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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  June 14, 2018 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. remembering grenfell. a year after the devastating blaze which left 72 people dead, a community pays tribute. what is important from this day onwards is that those who we have physically lost will never, ever, ever be forgotten. 72 seconds of silence — one each for the victims of the disaster. and i am in west london, where people have been reeffecting on the tragic events of 12 months ago. more than 4,500 jobs are to go at rolls royce engineering in a major reorganisation, to save hundreds of millions of pounds. immigration rules are to be relaxed — it's expected more foreign doctors and nurses will be allowed in to help fill nhs vacancies. coming up on afternoon live all the sport with hugh — and the countdown is finally over!
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there is only one story if town. yes the day is finally here, we are less than two hours away from the start of the 21st football world cup in russia. we will check in on the england camp a bit after 2.30. thank you. it was a blowy night for some. it was, in fact the weather is causing some disruption, storm hector, a named storm, particularly in the north, that is bringing disruptive weather. the winds will ease out later 0rr on today but i will have more in half an hour. thanks. also coming up — on family duty. the queen and duchess of sussex are in cheshire for their first royal engagement together. hello everyone — this is afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy.
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commemorations and vigils are being held to remember the 72 people who died in the grenfell tower fire — one year ago. a memorial service has been held in west london, and a nationwide 72 second silence took place at midday. my colleague reeta chakra barti is there. simon, it has been a day of solemn and sombre reflection here in west london, with various events goingen to remember the 272 who died. key this horn was a memorial service where the names of each and every person who died were read out in nearby st helen's church. there was a separate gathering at the foot of the tower be mind me, where relatives and survivors stood with their own thoughts and reflections on this anniversary. last night buildings across london, including grenfell tower itself were lit up in green. at the moment the fire started. 0nam.
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12 months ago. with ourfirst fire started. 0nam. 12 months ago. with our first report this afternoon, here is our correspondent richard galpin. shortly before one o'clock this morning, grenfell tower was lit up in the colour chosen by the community to represent them, and what happened a year ago. the time marking the moment the fire was first reported to the emergency services. # amazing grace, how sweet the sound... on this, the first anniversary of the fire which took so many lives, a chance for survivors, the bereaved and members of the community to come together again in memory of those who died. hashim kedir. sirria choucair.
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nadia choucair. bassem choucair. fatima choucair. mierna choucair. zainab choucair. mary mendy. khadija saye. mehdi el—wahabi. yasin el—wahabi. faouzia el—wa habi. abdulaziz el—wa habi. what is important from this day onwards is that those who we have physically lost will never, ever, ever be forgotten. and it is incumbent on each and every one of us that we ensure that they are never forgotten. and further, they are revered, because our strength will ensure that the truth will notjust present itself, but will announce itself in such a way that the tragedy of grenfell tower can never,
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ever, ever reoccur. # lean on me when you're not strong. # i'll be your friend, i'll help you carry on. 0utside, right next to grenfell tower itself, a gospel choir led another commemoration, as people gathered to reflect at this, the most poignant of locations. and to listen to a recitation from the koran. many of those who died in the fire were muslim. at midday, everything stopped for a period of silence. here at grenfell tower,
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it lasted 72 seconds, in memory of each of those who never made it out of the burning block of flats. it also fell silent at other locations around the country, and beyond. # you can't deny me, you can decide to turn your face away. # no matter, cos there's something
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inside so strong...# this is a day evoking the most painful memories. the children at this primary school near grenfell tower lost friends and a member of staff in the fire. but for the community in this area, hope lies in their expectation that there will ultimately be justice, with those responsible for the catastrophic fire being punished. richard galpin, bbc news. 0ur correspondent charlotte gallagher is at the base of g re nfell tower. iam. 12 iam. many relatives and survivors
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have been meeting there. for many this is a very difficult day charlotte 7 this is a very difficult day charlotte? incredibly difficult, an important day, but such a painful and emotional day for people. the grief for many is still so raw, only a year ago many of them lost family, oi’ a year ago many of them lost family, or lost their homes, still some people are living in emergency accommodation, living in a sort of limbo, so even though it feel like a year has past for many it only seems like yesterday when they lost so much. now we had the two very moving service, one here, at the base of g re nfell tower, service, one here, at the base of grenfell tower, and another at st helen's church and the one at st helens the church was deck railway stationed in green, the congregation we re stationed in green, the congregation were given green scarfs to war of course green has become the colour that symbolises grenfell. there is a green heart on top of the tower behind me. the names of the 72 victims were read out and when you
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hear them being read out like that you realised how many lives were lost that night, an also we had 73 doves released and an extra one for the unknown person that could have died that night. that is what many people fear, that more people might have died that night, and are just not known about. so, incredibly, incredibly moving. so later on today we will have this silent march around the area, now this happens every month, but of course it is going to be much more significant on this year anniversary. 0n the sixth month anniversary organisers say they had round 600 people attending. tonight they expect many, many more, just breed people, survivors, and also the community and it has to be said the community here has come together. we saw that in the aftermath of the disaster, church hauls filled with donated clothes, food, nappies, offers of accommodation and it is still very
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much like this around where we are now, i spoke to one man who survived the fire but lost his wife, and he said people have just the fire but lost his wife, and he said people havejust been the fire but lost his wife, and he said people have just been so good to him. he said he feels let down by officials because they couldn't sort him out housing and it was only many monthsen he got somewhere permanent to live. he says he walks down the street and he can't stop being hugged by people. people say i have seen you on hugged by people. people say i have seen you on the television, i know everything you are been through, so people have really come together, to support people, and as people were arriving for the if the rent service, there were so many hugs, so many tears, because it has been such a devastating, painful yearfor people here, and you know, you walk round the area, you see justice for grenfell, people here still want a nswe i’s grenfell, people here still want answers about what happened that night and how it was allowed to happen. so it is very very raw and fresh. many others might have moved
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on but people round here it is raw in their minds, that grief is still so in their minds, that grief is still so fresh. we will have more from charlotte throughout the day but for the moment thank you very much. i've been speaking to sandra ruiz, who lost her niece in the fire. she explained to me how relatives, survivors and the community are coping one year on from the disaster. we have families, but some some them are in pain, and some of them are possibly in denial, but we are all together in this, and we all understand each other, that we all have peaks understand each other, that we all have pea ks and understand each other, that we all have peaks and triumphs, so it's very supportive community, and it's carried us through and we will continue. this isjust the carried us through and we will continue. this is just the start.
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and have you come to know people that you didn't know before? yes, i have. yes. i have come to know them very well. that has been enriching? definitely. definitely and it is actually really solidified that sense of what community is, and the importance of diversity within a community, and how it strengthens, you know, who we are, and learning about other people, and their customs, and you know, their sense of family also. we all bring our own cultures to it and it has just made us cultures to it and it has just made us stronger and more understanding and more caring of each other. do you feel it has changed you?” and more caring of each other. do you feel it has changed you? i think before i used to be quite a compliant person, i now question everything. i am a lot lest trusting, but i think i have become stronger through it, even if my own
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wea kness stronger through it, even if my own weakness i have become stronger, i draw on people's strength, and i think very, we found skills in ourself that we didn't know we had. what are your thoughts about the future as you face this anniversary? the future i hope we can bring about change, significant change. the thing with grenfell is that it came about because change didn't happen fast enough. so i am hoping that the prime minister and government commit now, now, as the inquiry is starting, that any findings that come out are put into effect immediately, because people are in danger now, whether it's in north kensington, whether it is in hull or birmingham or manchester, or glasgow, you know, people are in danger. why should they be? we should be safe in our own homeser oui’ should be safe in our own homeser our own beds, this should never
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happen again, so we want change, we wa nt happen again, so we want change, we want long lasting change for we want regulatory change, throughout the whole of the structure, it the building, regulation, it is management, it is also about ethic, you know. our landlords need to be ethical and understand that social housing is for every one, and we should be treated as people notjust as numbers on sandra lost her niece in the fire and there she was, with her reflections about how the last year has changed her. plenty more from here later this hour — and a reminder that we'll be bringing you special coverage of the one year anniversary of the grenfell tragedy, including the silent walk from the wall of truth, just before 7pm, here on the bbc news channel. for now it's back to simon in the studio. rolls—royce is to cut 4,600 jobs
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over the next two years — the company says it needs to save hundreds of millions of pounds a year. many of the posts affected are in management and among office staff at its headquarters in derby. theo leggett reports. rolls—royce is an engineering giant. it builds power systems for aircraft, ships and heavy machinery. but the company's boss thinks it's become bloated and inefficient. so he is planning some radical surgery. this is a very difficult decision. however, we do need to think about all the hard work that's gone in and turning that into opportunities for the future. we are actually trying to create a stronger rolls—royce, which is good for derby and good for the uk. rolls—royce has 55,000 employees around the world. of those, some 26,000 work in the uk, many of them at the company's headquarters in derby. now, it says it wants to get rid of a600 jobs, mainly among middle management
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and back office functions. it is bad news for workers in derby, because that is where a large number of managerialjobs are based. but thousands of engineering posts will be protected for the next few years. derby's mps have already made their concerns very clear. isn't this a failure of shareholder capitalism, which basically sacrifices jobs on the altar of higher shareholder dividends? i understand why a member with a strong constituency interest in the workforce there of course will be anxious and combative in defending the interests of the workforce. the cutbacks come at a time when rolls—royce is also facing some significant engineering challenges. it is working hard to fix problems with engines used on boeing's 787 dreamliner. the faults have proved costly
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and difficult to rectify. analysts say the company has to be careful not to cut too far, too fast. getting the balance between maintaining core skills and cutting costs is one of the most difficult things for any manager. the company is making it clear that the bulk of the cuts are in back—office functions, not core front—line engineering staff. it is also trying to do this process through non—compulsory means, through voluntary means. for rolls—royce employees, these may be deeply uncertain times, but bosses believe that by accepting painful cuts now, they can guarantee future prosperity. theo leggett, bbc news. andy moore is outside rolls—royce in derby. andy, that is where the cuts will be most keenly felt. that is right. two thirds of these cuts are going to happen in the uk, this is the head quarters of the company. something like 15,000 people work here, and we estimate something like 20, 25% of the workforce is going to go. that
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blow will come quite quickly, we are told about a third of the jobs will go told about a third of the jobs will 9° by told about a third of the jobs will go by the end of the year. so this will be quite a shock here in the city and surrounding area, this is the biggest private employer in the city, you talk to anybody around here, and they know somebody who works here. and so it will have a knock on effect on the economy. that is why local mps raised the issue today and were given a reassurance by the business secretary that he would do what he could to off set thejob would do what he could to off set the job losses. would do what he could to off set thejob losses. question would do what he could to off set the job losses. question about whether these will be compulsory or not, the unions say the company has given undertakings there won't be, in certain areas at least. the company says the scale of the job losses is such there will inevitably be some compulsory redundancies. thank you andy. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. a memorial service has been held in west london to remember those
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who died in the fire at grenfell tower a year ago. more than four and a half thousand jobs are to go at rolls—royce engineering in a major reorganisation, to save hundreds of millions of pounds. immigration rules are to be relaxed — it's expected more foreign doctors and nurses will be allowed in to help fill nhs vacancies. and in sport russia is preparing for kick off at this summer's world cup ahead of today's opening match. england news though, marcus rashford missing from training again today, as england continue their preparations for the first group game against tunisia on monday. spurs will begin their premier league campaign at wembley, a first game at their new home on the site of white hart lane will be against liverpool in mid—september. and chris robshaw is dropped from the test squad for their second match against south africa on saturday. brad shields will make his
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first international start at flanker. i will be back with more on those stories at half i will be back with more on those stories at half past. the rules which tightly restrict the number of doctors and nurses from outside the eu who can work in the uk are to be relaxed. the cap on skilled migrants was introduced by theresa may when she was home secretary. but the nhs is now struggling to fill thousands of medical vacancies. 0ur political correspondent jonathan blake reports. working hard under pressure, but there just aren't enough doctors and nurses. hospitals across england are badly short—staffed. in february, nhs england had 35,000 vacancies for nurses, and nearly 10,000 doctors' posts unfilled. we have got substantial demand pressures on the nhs, an ageing population, and more patients needing health care services. also it is linked to a decision in 2010 when austerity hit, to restrict the number of nurses and doctors being trained in the nhs to meet that demand, which is why we have got so many vacancies across the nhs at the moment. the prime minister knows the health
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service relies heavily on workers from abroad, but for years, the numbers coming have been restricted. it was theresa may as home secretary who set a limit on tier 2 visas for skilled workers from outside the eu, atjust under 21,000 per year, part of a broader approach to restrict immigration.. we will reduce net migration from the hundreds of thousands to the tens of thousands. it will not be easy. it will take hard work and a great deal of political courage. but the british people want us to do it, and it is the right thing to do, so we will do it. more doctors and nurses are being trained in the uk. but that will take time. and beyond the need to fill gaps in the health service, is this relaxation of the rules more than just a possible quick fix? i think there is a total change in approach with sajid javid and the prime minister. without her approval, none of this would be happening.
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it is a point to get across that, just because we are leaving the eu, it doesn't mean we are anti—immigration, we are not, we have to be flexible. we are told the prime minister is enthusiastic about this plan to fill staffing gaps in the nhs short—term. what is much less clear is how far this move reflects any broader shift in government policy on immigration, and what its long—term plan might be. jonathan blake, bbc news, westminster. the opening ceremony for the football world cup is to start shortly at the luzhniki stadium in moscow. president vladimir putin is there — and robbie williams is performing. there will be 64 games during the month—long tournament, with 32 countries competing — and hosts russia will play saudi arabia in the first match. 0ur sports correspondent richard conway is at the stadium and sent this report. the rhythm of the world cup has arrived in moscow. fans from around the globe are here in their thousands, turning red square into
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a kaleidoscope of colour. the build—up to today's first game has presented many challenges for fifa, football's world governing body. but with kick—offjust hours away, organisers are confident of the impact the tournament will have. kicking off from the luzhniki stadium, from the beautiful luzhniki stadium. here in moscow, football will conquer the world. russia will start its campaign against saudi arabia tonight, with victory perhaps vital if the hosts are to stand any chance of progressing. tonight is a massive game for them, to get off to a good start. they are playing saudi arabia. i'm sure saudi arabia will be thinking this is their game that they have to win as well. but i think it will be difficult for this russian team. they have not got a lot of household names. of players playing in top—level football and i think it could be a real struggle for the home nation to do well in this tournament. russia and saudi arabia may be the two lowest ranked
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teams in the competition, but it certainly has not dampened the spirits of their supporters. we are very happy, because many people around the world come to russia. they have fun. i wanted to attend this event and to support my team. inshallah, we will win tonight. while the excitement may be building, fears linger over the threat of potential violence and racism. especially in a country with a long history of discrimination within football. you can only hope it does not play a part. you want the football, the main football on the parks to do the talking and then hopefully become away talking about what a great world cup it actually was. after eight years of preparation, russia's big day is finally here — a moment it wants to share with its visitors. and there are hopes that nothing will spoil its plans for a month—long party. don't forget — you can let us know
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what you think tweet us using the hashtag afternoonlive. all the ways to contact us on screen right now. time for a look at the weather. here's sarah keith lucas for much of the country it was windy. yes it has been windy out there today. we have a named storm, but pictures like this, so we are trees down in county down, and really widely across the northern half of the uk, very windy conditions, so this is how it is looking in cumbria, and take a look at this, this comes in from lancashire so we have big waves round the coast. in fact there has been flooding prisons in scotland, with high tides combined with big winds round the coast. no-one told hector it is mid june. winds round the coast. no-one told hector it is mid june. pretty unusual conditions for the time of year. some times we get windy spells
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injune but year. some times we get windy spells in june but look at year. some times we get windy spells injune but look at some the gust, in cairngorm104mph. that is the strongest wind gust recorded injune in northern ireland, so for the time of year pretty unusual. what is in store for the rest of us? we have seen the worse of the windy weather so the strong winds will be easing away but storm hector is still with us, you can see it on the satellite image, this swirl of cloud here, the cold front pushing away from southern and eastern parts of the country but further north we still have a lot of isobars on the map. so windy conditions to come. northern ireland and northern england before the low pressure heads off to scandinavia. through the rest of afternoon the winds coming from a westerly direction, bringing heavy showers too in scotland, in particular, if we scheme zoom into scotland, sunny spell, heavy blustery showers and some the wind gusts here are shown
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in the black circle, so winds gusting round 50—60. notjust round the coast and hill right through the central belt so further disruption to travel, power cuts possible, and certainly over the next few hours, further south the winds are not as strong but down to the london region we have winds gusting about 30mph, so we have winds gusting about 30mph, soa we have winds gusting about 30mph, so a blustery afternoon, really, where ever you are. lots of dry weather and there is more sunshine around as they cold front clears towards the east, we are left with sunny spell, scattered showers in the north and temperatures ranging between 17—22. so in a few sheltered sport spots that is feeling pleasant. 0n into the evening strong winds will ease away, heavy showers pushing across northern ireland and scotla nd pushing across northern ireland and scotland through the course of tonight. still breezy in the north overnight, less windy further south. with clearer skies it will feel fresher than it has done. 8—13, so friday starts on that fairly fresh
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note. but it will be a much quieter day than we have seen today. still breezy in the north. with scattered showers affecting scotland, northern ireland, one or two isolated showers further south too, but many of us avoiding the showers in the sunshine, 22 degrees towards the south—east, 1a or 15 for scotland and northern ireland as well. what about the weekend ? and northern ireland as well. what about the weekend? saturday looks to be still holding on the a few of those heavily shower, sunday though should be a drier day although turning cloudy across the country too. and of course, it is the world cup starting today, this is how things are looking in moscow today, so temperatures round about the mid teens, fairly cloudy the conditions but it looks like things will be warming upforthe but it looks like things will be warming up for the world cup over the next this is bbc news — our latest headlines. commemorations and vigils have been held in west london to remember the 72 people who died in the grenfell tower fire a year ago today. 0vernight, the tower was illuminated in green to mark the moment the blaze was reported. more than 11,500 people are set to lose theirjobs at rolls—royce over the next two years, in a major restructure of the company. the firm is focusing
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on civil aerospace, defence and power systems. the home office has announced it's relaxing immigration rules to allow more foreign doctors and nurses to work in the uk, to help fill nhs vacancies. the us secretary of state says sanctions on north korea won't be lifted until the country has demonstrated complete denuclearisation. speaking in seoul, mike pompeo explained the deal struck between donald trump and kim jong—un to his south korean and japanese counterparts. in a moment: the newest member of the royal family, the duchess of sussex, has accompanied the queen on her first official royal visit. the queen and the duchess have spent the afternoon together in cheshire and chester. sport now on afternoon live with hugh woozencroft it is here, the world cup begins. and we start talking about injuries. marcus rashford missed the open
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training session yesterday which —— with what was a minor knee problem, but he did not train again today and it is likely he will not play in the first game against tunisia on monday. we should expect raheem sterling and jesse lingard to appear in that match. harry kane will be the captain going into this tournament. he picked to won —— he beatjordan henderson to the role and today one of his team—mates during trippier spoke about that position. —— kieran trippier. during trippier spoke about that position. -- kieran trippier. we have got to be patient, we have analysed them and we have looked at their strengths and weaknesses, and i try to watch as many games as i can to study the opposition. tunisia, we watched them against
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spain, and it will be a tough game on monday but we are looking forward to it. kieran trippier, the full—back looking forward to the game on monday. the first game begins this afternoon. the opening match at the world cup includes the hosts so russia will be taking part, facing saudi arabia. saudi arabia and russia are the lowest ranked teams in the tournament. although the hosts don't have to qualify and if you miss out on those competitive matches your ranking slips. russia are not a great team at the moment but they are not the 71st worst team either. we will get the build—up to that match. robbie williams will be singing for the crowd. he says he
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will be performing a smorgasbord of his greatest hits. that will be coming very shortly indeed. we will keep you posted. the fixtures have been released for next season's premier league campaign. with one big question — who can stop pep guardiola's manchester city from winning another title? the defending champions will begin their campaign away to arsenal in the tie of the opening weekend. manchester united host leicester city, liverpool take on west ham, while championship winners wolverhampton wanderers welcome everton to molineux. tottenham have announced that their new stadium won't be ready for the start of the season. they begin away to newcastle and they'll play fulham at wembley before the first match at their revamped white hart lane ground on the 15th of september against liverpool. in rugby union, flanker brad shields will make his first international start for england, as they aim to level their three match series with south africa this weekend. that means former
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captain chris robshaw won't be taking part — he's been left out of the squad entirely. new zealand—born shields was fast—tracked into the squad by head coach eddiejones and he made his debut off the bench in the first test. danny cipriani is a replacement for the match in bloemfontein on saturday, and in line for his first cap for three years. jones said they were looking for something a little bit different to finish the game, which cipriani could bring. and the return ofjohnny sexton at fly—half is one of eight changes to the ireland side for the second test against australia in melbourne on saturday. defeat last week ended ireland's 12—game unbeaten run, but a far stronger side may well help level the three—test series. wales coach warren gatland has made five changes for the second test with argentina on saturday. ellisjenkins comes in at blindside flanker and there are first tour
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starts for hooker ryan elias, tighthead tomas francis and scrum—half aled davies. 0wen watkin replaces the injured hadleigh parkes. wales lead the series 1—0. strong gusting winds could make scoring difficult on the first day of the us open at shinnecock hills in new york state. although organisers say a tweaked course design may alleviate the problem. usa's brandon steele is the early leader — he's 1 underfrom his first 7 holes — but as you can see no real high scoring has emerged. england's justin rose, and ian poulter are also tied for first. rory mcilroy has just started his round. that's all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. is he first or tied for first? which
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one? all right. you win. i wasn't expecting that! commemorations and vigils are being held to remember the 72 people who died in the grenfell tower fire — one year ago. a memorial service has been held in west london, and a nationwide 72 second silence took place at midday. reeta chakrabarti is there. it has been a day heavy with a motion in west london, and also a day filled with ceremony as people come together to mark this first anniversary of the grenfell tower fire. there was a service this morning at st helens church nearby and this afternoon there will be another service at st clements church. i'm joined now by reverend mike long from notting hill church. how have people approach the first anniversary? with a sense of something like to read, often you might think people approach
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commemorations with adrenaline but i don't find that anywhere here —— with something like bread. the many people this is an ordeal and it reminds them of those terrible offence a year ago and for many of them it is a continuing and unfolding tragedy —— those terrible events year ago. there is resignation and weariness and huge sadness. very difficult for them. you saw people on the night of the fire and you have been with them this year. have you seen changes in people? people go up and down and the community is a very diverse and strong one but of course we grieve in different ways and at different speeds. the many in the community there is a sense in which there is a long way to go. many people feel in
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limbo because there are so many families waiting to be rehoused and the public inquiry and the criminal investigation are still taking place and the tower site is still very visible and these are things which although understandable, they still have consequences for the psychological recovery of the bereaved and the survivors and the wider community. it makes it difficult to have a swift resolution to this, it will take many many years. what sort of help are you able to provide? for our church and the faith community, much of it is about supporting people, allowing them to express themselves and to be listened to, especially when they feel they have not been listened to as well as they would have liked. and to seek ways in which we can help foster a stronger sense of community engagement with each other and a stronger resilience among the
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community but also to help the community but also to help the community find its own voice and speak for itself and determine its own future. many people would say becoming aye has had no trouble finding its voice, —— many people would say b community has had no trouble finding its voice. i was speaking to one woman, she said she used to be trusting and comply, but now she did not trust anybody. —— compliant. she had become an expert in building regulations and legal matters, this has changed people fundamentally. it has. it will change people for ever and our community for generations. people are hugely resource for —— resource for, and at times we can be impatient and frustrated, but despite that people find very good ways of being able to pull together, especially at times like these. it
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isa especially at times like these. it is a wonderful place to have the privilege of being minister. as a religious man, and he found religion to bea religious man, and he found religion to be a comfort to people? and what about people with no religion? —— have you found religion to be a comfort. we have people from all faiths and none, and that doesn't mean they necessarily share the same specific beliefs but we find a growing respect and understanding of each other which can only be good for the community. there is a place for the community. there is a place for community which helps us foster a sense of understanding and when so many people see religion as a source of conflict, this shows the opposite, we can find shared understandings and shared values and come together in a common cause. while accepting what you say, that the page is very raw and ongoing, ——
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the page is very raw and ongoing, —— the pain is very raw and ongoing, would you say that passing this hurdle of the first anniversary still has a meaning for many people? most definitely. 0ne still has a meaning for many people? most definitely. one of the words i heard on the services earlier was the word cathartic, because for some people it is an ability to come together, people who have not had a chance to meet together for a long time and find support and strengthen each other, and the faith community provides that, as well. and where connecting with each other which i think provides strength for each other. —— a way of connecting with each other. reverend, thanks for joining us. a sense there of how complex the scene is here in west london, of the huge different emotions that are swirling around,
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attempting to find healing and finding some of it in the sense of community but also raw pain still very much on display. much more on this commemoration of the first anniversary throughout the afternoon here on bbc news but now back to the studio. the thoughts from people around the world regarding grenfell. this is on the england football squad in russia. —— this is from. they remembered those who died with a minute's silence. closer to home, staff at the nearest underground stations also remembering the events of one year ago. ladbroke grove and latimer road staff talking about their feelings. this is
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latimer road staff talking about theirfeelings. this is the latimer road staff talking about their feelings. this is the front page of the evening standard. they are marking this. a photograph of the queen with the duchess of sussex in cheshire, but the queen was wearing green in tribute to the events in west london exactly a year ago today. so that is grenfell tower being remembered in various ways across the country and across the world. sanctions on north korea won't be lifted until it has demonstrated complete denuclearisation, according to the us secretary of state mike pompeo. he was speaking in seoul, where he's been having talks with south korean and japanese counterparts, and trying to explain the details of the deal struck between president trump and kimjong un at their summit in singapore. robin brant reports from seoul — his piece contains flashing images. fresh from that summit, he's come to explain and to reassure. first, the secretary of state met with south korea's president, the leader of a country
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still technically at war with the north. then he had talks with his japanese and south korean counterparts — both staunch allies, both countries that might not fully agree with this. as he arrived back in the us, the president took to his phone, tweeting there is no longer a nuclear threat from north korea. the world should rest assured that the united states, the republic of korea and japan remain committed to achieving the complete, verifiable and irreversible denuclearisation of north korea. the us alliances with these two countries are absolutely ironclad. and on the crucial issue of sanctions, the way the world has punished north korea, he was specific. we believe that chairman kim jong un understands the urgency of the timing of completing this denuclearisation, that he understands that we must do this quickly, and that sanctions relief — we should recall these are un sanctions —
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that sanctions relief cannot take place until such time. but we still don't know much about how kimjong un will ditch those weapons. and he wasn't about to tell us. mr secretary, bbc news, if north korea is no longer a threat, why does it need to denuclearise? in the heart of seoul a reminder of the military alliance between the us and south korea. almost 30,000 american troops are still here. part of that alliance is on hold after the president announced he'd be stopping joint military exercises. but no stand down, says the south. next up on this tour is china and it's far less likely america's top diplomat is going there to reassure them, but instead to seek reassurance from china about its ongoing support for the sanctions regime. that's something china has already hinted it wants to ease off on. robin brant, bbc news, seoul. the newest member
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of the royal family, the duchess of sussex, has accompanied the queen for the first time on an official royal visit. the queen and the duchess have been in cheshire, where they opened the mersey gateway bridge, and the storyhouse theatre in chester. it is the first time the duchess has attended an event with the queen without her husband prince harry. 0ur royal correspondent sarah campbell is in chester. it has been a busy morning of engagements and a milestone day in her life as a new member of the royal family. her life as a new member of the royalfamily. herfirst her life as a new member of the royal family. her first solo visit, without prince harry, and also her first visit accompanying the queen. if you have to learn the ropes from someone, if you have to learn the ropes from someone, the queen is the best person to learn from. we can take you through the day. she spent overnight on the royal train with the queen, travelling up to runcorn
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in cheshire. getting off at runcorn station, and that must have been an experience in itself, going on the royal train, and then they went to mersey gateway bridge, one of the biggest infrastructure projects in the area. she is now a working royal and these kind of things are going to be her bread—and—butter. 0penings and walking around, meeting the people, and she did that in runcorn and then after the various openings in chester, thousands of people had lined the street here since early morning, and to their delight after they had been inside the storyhouse theatre they both left and completed a walkabout on the streets of chester. having been at a few of the blog about is with harry meghan and wood —— harry and meghan, this was a
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more sedate affair, but there were still excitement, because they were seeing the queen and also the newest member of the royal family. the queen wearing green in tribute to the victims of the grenfell tower fire? there was a sombre moment at 12 o'clock when the queen and the duchess of sussex, they stood outside the theatre and observed the 72 seconds of silence. the queen, you will remember, a few days after the fire at grenfell, she met some of the people from the local community, and we know that meghan herself has made private visits to the charities related to grenfell tower. grenfell tower is very close to kensington palace, her new home. thanks forjoining us. in a moment the business news.
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first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. a memorial service has been held in west london to remember those who died in the fire at grenfell tower a year ago. immigration rules are to be relaxed — it's expected more foreign doctors and nurses will be allowed in — to help fill nhs vacancies. and the football world cup is about to get under way — with russia taking on saudi arabia in moscow. here's your business headlines on afternoon live, engineering firm rolls—royce is to cut 4,600 jobs over the next two years as it refocuses on civil aerospace, defence and power systems. most of the cuts will be among middle managers and back—office staff particularly at its derby headquarters. there was a boom on the high street in may, thanks to hot weather and the royal wedding. sales last month were 3.9% up on the year before — much of them in food and household goods stores. they're the best numbers we've had on retail sales for over a year.
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after spending some 2.4 trillion euros buying up government bonds, in order to push money into the european economies and boost lending, the european central bank has said it will wind down its qantitative easing programme by the end of the year — but said it won't put up interest rates until at least next summer. apple is doing things to their products. making it harder to break into — a good thing or a bad thing? it's a good thing if you remember of the public but not such a good thing if you remember available enforcement agency. there was that incident with the fbi where they
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wa nted incident with the fbi where they wanted to hack into a phone but apple would not let them. there are companies who specialise hacking into iphones for the security services and for people like the fbi. which is why apple is doing what it's doing. that is right. the problem is, it brings a political dimension to it, donald trump said the fbi should be allowed to be able to get in and hack these phones in extreme circumstances. that is why they have done it. what the reaction is going to be? we will find out on saturday. the americans decided to put their hedge fund is up. that is why, this will be four rises in a year. -- interest rate up. the reason is inflation, wages going
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up, retail sales very strong in the us, and the tariffs being imposed on things like steel and aluminium. we are also finding that they put a tariff on imported steel but domestic steel producers are also putting up their prices because they realise they have had room against their competition and they can put their competition and they can put their prices up by 10% as well so... yes, but didn't they see that coming? that prices would go up? possibly not. maybe that is a risk worth taking, that by allowing them
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to put up their prices in roosts the domestic industry and allows them to make more profit. —— it boosts the domestic industry. we will ask paul what he thinks. indeed! joining us now is paul blake, live from new york. most people were expecting the rate rise to go up, the projection they we re rise to go up, the projection they were likely to raise interest rates more than people thought, that caused a dip in the market, but most people this morning have been talking about the plain speaking style of mr powell compared to previous fed chair people who have come out with impenetrable monetary policy talk. the chairperson was
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talking in very lay person terms about how great the economy was doing but he also said he was hearing anecdotally that there was concern about trade and the tariffs we have all been talking about, but he said he hasn't seen that reflected in the data yet. what about apple? what have they done, in the way they have changed the defect in the phones which allowed them to be hacked into? they have changed the default settings around the usb port, you can normally sync it with a computer even if you have turned off the phone. but now the usb port will become disabled. you can charge it but you can't sync it with your computer, after an hour, unless you unlock the phone, that has upset law enforcement agencies who say they should be able to crack into the
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phones to gather data intelligence about suspects, to understand crimes, but apple says anyone who is able to find a loophole that allows them to crack into it, a hacker would be able to do that, as welcomer so they are protecting the “ as welcomer so they are protecting the —— as well, so they are protecting the consumers as well. a quick look at the markets. the shares have gone up at rolls—royce? the shares have gone up at rolls- royce? they the shares have gone up at rolls-royce? they think they are focusing their business more on the aerospace area and because they are going to be cutting jobs they are saving money and they think this would be good for the bottom line and therefore good for your shares. it depends where you are standing. apple, that as a result as >> studio: cash of what they have been
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saying, and also we have the pound looking strong. see you in one hour. thank you very much. time for a look at the weather. here's sarah keith lucas. we have some unseasonably windy weather for this stage we have some unseasonably windy weatherfor this stage in we have some unseasonably windy weather for this stage in june, especially across the northern half of the country, breezy where ever you are, storm hector has been named. this is a picture from whitby showing a fairly active and foamy seascape. these are the gusts we have seen from hector, 100 mph in the pennines and the cairngorm mountains. causing some disruption with the strength of the wind. the satellite images showing the storm, pushing its way slowly eased the man for the rest of the day the low— pressure for the rest of the day the low—pressure centre moves to the shetland isles and then towards scandinavia —— slowly east, and for
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the rest. although we will have seen the rest. although we will have seen the strongest of the winds across the strongest of the winds across the mainland, we could still have gusts of more than a 50 mph, so causing travel and power outages. windy afternoon for scotland and northern ireland. but for much of england and wales, the weather looks dry, sunshine reappearing, but still blustery and there could be a gust of around 30 mph in the london region. in the evening most places stay dry and the strongest of the winds easing. still blustery showers for northern ireland and the north of england. in this south it stays dry, and the temperature will be dipping down to around 8—13. a fairly fresh start to friday morning. still quite breezy in the
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north, with scattered and heavy showers, northern ireland, as well. much of england and wales will stay dry, less windy, and temperature ranging between 14—22 on friday. the weekend? a weekend of two halves, fairly heavy blustery showers on saturday, it is drier and less windy on sunday, and things will be staying dry for the start of the world cup in moscow through into the evening. hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at three. remembering grenfell — a year after the devastating blaze which left 72 people dead, a community pays tribute. what is important from this day onwards is that those who we have physically lost will never, ever, ever be forgotten. 72 seconds of silence — one each for the victims of the disaster.
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and i'm in west london, where people have been reflecting on the tragic events of 12 months on the tragic events of 12 months ago. more than 4,500 jobs are to go at rolls royce engineering in a major reorganisation, to save hundreds of millions of pounds. immigration rules are to be relaxed — it's expected more foreign doctors and nurses will be allowed in to help fill nhs vacancies. coming up on afternoon live all the sport with hugh — the world cup is upon us. and i'm yes, if you didn't know it is about to beginment it kicks off at 4.00 we will have our eyes on the opening ceremony shortly. they are gathering in the fan zone, getting ready for the first game. the hosts are playing and boy, the
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excitement, you can feel it mounting as there are windy condition, storm hector has brought trees down. travel disruption and power cut, i think we have seen the strongest of the winds. they should ease for the rest of day. more in about half an hour. see you then. also coming up — on family duty. the queen and duchess of sussex are in cheshire for their first hello everyone — this is afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. commemorations and vigils are being held to remember the 72 people who died in the grenfell tower fire — one year ago. a memorial service has been held in west london, and a nationwide 72 second silence took place at midday.
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my colleague reeta chakrabarti is near the tower in west london. simon, thank you. it has been a day intense we're motion here in west london, with people remembering those that they lost, and also expressing their feelings of anger and helplessness and incomprehension at why it happened. the day has been marked by ceremony and collective remembrance, so this morning, there was a memorial service at st helen's church just down the road from here, where the names of each of the 72 people who died were read out one by one. and separately there was another active remembrance at foot of the tower behind me where survivors and families of the victims gathered, to think and to contemplate and to remember what they had lost. last night, many
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buildings across the city, including g re nfell tower buildings across the city, including grenfell tower itself, were lit up in green, at the moment that the fire started one year ago. with the first of our reports this afternoon here is our correspondent richard galpin. here is our correspondent richard galpin. shortly before one o'clock this morning, grenfell tower was lit up in the colour chosen by the community to represent them, and what happened a year ago. the time marking the moment the fire was first reported to the emergency services. # amazing grace, how sweet the sound... on this, the first anniversary of the fire which took so many lives, a chance for survivors, the bereaved and members of the community to come together again in memory of those who died. hashim kedir.
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sirria choucair. nadia choucair. bassem choucair. fatima choucair. mierna choucair. zainab choucair. mary mendy. khadija saye. mehdi el—wahabi. yasin el—wahabi. faouzia el—wa habi. abdulaziz el—wa habi. what is important from this day onwards is that those who we have physically lost will never, ever, ever be forgotten. and it is incumbent on each and every one of us that we ensure that they are never forgotten. and further, they are revered, because our strength will ensure that the truth will notjust present itself, but will announce itself in such a way that the tragedy of grenfell tower can never, ever, ever reoccur. # lean on me when you're not strong.
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# i'll be your friend, i'll help you carry on. 0utside, right next to grenfell tower itself, a gospel choir led another commemoration, as people gathered to reflect at this, the most poignant of locations. and to listen to a recitation from the koran. many of those who died in the fire were muslim. at midday, everything stopped
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for a period of silence. here at grenfell tower, it lasted 72 seconds, in memory of each of those who never made it out of the burning block of flats. it also fell silent at other locations around the country, and beyond. # you can't deny me, you can decide to turn your face away. # no matter, cos there's something
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inside so strong...# this is a day evoking the most painful memories. the children at this primary school near grenfell tower lost friends and a member of staff in the fire. but for the community in this area, hope lies in their expectation that there will ultimately be justice, with those responsible for the catastrophic fire being punished. richard galpin, bbc news. 0ur correspondent charlotte gallagher is at the base of g re nfell tower. charlotte, we were speaking earlier,
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weren't we, about how difficult todayis weren't we, about how difficult today is for many of the people who lost loved ones in the tower last year. it has been an incredibly difficult day, very painful, emotional, but people have said it is really important that they have these commemorations today, so what happened at grenfell tower and those 72 people will never ever be forgotten. now earlier we saw the church service at st helens the names of the 72 victims were read out and a candle was lit for each of them. now, after that service, they marched, the entire congregation down to grenfell tower, a sea of green, people carrying green balloon, wearing green scarf, green clothing and the floral wreaths saying justice for grenfell. we saw the long procession, as you get to
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the long procession, as you get to the base of the tower where people have collected it is more an more people dressed in green, taking really silent reflection at that point, looking at the base of the tower, at the boards which are surrounding it. people have been writing on them, rest in peace, forever in our hearts, justice for g re nfell forever in our hearts, justice for grenfell written many, many times, so grenfell written many, many times, so really getting a sense that people want to take their time actually, not just for people want to take their time actually, notjust for the days' events, but take that and remember what they lost that day, many people lost family, many people lost homes, many people are still living in emergency accommodation, so there is a lot of anger about that here at grenfell. they feel like they have had to really fight for things that they shouldn't have had to fight for. this disastrous horrendous thing happened and they weren't offered appropriate accommodation and they are still living in hotel, families with small children living in one bedrooms there is a lot of children here because so many people
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lost relatives, aunt, uncles, pa rents, lost relatives, aunt, uncles, parents, sister, brother, there was even a teacher at a local school, they died. so a huge amount of people wanting to be in that service, in fact there were so many people who wanted to be in the church they had to air it outside as well, because they couldn't fit eve ryo ne well, because they couldn't fit everyone in, the people that wanted to be there. you know, it is not just a day for the bereaved and survives it is a day for the g re nfell survives it is a day for the grenfell community, the the people who live in this area. a year ago today, they woke up, to the most dreadful scenings, and smells, even around here, something had happened so around here, something had happened so close to them, and a lot of raw grief still, in the community, about what happened. so so it is grief still, in the community, about what happened.@ so it is lots of memories that are coming up for people i spoke to one man who lost his wife. he says he doesn't feel that much time has passed at all. it has been a year but it is still, you know, it still seems so fresh, so
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raw. so lots of emotion today, and i imagine there will be more tonight when they have this silent march through the area. i mean they have this every month to remember what happened that night but this year, this month it will be everyone more significant, of course, the 12 month anniversary, they expect a crowd of over 1,000 people to take part in that march, to remember what happened and remember those 72 people who died. charlotte, thank you very much. charlotte was talking about the pain and difficulty. charlotte was talking about the pain and difficulty. joining me now is abdurahman sayed, from the muslim cultural heritage centre. thank you for being with us. charlotte was talking about how today has stirred up so many difficult feelings for people, but you and i were speaking about some
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of the better things to have come out this past year, i think it was the sense of community you spoke of. absolutely. community that has shown great unity, and resilience in terms of addressing the difficulties that people go through normally after such a, you know, tragic event, and i think that unity has been remarkable, in keeping people going on and coping with the loss of loved ones, as well as seeking justice and going through all the process of rehabilitation from temporary accommodation, to semi permanent and so on. accommodation, to semi permanent and so on. so i think the unity has been one important factor that has come out of this tragedy, the second important factor is the willingness to work together, to address issues of common concern. this is like the faith communitieses for example in kensington and chelsea have been working in a co—ordinated fashion on
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a regular basis since day one, this this has continued to this day and hopefully by september there are now plans to even have some kind of a structure, to make sure we all work together in a complimentary fashion, so we can together in a complimentary fashion, so we can assist the people who need our assistance, as well as keep the unity and legacy of this tragedy in a positive and constructive manner. so that would be a very positive outcome, of a very tragic situation. how do you go about speaking to people, who come to you, with the sort of pain that we have heard a bit of? the muslim cultural heritage centre, we have identified one of the major problems is going to be issues of post trauma situations, where we don't have the technical and knowledge of how to cope with that kind of issues, is with the help of the local authority, we have managed to open a counselling
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service at the centre this is a community professional service, by qualified psychotherapists who are row avoiding the service for the last year, and they will continue tot do that, there is now a need for that, because people are still in need to cope with the aftermath of the fire, also with the whole situation of having to go through different play layer, if i give you one simple example, someone who might have been living in the tower on the fourth or tenth floor, if someone on the fourth or tenth floor, if someone else offers them the same floor probably the same flat, they wouldn't take it any more. they might have lived in that situation for 10, might have lived in that situation for10, 20, 30 years might have lived in that situation for 10, 20, 30 years but now their situation is different. they might have developed a phobia against living in high rise floors. those sort of things, it may not be easy to be identified so the professional psychotherapists would be able to
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assist with diagnosing these problems and signposting people to the right institution. so this is what we are trying to do within the community. we will have to leave it there. very good to the talk to you. thank you for having me. we will have plenty more for you from west london, a reminder we have special coverage this evening, of the one year anniversary of the grenfell tragedy, that includes the silent walk from the wall of truth. just before 7pm here on the bbc news channel. for now, back to simon the rules which tightly restrict the number of doctors and nurses from outside the eu who can work in the uk are to be relaxed. the cap on skilled migrants was introduced by theresa may when she was home secretary. but the nhs is now struggling to fill thousands of medical vacancies. 0ur political correspondent jonathan blake reports. working hard under pressure, but there just aren't enough doctors and nurses.
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hospitals across england are badly short—staffed. in february, nhs england had 35,000 vacancies for nurses, and nearly 10,000 doctors' posts unfilled. we have got substantial demand pressures on the nhs, an ageing population, and more patients needing health care services. also it is linked to a decision in 2010 when austerity hit, to restrict the number of nurses and doctors being trained in the nhs to meet that demand, which is why we have got so many vacancies across the nhs at the moment. the prime minister knows the health service relies heavily on workers from abroad, but for years, the numbers coming have been restricted. it was theresa may as home secretary who set a limit on tier 2 visas for skilled workers from outside the eu, atjust under 21,000 per year, part of a broader approach to restrict immigration.. to restrict immigration. we will reduce net migration from the hundreds of thousands to the tens of thousands. it will not be easy. it will take hard work and a great
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deal of political courage. but the british people want us to do it, and it is the right thing to do, so we will do it. more doctors and nurses are being trained in the uk. but that will take time. and beyond the need to fill gaps in the health service, is this relaxation of the rules more than just a possible quick fix? i think there is a total change in approach with sajid javid and the prime minister. without her approval, none of this would be happening. it is a point to get across that, just because we are leaving the eu, it doesn't mean we are anti—immigration, we are not, we have to be flexible. we are told the prime minister is enthusiastic about this plan to fill staffing gaps in the nhs short—term. what is much less clear is how far this move reflects any broader shift in government policy on immigration, and what its long—term plan might be. jonathan blake, bbc news, westminster. 0ur political correspondent eleanor garnier is at westminster.
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eleanor. hello. yes i think this announcement if you like, from the home office does really feel like a pretty significant shift in immigration policy, since sajid javid has been in the home office, things do seem to be changing and there is a bit of a rebranding, if you like, of what was theresa may when she was in the home office policy, that let toe a hostile environment when it came to immigration. let us find out some of the reaction from labour on this. i am joined by yvette cooper, one of the backbench mps. what do you make on this shift from the government on immigration? this is the right thing to do. our committee has been calling this for months and at a time when you have thousands of medical vacancies in the nhs, the idea that over 2,000 doctors had had their visas turned down even though they had nhs job their visas turned down even though they had nhsjob offers their visas turned down even though they had nhs job offers was ludicrous. the immigration system has been much too rigid, to deal
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with these kinds of things are we need the skills and so it is important that this change is being made. it is the way the policy was implemented, the hoops if you like people had to jump through or the principles you disagreed with? the home office has been too rigid in its approach to the kinds of skills that we need, and at a time when you have huge medical shortages, really, the home office should have been able to respond, so it is good they have made changes now, we have been calling for it for many months but it would have been better if they came one a system that could respond much more quickly to the kind of skills we need. do you know where you party, your leadership stands on immigration? we heard the shadow business secretary talking about reasonable managed migration, what does that mean? what is labour's policy? i speak party for the cross— party policy? i speak party for the cross—party home affairs select committee, you would have to ask the
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front bench... what is labour's position? ity labour party for some time has had a concern about making sure immigration isn't exploited, to make sure that the system is fair but also to make sure that the home office isn't getting things wrong or making a mess, and i think that there is a wide sense, not really just across one party but all parties that the government's net migration target isn't working, that has been the prime minister's target and a lot of people within the cabinet as westminster as other parties think that isn't working, it is too rigid and it is causing problems throughout the system. the home secretary has hinted he will look to include students in that. you are the chair of the home affa i rs that. you are the chair of the home affairs select committee, but as a labourmp do you affairs select committee, but as a labour mp do you think the position is confused? much as you would like
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to draw me on being a spokesman, my job is to represent those cross—party views job is to represent those cross— party views and job is to represent those cross—party views and the cross—party views and the cross—party discussions we have had. where i can tell you is we had, did a major report on immigration consensus and you build consensus on immigration. i think it has lessons for the labour party and for the conservatives and the government about how, what people want is a similar that is controlled but one thatis similar that is controlled but one that is fair. people recognise the huge benefits of immigration across the country but they want to know that the system is being managed. there support for public services and there is a fairness. those are lessons is all parties could learn. in that sense would your advice be to scrap all targets that we don't need them at all. our approach is to say what you need is a system of
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different kind of targets or controls for different migration. pa rt of controls for different migration. part of the problem with the target it treats all ill integration as the same, high skilled, low skilled, refugee, student, it doesn't make sense to have a single target that includes everybody and that is how you get into the kind of mess where o you get into the kind of mess where 0 you turn down students we need but not addressing illegal immigration and it is how you get to the kinds of problems we have seen with the windrush cases where you have huge injustices and a concern that is all because of the home office trying to meet particular targets but don't recognise the different humanity of people's cases and the ditch rent circumstances that people are many. thank you very much. the chair of the home affairs select committee giving her response. we have had the overall announcement today. it is tomorrow when we will get the detail of exactly how this policy is going
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to work. p p rolls—royce is to cut 4,600 jobs over the next two years — the company says it needs to save hundreds of millions of pounds a year. many of the posts affected are in management and among office staff at its headquarters in derby. theo leggett reports. rolls—royce is an engineering giant. it builds power systems for aircraft, ships and heavy machinery. but the company's boss thinks it's become bloated and inefficient. so he is planning some radical surgery. this is a very difficult decision. however, we do need to think about all the hard work that's gone in and turning that into opportunities for the future. we are actually trying to create a stronger rolls—royce, which is good for derby and good for the uk. rolls—royce has 55,000 employees around the world. of those, some 26,000 work in the uk, many of them at the company's headquarters in derby. now, it says it wants to get rid of 4600 jobs, mainly among middle management
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and back office functions. it is bad news for workers in derby, because that is where a large number of managerialjobs are based. but thousands of engineering posts will be protected for the next few years. derby's mps have already made their concerns very clear. isn't this a failure of shareholder capitalism, which basically sacrifices jobs on the altar of higher shareholder dividends? i understand why a member with a strong constituency interest in the workforce there of course will be anxious and combative in defending the interests of the workforce. the cutbacks come at a time when rolls—royce is also facing some significant engineering challenges. it is working hard to fix problems with engines used on boeing's 787 dreamliner. the faults have proved costly
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and difficult to rectify. analysts say the company has to be careful not to cut too far, too fast. getting the balance between maintaining core skills and cutting costs is one of the most difficult things for any manager. the company is making it clear that the bulk of the cuts are in back—office functions, not core front—line engineering staff. it is also trying to do this process through non—compulsory means, through voluntary means. for rolls—royce employees, these may be deeply uncertain times, but bosses believe that by accepting painful cuts now, they can guarantee future prosperity. theo leggett, bbc news. the opening ceremony for the football world cup is about to get under way at the luzhniki stadium in moscow. president vladimir putin will be there and robbie williams will be performing. there will be 64 games during the month—long tournament, with 32 countries competing — and hosts russia will play saudi arabia in the first match. our sports correspondent olly foster is in moscow now.
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i don't know how you got this gig, i don't know how they let you in! here we go. i am not in, i amjust outside. i don't know how robbie williams got the gig. he isroom warring up in a dressing room somewhere alongside other performers. robbie williams has a big set. four of his favourite, 15 minutes he will be going for before this world cup can get under way, between the hosts and saudi arabia. we hope for an exciting match, because any other day of the week, russia against saudi arabia, 70th in the world against 67th in the world you wouldn't pay much attention, but for 90 minutes it is the most important match in the world because we will be up and running. we have seen we will be up and running. we have seen pictures of the fan zones already, what is the atmosphere
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like, i know you don't go near bars but i wonder how people are getting into this? it has been fabulous, we are lucky in moscow because it seems that all the fans from all 32 nations are coming in to moscow, just really enjoying what is a fascinating city. my first time here, so many sights and sounds, and everybody is just getting into the spirit of things, the south americans, the noise they make, amazing, before they go a on their separate way, a fantastically large nation, 11 host city, 2,000 miles between the furthest east and the furthest west. england will be putting in some air miles as well. it is just been incredible since we have been here. it is so important, simon, that the russian, the locals here, who have been so welcoming, whether they can carry that on, when perhaps their team doesn't carry on
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as far as they would like because russia are up against it, just to get out of their group. something they vent done for the last three or four world cup, they are a team in decline, and the manager has been chopping and changing, it is a real patch work of a team. i can see they have been warming up on the pitch already, before this very short opening ceremony gets under way, before crick off of —— kick off of this opening match at 4pm your time. it is approaching 6.00 in the evening here. let us talk about other teams that tend not to carry on. let us talk football, jose mourinho has said that he thinks england could go through and win this. well he is being nice because he manages in england, that is all he manages in england, that is all he is doing there, he will probably say something very different on portuguese tv. there is optimism behind this england group, because in the past they have all been scarred really, wouldn't you say, by
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past experiences at world cup, certainly the last two major championships when they were humiliated by iceland at euro 2016. famed to get out of their group at the last world cup cup in brazil but very few survivors from those experiences under gareth southgate. he knows his players very well, he has brought them through the age group, qualification flattered them as qualification usually does but let it hope they go out on monday, starting against tunisia in vog brad playing without fear, that is all we ask. but for today, this opening of the world cup, wejust ask. but for today, this opening of the world cup, we just hope we see some goals at least, because like i say, russia against saudi arabia, doesn't really fill you with much optimism does it. you try and enjoy yourself olly. i know it is hard work. always do. always do. thank you. the veteran gay rights campaigner
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peter tatchell has been arrested by russian police during a protest close to the kremlin. mr tatchell was protesting about what he says is russia's mistreatment of lgbt people — particularly in chechnya. human rights groups have accused russia of creating a hostile environment for lgbt people. police said his arrest was for "violating public order." he has said on twitter that he has been released and was well treated. our political editor tweeting about events in the house of commons. we are awaiting the new amendment as pa rt are awaiting the new amendment as part of the brexit bill. our correspondent has said on twitter,
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actually, there doesn't seem to be taking at the moment, but we will keep you updated —— that doesn't. time for a look at the weather with sarah keith lucas. the weather has been causing some disruption as storm hector has been affecting the northern half of the country. this was taken in whitby, fairly active seascape, strong winds will be easing to the rest of the day. the swirl of cloud associated which will be pushing away to the east but still windy this evening across scotland and northern ireland with scattered and blustery showers but the winds will be easing tonight and much of england and wales remains dry. a fresh start friday. it looks like a much quieter day, still quite breezy, a few heavy showers across parts of northern ireland and scotland and a few in
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england and wales but plenty of sunshine in between and highs of around 14—22. what about the weekend? showers on saturday but drier and less windy on sunday. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. thousands of people have paid tribute to the 72 lives lost in the grenfell tower fire which happened a year ago today. candles were lit and doves released in their memory. overnight, the tower was illuminated in green to mark the moment the blaze was reported. middle managers and back—office staff will bear the brunt of the 4,500 jobs being cut at rolls—royce. the engineering firm says the cutbacks will save hundreds of millions of pounds. the home office has announced it's relaxing immigration rules to allow more foreign doctors and nurses to work in the uk, to help fill nhs vacancies. sport now on afternoon live with hugh.
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the atmosphere is very much getting going. indeed. the opening ceremony has begun. it was put back because the players did go out on the pitch to train. robbie williams has gone out onto the pitch. he has begun performing to a very big and excitable crowd. we can see him singing and dancing. we can show you that later on. we can't show you those pictures now. but the opening ceremony is under way as we count down to the first match of the world cup, with russia taking on saudi arabia. why do you tell everyone what is on all the channels so eve ryo ne
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what is on all the channels so everyone can switch off? laughter let's talk about england. they have a bit of time to relax before their first game. yes, they have been speaking about how good their camp is, they have a table tennis, they have been playing golf, computer games, and their were relaxing scenes and the relaxed scenes continued between the media and the england team because gary cahill played some darts. this may well happen before their press meetings. taking on charlie from the daily mail. it was a game of three darts. very relaxed feeling. it was quite serious before this, there was work to do on the training pitch. they trained earlier this morning. harry kane and the rest of the squad.
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their second day of training. this was not an open session like we saw yesterday with plenty of supporters and cameras, this was a more serious tone. harry kane was spoken about by his team—mate kieran trippier. a great leader, on and off the field. top professional. just speaking to him one—to—one, he's a great help, individually, and as a group there is no one better to leave us in the world cup. —— lead. the fixtures have been released for next season's
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premier league campaign. with one big question — who can stop pep guardiola's manchester city from winning another title? the defending champions will begin their campaign away to arsenal in the tie of the opening weekend. manchester united host leicester city, liverpool take on west ham, while championship winners wolverhampton wanderers welcome everton to molineux. tottenham have announced that their new stadium won't be ready for the start of the season. they begin away to newcastle and they'll play fulham at wembley before the first match at their revamped white hart lane ground on the 15th of september against liverpool. in rugby union, flanker brad shields will make his first international start for england, as they aim to level their three match series with south africa this weekend. that means former captain chris robshaw won't be taking part — he's been left out of the squad entirely. new zealand—born shields was fast—tracked into the squad by head coach eddiejones and he made his debut off the bench in the first test. danny cipriani is a replacement for the match in bloemfontein on saturday, and in line for his first cap for three years. joe launchbury comes in at the second row. the only other change. wales coach warren gatland has made
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five changes for the second test with argentina on saturday. ellisjenkins comes in at blindside flanker and there are first tour starts for hooker ryan elias, tighthead tomas francis and scrum—half aled davies. owen watkin replaces the injured hadleigh parkes. wales lead the series 1—0. and the return ofjohnny sexton at fly—half is one of eight changes to the ireland side for the second test against australia in melbourne on saturday. defeat last week ended ireland's 12—game unbeaten run, but a far stronger side may well help level the three—test series. that's all the sport for now. back with more in the next hour. more now on that major relaxation of the immigration rules which have prevented hundreds of overseas doctors and nurses from working in the nhs. in february, nhs england had 35,000 vacancies for nurses — and nearly 10,000 for doctors. now, downing street has confirmed that the cap on the number who can work here is to be lifted.
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let's talk to dr sandeep kumar who passed the exams to become gp in the uk but was refused a visa. you are rather pleased by this news? thank you for having me on the show. this is good news for you but you need to know when this comes into force ? need to know when this comes into force? it is good news for us. we cleared our exams so we were planning to move to the uk from ireland where we are working at the moment. when the e—mail comes that your visa has been refused, it is a shock, after going through all of the exams. this is the last thing you are expecting. the situation has been going on now for a few months
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and we are thinking it will resolve. but now, thank you for the home secretary, sajid javid, he looked into the matter, and they are taking steps. but we never know when it will be implemented. it will be permitted now and that will be beneficial for us and many of the thousands of doctors. it will take time like any other political policy so time like any other political policy soi time like any other political policy so i doubt it will be ready that soon. so i doubt it will be ready that soon. why do you and your wife want to be gps in england? england, the health care system is one of the best in the world, it is a doctor's dream for my part of the world, i come from india, and everyone wants to get higher training in one of the best countries in the world where we can get good hands—on training so
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the uk is one of those countries where we really want to come and get better training. you are working in ireland and they offered to extend the visa to work there but you said no? that is the thing. when we were going through this process, there we re going through this process, there were e—mails saying, you have been selected, and at the same time there was recruitment in our hospital and all over ireland, and we did not apply. but then we said, thank you, but we have a job in the uk, which is ourdreamjob, a but we have a job in the uk, which is our dream job, a training job at the same place, so we told our hospital that you can recruit someone hospital that you can recruit someone else rather than keep them in limbo. and at the end of the recruitment round, if they say no, you are in a better place, and now we have a visa which covers us until
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the end ofjuly, and if we are not granted a visa after that we don't know what will happen. it is easy to move from ireland to the uk, but if that doesn't happen, we have to go back to india. i do mind, that is our home country, but living with a child, it will be a difficultjob —— i don't child, it will be a difficultjob —— idon't mind. child, it will be a difficultjob —— i don't mind. so many vacancies in the nhs in the uk, are you able to pick and choose where you want to go when this is lifted? it's a difficult process, you had to apply, it isa difficult process, you had to apply, it is a central recruitment process for gps it is a central recruitment process forgps —— you it is a central recruitment process for gps —— you have to apply. they assign you the jobs depending on the number of posts available in different areas, and we were lucky,
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we got a placement in the same hospital, it is very difficult for a couple to get a job with the same trust m sam hutsby to so this was a dream come true situation for us —— difficult for a couple to get a job with the same trust that alone the same hospital so this was a dream come true. thanks forjoining us. the newest member of the royal family, the duchess of sussex, has accompanied the queen on an official royal visit to cheshire. it is the first time the duchess has attended an event with the queen without her husband prince harry. our royal correspondent nick witchel was watching. she has been used to learning a roll and other meghan markle the actress has become the duchess of sussex, how better to learn the finer points of what is required than to accompany someone of what is required than to accompany someone who has spent her entire adult life perfecting the technique. the queen's masterclass took place on a visit to cheshire,
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and there were the usual elements, bunches of flowers to collect, displays by local schoolchildren which reminded the queen of a journey by canoe somewhere, and the two of them were getting on famously, exchanging remarks and jokes. and then a short walkabout and another example of teamwork, the queen took one side of the street and michaela took the other. —— meghan. this is a very public endorsement from the queen, and this is part of the process of handing on the baton to a younger generation. a day to watch and learn, there will be many years ahead to perfect it all. in a moment the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. a memorial service has been held in west london to remember those who died in the fire at grenfell tower a year ago. immigration rules are to be relaxed —
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it's expected more foreign doctors and nurses will be allowed in — to help fill nhs vacancies. and the football world cup is about to get under way — with russia taking on saudi arabia in moscow. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. engineering firm rolls—royce is to cut 4,600 jobs over the next two years as it refocuses on civil aerospace, defence and power systems. most of the cuts will be among middle managers and back—office staff particularly at its derby headquarters. there was a boom on the high street in may, thanks to hot weather and the royal wedding. sales last month were 3.9% up on the year before — much of them in food and household goods stores. they're the best numbers we've had on retail sales for over a year. after spending some 2.4 trillion euros buying up government bonds, in order to push money into the european economies and boost lending,
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the european central bank has said it will wind down its qantitative easing programme by the end of the year — but said it won't put up interest rates until at least next summer. the drinks retailer majestic wine has turned from loss to profit over against losses of £1.5 million last year. but it's not been easy. rowan gormley, group chief executive, said: "we expect the uk market to remain tough, possibly even tougher than last year". 4,600 jobs to go at rolls royce — is that a sign of trouble at rolls? it is hoping it will bring future success. it is a lot of jobs. 1096 of the workforce, it is a lot. it is mostly in middle management and administration and the engineers went be affected, they say. they
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said this is nothing to do with that. in many ways investors are seeing this as a good sign, shares are up by 2% today. they are looking investors think it will slim down the company and it will make it more profitable, but it is at the cost of a lot ofjobs. we can talk to david bailey. professor of industry at aston university. this is very nice for the investors. 4600 jobs, mainly middle this is very nice for the investors. 4600jobs, mainly middle management, echoes of bt slim down recently, and i think you are right, this is not problems to do with the engine. there has been a reduction in defence expenditure and it is not as profitable as general electric. it
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was to take a cost to put profitability back into it. they are thinking of selling it off? they have had ups and downs in terms of offshore energy and sanctions against russia, many external factors, but the firm is too top heavy and i think the management is right in understanding that, it wants to become a much more simple five company with fewer levels of management between the top of the company and the engineering and the research and development, it wants to be more responsive to customers, reduce costs and produce more electricity for general electric. are they going to continue to invest in the uk? we want to see the evidence of that. david, thanks.
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staying with jobs. on the subject ofjobs — the tech industry is having problems recruiting. it is having problems finding people with the right quality, especially in small companies, especially having people coming from abroad. what we found, the government said it would have a start—up visa which will allow people to come into the country easily on a visa. this is post brexit? it goes back further. similarto post brexit? it goes back further. similar to the problems with the nhs, people coming to this country quickly and easily in order to be able to work in businesses and the nhs, but will this make things better for the business? the nhs, but will this make things betterfor the business? the tech industry is worth £184 billion to the uk economy, going to the half times faster than the uk economy itself, it is very important. ——
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growing two and a half times. a survey from last month, stem learning, it found stem skills shortages... why are you leaning over? it is quite rude, but ok. laughter ifind laughter i find the camera more laughter ifind the camera more interesting than you. joining us now is priya guha, general manager of technology campus rocket space, speaker at london tech week and former diplomat. give us an idea of how important the industry is. the uk digital sector brings over hundred £84 billion into the uk and that is a cross different areas, but we are celebrating london
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tech week which brings together 50,000 people from countries all over the world to 200 plus events celebrating every thing that is great about uk technology. there is a problem about getting people to come to the country to be part of this enormous success story, is the start—up visa idea going to work? there are couple of ways you address the need for more talent, we need to build up our home—grown talent and things like the digital skills partnership to make sure people are learning the right skills for the workplace, but we need talent and we need it now, so the start—up visa is a great way to bring in the best and brightest entrepreneurs from around the world and also with the announcements we have tomorrow, there will be more these as for the highly skilled professionals that are needed to feed the industry which is a great thing for the tech sector —— there will be more visas.
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how mobile is the industry? how quickly can it live next door? the industry is very mobile, software, tech, it doesn't have boundaries, digital doesn't have baddies, but we don't need to focus on that. uk is an open economy, that is good for the sector —— digital doesn't have boundaries. that means we can attract people from all over the world. thanks forjoining us. but look at the markets? investors like what rolls—royce has said about getting rid of 2500 jobs, in middle management, stopping it from being too top heavy, and apple will make its iphone more secure and more difficult for people and it is saying specifically for the security
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businesses, the fbi, to stop them being able to hack into it, so this is putting up a kind of challenge to the fbi and other people... this is what they are doing? absolutely. fundamental human right, the idea of privacy, and they are saying they are going to make these things impenetrable to the fbi. there was the experience after a gunman shot a lot of people in the united states, the federal authorities wanted access to his phone but apple said no. but the fbi got a way around it and they got in, but now apple have said they are going to say, no, we are going to stop you, because they believe that privacy is a fundamental right. those are the words of tim cook. interesting fact about the apple logo. that is
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supposed to be a tribute to alan turing who killed himself by eating a poisoned apple. they denied that. yes, but that is a great story. i'm trying to fill time. not that much, i've been told! alan turing was the bletchley park scientists. mathematician. briefly, the pound against the euro, looking quite strong. the european central bank has bought quantitive easing to an end. jamie, thanks forjoining us. one of the musical stars of the royal wedding last month has won two awards at the classic brits. the cellist, sheku kanneh—mason, who's 19, picked up male artist of the year and the critics‘ choice award. our entertainment correspondent colin paterson was at the royal albert hall for the ceremony. last month, sheku kanneh—mason
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played the cello at the royal wedding. at the classic brit awards, the 19—year—old won both best male and the critics' choice award. it is an honour, really. just a lovely summing up of my first two years. surprisingly, he's still a student, and sat exams last week but hasn't got his results due to a bungle. they're out but i need to go and collect them. so you could find them out? yeah, but only as of two days ago and i need my id card, which i've lost. # i want to be a part of it... alfie boe and michael ball also had a problem after winning best group. they only give you one. we've never had an argument. this might be the first one! # it's up to you,
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new york, new york.# thankfully, for the sake of harmony, they later triumphed in album of the year, meaning they could each have a brit. # we'll meet again...# and at the age of 101, there was a lifetime achievement award for dame vera lynn. she couldn't be at the ceremony, but she spoke to bbc south east today on the phone. unexpected but very nice. it's lovely after all these years to get acknowledgement like that. # i know we'll meet again some sunny day.# colin paterson, bbc news, royal albert hall. time for a look at the weather. here's sarah. hello there. we've got some unseasonably windy weather for this stage in june,
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particularly across the northern half of the country — breezy really where ever you are. storm hector has been named by met erin, here's a picture from one of our weather watchers in whitby, showing a fairly active and foamy sea scape there. now here are some of the gusts we have seen down to storm hector earlier on in the day. 100mph across the pennines and the cairngorms too, but even at lower levels we have seen gusts of 60 or 70mph, so causing some disruption with the strength of the winds out there. the satellite image shows the storm. it will be pushing its way slowly eastwards over the next few hours so for the rest of the day, the low pressure centre moves up to the shetland isles then scandinavia. there are sharp showers in association with that storm, pushing in across parts of northern ireland, scotland, although we will have seen the strongest of the winds, particularly across the mainland we could still see gusts of more than 50mph, so the weather still causing disruption in terms of travel,
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and power outages as well. for northern ireland, scattered showers, a windy afternoon to come. one of two of those showerjust pushing into parts of cumbria, but really for much of england and wales, the weather looks dry through the afternoon, some sunshine reappearing, still blustery though down towards the london region, we could see a gust or two of around 30mph. so as we look towards the evening hours then, most places do stay dry, the strongest of the winds gradually starting to ease. still blustery showers for northern ireland, scotland, into the far north—west of england too. further south it stays dry and as the winds fall lighter through the night, we will see the temperatures dipping down to around about 8—13 degrees so a fairly fresh start to your friday morning. friday will be a quieter zone than we have seen out there today. still quite breezy in the north with some scattered heavy showers, for parts of western scotland, northern ireland too. much of england and wales though should stay dry. less windy, just a few isolated showers cropping up and temperatures ranging between round 14 to 22 degrees or friday. what about the weekend?
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it is going to be a weekend of two halves. there will be some fairly heavy blusterly showers around on saturday, it's drier and less windy as well for sunday, and things should be staying dry for the start of the world cup in moscow through into this evening. that's it for now, bye. hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 4pm: remembering grenfell — a year after the devastating blaze which left 72 people dead — a community pays tribute. what is important from this day onwards is that those who we have physically lost will never, ever, ever be forgotten. 72 seconds of silence — one each for the victims of the disaster. iam in i am in the west london where people had been reflecting on the tragic
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events of 12 months ago. more than 4500 jobs are to go at rolls royce engineering — in a major reorganisation, to save hundreds of millions of pounds. downing street has confirmed the loosening of immigration rules — to allow more doctors and nurses from outside the eu to work in the nhs. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport. hugh woozencroft has it — the world cup is officially underway? it is — opened by the russian president vladimir putin and fifa president gianni infantino. at an opening ceremony performed at by singer robbie williams. more on that to come. let's just show you what is happening in the fan zone there, in moscow. getting ready for the first game, and russia against saudi arabia. it may not be a humdinger but at least they are all together and they can enjoy it may not be a humdinger but at least they are all together and they can enjoy! and sarah keith lucas has all the weather — sarah? it has been a very windy day, storm hector bringing some destructive
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weather. the winds will ease, showers are easing as well. more details in half an hour. also coming up... on family duty: the queen and duchess of sussex are in cheshire for their first royal engagement together. hello everyone, this is afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. commemorations and vigils are being held to remember the 72 people who died in the grenfell tower fire — one year ago. a memorial service has been held in west london, and a nationwide 72 second silence took place at midday. my colleague reeta chakrabarti is near the tower in west london. this is the tower as it looks today. covered in white sheets with the
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symbol of grenfell, the greenheart at the top. it's been a day of intense emotion as you can imagine, and will, deep, raw grief. there have been various events to commemorate this anniversary, starting this morning with a memorial service at the nearby church, saint helens where the names of the 72 people who died were read out and then separately, relatives and survivors met at the foot of the tower to remember those that they had lost. last night, grenfell tower itself and various other buildings in the city were lit up in green at the very moment the fire started, 1am. one yearago. the very moment the fire started, 1am. one year ago. ourfirst report this afternoon is from our correspondent richard galpin. the tower lit up in the colour chosen by the community to represent them and what happened one year ago. the time marking the moment the fire was
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first reported to emergency services. #amazing grace... #how sweet the sound that saved a wretch like me... on this, the first anniversary of the fire that took so many lives. a chance for the members of the community to come together again in memory of those who died. he reads the names of victims she reads the names of victims what is important from this day
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onwards is that those who we have physically lost will never, ever, ever be forgotten. and it is incumbent on each and every one us that we ensure that they are never forgotten. further, that they are revered. that will ensure the truth will not just present revered. that will ensure the truth will notjust present itself but it will notjust present itself but it will announce itself in such a way that the tragedy of grenfell tower can never, ever, ever we “— re—occur.
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#lean on me. outside, right next to grenfell tower itself, a gospel choir led another commemoration as people gathered to reflect on this, the most poignant of locations. and to listen to a recitation from the quran. many of those who died in the fire were muslim. at midday, everything stopped for a period of silence. here at grenfell tower, it lasted 72 seconds,in here at grenfell tower, it lasted 72 seconds, in memory of each one of the 72 people who lost their lives.
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it also fell silent at other locations around the country and beyond. #you can't deny me. #you can't deny me. #you can't deny me. #you can't decide to turn your face away... this is a day evoking the most painful of memories. the children at this primary school near grenfell tower the children at this primary school near g re nfell tower lost the children at this primary school near grenfell tower lost friends and
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a member of staff in the fire. but for the community in this area, hope lies in their expectation that there will be justice. with those responsible for the catastrophic fire being punished. our correspondent charlotte gallagher is at the base of grenfell tower. you have been following the various events that have been going on during the day, do you get the impression that people are finding some consolation, some solace in these events, that they are healing, or not? i think! have been getting a sense that people are finding a lot of solace in the coming together asa lot of solace in the coming together as a community and having that community spirit around them. we saw hundreds of people attending the service at saint helen ‘s church,
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and then also this other service at the foot of grenfell tower, lots of people attending that. lots of hugs and tears. it has been a very, important day. for the family of the bereaved and the survivors, being able to have the names of those people who died being read out, candles lit for them, dubs being released, their family members are not being forgotten. they are continually being remembered and thatis continually being remembered and that is incredibly important to the people there. they don't want what happens here to be brushed under the carpet. they still want lots of a nswe rs carpet. they still want lots of answers about what happened that night and what led up to that night. it has been a painful day as well, the grief here is very raw, notjust for the bereaved but for the community. it rocked them that night, as a community, seeing a neighbour landmark burning. those
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desperate people trapped inside. people were so desperate to help, we saw people donating what they code, clothes, nappies, offers accommodation. food. it's it's been accommodation. food. it's it's been a chance for the community to reflect a nd a chance for the community to reflect and remember. there's been a lot of reflection at the foot of the tower where people have written m essa g es to tower where people have written messages to family and friends, people they did not know, that they feel so strongly about what happened that night. there have been candles and that night. there have been candles a nd flowers that night. there have been candles and flowers and people taking time to stand in silence, reflecting on what happened. it has been really important. then we will get this silent march, which as we know takes place every month around this area through grenfell but even more significant as the 12 month anniversary takes place. we are expecting over 1000 people, perhaps more, to take part in the silent procession tonight, remembering the
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72 people who died that night. many thanks. i am joined 72 people who died that night. many thanks. iamjoined now 72 people who died that night. many thanks. i am joined now by the right reverend doctor graham tomlin who is the bishop of kensington. our correspondent there was talking about the really raw paying people have been expressing. you have been talking two people and counselling, do you see any change in the past 12 months in people'sattitudes?|j in the past 12 months in people'sattitudes? i think there is. grief is a process, it takes time that a motion to change over time. we have seen initial raw anger as we saw at time, lots of that around. in all of that has now been channelled. anger is something you can't live with forever, you either have to deal with it or live forever with it. people have to channel their
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anger into action. that is one of the remarkable things about the local community here, the way that initial anger has been channelled into patient, determined and quite dignified action. how has it been for you listening to people, having to cope with this weight of grief? as someone who is listening and trying to do what you can, and others have been doing much the same, a lot of the time you try to carry that as much as you can. you need to find moments or self to be able to grieve. i remember at the time, there was a huge rush confusing emotions and activities at the time. i had to sit the odd moment where i could sit quietly on my own to express my own grief at the same time. when you go through these services, i am also there as someone these services, i am also there as someone who is worshipping, grieving along with everybody else, as well as leading, trying to play a leading role within the community. you have
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to manage your own emotions at the same time as trying to carry other people'stwo. i wanted to ask you about the tower itself, covered in white sheeting and now with that big, green heart at the top. what do people feel about having this tower in their midst? are their disagreements over what should happen to it? it's been a bit of a discussion within the local community, there are those who will not even look at it and have tried to avoid it because of the terrible memories. there are others who want it to stay and wanted to be there as a memorial to what's happened and struggle with the idea that it might be taken away because it is a by thing that keeps those who have been lost in the memory of people in this area and beyond. as the covering has gone up, it was a bit strange to begin. it felt a little bit functional, maybe a little bleak. when the green heart and the wording
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at the top, grenfell forever in our hearts, went on, that brought something good to the community. i was talking to someone last night who said when they see those words and the green heart, which has become a symbol for grenfell and the survivors, he was saying it made me smile for the first time, for quite a long time. i think it has been good that it's been covered up for this occasion. the question of what happens to it in the long—term is entirely in the hands of the local community. lets people here decide what happens to the tower in in the longer term. we must leave it there. so good to talk to you, thank you very much indeed. we will have more from west london throughout the evening. we'll be bringing you special coverage of the one year anniversary of the grenfell tragedy, including the silent walk from the wall of truth, just before 7pm — here on the bbc news channel. for now it's back to simon in the studio. rolls—royce is to cut 4,600 jobs over the next two years — the company says it needs
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to save hundreds of millions of pounds a year. many of the posts affected are in management and among office staff at its headquarters in derby. theo leggett reports. rolls—royce is an engineering giant. it builds power systems for aircraft, ships and heavy machinery. but the company's boss thinks it's become bloated and inefficient. so he is planning some radical surgery. this is a very difficult decision. however, we do need to think about all the hard work that's gone in and turning that into opportunities for the future. we are actually trying to create a stronger rolls—royce, which is good for derby and good for the uk. rolls—royce has 55,000 employees around the world. of those, some 26,000 work in the uk, many of them at the company's headquarters in derby. now, it says it wants to get rid of 4600 jobs, mainly among middle management and back office functions.
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it is bad news for workers in derby, because that is where a large number of managerialjobs are based. but thousands of engineering posts will be protected for the next few years. derby's mps have already made their concerns very clear. isn't this a failure of shareholder capitalism, which basically sacrifices jobs on the altar of higher shareholder dividends? i understand why a member with a strong constituency interest in the workforce there of course will be anxious and combative in defending the interests of the workforce. the cutbacks come at a time when rolls—royce is also facing some significant engineering challenges. it is working hard to fix problems with engines used on boeing's 787 dreamliner. the faults have proved costly and difficult to rectify. analysts say the company has to be careful not to cut too far, too fast.
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getting the balance between maintaining core skills and cutting costs is one of the most difficult things for any manager. the company is making it clear that the bulk of the cuts are in back—office functions, not core front—line engineering staff. it is also trying to do this process through non—compulsory means, through voluntary means. for rolls—royce employees, these may be deeply uncertain times, but bosses believe that by accepting painful cuts now, they can guarantee future prosperity. theo leggett, bbc news. andy moore is outside rolls—royce in derby. this is going to have a devastating effect, that number of jobs this is going to have a devastating effect, that number ofjobs in an area like that? that's right. rolls—royce's headquarters is here in derby. rolls—royce is the heart and soul of the city, something like 15,000 people work here. something like 20, 20 5% of the workforce are
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going to lose theirjobs and a third of those jobs are going to go very soon, by the end of the year. they will not be lost in engineering, you can see behind me one of the test bed facilities where these giant engines are tried behind walls five feet thick. they will not be lost on engineering but in middle management and back office. why is that? it's not about brexit, the company says, it's not about problems with the trench 1000 engine, it simply says the company has got too big, they need to trim back a little so they are ina need to trim back a little so they are in a better long—term position. they say it is essentially short term pain, job losses over the next couple of years, so that in decades to come, they will be able to offer people here in derby and the surrounding area a secure job. let's a they have to go through this process in the short—term but by and large the company is in a good state. they made a profit last year, and they have an expanding share of
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and they have an expanding share of an expanding market. they say a long—term they are are looking pretty good. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. a memorial service has been held in west london to remember those who died in the fire at grenfell tower a year ago. more than 4500 jobs are to go at rolls—royce engineering — in a major reorganisation, to save hundreds of millions of pounds. immigration rules are to be relaxed — it's expected more foreign doctors and nurses will be allowed in — to help fill nhs vacancies. in sport, the russian president vladimir putin and the fifth boss gianni infantino have officially opened this year's world cup. singer robbie williams sang a medley of hits in the stadium in moscow before russia's match against saudi arabia. there is nobody better to lead you out of world cup than harry kane according to his team—mates. there are still injury concerns for the squad ahead of their opener. and british number one johanna konta
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shows her class to reach the quarterfinals adding the nottingham open. she beat fellow briton. the rules which tightly restrict the number of doctors and nurses from outside the eu who can work in the uk are to be relaxed. the cap on skilled migrants was introduced by theresa may when she was home secretary. but the nhs is now struggling to fill thousands of medical vacancies. our political correspondent jonathan blake reports. working hard under pressure, but there just aren't enough doctors and nurses. hospitals across england are badly short—staffed. in february, nhs england had 35,000 vacancies for nurses, and nearly 10,000 doctors' posts unfilled. we have got substantial demand pressures on the nhs, an ageing population, and more patients needing health care services. also it is linked to a decision in 2010 when austerity hit, to restrict the number of nurses and doctors being trained in the nhs
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to meet that demand, which is why we have got so many vacancies across the nhs at the moment. the prime minister knows the health service relies heavily on workers from abroad, but for years, the numbers coming have been restricted. it was theresa may as home secretary who set a limit on tier 2 visas for skilled workers from outside the eu, atjust under 21,000 per year, part of a broader approach to restrict immigration.. we will reduce net migration from the hundreds of thousands to the tens of thousands. it will not be easy. it will take hard work and a great deal of political courage. but the british people want us to do it, and it is the right thing to do, so we will do it. more doctors and nurses are being trained in the uk. but that will take time. and beyond the need to fill gaps in the health service, is this relaxation of the rules more than just a possible quick fix? i think there is a total change in approach with sajid javid and the prime minister.
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without her approval, none of this would be happening. it is a point to get across that, just because we are leaving the eu, it doesn't mean we are anti—immigration, we are not, we have to be flexible. we are told the prime minister is enthusiastic about this plan to fill staffing gaps in the nhs short—term. what is much less clear is how far this move reflects any broader shift in government policy on immigration, and what its long—term plan might be. jonathan blake, bbc news, westminster. our political correspondent eleanor garnier is at westminster. crucial to this is when it takes into effect? that's exactly right. although we've had the announcement today from government and the home office that this is going to happen, that these rules will be relaxed around this tier two visa are for those working in the nhs, we don't actually have the details yet. that will all be set up tomorrow. in the
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meantime, it's interesting to get the reaction from politicians, not just those on the labour side you've been saying yes, this is the right thing to do we need those nurses and doctors in the nhs because there is suchis doctors in the nhs because there is such is shortage but we have in the last hour or so had reaction from a secretaryjeremy last hour or so had reaction from a secretary jeremy hunt last hour or so had reaction from a secretaryjeremy hunt himself, speaking at the nhs confederation in manchester. there is a huge upscaling of capacity in health systems, the world health organisation says there is a two million shortage of doctors and 9 million shortage of doctors and 9 million shortage of doctors and 9 million shortage of. if we are going to address those issues we have to be training on a sustainable basis but once we do that, and that's why lam but once we do that, and that's why iamso but once we do that, and that's why i am so proud we have now got 25% increase in both doctor training places, nurse training places and midwives, we are then able to make the argument that in the period between now and when those training
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places convert into fully trained clinicians, the government should be flexible onjesus. that's why it is extremely welcome that today the prime minister has announced that doctors and nurses will be removed from the tier two visa caps, which means the nhs will be able to recruit the numbers of doctors and nurses we need from overseas. the home secretary has not been in his job long, that is sajid javid, and already we are seeing the on picking some of those extremely restrictive elements of the immigration elements put into place by theresa may when she was in the home office. time is ticking away before this 5pm deadline for some sort of amendment on this whole brexit deal. must be getting a bit tense isn't it? it's been a tense week in westminster. we have this 5pm deadline which we understand the government is going to be putting down its response to
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the amendment, if you like, that will then go to the house of lords. think back to tuesday when it was incredibly tense spencer, and theresa may managed to stave off a potentially devastating defeat by buying off her tory, remains supporting rebels by saying, look, let's re—discuss and go back on this amendment for a meaningful vote, and about how much power mps would have in the event of a no deal or if the negotiations ran out of time. the remaining rebels would like to see mps able to dictate the next steps that the government if that scenario we re that the government if that scenario were to happen. theresa may looked like she was facing defeat in the commons on that on tuesday night, she managed to stave off by promising to go back to this issue, to discuss it, and ever since then there have been these back door conversations going on off the
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corridors of power here in westminster, remainers talking to remainers, plotting the way forward, brexiteers talking to brexiteers. 5pm tonight is the deadline when they must agree some form of words that will form the amendment that will then go to the house of lords for their debate on the issue next week. we are watching the clock and waiting to see exactly what is going to be in that amendment. the opening ceremony for the football world cup has been taking place, at the luzhniki stadium in moscow. russia has already just russia has alreadyjust on one up at the game. president vladimir putin was at the ceremony — and robbie williams performed on stage. there will be 64 games during the month—long tournament, with 32 countries competing — and hosts russia will play saudi arabia in the first match. our moscow correspondent sarah rainsford is outside the stadium now. they are off! they are, and for russia, it's the best possible
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start. it just took them 12 russia, it's the best possible start. itjust took them 12 minutes to score and we could hear the roar coming over the roof of this brand, newly renovated stadium in moscow. one of the 12 venues for this world cup which of course is a huge deal for russia. this has put this country in the global spotlight, a showcase for a country going through a difficult time in terms of international relations. its relationship with the west is at an all—time low. for a whole host of reasons. russia hopes this competition, this tournament will mean politics are put on the back burner, everyone will forget about all the accusations and allegations against russia and focus on football. the atmosphere up to now has been extremely good. lots of fa ns has been extremely good. lots of fans here pouring into the stadium and in the city centre of moscow, talking about how surprised they are at just what it warm welcome talking about how surprised they are atjust what it warm welcome they have got. it's been a really international crowd with people from all over the world, from colombia to
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australia, meeting, making friends and taking photos, singing in the streets of rasher. that's pretty extraordinary, not the kind of thing you see here every day. vladimir putin where he likes to be, under the global spotlight? well, yes. at an event which some were calling to be boycotted, certainly the british government wanted at some point a discussion about whether this world cup should be boycotted because of what happened in salisbury, the poisoning of the skripals, that did not happen. we know that no government ministers or royal family members will attend but fans are, and as faras members will attend but fans are, and as far as vladimir putin is concerned, that means it is a huge success already. he is at the centre of all this, in the stadium now, welcoming the world to russia. as far as he is concerned, that proves russia is not isolated, it is as he likes to see it, a global power
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again. sarah, do you like football? i love football! i am sure. we will let you get on. time for a look at the weather... it was windy last night? it's certainly was. very windy weather, storm hector has been named by the irish met. it has brought some big disruption, trees down in northern ireland, some disruption to ferries and bridges. footage is from port stewart on the northern coast of northern ireland, a huge waves and high tides. that combination is causing a few problems around the coast, if you flood warnings off the coast, if you flood warnings off the coast of scotland as well. quite a lot of disruption there in terms of transport. this is the scene in cumbria. really across much of
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northern ireland, scotland and northern england, looking quite similar. similar pictures we have seen similar. similar pictures we have seen before but not in mid—june. similar. similar pictures we have seen before but not in mid—junem is quite unexpected for this time, but not unheard of. sometimes we do get areas of low pressure, just last year we had a big storm as well. as you say, it's pretty rare. you don't expect wind gusts like this. five miles on top of the cairngorms, even at lower levels, 60 to 70 miles gusts and not something you see at this stage summer. what is in store for us in the next few days? and improvement certainly. the weather will be quietening down. the satellite image shows storm hector, this swell of cloud pushing away towards the east. most of the cloud and earlier rain heading towards the east, still very windy conditions. you can see the proximity of the
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isobars across the north. pretty blustery through the remainder of this afternoon into this evening. further showers piling in across northern ireland and scotland in particular. some heavy, blustery showers. these numbers in black wind gusts, an indication of the strongest winds. they are starting now just to ease strongest winds. they are starting nowjust to ease down a bit but really windy conditions through the central belt of scotland causing some disruption. trees down, power cuts. northern ireland and england also seeing windy conditions with a few showers, not as windy as it was earlier on. those wind gusts still quite strong across the south but they will be easing over the next few hours. 30 mile per hour or so but they are beginning to die down. temperatures are doing pretty well, particularly in the south. 23 degrees or so, further north, 17 or
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18. feeling cooler with the strength of the wind. further showers come, the wind is still rattling a few windows in northern ireland and scotland. further south and the winds are clearing, a fresher and night and recent lee —— a fresher night and recent lee —— a fresher night than recently. a quieter day on friday. still windy but not as much. showers across scotland and northern ireland, one or two isolated showers across england and wales but many of us will avoid the showers and stay dry. in sun, 22 or 21. a weekend of two halves. still some showers around on saturday towards the north and west but for most places, sunday will be a better day. it will dry up, not wall to wall sunshine but things are looking dry. dry weather is continuing in moscow. the world cup has now kicked off. we have already seen the first
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goal. whether in the mid teens but things will be warming up somewhat across moscow in particular as we head through the next couple of days. a full 14 day forecast. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. the queen and the duchess of sussex havejoined people across britain to remember the 72 lives lost in the grenfell tower fire a year ago today. commemorations and vigils have been held in west london, with candles lit and doves released in memory of those who died. overnight, the tower was illuminated to mark the moment the fire started. middle managers and back—office staff will bear the brunt of the 4,500 jobs being cut at rolls—royce. the engineering firm says the cutbacks will save hundreds of millions of pounds. labour has welcomed the government's plans to relax immigration rules to allow more non—eu doctors and nurses to work in the uk to help fill nhs vacancies. sport now on afternoon
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live with hugh. the world cup is already in full flow. the tour is over and it is time for the football to start, —— the talk. posts russia taking on saudi arabia, already going the way the home crowd would have wanted —— hosts. the russians in front? yes, you should have heard the cheering erupting from the luzhniki stadium, we have a goal, and we were bit worried about the football between these two, the lowest ranked in the tournament, but there he was, after 12 minutes, yuri gazinskiy, his first goal for russia. my word, what a precious
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goal for russia and the crowd and i'm sure the host cities and households around this nation will have been jumping out households around this nation will have beenjumping out of their seat. we have a goal. we were worried it would be goalless. one of the star players for russia has gone off injured, though, midway through the first half. two minutes to play here at. —— here at luzhniki stadium, but most important russia are in front. the opening ceremony took place and there was a bit of british interest? more thanjust there was a bit of british interest? more than just a bit. it was mercifully short compared to many opening ceremonies. but welcome ceremonies are quite short. robbie williams, it was —— he played four
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off his hits and he had a big set, singing with a local soprano. they put on quite a show. vladimir putin welcomed the world, and a nice touch after the goal, the fifa president is sitting in between the russian president and the crown prince of saudi arabia, but vladimir putin offered his hand to the saudi crown prince and it was accepted. as you would. indeed. updates on the bbc sport website. england do not start theircampaign sport website. england do not start their campaign until monday when they play choosier. harry —— they play tunisia. harry kane is the
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captain and kieran trippier thinks he's the perfect man to lead his country. he is a great leader, you can see that on and off the field, top professional, and even after third, one—to—one, speaking to him one—to—one, he is a great person, if you ever need help, he's there to help you individually and as a group, and there's no better person to lead us out into the world cup. mohamed salah is always 100% certain to play in friday's opening match against uruguay, but according to his manager hector cooper. —— cuper. his manager said he was doing well and had recovered after your shoulder injury in the champions league finalfor shoulder injury in the champions league final for liverpool against real madrid —— after his shoulder injury. manchester city will begin
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their new campaign away to arsenal in the tie of the opening weekend. manchester united will take on leicester city. liverpool take on west ham, while championship winners wolverhampton wanderers welcome everton to molineux. british number one johanna konta says she feels fortunate to have beaten compatriot heather watson in straight sets at the nottingham open. konta was taken to a tie break in the second set and it took an hour and 39 minutes to get past watson, who's currently ranked 69 places lower. konta will face slovenia's dalila jakupovic in the quarter final. on to rugby league and joel tomkins has been speaking today about his controversial move from wigan to hull kingston rovers — tomkins left wigan after a video of him being drunk and abusive to bar staff appeared on social media. he says he made a huge mistake. i got igota i got a point to prove to the fans and fellow players, to earn their respect on the field. i haven't got
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a point to prove, anything to do with the incident, that was a one—off incident, which was a huge mistake which i made. i'm not proud of it but of hold my hands up and said sorry and i will move on from it -- said sorry and i will move on from it —— but i've held my hands up and said sorry. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. now on afternoon live — let's go nationwide — and see what's happening around the country — in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. amelia reynolds is in cambridge who can tell us more about a community organisation that is asking for the public‘s help to address the problem of knife crime in luton. rebecca wood's in birmingham where 50 years ago work started on one of the most complicated road junctions in the country — called spaghetti junction.
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first to amelia. so what's being done related to knife crime and stabbings in luton? it has got national attention. figures out today show that bedfordshire has the fourth highest rate of knife crime in the country, just behind the big urban areas of merseyside, cleveland and the west midlands. there was a stabbing in luton in broad daylight on monday and last month a 20—year—old was stabbed to death with a single knife wound. so the police and the cancer had a big public meeting and hundreds of people went along —— the council. there were questions about what the community has got and where people can go and what there are young people to do. there seems to be emerging in luton and elsewhere in the region this disconnect between these communities and the authorities who were there, trying to support them, so a community
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group has stepped in and said, we will hold a series of smaller public meetings around the luton and i want eve ryo ne meetings around the luton and i want everyone to come along to share their experiences —— they want. we went to a meeting last night and this is what some people had to say. i would not say it is a rascal but there are some rough people who carry guns around and i know one day they might get in a gang or they might get hurt —— i would not say it isa might get hurt —— i would not say it is a rough school. these comments will be fed back to the council. shocking to hear that youngsters are carrying guns in school? carrying knives, a lot of violence, this is why any intervention needs to take place very early, really. this situation is being mirrored in ipswich, three stabbings there in the last three weeks, and a lot of talk about gangs and drugs and
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violence, and the police are calling this county lines where gangs from london go to towns and cities across the east and tried to corner the drugs market. before i came into the studio i listened to an interview that one of our reporters did with a former gang member. she asked him why did you feel it necessary to carry a knife when you were young and he said, children don't carry knives and guns because they think they are big and strong, they carry guns and knives because they are living in fear. thank you for that. i think living in fear. thank you for that. ithinki living in fear. thank you for that. i think i said guns, but i meant knives. more on bbc one at 630. rebecca, why on earth are we celebrating the 50th anniversary of a road junction? why not celebrate spaghetti junction? it was iconic when it was
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built and it is used by 220,000 vehicles every day. the busiest road junction in europe. it is now often a free—flowing, but it is very busy and i'm sure you have been over it. it is the gravelly hill interchange, and you and find it on a map referred to as spaghetti junction —— you won't. many other big interchanges have been named spaghettijunction interchanges have been named spaghetti junction as a result of it, so this is very popular and known around the world, and it is pretty impressive, held up by 550 columns. it had to be elevated, 13 kilometres of motorway that had to be elevated to accommodate the rivers and canals that run underneath. impressive piece of engineering. it was named by a jealous because he said it looked like a messy plate of spaghetti and an attempt at a joke —— named by a
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journalist. he had a point. what is being done to mark its fiftieth anniversary? a recipe has been made to celebrate spaghettijunction, a recipe has been made to celebrate spaghetti junction, but not now the won “— spaghetti junction, but not now the won —— but not using normal spaghetti. he says he's mixing the salt of the earth which people from birmingham are. there is tough while and cream, to show how far birmingham have done, but he says he is proud to show that he has been in line with this project. people see this on the tv, it is iconic, iconic landmark for birmingham, very practical, and when you think about birmingham you think about all of these things and also spaghetti junction. this is the 50th
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anniversary of the start of construction, it took four years to build, four more years of celebrations to come, and something quite exciting going on with lego land but you have got to wait and see. you are very smiling and happy, but the next time you are sitting in your car but the next time you are sitting in yourcar in but the next time you are sitting in your car in traffic on spaghetti junction, remember how happy you are at this moment. i have spent many hours on spaghetti junction, let me tell you. you clearly enjoyed it. to both of you, thanks forjoining us. that is nationwide this evening. if you would like to see more on any of those stories you can access them through the bbc iplayer and a reminder we go nationwide every weekday afternoon at 430 here on bbc news. four people smugglers in hungary
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have each been sentenced to 25 years in jail for their part in the deaths of 71 migrants found in a sealed lorry. prosecution lawyers say the sentences are too lenient and have asked the court to impose life sentences on the four men. at the height of the migrant surge into europe in 2015, the 71victims were found by police suffocated in the lorry, which had been abandoned by the side of a road in austria. the gay rights campaigner peter tatchell was arrested, but later released, by russian police this afternoon during a protest close to the kremlin. mr tatchell was protesting about what he says is russia's mistreatment of lgbt people — particularly in chechnya. human rights groups have accused russia of creating a hostile environment for lgbt people. police said his arrest was for "violating public order." the newest member of the royal family, the duchess of sussex, has accompanied the queen on an official royal visit to cheshire. it is the first time the duchess has attended an event with the queen without her husband prince harry. our royal correspondent nick witchel was watching.
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she has been used to learning a role and now that meghan markle the actress has become the duchess of sussex, how better to learn the finer points of what's required than to accompany someone who has spent her entire adult life perfecting the techniques. the queen's masterclass for meghan took place on a visit to cheshire. there were the usual elements, bunches of flowers to collect, displays by local schoolchildren which reminded the queen of a journey by canoe somewhere. the two of them were getting on famously, exchanging remarks and jokes. and then a short walkabout and another example of teamwork — the queen took one side of the street and meghan took the other. this is a very public endorsement from the queen. and this is part of the process of handing on the baton to a younger generation. a day to watch and learn — there will be many years
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ahead to perfect it all. we have had a twig from the falkland islands, today marks the 36th anniversary of the liberation of the falkland islands —— we have had a tweet. they said is worth a mention, andindeed tweet. they said is worth a mention, and indeed it is. in a moment the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. a memorial service has been held in west london to remember those who died in the fire at grenfell tower a year ago. immigration rules are to be relaxed — to allow more doctors and nurses from outside the eu to fill thousands of nhs vacancies. and the football world cup has got under way — with russia taking on saudi arabia in moscow. they are leading 2—0. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. engineering firm rolls—royce
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is to cut 4,600 jobs over the next two years as it refocuses on civil aerospace, defence and power systems. most of the cuts will be among middle managers and back—office staff particularly at its derby headquarters. there was a boom on the high street in may, thanks to hot weather and the royal wedding. sales last month were 3.9% up on the year before — much of them in food and household goods stores. they're the best numbers we've had on retail sales for over a year. the drinks retailer majestic wine has turned from loss to profit over the last 12 months — it made over £8 million against losses of 1.5 million last year. but it's not been easy. rowan gormley, group chief executive, said: "we expect the uk market to remain tough, possibly even tougher than last year". rolls royce losing 4,600 jobs — a sad day for derby where it's headquarters is.
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yes, a lot ofjobs will go from there. about two thirds of the job losses will be within the uk, and many will be in derby amongst middle management and back office staff. rolls—royce have been having problems. especially with their trent 100 engine, but this restructuring is not to do with that. it has had problems with profitability over the last 3—4 yea rs. profitability over the last 3—4 years. they sell the engines at a loss, but it is the ongoing contract? yes, that is what makes a lot of money, and there are also questions over their marine businesses, as well. we will hear more about that in the next few weeks. it is one of these horrible situations, share prices rise, investors like the idea, to make it a more profitable business, but for
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the people who will be losing their jobs, horrible. interest rates going up jobs, horrible. interest rates going up in the united states. quantitative easing is back in the news because the ecb will end it? yes, no more quantitative easing going on by the end of the year. it is the process by which a central bank buys bonds, usually government bonds, from the banks, giving them cash, and as a result they print money which is lent to a wider economy. a fairly blunt instrument and no saying exactly what the banks will do with the money at their disposal but generally speaking it is considered to have worked within the eurozone. but they say that is coming to an end. meanwhile in the us we have interest rates going up. they went up last night by a quarter
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of 1% and they will also go up two more times. they are facing an inflation problem, not so much in the eurozone, but it means money generally is going to become more expensive. the us has steel and aluminium import tariffs in place, are there any more? we will find out tomorrow, possible, there's a good chance president trump will announce ta riffs chance president trump will announce tariffs will be applied to chinese imports, something like 1500 different product categories, worth about $50 billion in terms of tariffs. joining me now is simon derrick, chief markets strategist, bank of new york mellon. what kind of effect will these ta riffs what kind of effect will these tariffs have? will this affect the uk? there is a concern within markets overall that the net impact of the trade war and the additional
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tariffs, it could be a drag on economic growth globally. you see this in the local market, the chinese markets are trading at those for the year, so there's a direct concern, but more generally, if you look at markets within the us and indeed byes, a sense that may be this will act as a drag on growth —— indeed byes. that is a worry. —— europe. it is open to question whether this will happen as we have seen whether this will happen as we have seen backwards and forwards on this but from the signs of what was coming out last night, there has been able agreement in the us and it looks like a good chance we might hear something tomorrow. how china reacts will be important. it is already on the steel and aluminium front, putting up prices, being inflationary, along with wages and
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retail sales and the price of oil, it is all pushing up inflation which is making people put up interest. we are seeing that in europe. we're getting this story in the us and from the eurozone over the course of the last 24 hours, we are talking about this issue pushing up rates in the us four times. maybe another 2—3 next year. the market seems to be a bit concerned, that by pushing rates up bit concerned, that by pushing rates up so aggressively, it may start to choke the economy in the us so there isa choke the economy in the us so there is a concern about what happens in the next few years. in europe we have the end of quantitative easing, made fairly clear that that will be done by the end of the, finally, but we still have got to get interest rates up even to zero. we have the
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astonishing negative interest rates, it won't be until the summer of next year at the earliest before we start to get above the zero level. what about rolls—royce? to get above the zero level. what about rolls-royce? painful readjustment. they have got to go through it to regain their profitability. there is a sense we have been listening to this story now for four years and there's a sense that the investors want rolls—royce to sense that the investors want rolls— royce to get sense that the investors want rolls—royce to get on with it. 10% of the workforce, though, and such a long time in derby, that there will be some sort of support for the economy there. maybe if this will ta ke economy there. maybe if this will take place at all, though, at least this is taking place at a time in the economy is relatively buoyant, better if you're going to make these simplifications with the company, but you do this at this point in the cycle, rather than at a point when
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it would be far worse. thanks for joining us. the markets? the ftse is up. rolls—royce, 6.5%, gradually climbing. apple have put this new fix on their phones which makes them impossible to get into. a new security measure? that is right. what they have done, they have said to people like the fbi who have been wanting to get into their phones, looking into the phone are criminals, they have said, no, you can't do it. so rather than put a red line down there... the pound looking pretty strong, starting the day at just under looking pretty strong, starting the day atjust under 1.14 and it has gone up over half a cent. thank you.
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more tomorrow. see you then. that's it from your afternoon live team for today, next the bbc news at five with huw edwards and reeta chakra barti. time for a look at the weather. here's sarah keith lucas. hello there. we've got some unseasonably windy weather for this stage in june, particularly across the northern half of the country — breezy really where ever you are. storm hector has been named by met erin, here's a picture from one of our weather watchers in whitby, showing a fairly active and foamy sea scape there. now here are some of the gusts we have seen down to storm hector earlier on in the day. 100mph across the pennines and the cairngorms too, but even at lower levels we have seen gusts of 60 or 70mph, so causing some disruption with the strength of the winds out there. the satellite image shows the storm. it will be pushing its way slowly eastwards over the next few hours so for the rest of the day, the low pressure centre moves up to the shetland isles then scandinavia. there are sharp showers
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in association with that storm, pushing in across parts of northern ireland, scotland, although we will have seen the strongest of the winds, particularly across the mainland, we could still see gusts of more than 50mph, so the weather still causing disruption in terms of travel, and power outages as well. for northern ireland, scattered showers, a windy afternoon to come. one of two of those showerjust pushing into parts of cumbria, but really for much of england and wales, the weather looks dry through the afternoon, some sunshine reappearing, still blustery though down towards the london region, we could see a gust or two of around 30mph. so as we look towards the evening hours then, most places do stay dry, the strongest of the winds gradually starting to ease. still blustery showers for northern ireland, scotland, into the far north—west of england too. further south it stays dry and as the winds fall lighter through the night, we will see the temperatures dipping down to around about 8—13 degrees so a fairly fresh start to your friday morning. friday will be a quieter zone than we have seen out there today. still quite breezy in the north with some scattered heavy showers,
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for parts of western scotland, northern ireland too. much of england and wales though should stay dry. less windy, just a few isolated showers cropping up and temperatures ranging between round 14 to 22 degrees or friday. what about the weekend? it is going to be a weekend of two halves. there will be some fairly heavy blusterly showers around on saturday, it's drier and less windy as well for sunday, and things should be staying dry for the start of the world cup in moscow through into this evening. that's it for now, bye. today at five, a day of remembrance for the 72 people who lost their lives in the grenfell disaster one year ago. the queen led a nationwide silence observed by communities across the uk, including in west london, where the grenfell disaster happened. # amazing grace, how sweet the sound # that saved a wretch like me...
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a service of remembrance was attended by survivors, families and friends, representing people from dozens of nationalities. from this day onwards, those whom we have physically lost will never, ever, ever be forgotten. i'm here in west london as the communityjoins together to remember those who died.
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