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tv   Beyond 100 Days  BBC News  June 13, 2018 7:00pm-8:00pm BST

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so we're going to decide tonight — injust one hour. with the help of this man. what's going on, colin? eight table football tables, and 32 players all warming up — each representing one of the 32 countries in the real world cup. tonight, matt and alex, we are going to be playing you're watching beyond 100 days. president trump says the nuclear threat from north korea is over, but there's still no plan for denuclearisation. he insists everyone can feel much safer since he took office. but some of north korea's neighbours, following his concessions to kim jong—un, feel anything but safe. the us secretary of state is in soul explaining why the president cancelled joint military exercises and says he's convinced north korea knows verification is part of the deal. supporters say the summit is a hit for the president's unorthodox diplomacy, but lawmakers of both parties want a say in what happens next. also on the programme... saudi led pro—government forces in yemen, have launched an all—out assault on a key port. aid agencies warn humanitarian supplies to millions of people could be disrupted.
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canada, mexico and usa have been selected by the fifa congress to host the 2026 fifa world cup. and the premierfootball tournament heads to the land where they play soccer. america and canada along with mexico, win a joint bid to host the 2026 finals. do get in touch with us using #beyondtoodays. hello and welcome — i'mjane o brien in washington and clive myrie is in london. as a piece of political theatre, there's no doubt the singapore summit was a show stopper. but now the curtain has dropped, there are important questions over what was actually achieved and whether president trump gave away too much too soon. the us secretary of state, mike pompeo, is visiting
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nervous allies in the region, trying to convince them that's not the case. he's also keen to stress that although there was no mention of verification in the document mr kim and mr trump signed, checking pyongyang is dumping it's nukes is definitely part of the deal. meanwhile, back at the white house, the tweeter in chief has been busy. "everybody can now feel much safer than the day i took office". "there is no longer a nuclear threat from north korea". is he right? let's get the thoughts of christopher hill, former us ambassador to south korea under president george w bush. ambassador, thank you forjoining us. ambassador, thank you forjoining us. is he talking about intent here? the threat has been reduced because neither he nor kimjong—un intend to use their nuclear deterrence? he certainly basing a lot of this on what he calls trust. trust in the person he met within singapore. it was kind of a speed dating thing,
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because he met him for about 45 minutes and were announced he trusted him. usually those of us who have been involved in these negotiations with the north koreans, have spent a lot of time on verification measures on trying to speu verification measures on trying to spell them out very carefully and frankly trust doesn't have a lot to do with it. so he is quite confident that he and mr kimjong—un have something in common. quite interesting you talking about trust. you have been through this but mike pompeo says he believes north korea understands verification is part of the deal. why aren't you reassured by that? i have been there and done that. verification was part of our deal in 2005. it was in the agreement very clearly, and the north koreans at the end of the day, it took awhile for them to finally admit that they had no intention of verifying by standard worthy of the international community. they were prepared to verify things we already
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knew but nothing in addition. prepared to verify things we already knew but nothing in additionm prepared to verify things we already knew but nothing in addition. it is clive myrie here in london. mike pompeo was in seoul in and tried to calm things down and also in tokyo asa calm things down and also in tokyo as a result of the summit. he is going to have to reach out to the neighbours in the region in a way that perhaps president trump has not. we know the president is not a multilateralist. how does mike pompeo square that with the gut instincts of the president, who is a bilateral list, if anything? he is a bilateral list, if anything? he is a bilateral respect if you're going to be talking about us troops on what they do in south korea, i think you should spend some time with the south koreans. instead he talked about it with the north koreans and they will raise a usual thing, that they will raise a usual thing, that they considered these troops hostile and dangerous for them. he responded by saying, 0k, these war games are hereby cancelled and besides, they
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cost too much money anyway. well, obviously that conversation should have been with the south koreans, not the north koreans. you are on record saying you thought it was a goodidea record saying you thought it was a good idea for president trump to meet mr kim. knowing everything we all know now, do you still hold that view? i do. i'm not sure what the alternative was. you will recall at the end of 2017, there was a lot of talk about a bloody nose strategy, whatever that meant. but nonetheless, when you deploy donald trump intoa nonetheless, when you deploy donald trump into a complex situation, expect complex messes to emerge from it and expect complex messes to emerge from itandi expect complex messes to emerge from it and i think that is part of what secretary mike pompeo is dealing with today, because i think the japanese are worried and the south koreans are very good reason to be worried. ambassador chris hill, thank you forjoining us. well, just as mr trump is heralding the summit
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a great success back in washington, pyongyang is also claiming it was a winner for their supreme leader. few doubted that this would quickly become a propaganda coup for kim jung—un and that certainly seems to be the case. here's reaction from north koreans. translation: the future of our country's looking bright because we have kim jong—un leading the world's political trend on the korean peninsula, steering wheel of history. translation: the meeting between the people's republic of korea and the us leadership in singapore was very great event that has great significance for reconciliation, peace, stability and future prospects of the korean peninsula. translation: bringing dramatic change in our country's relationship with the united states, which took the world by surprise, is the result of efforts by the workers' party and our government, which has been willing to safeguard the peace and stability of the korean peninsula and the world. everyone on messaging jonny agnew. the debate over the outcome of the summit as you can imagine, is a little fiercer in the us.
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a big feature of donald trump's tweets recently has been his references to "haters and losers," who didn't think negotiations were possible. so how is the president's base reacting to his unique brand of foreign policy? joining us now to look at the politics of the past few days is the washington post correspondent, maryjordan — who was formerly based injapan. thank you forjoining us. president trump isa thank you forjoining us. president trump is a disruptor, we know that, thatis trump is a disruptor, we know that, that is why he got the job, so what do you think his supporters are making of his performance over the last few days? they love it. they wa nted last few days? they love it. they wanted a new day in the white house, somebody who is going to get things done and they are really listening to his tweets saying, hey, i'm the one that did it, this has been going one that did it, this has been going on decade after decade, everyone else failed, it wasn't just 0bamacare andi else failed, it wasn't just 0bamacare and i was the one that sat down and is safer now. those that love donald trump no matter what he
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does, see this as a big win. of course, the rest of the country is like, what just happened? course, the rest of the country is like, whatjust happened? this whole idea that he's not even telling our long—time allies, south korea, that he called war games was fairly stunning. youjust he called war games was fairly stunning. you just said he called war games was fairly stunning. youjust said it, no matter what he does. today we had senator bob corker of tennessee, a state you have spent a long time and, warning against the cold like situation that donald trump has created. why do you think he is worried about that?” created. why do you think he is worried about that? i think that u nfortu nately worried about that? i think that unfortunately it is not about facts, as we know. there is too much spin. the people that love donald trump often only hear what they want to hear. he says we are a safer world now because of donald trump and they are like, great! they see the visuals with this summit, which was a big deal. and by the way, we don't
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know how this is going to went. if it does end the stalemate that has been going on for 70 years, i mean donald trump will have actually done something. but right now there is nothing we can come to that says we're safer but they are buying it. why does he have this cult of personality? is the million dollar question but people love him, though like his style, they like he is different, they like mostly that when he says something, he is going to do it. he said he will stop immigration and he doesn't even care what it looks like. there is horror going on at our border, what are we doing? we're taking kids coming across the border away from their pa rents across the border away from their parents but his supporters said, he said he was going to do it and he is doing it and they loved that. he is different than anything they have seen different than anything they have seen and they didn't like american politics before, and so this is something new and they are getting results. and by the way, the economy is doing well and jobs are,
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joblessness is really low, so that isa joblessness is really low, so that is a huge thing. that is important, the state of the economy. i suppose his relationship with his supporters isa his relationship with his supporters is a little bit like that like kim jong—un has with his supporters in north korea, minus, i have to say, the repression, the gulags, torture chambers, murdering members of his own family. does any of that cut any ice with the people who support donald trump? bearing in mind he has invited kim jong—un to possibly visit him in the white house?|j invited kim jong—un to possibly visit him in the white house? i hate to say this but i think people possibly focus on a limited number of things. a lot of them don't know the whole history of what is going on in north korea and the famine and the deaths and the people jailed just because you are against him, the political prisoners. i have been there at least three dozen times to there at least three dozen times to the dnc and it is a pretty
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terrifying history but unfortunately a lot of people do not know that. what they know is, do they have a job? hey, is this guy making waves? 0bama couldn't, or didn't, he could haveif 0bama couldn't, or didn't, he could have if he wanted to, didn't sit down with him and a see him as someone down with him and a see him as someone that does things. again, this is not all of america, this is from's america that sees it as a good thing. mary jordan, thank you very much forjoining us. i have been looking at the statistics,. estimated 15,000 north korean cannons and rocket launchers are aimed directly at seoul. so on the say—so of kim jong—un he wags his finger, seoul with 25 million people could be obliterated. so it does seem absolutely bizarre that president moon and the japanese, because they have rocket launchers
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targeted at tokyo, they were not included in any of the discussions leading up to this summit. it seems incredibly bizarre. yes, welcome to trump land. we have been on the situation time and time again when president trump has said something, apparently off—the—cuff, normally in an unscripted environment by the press conference he gave after the summit, and mike pompeo, ina he gave after the summit, and mike pompeo, in a very, very familiar situation now, going in after the president and explaining to america's allies what exactly the boss meant. it seems like this cabinet is continuously clean up an aisle nine. that is what we see over and over again. moving on now. the conflict in yemen has caused the deaths of thousands of people humanitarian misery for millions more. now the saudi—led coalition and forces loyal to the former president, are bombarding yemen's main port, hodeida in an attempt to drive houthi rebels from the city. aid organisations say they're worried that attacking the port, which is the country's main point of entry for supplies to rebel—held areas, could lead
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to a humanitarian disaster. let's get more from our chief international correspondent lyse doucet who is here with me now. this could be... the whole situation in yemen is a disaster anyway but this could be particularly appalling, because so much of the aid that is sustaining millions of people getting through that port. you know, you have seen the situation on the ground. it has been a few months, it has steadily got worse. yemen is already described as the world's worst humanitarian disaster. it is quite extraordinary that all the major organisations working in yemen, aid organisations working in yemen, aid organisations working there, say the consequences of shutting hodeida will be catastrophic. the head of one relief agency said, let us be clear, if the hodeida port is out of action,
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people will die. there are going to be consequences. we saw the ambassador of the united arab it is today. he says everyone is exaggerating it, exaggerating the casualties. the worst—case scenario, the un says, is 250,000 people, casualties in the assault. they say the aid, there will not be aid shortages may have contingency plans, they will bring in food, medicine by airand plans, they will bring in food, medicine by air and land but what if it goes on for months? right now the saudis are being optimistic saying it will be a matter of weeks and they will take care of the shortages. it has been backed by many people around the world, many members of the united nations, britain sells jets to this saudis, america and so on. however the saudis managed to sell this attack on hodeida, given the possible implications of what that might mean for civilians? they haven't. for example, we are today the french
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have given us a green light and after that i got a message from the french saying, we never gave the green light. they are lying? there was a report on american newspaper today saying what the americans gave was what was described as a blinking yellow light. in other words, was what was described as a blinking yellow light. in otherwords, be careful. there was a closed meeting of the un security council. some members wanted there to be a statement condemning the attack but other countries including britain said no, wejust made a statement saying be careful of civilian casualties. the ambassador here in london admitted that britain asked for more time, to give the new un envoy more time to negotiate. i'm in co nsta nt envoy more time to negotiate. i'm in constant contact with martin griffith, he's still trying to get a deal which would stop the military offensive, convinced the houthis to give up control of the port. remember, there are two sites. the houthis have been under pressure also, because the allegation is they
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are mismanaging the aid, pilfering it and they are smuggling in weapons. that is what the uae and the saudis said. sure. very briefly, given the complexity of all this, is there any influence the us in particular can use in this situation? the question is, what kind of influence does the us want to use? what we're hearing is they may give them the kind of help they will give is to have them target better, not to stop targeting. ok. many thanks for that. an italian coastguard ship carrying hundreds of migrants has been allowed to dock in sicily, days after italy turned away another vessel with rescued migrants on board. the ship arrived in the port of catania, carrying more than 900 people, and was allowed to dock because it's an italian vessel. italy had refused to take in the other rescue boat, the franco—german aquarius, which has now been given permission to dock in spain. italy's new right—wing interior minister matteo salvini, has decided to adopt a hardline
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stance, on immigration. aid agencies are warning of a potential humanitarian catastrophe in bangladesh. several rohingya refugees have died, with the arrival of monsoon rains. as many as 200,000 refugees could be at immediate risk from flooding and landslides. japan has voted to lower its official age of adulthood, from 20 to 18. the change to the civil code means 18—year—olds can marry, or obtain a passport, without parental consent. they will, however, still be barred from drinking alcohol, smoking or gambling, until they reach 20. their political leaders may have been at odds, but today, the us, canada and mexico were chosen to host the 2026 world cup, with theirjoint bid. fifa made the announcement, on the eve of russia's world cup, which starts tomorrow. it'll be the first time
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the tournament will be shared by three host nations, with thejoint bid holding off competition from morocco. richard conway has more. the member associations of canada, mexico and usa have been selected. . .. united in victory, mexico and the united states and canada can now prepare to host the 2026 world cup, a prize that they insist will turbo—charge football in north america and deliver huge revenues to invest in the worldwide growth of the game. a very emotional day for everyone, it has been a long and hard campaign and congratulations to morocco, who put it up to the very end but we are gratified by the result. how could you not be? thankful to fifa, the administration, i said in my thank you note today, an impressive job in a relatively short time. and i'm delighted. the north american bid, known as united 2026, will host 48 teams playing 80 games across the three countries.
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0rganisers promise a riot of passion and colour. the north american bid has prevailed and the fifa voters have listened to promises of $11 billion of profits and a relatively headache free build—up to the tournament. the result will also delight the fifa leadership. donald trump who had urged fifa voters, some felt threatened them, to back the bid, was quick to issue his congratulations. meanwhile, prior to the vote vladimir putin made an appearance to thank fifa delegates for their support in the build—up to the russian tournament, which starts in just over 2a hours. welcome to russia. thank you very much. the world cup remains a glittering prize for many nations. russia will take its turn starting tomorrow. the us, canada and mexico now have eight years to prepare for theirs. richard conway, moscow. well, for more on the awarding
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of this bid we are joined now by rajini vaidya nathan who is outside the new football stadium here in washington, dc. we are both used to some pretty strange optics in this city, but mexico, canada and the us, they are at each other‘s throats at the moment politically. how on earth did they manage to plot a joint bid of this magnitude? that is a very good question. i think partly it's because the opposing bid from morocco just wasn't seen as strong enough. what fifa did was evaluate the two countries, the two bids and it gave morocco a grading of 2.7 out of five, where as the united bid got four out of five and that was based on things like infrastructure, accommodation, hotels and that sort of thing and also there were concerns about how lgbt queue people would be treated because of morocco's policy towards them but
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when it comes to geopolitics, this really is quite astounding. i will we do this. the president of the us soccer federation said the beautiful game transcends borders and cultures. but of course the irony is not lost here. does it transcend the border wall between the us and mexico about ongoing trade feud between canada and the us? indeed. 0ne between canada and the us? indeed. one wonders what it was about the £11 billion in profits that fifa found attractive in the us bid. having said all that, what about this idea that donald trump intervened and really quite so pointedly in the bidding process, making it clear he believed it would bea making it clear he believed it would be a bit strange, to put it mildly, if the number of countries that america had always supported didn't support the us and canada and mexico bid? yes, i mean that's quite remarkable, actually. 0bviously, many of our viewers will know that soccer, as it's known here, is not
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really a national game like it is back home the uk. and of course in other countries around the world. so the idea the president of the united states personally made an appeal to make sure that this united bid won is quite remarkable. you mentioned a twea ked is quite remarkable. you mentioned a tweaked the president sent in april when he said, why should we support these countries when they don't support us? brackets including at the un. after that, fifa was concerned and reissued its ethics guidelines over lobbying before any future vote. also, it's been noted president trump wrote three letters to fifa to allay any concerns over his hardline stance on immigration. he is reported to have written to fifa and their governing body to say that any players or officials or fa ns that any players or officials or fans who want to come to the 2026 tournament would not be subject to any travel bans or any other policies that would restrict the
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movement, so policies that would restrict the movement, so anyone policies that would restrict the movement, so anyone could get it either. so again, quite remarkable, but more remarkable that these three countries that are at loggerheads are united when it comes to football, or should i say soccer.|j don't know, your choice, i'm not going to go there. thank you for joining us. it's football! it is not soccer! iam not it's football! it is not soccer! i am not getting involved! we're talking about the cult of the personality with mary jordan talking about the cult of the personality with maryjordan a few seconds ago. it's extraordinary isn't it, that donald trump has managed to insert himself even on this, when he won't even be president in 2026? isn't that something to conjure? his reach will extend down the ages, that is how it works. by all accounts, you have picked, is it saudi arabia in the swee psta ke ? picked, is it saudi arabia in the sweepsta ke? in the picked, is it saudi arabia in the sweepstake? in the office sweepstake at the bbc in washington? let me just make this clear, let me break this down for you. why does everyone else has already. you will lose your
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shirt. apparently they are 2001 to win the world cup. it is not that happen on a friend. miracles can happen, clive, miracles can happen, iam sure happen, clive, miracles can happen, i am sure some of happen, clive, miracles can happen, i am sure some of us happen, clive, miracles can happen, i am sure some of us have felt a little on edge reason i am notjust about the world cup. there is, after all a lot going on in the world. so you can probably relate to this... look closely and you'll see a raccoon climbing up this building in minnesota — all 25 storeys of it. its antics attracted crowds in the city of st paul and local media even streamed his nerve racking accent which went on, and on, and on... after a short break on the 17th floor the raccoon reached the roof, where a trap of tempting cat—food had been set. ican hear i can hear everyone in the audience going aww. i mean how on earth did
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they managed to cling on like that? ican they managed to cling on like that? i can tell you, because they have little feet and on the edge of little feet and on the edge of little feet and on the edge of little feet they have claws which can get into any knock and cranny and they can also rotate their little feet 180 degrees, so they are pretty mobile. and it was out in daylight, so it properly had rabies, which makes them a bit mad. they are nocturnal, he should be asleep! exactly. all right, well done to him. this is beyond 100 days from the bbc. coming up for viewers on the bbc news channel and bbc world news — spain sacks its head coach just two days before its opening match in the football world cup. and she was one of the 20th century's cultural icons — now a new exhibition is shedding light on how frida kahlo shaped her identity. that's still to come. there is a storm on the way and it
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is going to cause some problems tomorrow morning and possibly into the afternoon. delays to transport, possibly some trees down across the north. an amber warning possibly some trees down across the north. an amberwarning in possibly some trees down across the north. an amber warning in force from the met office, 60—70 mile an hour winds this time of year can cause a lot of problems. trees, lots of leafy branches around. could be some debris scattered on the ropes, so some debris scattered on the ropes, so take care tomorrow. here is the storm that is developing, around 1000 kilometres to the west of us or so. 1000 kilometres to the west of us or so. it is moving in our direction and initially it will bring strengthening winds on some heavy rains of the north—west of the country and later tomorrow morning, the strong winds will arrive. this is what it looks like through the course of this evening and overnight. strongest winds here. the ampleforth in parts of northern
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ireland but very strong winds blowing through the lowlands during thursday morning. very strong winds potentially disruptive across northern england and into northern parts of wales and possibly the north midlands. these gusts, 60—65, this isjust a rough guide, they could be higher than in fact, possibly even around 70 miles an hour or a little more. asi 70 miles an hour or a little more. as i say, there could be some travel disruption on thursday morning across many northern parts of the uk. to the south, we are still going to be feeling strong winds, around 60 orso, to be feeling strong winds, around 60 or so, because the wales very windy england. billy strong winds will be towards the south but we're still going to be feeling those winds and this time of year gusts of 30-40 winds and this time of year gusts of 30—110 miles now will take twigs off of trees. later in the afternoon on thursday, the weather looking fine. 0nce later in the afternoon on thursday, the weather looking fine. once in a sweep through, we are in for a sunny day or a sunny afternoon but still a very blustery one. a bizarre day
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with strong gusts of wind and yet a lot of sunshine. friday looks like we re lot of sunshine. friday looks like were expecting some showers, especially in north—western areas. to the south, some sunshine around. i don't think there will be clear blue skies, partly cloudy, and the wind will be a lot lighter. how about the weekend ? saturday, we are expecting heavy showers went even crack of thunder and sunday looking drier and. bye— bye. and sunday looking drier and. bye—bye. —— drier and brighter. this is beyond 100 days, with me, jane 0'brien in washington — clive myrie's in london. our top stories: as president trump lauds his deal with north korea, his secretary of state mike pompeo is visiting allies in the region, reassuring them that verification of any denuclearisation is part of the agreement. politicians from the scottish national party have walked out of the house of commons after their westminster leader was thrown out of the chamber. ian blackford clashed with the speaker over what he called a "power grab" over brexit.
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coming up in the next half hour — the world cup is kicking off in russia tomorrow — spain's preparation involves sacking its head coach 48 hours before its opening game. and locked away for 50 years — the personal belongings of mexico's iconic artist frida kahlo are to go on display in london for the first time. let us know your thoughts by using the hashtag #beyond100days. as we've mentioned, one of the most surprising things to come out of the summit in singapore was president trump's announcement that he'd be stopping joint military exercises with south korea. now even those in seoul and the folks at the pentagon seemed to be caught off guard. today, mr trump defended the move, tweeting. .. "we save a fortune by not doing war games, as long as we are negotiating in good faith —
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which both sides are!" in a moment, we'll get the military view but first, here is some of the mixed reaction on the streets of south korea. translation: i think it's a bad thing that they decided to stop the south korea—us military exercises without president moon jae—in being present. translation: i think we have taken the first step towards peace with just the fact that the two leaders of north korea and the us have met. i pray things will work out well. halting military exercises was a careless move by president trump. such a decision should have been made after discussions with the south korean government. translation: although it is important for south korea to be part of the process, it's more important for them to have reached an agreement. south korea canjoin in later on. if kim jong—un has shown his will for denuclearisation, we need to show trust and believe him. well, as you can see, there is debate on what the impact of calling off the military exercises will be, but someone who knows the subject better
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than most is former us defense secretary william cohen, who joins us now. just what is the impact of cancelling one exercise, if it is one exercise, because surely if the talks break down, you can reschedule it? the symbolic impact is quite severe. number one, the south koreans were not alerted. i understand that the us department of defence was not alerted. so this came simply via the president'sdeclaration that they we re president'sdeclaration that they were off. the symbol is that we are pulling back, and this is too costly for us to do. to me, you could say we could reduce the size of our military to save on costs. we could reduce exercises around the globe and save costs. the reason that we exercise and training is so that we can be ready to meet any
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contingency. so when you cancel one, yes, you could put it back, but if it is true what president trump has said, this is a provocation. that is language from the north koreans, that our exercises were a provocation. if you cancel them and put them back on, isn't that more of a provocation? you can't go back to the beginning of this again. you can't go back and tell the russians and the chinese to intensify sanctions, the north koreans are not living up to their agreement. the russians and the chinese will say, wait a russians and the chinese will say, waita minute, russians and the chinese will say, wait a minute, we were on a path to peace, let's hold back here. meanwhile, you are going to ratchet up meanwhile, you are going to ratchet up the exercises again and threatened fire and fury again? it would be difficult for president trump to go back. that is why it is important not to do this as a win, but rather a calculated strategy worked out in advance —— rather than a whim. how worried are the other
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leaders by this apparent disengagement by the us? they were hopeful that the summit would take place. they were hopeful that it would be successful. they were very apprehensive about what president trump would say or do while at the summit. and their apprehensions are valid. number one, the cancelling of the exercises, but number two, president trump has said, i want our troops out of south korea. i want our troops eventually out of japan and out of europe, and that is sending a signal to all of our friends in the region that we are disengaging. trans—pacific partnership was the first. we were going to lead the effort to draw the economic rules of the game, and we bowed out of that. now we want our troops out. i think they will have strong troops out. i think they will have strong concerns troops out. i think they will have strong concerns in the future about whether they can rely on the united states as a security guarantee. taking all that into account, one
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assumes that the real winner of that summit in singapore between mr kim and mrtrump is summit in singapore between mr kim and mr trump is china, because they can move into the vacuum that america on paper seems to be wanting to vacate. ultimately, that will be the case. the chinese want the very things that we gave them and the north koreans, namely cessation of exercises. that was always a complaint from the chinese, and a reduction or elimination of our troops in the korean peninsula. those two objectives will have been achieved, giving very little in return other than paper thin promises that we are going to work towards peace and we will work towards peace and we will work towards denuclearisation. no comprehensive, irreversible verification. none of that in the document, it is working towards denuclearisation, which raises the issue of what they mean by it and what do we mean by it? thank you for joining us. clive, he has hit the
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nail on the head. what do we mean by any of this? this is the never—ending question. it will be interesting to see whether or not mike pompeo can clarify these issues when he meets with leaders in seoul. he is also talking to his counterpart from japan. all of these regional allies are very worried by these big unknowns. mike pompeo's role will be crucial. there is no way mrtrump role will be crucial. there is no way mr trump will want to go back to six party talks, which was what we had a few years ago, which brought about a had a few years ago, which brought abouta similar had a few years ago, which brought about a similar kind of deal that mr trump has managed to sign with mr kim. but there was no question that the regional allies have to be brought into this equation. the japanese, the south koreans, the chinese have skin in the game and to not include them is, according to many, a mistake. so mike pompeo has a lot of ground work to do. and
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there is still this comparison with there is still this comparison with the iran nuclear deal. allies and partners were involved in formulating that, it took years, and mrtrump formulating that, it took years, and mr trump pulled out of itjust a few weeks ago. so even when allies are involved, it doesn't necessarily mean it will contain america within those partnerships, at least not at the moment. let's move on now. british prime minister theresa may remains under pressure over key brexit votes and how much say mps will have in any final deal. pro—eu conservatives say they fear ms may could betray them over assurances given yesterday that persuaded them to back the government's key brexit legislation. while the government has so far seen off a defeat, there's still a long way to go to the end of the divorce process. chris morris from our reality check team has been looking at the next steps. the eu withdrawal bill is domestic legislation that will formalise will formalise the uk's exit from the european union, repealing the laws that took us into the eu in the first place and turning a lot of current eu law
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into british law. so it's an important part of the brexit process, but it's by no means the only one. as the clock continues to tick towards the day brexit is supposed to happen, march 29th 2019, alongside the withdrawal bill in parliament, the government is also trying to negotiate a withdrawal agreement with the rest of the eu. at the end of this month there will be an important eu summit in brussels which will highlight the fact that various aspects of the withdrawal agreement are still unresolved, notably but not exclusively the irish border and the continuing search for some kind of solution that will avoid any border checks in the future. critics say it can't be done if you leave the single market and the customs union, but the government still insists we are leaving both. either way, don't forget, the overall withdrawal deal will still need to be ratified before brexit, notjust by the uk parliament, which will debate a withdrawal agreement and implementation bill to enshrine the deal in domestic law, but by the european parliament as well. then there are negotiations
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on the future relationship with the eu which have barely begun. they will involve discussion of a new trade partnership and internal security issues, foreign policy and more. by october, ideally, the eu hopes to finalise a political declaration on the broad terms of a future deal, with detailed negotiation continuing during the transition period after brexit and probably after that as well. then the government also has to find a way to ensure that hundreds of treaties the eu has signed with other countries around the world continue to apply to the uk after brexit. if that isn't enough to be getting on with, then there's also all the new legislation that the government needs to replace policies that used to be run by the eu. that means new bills, for example, on trade, customs, immigration, agriculture and fisheries. all of those new laws and processes will need to be in place by december 2020, when the proposed transition or implementation period
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is due to come to an end. in other words, there is an awful lot still to do and it's got to be done by a government, of course, without an overall majority in parliament. so it's not surprising that tempers are sometimes fraying, and all sorts of people are calling for greater certainty. let's cross now to westminster and speak to my colleague annita mcveigh. a lot of votes yesterday in the commons which the government managed to win. how well are they doing today? well, we are waiting. we should imminently have some more votes following this second day of debate on the withdrawal bill. in terms of how the government is doing, yes, it won the votes it wa nted doing, yes, it won the votes it wanted to win yesterday. it managed to stave off a rebellion by some of its own mps who were backing an
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amendment that would allow them to have a vote on the final brexit deal. they have been satisfied, for the moment at least, although there we re the moment at least, although there were rumblings today about what exactly the prime minister have promised them and whether those promises were what they understood them to be. but earlier in the day, there was a lot of drama before the debate got under way in the weekly session of prime minister's questions, when the leader of the scottish national party at westminster, ian blackford, was expeued westminster, ian blackford, was expelled from the chamber by the speaker, john bercow. he had been asked by mr bercow a number of times to sit down and retake his seat, but he didn't. he was complaining about what he said was a lack of opportunity for scottish voices to be heard in brexit debate. pmqs is usually a lively affair, but this was even more lively than usual.
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in light of the persistent and repeated refusal of the right honourable gentleman to resume his seat when so instructed, i order the right honourable gentleman to withdraw immediately from the house... order! for the remainder of this day's sitting. jeering. very well. so mr blackford won't be able to ta ke so mr blackford won't be able to take part in any of the votes that we are expecting to happen this evening. but his snp colleagues will be able to. meanwhile, the scottish national party leader and first minister of scotland, nicola sturgeon, said she had mr blackford's back and she accused westminster of treating scotland with contempt. if you look at that episode, it is symptomatic of the
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wider pressures that theresa may, the prime minister, is facing not only from those outside her party, but also from within her party. the government has survived a lot of these votes because it has made promises to rebels who were potentially going to wreck the votes for theresa may. the government has said, we will discuss this issue further down the line, we will put forward a new motion to deal with your concern. they have kicked so many cans down the road that it is getting deafening. at some point, the government will have to lay its cards on the table and explain exactly what it is going to do, and those who support the government and it stands, if they are hard brexiteers, will be happy, or the remainers are going to be happy or both sides will be unhappy. at some point, there has to be a break in all of this. yes, there has been a lot of discussion about kicking cans down the road today at westminster. depending on who you talk to, you
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get a different interpretation of how much room for manoeuvre theresa may has before she comes to the crunch point where she has to try to reconcile the views of the mps within her party, those who essentially want the brexit deal to go through without any further vote in parliament, and those who think there should be another vote. those we re there should be another vote. those were the people who threatened to rabble yesterday. most of them agreed to a compromise position, but you get different takes on how much time theresa may has a work—out this deal. some say it is as little time as this weekend, when potentially, that could go back to the house of lords, the upper chamber here of the parliament. they could put an amendment by one of those would—be tory rebels back in and could then
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ping—pong back to the house of commons with those tory rebels, who if they were not satisfied, could rebel against theresa may. it gets pretty conjugated. 0thers rebel against theresa may. it gets pretty conjugated. others say you have the summit at the end ofjune and that is the crunch point. 0thers say it is much later in the year when we see the shape of the final deal. so there are lots of views which i have heard today from various mps about when theresa may will face the point where she has either got to achieve some kind of accord between her mps and if not, who knows what will happen? annita, many thanks. this is beyond 100 days. still to come — she was one of the biggest cultural icons of the 20th century. now a new exhibition is exploring how frida kahlo shaped her own identity. a plumber has won a legal battle at the supreme court,
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with a unanimous decision that he should have been treated as a worker with employment rights. our business correspondent simon gompertz reports. the boss of pimlico plumbers turned up at the supreme court in his bentley, charlie mullins keen to show how self—employment helps his plumbers get rich too, some making over £100,000 a year. that would be by operating as free agents. but the plumbers, the court decided, were losing out. they didn't have the option of sending any substitute to do jobs. they drove company vans, had uniforms and were controlled by the firm, so they were workers who should have had rights like sick pay and minimum wage. it meant pimlico plumbers was not a customer, it was an employer. gary smith, who won the case, claimed he was due holiday pay and was unfairly dismissed after a heart attack. what are you going to do now?
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celebrate, with a stiff drink. despite being class as self—employed, he claimed he was u nfa i rly self—employed, he claimed he was unfairly dismissed. mr mullin said there was no uncertainty about where people stood, a difficult situation for firms people stood, a difficult situation forfirms which people stood, a difficult situation for firms which needed to be cleared up. do you disagree with the decision? totally. it's disgraceful and cowardly. they have the opportunity to rectify things today, and it is a bad and sad day for self—employed people. the significance of this ruling is likely to be considerable for people working in the so—called gig economy, where you have to be very flexible and you are regarded as self—employed. because pimlico plumbers has lost in the supreme court, the decision will weigh heavily in future cases on whether people should have workers' rights. uber, the taxi app, is another company fighting a claim from self—employed drivers. deliveroo is also facing challenges.
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they will be looking carefully at today's judgment. the spanish football federation has sacked the national team's head coach julen lopetegui just two days before their opening world cup match with portugal. it came after a surprise announcement by real madrid that lopetegui will succeed zinedine zidane at the bernabeu on a three—year deal. his new role at real madrid came as quite a shock for everyone — including the president of the spanish football federation, who was informed of the news only minutes before the official announcement. here's what he had to say. translation: i don't feel betrayed. from the time he worked with the spanish national team, lopetegui has done an incrediblejob. it is a difficult thing, the way it has been done. i don't mean by him, but by people who have done things without communicating with the spanish royal football federation. that is something
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which we can't let pass. we were forced to sack lopetegui. i always said the best person to guide the national team is julen lopetegui. for more on this, let's cross to our colleague 0lly foster, who is in moscow. the spaniards were one of the favourites to lift the title. this is like the allies getting rid of eisenhower before d—day! is like the allies getting rid of eisenhower before d-day! you can look at it many ways. it's an astonishing story. talk about cutting off your nose to spite your face, but you heard from the spanish president there. he was not for turning and this makes the relationship between the spanish federation and their greatest club, real madrid, very interesting indeed. 0nce real madrid, very interesting indeed. once the dust has settled on this world cup, it starts tomorrow, so this world cup, it starts tomorrow, so spain go into it with the man in charge now, their sporting director fernando hierro, who used to play for ir madrid and spain. he will make his debut against the portuguese in sochi on friday. but
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real disarray. you're right, they we re real disarray. you're right, they were one of the favourites. they have been in the doldrums for the last two major championships. they won the world cup eight years ago. that was when they dominated all the major championships because they we re major championships because they were twice european champions as well. in between, they won that world cup in south africa. but now, com plete world cup in south africa. but now, complete disarray. if you look at the likes of brazil, the french, the argentinians and germans, they will probably be glad that spain are in such a mess. so this could be a real upset not just for spain, but for the entire tournament? it really could upset the balance of things. spain have a good, young team, with a mix of the old as well. by all accounts, the captain sergio ramos, accounts, the captain sergio ramos, a real madrid player who will be with lopetegui next season, fought
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ha rd to with lopetegui next season, fought hard to keep him at least until the end of the world cup, but this breakdown in communications and the way that things have been handled is very poor. sergio ramos has tweeted a rallying cry. he says "we are the selection. we represent a crest, a shield, subtle colours, a country, the responsibility and commitment are with you, the fans, and for you yesterday, today and tomorrow". make of that what you will. we will find out how badly it has affected them when they face the portuguese in group b down in sochi on friday. that is an important match because it could decide who tops group b and which of those two goes through at all. in fact very much. maybe saudi arabia could have a chance now. absolutely right. i hope so. i have a lot riding on this. maybe that
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condo in north korea is beckoning. she became a culture icon of the 20th century and frida kahlo's influence stretched beyond art to the worlds of fashion, music and film. but the mexican artist also had a disability — which shaped her work. now, a new show at london's v&a explores how she shaped her identity. 0ur arts editor will gompertz went to see the collection which has never before been exhibited outside mexico. the instantly recognisable face of frida kahlo, the mexican artist with a world—famous mono—brow, who fashioned an image that turned her into an international icon with a back story we thought we knew. the near—fatal car crash in her teens, her turbulent marriage to the muralist diego rivera and their communist politics. but that was before a hidden treasure trove was discovered. this is the blue house in mexico city, where frida kahlo lived. when she died, they decided that the bathroom should remain locked for 50 years. when it was opened in 2004, they found tens of thousands
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of objects, a selection of which make up the contents of this show. they found wardrobes packed with her trademark traditional mexican clothes, drawers teeming with indigenous jewellery and cupboards full of her medical equipment, showing how frida kahlo used art and fashion to both conceal and confront her disabilities. no matter where i look around on the walls, i can see everything. she has become a role model for this fashion writer and activist. for me, fashion allows me to narrate and articulate a whole identity that perhaps people don't perceive. so i am currently wearing an orange cape and from that, you may have a sense of my personality. and that's exactly what frida did. she took items that were supposed to be medical devices, whether they were corsets, or whether they were boots, or whatever it was, and really accessorised them, not only to give her self—confidence, but to make them really visible and say yes, iam disabled. look at me. i'm great.
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why can't we be proud of all our differences and challenges, because that is what makes us who we are, and it's not something that we need to overcome and something which is negative, but entirely empowering. this show is not so much about frida kahlo the artist as frida kahlo the person, or, more specifically, the public image she constructed for herself and the very personal reasons behind it. iam heading i am heading to mexico city next week and whenever i go, i do try to visit the blue house. it is an incredible museum. her painting, her bed and books are there. and above her bed, she has little pictures like a kid with pop star pictures on their walls. she has got stalin, lenin and karl marx above her bed. that is the kind of person she was. fascinating. it's amazing how there
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are some figures, artists and musicians, who we just can't get enough of. we want to know more and more about them. and i suppose this is one of those instances where fortu nately, is one of those instances where fortunately, there is still more to discover. you will have to get on a plane and get over here and see this exhibition. failing that, get over to mexico city when it all goes back over there. you're watching bbc news. next up is ros atkins with 0utside source for viewers in the uk. there's a storm on the way and it is going to cause problems tomorrow morning and possibly in the afternoon as well, with delays to transport and possibly trees down across the north. there is an amber warning in force from the met office, 60 to 70 miles an hour winds which at this time of year could cause a lot of problems for trees. lots of leafy branches around. there could be debris scattered on the roads,
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so take care tomorrow. here is the storm as it is developing. it is around 1,000 kilometres to the west of us and is moving in our direction. initially, it will bring strengthening winds and heavy rain to the north—west of the country. then later tomorrow morning, the strong winds will arrive. this is what it looks like through the course of this evening and overnight. the strongest winds are here, the amber warning in force across parts of northern ireland, with very strong winds blowing through the lowlands during thursday morning. very strong winds, potentially disruptive across northern england and northern parts of wales and possibly the north midlands. it says gusts of 60 to 65. that is a rough guide. they could be higher than that, possibly even 70 miles an hour or more. as i say, there could be travel disruption on thursday morning across northern parts of the uk. to the south, we will still be feeling the strong winds. very windy inland.
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the least strong winds will be towards the south, but we are still going to be feeling those winds. at this time of year, gusts of 30 to a0 miles an hour will take twigs off trees as well. later in the afternoon on thursday, the weather is looking fine. 0nce any showers sweep through, we are in for a sunny afternoon, but still very blustery. it will be a bizarre day, with strong gusts of wind, yet a lot of sunshine. friday looks like we are expecting showers, particularly across the north—western areas. to the south, some sunshine. i don't think there will be clear blue skies. and the winds will be a lot lighter. how about the weekend? on saturday, we're expecting heavy showers, even a crack of thunder. sunday is looking drier and brighter. this is bbc news, i'm ben brown.
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the headlines at 8pm. i order the right honourable gentleman to withdraw immediately from the house. chaos in the commons, as the snp‘s westminster leader is expelled after a row with the speaker, and his colleagues followed him out of the chamber. let's be under no illusion. this is a constitutional crisis. we are now getting message to the government that we will take them on. this is the scene in the house of commons where a number of snp mps have returned to the chamber as votes continue for amendments on the government's eu withdrawal bill. i'm at westminster, where tory rebels continue to pile the pressure on the prime minister on what say mps have on the final brexit deal.
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