seen nearly half a million more people in work just over the last year, and that is conservatives delivering on a britain that is fit for the future
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and i've heard that the right honourable gentleman is trying to organise a music festival. arles pass over the fact it's going to have a solidarity tents which are busily won't have any labour mps within it. —— obviously. i have to say, i don't know if all members are aware of the headline act at labour lie. they are the shadow chancellor and the magic —— the magic numbers. that just about sums them up. we must come to order. would my right honourable friend join a growing number of her ministers who are very supportive of our bid for a one—off grant of £18 million to
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repair the weymouth harbour wall and improve the flood defences. this will, the weymouth harbour wall. —— not my wall, the weymouth harbour wall. this work is essential, and if planning permission is to be granted to be redeveloping a housing area in the resort, safeguarding existing jobs, creating new ones and providing more homes. can i first will say to my honourable friend i commend him on the work he has done andi commend him on the work he has done and i know he's worked hard on the issue of flood defences. i am sure that he will understand that ministers need to consider the various options for allocations of the fun very carefully. we need to make sure we get the best possible outcomes across the country.
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ican i can anticipate that we can make the decision by 2018. the prime minister gave a commitment that she would treat scotland as part of a union of equals. she pressed ahead with at paragraph in direct opposition to the elected parliament in scotland. that is what silent scotland's boys. —— voice. that plunge scotland into a constitutional crisis. will the prime minister now commit to bringing forward emergency legislation so that the will of the scottish parliament can be heard and more importantly respected. can i say to the right honourable
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gentleman that we do expect the outcome and it will happen and it will be in the decision—making power of holyrood. it is not the case that this is in any case a power grab. in over 80 areas of over responsibility of decision—making, that will flow direct to holyrood. 0nly of decision—making, that will flow direct to holyrood. only the smp could say that getting 80 areas where they take decision is a power grab. —— the snp. if he wants to be concerned about the process that the house has followed, his real question should be why it is the labour party who manoeuvred last night, using procedural manoeuvres, to make sure there was no debate about the amendments referred to about the amendments referred to about scotland. mr speaker i really do hope that the people of scotland listen carefully to what the prime minister has said. the reality of
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the situation is, the powers enshrined under the scotland act in 1998 are being grabbed back in a power grab and the mps from scotland we re power grab and the mps from scotland were not given the courtesy of debating it last night. i think it is an outrage. the people of scotla nd is an outrage. the people of scotland will not be disrespected by this parliament. mr speaker, under the circumstances, given what has gone on, i have no option. lam not i am not hearing that at this time and i'm not obliged to do so is my clear understanding. the right honourable gentleman can resume his seat. i'm not obliged to hear that
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at this time. what i would say to the right honourable gentleman is that the standing order requires the matter be put, if it's to be put, order, order, it might be for the convenience of the house for the matter to be addressed at the conclusion of prime minister's questions and if the right honourable gentleman who had not signalled to me his intention to do so. 0rder, order. i'm always grateful to the moral support even if it is chanted from a sedentary position and i realise it's done for my benefit but i think i can handle the matter. we could have the vote now. 0r the matter. we could have the vote now. or it could be taken at the end. if the honourable gentleman wishes to indicate a desire to have the vote now, so do it. i beg to
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move. my advice, a mixed sequence of advice. order! my view is that it is better for the vote... order... advice. order! my view is that it is betterforthe vote... order... my view is that it is better for the boat to be conducted at the conclusion of questions to the prime minister. order, order, order. i always admit the maximum number of votes and divisions as the right honourable gentleman should know, but i hope that he will trust me that i know of what i speak. there can be a division and it will be at the end of this session, not now. that is the end of the matter. resume your seat. mr blackford. no, you are not moving anything. resume your seat. mr blackford resume your
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seat. resume your seat. mr blackford, order! order! the house will have heard... order, please! the house will have heard, very clearly, my acceptance that there can be a vote on this matter. order! mr linden, i say to you, and i say it in the kindest possible spirit, don't tell me what the procedures of this house are. i am telling you that there can be a vote at the end of this session and not now. no, mr blackford. order! order! order explanation
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resume your seat mr blackford. under the power given to me by standing order number43, in the power given to me by standing order number 43, in light of the persistent and repeated refusal of the right honourable gentleman to resume his seat when so instructed, i order the right honourable gentleman to withdraw immediately from the house. order for the remainderof from the house. order for the remainder of this day's sitting. he won't? well, we will have do have the vote. sitting. right, he will not. right, we will have to have the vote. very well, very well. extraordinary scenes in the house of
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commons. order, order. mr walker. order, order. mrwalker. purely very jocular fellow but you're over excitable today. a long time to go. i say, order. i see only to the house, order. i see only to the house, what a pity,
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because the scottish national party members of parliament who have questions on the order paper and as colleagues now i always like to get to the end of the order paper. they have lost that chance by their own choice. high, ian blackford. you have made a protest in the commons. you have been booted out in, a protest based on what. scotland's voice has not been heard, we have had changes to the devilish and settlement that we re the devilish and settlement that were pushed through last night without scottish mps voice is being heard. that is a democratic outrage. i asked the pre—mister today to bring in emergency legislation so we could conduct a proper debate with respect on the powers of the
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scottish parliament. let's discuss the paragraph coming from westminster. that is not acceptable. and the speaker refused to allow a division which i rightly cold for. it is an absolute disgrace. myjob and my colleagues jobs it is an absolute disgrace. myjob and my colleaguesjobs is it is an absolute disgrace. myjob and my colleagues jobs is to stand up and my colleagues jobs is to stand up the powers of the parliament i will do that. the speaker said you could have a vote after pmq ‘s, this isa could have a vote after pmq ‘s, this is a stunt. understanding orders i was entitled to push for that vote today on the basis of the lack of respect that the conservative government and theresa may have shown, it is not acceptable. i have a duty on behalf of my colleagues, on behalf of the first minister and the government of scotland and of the government of scotland and of the parliament of scotland to stand up the parliament of scotland to stand up against the betrayal that has taken place up against the betrayal that has ta ken place of up against the betrayal that has taken place of the scottish people with the unprecedented power grab that has taken place. we need to, we must and we will stand up. you heard the prime minister say that something like 80 powers will come
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back to holyrood and that more powers will for directly to holyrood after brexit. she recognises, she must recognise that what is happening is that she is ripping up the scotland act 1998, pulling back control over areas such as fishing, agriculture, the environment, food standards, without the consent of the scottish parliament representing the scottish parliament representing the scottish parliament representing the scottish people. where is the respect to the scottish people? where is the respect to the sovereignty of the scottish people? what happens now? you have called for emergency legislation to do what? we need emergency legislation in order that the government recognises that the parliament in edinburgh has not given consent to what the prime minister is doing. let's be under no illusion, this is a constitutional crisis. we are now giving message to the government that we will take them on, we are not prepared to sit back and see paris taken from the scottish parliament. take them on meaning
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what? in every way, we will use parliamentary devices to hold this government to account. leckey very much for your time. applause you have left the chamber after being in effect kicked out by the speaker. it's now return to the commons and prime ministers questions which are still going on. cani questions which are still going on. can ijoin with my right honourable friend in remembering the anniversary of the grenfell fire? cani anniversary of the grenfell fire? can i commend herfor the way she has established the enquiry that is looking into that tragedy? because cani looking into that tragedy? because can i testify to having met victims of the grand hellfire as she has, they are showing growing confidence that they will get the findings that enquiry they want to make sure such a thing never happens again and that isi a thing never happens again and that is i think a testament to her personal courage and persistence in making sure that the enquiry was not
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blown off course by the understandable anger that followed the media tragedy. can also add my personal congratulations to my honourable friend on his knighthood? and can! honourable friend on his knighthood? and can i say that i absolutely agree with him of the importance of ensuring that the enquiry into the ground felt our fire is able to provide the truth to get the answers of exactly why what happened happened and to ensure that justice is provided for the victims and survivors. it is a static enquiry, it has the power to compel witnesses in the production of evidence. i think that is important. anyone who is found to have misled the enquiry would face prosecution. i hope this gives confidence to the survivors and people in the local community that this is an enquiry that will indeed get to the truth. thank you mr speaker. my constituent has lifelong profound learning and physical this ability is, he is
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doubly incontinent, cannot wash, dress or cook for himself. he has no notion of personal safety and left unsupervised he is at risk. his elderly mother is herself unwell and by virtue of the local authority social care package. now his application that he must fund his own care must be refused on the grounds that he can cope i needed. thus the pre—minister agree with me that there is something very wrong with a system that punishes citizens whose only crime is to be born disabled? the honourable lady has raised the specific case and i'm sure she will understand i do not have the details to address that specific case and i do not think it would be right to do so in this chamber. what i can assure her is that individual cases raise with me
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and prime ministers questions are taking extremely seriously and this one will be no exception, so we will make sure the cases like that releva ntly by make sure the cases like that relevantly by the minister. cases are complex, multifaceted. my constituents have been incredibly tolerant in the face of the fiasco that has followed the commuter journey following the reorganisation of the timetables. however added to their misery is the fact that when trains to turn up they are incredibly overcrowded. i have written to go via three times and asked them could they please conduct asked them could they please conduct a brisk assessment on the safety of passengers, my constituents? three times go via have refused to answer me. with the prime minister please use her officers to ensure that an overcrowded trains at the moment those are suffering because of the rail delays, that our passengers are
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safe? can i say to my honourable friend that she raises an important issue and the experience that passengers for corvette template and also northern have had as a result of the changing timetable in the way that was done is simply unacceptable. and it is important that the improve services. i think all the attempts like are introducing a new timetable. there will be more journeys. passengers must now and want to feel that they are able to travel in trains that are able to travel in trains that are not too crowded and certainly this is an issue that thameslink will be looking at very seriously. we will work to make sure that we can provide the services people deserve, they pay for a ticket, the bigger ticket, they pay for a season ticket and they deserve to have a decent journey. the average length of time that a/ assistant has to
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wait to go to the gloucester and cheltenham centre for a hip appeal is 41 weeks. it is 31 weeks for an e fa is 41 weeks. it is 31 weeks for an e f a appeal. during that period of time constituents are losing notability cars and suffering enormous hardship. will the pre—minister promised to get a grip of the centre make sure that this hardship is not endured any longer? of course it is important that people get their appeal is heard in a timely fashion. the work and pensions secretary is looking at this issue to see what can be done with the tribunal system to see that people get a more timely results. will my right honourable friend join me ina will my right honourable friend join me in a book on the speaker of the thinning parliament to westminster? although i suspect he's utterly
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mystified by the events of ten minutes ago. will she take the opportunity to reaffirm the support of the uk for ukraine which is on the front line against russian aggression? she share the concern of ukraine about the strategic threat of the nord stream to russian gas pipelines? can i say to my right honourable friend that i am very happy to be from the united kingdom commitment and support for the ukraine, iwas commitment and support for the ukraine, i was very pleased with the matter of a few weeks ago to have a further conversation with the president of ukraine about the support we are able to give to the ukraine. the work we're doing to the ukraine. the work we're doing to the ukraine to lead the reforms being put through but also as i mentioned earlier in response to a previous question i think it is important that the eu maintains the sanctions on russia because the minsk agreement have not been put in place and filling permitted and i think we continue to need to show the
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russians that we do not accept what they have done in the ukraine. russians that we do not accept what they have done in the ukrainefi russians that we do not accept what they have done in the ukraine. it is most one year since the government promised its domestic violence and abuse bill and publication of that bill will trigger a cross—party amendment with widespread support to decriminalise abortion across the whole of the uk. that is long overdue. will the bill be published overdue. will the bill be published over the overdue. will the bill be published overthe summer overdue. will the bill be published over the summer recess until the pre—minister gave a commitment to floor of the house that her mps will have a free vote on decriminalisation? first of all the honourable lady has raised a number of aspects of this issue, the first one i would say is that the domestic violence and abuse bill will be published in draft first but we have been taking ourtime published in draft first but we have been taking our time through the consultation to work with the victims of domestic violence and hear from the victims and survivors of domestic violence because we want to make sure that i speak you ——
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bring property legislation in this new bill we get it right. she refers to the issue of abortion and i believe it is absolutely right that a woman should have the right to a safe and legal abortion. with regards to northern ireland i believe it is the best way in my preferred way is for that decision to be taken by the elected politicians in northern ireland because it is a devolved matter. as regards to votes on abortion in this house, they have always been treated as conscience matters, and therefore they will be subject to a free vote. this month nice decided whether to fund —— funded new treatments for neuroblastoma, a vicious childhood cancer affecting my constituents. will the pre—minister encourage the drugs company to provide the new treatments for children in britain so family —— to prevent families from having to seek such treatment
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in america? in all my honourable friend has raised this issue on behalf of constituents, i believe she has a constituency case which is particularly, which raises a particularly, which raises a particular issue. nice are developing guidelines for the nhs on the use of a new drug, i am not you like our present correctly, for the treatment of sizes neuroblastoma. it has not been able to recommend the drug asa has not been able to recommend the drug as a use of resources in its traffic guidance but it has consulted stakeholders on its track recommendations. it is an ongoing appraisal. it is not for the government to intervene in that but they will take all of the comments that are made very obviously into account when they're making their final guidance. i think the manufacture of the drug is currently making the drug available to some nhs patients through a compassionate use scheme and has agreed to continue the scheme for patients currently receiving treatment. mr speaker, vernon bogdan called the
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noble lord lord hailsham's amendment that we rejected yesterday at constitutional absurdity. while it is essential that this households the government to account, and has meaningful votes on many things, does my right honourable friend agree that it is absolutely essential that the separation of powers is observed and that in any compromise amendment it is clear that the job of the government and the job of parliament is different? cani the job of parliament is different? can i say to my honourable friend that i am happy to be clear about this situation? what i agreed yesterday is that as the bill goes back to the lords we would have further discussions with colleagues over those concerns. and i have agreed this morning with the brexit secretary that we will bring forward
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the amendment in the lords. then add a numberof the amendment in the lords. then add a number of issues that will guide our approach in doing so. my honourable friend is absolutely right about the separation of powers and the different role between the government and parliament. as my rate honourable friend the brexit secretary made clear yesterday in the house, the government's hand in negotiations cannot be tied by parliament. but the government must be accountable by parliament. government determines policy and parliament, we need parliamentary support to implement that policy. but the other aspect of this that i am absolutely clear on is that i cannot countenance parliament being able to overturn the will of the british people. parliament gave the decision to the british people, the british people voted to leave the european union and as prime minister lam determined european union and as prime minister i am determined to deliver that. pete wishart, not here. jack up
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their stay. thank you mr speaker. 15 months ago the then secretary of state for communities and local government called in the plan in my constituency. a plan that represents huge economic benefits that —— for the bristol and south gloucestershire area. there are 3000 construction jobs gloucestershire area. there are 3000 constructionjobs and gloucestershire area. there are 3000 construction jobs and 3070 permanent jobs and the hundred 50 new homes at sta ke jobs and the hundred 50 new homes at stake in this expansion as well as a significant infrastructure and investment. while the minister urged the new secretary of state to start is the new secretary of state to start as he needs to go on and make a good decision quickly?” start as he needs to go on and make a good decision quickly? i consider my honourable friend that obviously he has referred the independent public enquiry that after that took place my right honourable friend the housing secretary calls this decision and is considering the inspector's report. what i can say is that i understand that the secretary of state hopes to issue his decision on or before the published target date of the 2nd of
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august. mr speaker it took nearly 5000 cancelled trains in three weeks for the transport secretary to notice the northern rail prices. if this government can't run our railways properly, will the prime ministers agree with businesses, council leaders and over 25 newspapers from across the region and give transport for the north parade needs to do the job? can i say to the honourable gentleman that we have given that board for the north unprecedented powers to influence the sessions about transport investment in the north? once more be back them up with £260 million of government funding. so it has the power to deliver a transport strategy which the government must formally consider, as the powers to fund organisation and deliver transport projects and those in their other powers are exactly what transport for the north requested. the pre—minister in or is aware of
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the severe difficulties that my constituents in hatred and hertfordshire are faced with recent delays to train services. would the play minister reassuringly and my constituents that going forward the government will do everything it can to ensure that gtr and network rail get into shape to ensure a better quality and higher quality train service both now and into the future? can i say to my honourable friend that as i said in response to the earlier question from my honourable friend that the immediate priority is to ensure that we are seeing an improvement in services for the passengers on ago via thameslink and that is why they have introduced a new timetable which is not what will be the final timetable but is better than the premade timetable but what we also need to do is ensure that they take action so they can bring forward a proposed
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new timetable, which will provide more services and better services for passengers. but in the long term, what the government is wanting to do is bring train and track together so we can not see problems like this in the future. chris law, not here. all these opposition opportunities are being lost. i think that should not continue. the pre—minister will be aware that schools are often targeted in war zones schools are often targeted in war zones and a couple of months ago i made your seven students from these broken my constituency who implored me to ask the pre—minister to is a school ‘s declaration which i understand has subsequently been signed, so my question to the premise that today is does that declaration mean that she will now veto future arms sales to brutal regimes like saudi arabia which have been targeting schools as part of the military campaign in yemen? can i say to the honourable gentleman at theissue i say to the honourable gentleman at the issue of the education of girls
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and boys in conflict zones is an important one, it is one that was addressed that the g—7 summit, we have been cleared as a lighted qing government that we are providing financial support to ensure 12 years of quality education for girls particularly in developing countries and the g—7 summit give it commitment not only in financial terms to provide as he contributed more to provide for quality education, but also to focus on the areas where there are conflict zones and where particular action must be taken. my constituent lost her a -- lost her life last week aged 95, she survived and outwits ghetto and birkenau and became known as the breda billson when she married her liberator. will my right honourable friend join with me in celebrating her life, who dedicated her life to
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informing young people about the horrors of the holocaust? and ensuring that although her light has gone out, her legacy lives on. can i say to my honourable friend that i am happy tojoin him in paying tribute to dino terkel, and to the work that she did over so many years. she was one of the first survivor to go into schools and share her story. i have seen as i'm sure other right honourable members have the impact that a survivor from the holocaust calling into schools and explaining what happened has on young people. it is moving and she showed considerable determination and strength and i think that example is truly humbling. it is right that her legacy is going to live on in the national holocaust memorial, and the accompanying education centre that will be housing her testimony for generations to come. we must never forget what she taught us. we must fight hatred and prejudice in all
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its forms. on her walking holidays in wales, the prime minister must have seen her beautiful beaches. but plastic is killing our oceans and polluting our seas. with the prime minister stay here for a few minutes after pmq ‘s and listen to my ten minute rule bill on plastic pollution, support it so we can save our seats —— save our seas? pollution, support it so we can save our seats -- save our seas? when i go walking a real site to walk up and down hills rather than on beaches, and i think she has raised a very potent issue about the plastic. she has raised a very important issue which i think the uk public as well as members across this house have shown great energy in picking up this cause and wanting to fight against plastic waste and indeed the uk will be leading the
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newly formed commonwealth queen oceans alliance. and we are committing £61 million to fund global research and improve waste management in developing countries to tackle plastic pollution. this is another issue we took forward in the g-7 another issue we took forward in the g—7 summit, a document in relation to dealing with plastic waste, and cani to dealing with plastic waste, and can i say with the greatest of respect i think my diary has already been slightly changed as a result of what has been happening in the timber today and what has been happening in the timbertodayandl what has been happening in the timber today and i will not be able to sit and listen to her bill. duzza prime minister agree with me that people who want to have a those people who want to have a meaningful vote in this house would allow this house to vote to stay in the eu would be betraying the results of the referendum and sure how much the labour party have lost touch with working—class people up and down this country? how would she further agree that those people who wa nt further agree that those people who want to take no deal from the
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government negotiating hand would only incentivise government negotiating hand would only ince ntivise the government negotiating hand would only incentivise the eu not to negotiate at all in any meaningful way and betray not all of the result of the referendum - betrayed the of the referendum but betrayedihe interests of the british best interests of the british people? can i say to my honourable friend as he go ahead with the brexit negotiations we are of course ensuring we make preparations for eventualities. that eve ntualities. that is eventualities. that is entirely all eventualities. that is entirely right and proper for the government to do. but as i set out in response to do. but as i set out in response to our honourable fred elliott, what lam also to our honourable fred elliott, what i am also clear about is that parliament can not be allowed, we cannot, i cannot countenance parliament overturning the will of the british people. the british people were given the vote, given the choice as to whether to stay in the choice as to whether to stay in the eu, this parliament gave that choice to them overwhelmingly by the vote in this parliament, it is right that we listen to the british people and we deliver what they has to study which is to leave the eu.
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angela crawley not here. chris eva ns. angela crawley not here. chris evans. we're still the commitment of march for veterans to commemorate their service to our country. last week they were in the house of commons campaigning for a medalfor their service. all the premise to look at the campaign with a view to giving them a medalfor look at the campaign with a view to giving them a medal for the service they give to this country? can i say to the honourable gentleman this is i think the first time the issue he has raised with me has been raised with me and i will look carefully at what he has said in the house. charles watling. thank you mr speaker. as a father of... prime ministers questions overrunning, there was a spot of drama in the middle that you may have seen, the snp leaving westminster —— leader in westminster ian blackford being kicked out of the chamber because he was wanting to have a vote had in
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the house and he was overruled by the house and he was overruled by the speaker, john birkenau, it also to sit down and he would not, so in the end john burkle pulled in to leave the chamber. let's show you what happened. —— john leave the chamber. let's show you what happened. ——john bercow. leave the chamber. let's show you what happened. -- john bercow. sit down mr blackford. under the power given to me by standing order number 43 in light of the persistent and repeated refusal of the right honourable gentleman to resume his seat when so instructed, i order the right honourable gentleman to withdraw immediately from the house for... order! for the withdraw immediately from the house for... order! forthe remainder of this day is sitting. he is so... right, he won. we will have to have the vote. very well. very well. very
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well. order. order. order. order. order. order. order. order. order. order. order. order. order. mr gerald worden. he did leave, he was followed by the other snp mps, armin smith interviewed him outside of the chamber. we will have more on that on the one o'clock news with jane hill, also won about what else happened at premises questions. jeremy corbyn going again for the fourth time out of five pmq is an brexit, so much more of the politics of all that coming up that one. right now let's catch up with the weather. a stormy spell of weather on the way
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for the uk a stormy spell of weather on the way forthe uk in a stormy spell of weather on the way for the uk in the next 24 hours, courtesy of storm hector, named by the irish net service. the worst of the irish net service. the worst of the weather, certainly the strongest of the wind is coming in overnight and it could possibly for tomorrow morning's rusher. certainly the winner will begin to strengthen us to go into the small hours, there will be heavy rain moving across the northern half of the uk, but the wind really starting to intensify. into the latter part of the night and thursday morning with private and thursday morning with private and ireland and scotland looking at cost a lot to 60 mph. when you northern britain 50—55 mph. bbc local radio good place to get details on disruption occurred where you are. a more chrysler come the afternoon, the winds will ease out a little bit as well for the second pa rt little bit as well for the second part of the day, still quite strong for northern scotland and a windy day for the south generally, and a dryer picture of up to 22 in the
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sunshine. angry scenes in the house of commons this lunchtime, as the brexit debate heats up. i ordered the right honourable gentleman to withdraw immediately from the house. amid heated exchanges the snp leader is expelled by the speaker, and then the rest of his party's mps walk out of the chamber. earlier tory rebels warned the prime minister to stick to assurances made about parliament's role overseeing the terms of britain's withdrawal. this government will deliver a brexit forjobs. this government will deliver a brexit that is good for britain. we'll have the latest on a heated prime minister's questions. also this lunchtime. president trump says north korea is no longer a nuclear threat,
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as he returns from his meeting with kimjong un.
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