Skip to main content

tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  June 14, 2018 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

5:00 pm
today at five, 3 day of remembrance for the 72 people who lost their lives in the grenfell disaster one year ago. the queen led a nationwide silence observed by communities across the uk, including in west london, where the grenfell disaster happened. # amazing grace, how sweet the sound # that saved a wretch like me... a service of remembrance was attended by survivors, families and friends, representing people from dozens of nationalities. from this day onwards, those whom we have physically lost will never, ever, ever be forgotten. i'm here in west london as the communityjoins together to remember those who died. later, there will be a silent march
5:01 pm
in memory of them. we'll be back with reeta in west london shortly for the latest on the day's events. the other main stories on bbc news at 5. more than 4,500 jobs to be cut at rolls—royce in a major reorganisation to save hundreds of millions of pounds. immigration rules are to be relaxed — it's expected that more foreign doctors and nurses will be allowed in to help fill nhs jobs. vladimir putin kicks off the world cup in russia, with the host nation taking on saudi arabia in moscow. and a royalfirst, as the duchess of sussex joined the queen on a visit to cheshire. it's five o'clock. our main story is that the names of the 72 people who died in the grenfell tower fire a year ago today have been
5:02 pm
read out at a memorial service in west london. candles were lit in st helen's church, and doves were released outside. speaking at the service, the labour mp david lammy said it was a "bittersweet" moment as the community celebrated their unity, but mourned those lost. a minute's silence was observed across the uk at midday, while the england football team held its own in russia as the world cup got under way. for the latest on the day's events, let's join my colleague reeta chakrabarti in west london. this is the tower as it is today, covered with white sheeting and with the big green heart, grenfell forever in our hearts, right at the top. it's been a day, as you can imagine, of intense emotion here, of
5:03 pm
deep grief, but which has been channelled and contained by the ritual of the ceremonies and the marches and the vigil that have been held collectively. we will be considering the sort of trauma that people have suffered and that they continue to suffer in just a moment. first, with a look back at the day's events, here is my colleague richard galpin. shortly before one o'clock this morning, grenfell tower was lit up in the colour chosen by the community to represent them, and what happened a year ago, the time marking the moment the fire was first reported to the emergency services. # amazing grace, how sweet the sound... on this, the first anniversary of the fire which took so many lives, a chance for survivors, the bereaved and other members of the community to come together
5:04 pm
again in memory of those who died. hashim kedir. sirria choucair. nadia choucair. bassem choucair. fatima choucair. mierna choucair. zainab choucair. mary mendy. khadija saye. mehdi el—wahabi. yasin el—wahabi. faouzia el—wahabi. abdulaziz el—wahabi. what is important from this day onwards is that those who we have physically lost will never, ever, ever be forgotten. and it is incumbent on each and every one of us that we ensure that they are never forgotten.
5:05 pm
and further, that they are revered, because our strength will ensure that the truth will notjust present itself, but will announce itself in such a way that the tragedy of grenfell tower can never, ever, ever reoccur. # lean on me when you're not strong. # i'll be your friend, i'll help you carry on. outside, right next to grenfell tower itself, a gospel choir led another commemoration, as people gathered to reflect at this, the most poignant of locations, and to listen to a recitation from the koran. many of those who died
5:06 pm
in the fire were muslim. he sings in arabic. at midday, everything stopped for a period of silence. here at grenfell tower, it lasted 72 seconds, in memory of each of those who lost their lives. in memory of each of the 72 people who lost their lives. it also fell silent at other locations around the country, and beyond. and the theme of silence continued this afternoon with this march,
5:07 pm
heading through the streets to the foot of grenfell tower. the messages of solidarity conveyed on the placards and banners. # you can deny me. # you can decide to turn your face away. # no matter, because there's something inside so strong... this is a day evoking the most painful of memories. the children at this primary school near grenfell tower lost friends and a member of staff in the fire. but for the community in this area, hope lies in their expectation
5:08 pm
that there will ultimately be justice, with those responsible for the catastrophic fire being punished. richard galpin, bbc news. well, hope, of course, but there is still a strong sense of the ongoing pain that people are suffering one year after that terrible fire. to discuss that, i'm joined by dr catherine broadway, a clinical psychologist. you have been working with people who have been involved in this terrible tragedy. give us a sense of the numbers you have had to work with. we know that a large number of people have been affected. as of now, we have screened
5:09 pm
approximately 2000 people, but we know there are many more that we have yet to reach. we currently have about 700 adults and children in treatment. these are people who are survivors and relatives? yes. we have a broad remit at the grenfell health and well—being service. we are seeing health and well—being service. we are seeing anyone health and well—being service. we are seeing anyone who has been affected by the fire. they don't have to live in the borough. a number of people will be presenting with symptoms of trauma, and they may meet criteria for what people know as ptsd. but others might be experiencing other symptoms like anxiety or depression, grief or loss, and we will see everybody. and amongst this mix of people, there are amongst this mix of people, there a re lots of amongst this mix of people, there are lots of children that you have been seeing. how badly have children been seeing. how badly have children been affected? of course, there were children who were present in the night who ran out of the tower and also witnessed the tower. and we
5:10 pm
know children are very perceptive and sensitive to their parents. we have a remarkable specialist service thatis have a remarkable specialist service that is part of our grenfell health and well—being service who work with young people and they are working with schools and families to address the child need. sometimes, children are described as more resilient than adults. do you think that is that? children show a remarkable amount of resilience, that's true. but it's also important that often, young people may find it more difficult to describe how they are feeling so that we find ways to allow those conversations to happen both within families, but also within schools and in services where that is indicated. looking at events today and listening to people speak, the pain seems very present and very
5:11 pm
raw. you have been working with people for 12 months now. have you seen a people for 12 months now. have you seen a change in people. is there any sense of any healing?” certainly think this will be a gradual process. what is important is that the impact of grenfell hasn't ended. there are still people contending with housing issues and then there is the ongoing inquiry and investigation. people are still having to manage this impact. i am seeing incredible amounts of strength and resilience and local talent and a real coming together. just walking down here today and participating in the memorial ceremonies and marches that have been organised, there is a palpable sense of community spirit, and it's that that is holding this community together and allowing steps towards that healing. it's been important
5:12 pm
for us to keep an open dialogue with the community to find out what is working and what is not working and adapt our services accordingly so that we do all we can to support and provide the treatment and assistance required. a couple of people have said to me today that many local people have approached today with a sense of dread. do you think that the symbolism of today will have helped people get over, it will have been cathartic in some way?” helped people get over, it will have been cathartic in some way? i think today will mean different things to different people. for many, it may bea different people. for many, it may be a marker in the grieving process. for others, it will be a brutal reminder of what has happened and how their lives have been changed. what is important is that everyone ta kes what is important is that everyone takes today and looks after themselves and then seeks out
5:13 pm
support, be it within the community oi’ support, be it within the community or by approaching us. dr catherine broadway, thank you. you get a sense, huw, of how complicated the aftermath of this disaster continues to be. it has been a very intense day in west london and the day goes on into the evening. there is the silent march, which we will be covering on bbc news. for the time being, back to you. reeta chakrabarti being, back to you. reeta chakra barti at grenfell tower, being, back to you. reeta chakrabarti at grenfell tower, thank you very much. the government has promised to work with rolls—royce to support thousands of workers who are set to lose theirjobs. the engineering firm says a major restructuring will result in more than 4,500 jobs losses in the next two years. management roles and support staff are expected to bear the brunt of the cuts, which will hit the firm's base in derby particularly hard,
5:14 pm
as our correspondent theo leggett reports. rolls—royce is an engineering giant. it builds power systems for aircraft, ships and heavy machinery. but the company's boss thinks it's become bloated and inefficient. so he is planning some radical surgery. this is a very difficult decision. however, we do need to think about all the hard work that's gone in and turning that into opportunities for the future. we are actually trying to create a stronger rolls—royce, which is good for derby and good for the uk. rolls—royce has 55,000 employees around the world. of those, some 26,000 work in the uk, many of them at the company's headquarters in derby. now, it says it wants to get rid of 4,600 jobs, mainly among middle management and back office functions. it's bad news for workers in derby, because that is where a large number of managerialjobs are based. but thousands of engineering posts will be protected for the next few years.
5:15 pm
derby's mps have already made their concerns very clear. isn't this a failure of shareholder capitalism, which basically sacrifices jobs on the altar of higher shareholder dividends? i understand why a member with a strong constituency interest in the workforce there of course will be anxious and combative in defending the interests of the workforce. the cutbacks come at a time when rolls—royce is also facing some significant engineering challenges. it is working hard to fix problems with engines used on boeing's 787 dreamliner. the faults have proved costly and difficult to rectify. analysts say the company has to be careful not to cut too far, too fast. getting the balance between maintaining core skills and cutting costs is one of the most difficult things for any manager. the company is making it clear that the bulk of the cuts are in back—office functions, not core front—line
5:16 pm
engineering staff. it is also trying to do this process through non—compulsory means, through voluntary means. for rolls—royce employees, these may be deeply uncertain times, but bosses believe that by accepting painful cuts now, they can guarantee future prosperity. theo leggett, bbc news. joining me now from derby is chris hobson, director of policy at the east midlands chamber of commerce. i know you have close links with the company, giving your responsibilities at the chamber of commerce. did this come as a surprise? i don't think it was a total surprise, but that doesn't ta ke total surprise, but that doesn't take away from the fact that it is a sad day for the people who will be losing their positions over the next couple of years. on the short—term positive side, a lot ofjobs are being created in derby and the wider area which hopefully, these people will be well qualified to move into.
5:17 pm
so while the initial shock is there, hopefully it will not see people out of work for a long period of time. can you shed some more light for us on what the company has been telling you are the reasons for this? as you say, there may be positive signs in the employment market, but it is nearly 5000 jobs after all. in essence, this is a company looking to stay competitive. there was a big drive nationally to be productive and efficient. rolls—royce are looking ahead to the future and realising that if they want to continue to be in derby for the long term, they need to be as competitive as possible. so they are finding ways to tighten up. whether you employ ten people or 10,000 people, it isa employ ten people or 10,000 people, it is a business strategy we are going to see more. when we look at the local employment market, tell us more about that and what are the prospects for the people leaving rolls—royce and the kind of skills they have? the east midlands has
5:18 pm
been outperforming other parts of the country for a while. manufacturing is at the heart of what we do. we employed more people in manufacturing as a percentage of the workforce than anywhere else in the workforce than anywhere else in the country. rolls—royce is one of the country. rolls—royce is one of the jewels in that crowd, but there are others as well. and underneath, there is a whole chain of supply businesses. so businesses locally are telling us they are struggling to fill positions, so we would like to fill positions, so we would like to think that the people coming out of these roles will be prized asset and it will not be long before they find themselves back in employment, hopefully. but going back to the number, it is 5000 people. are you saying the local jobs number, it is 5000 people. are you saying the localjobs market is vibrant enough to soak up 5000? over two years, our members vibrant enough to soak up 5000? over two years, oui’ members are vibrant enough to soak up 5000? over two years, our members are telling us two years, our members are telling us they are struggling to recruit at the highest skilled managerial levels. you're right, a600 is a large number and lots of things may happen over those two years, but we are ina
5:19 pm
happen over those two years, but we are in a good position. the other positive thing we have had today is the fact that we have already been approached by local authorities, looking at ways they can support people who find themselves out of work. but i understand that in the medium term, that comes as little relief for those who find themselves out of work in the near future. you meana kind out of work in the near future. you mean a kind of task force? what with that achieve if it were set up? absolutely. i am not sure if it will be called a task force or something else, but the city council have been in touch. 0ur else, but the city council have been in touch. our members who are interested in the roles might be coming forward. of course it will not be easy and there will be lots of human stories behind this, but the area has a good track record in doing all it can to make sure that if the situations occur, it comes out stronger. thanks forjoining us. chris hobson, director of policy at the east midlands chamber of commerce. some news coming in from
5:20 pm
police at wolverhampton. three teenagers have been arrested on suspicion of the murder of a 15—year—old in wolverhampton on the 29th of may. this is a statement from west midlands police. detective inspector warren hinds tells us that this is a further significant development in the investigation. they continue to work on a number of leads. "i'm grateful to those who have provided information. he added that the tragic death of keelan was unnecessary. we are working around the clock to get answers for his family. the main news is that 310 measures have been arrested on suspicion of the murder of 15—year—old keelan wilson in wolverhampton —— three teenagers have been arrested. this is bbc news at 5 — the headlines: commemorations and vigils have been held in west london to remember the 72 people who died in the grenfell tower fire a year ago today. more than a,500 jobs are to be cut at rolls—royce in a major reorganisation to save hundreds of
5:21 pm
millions of pounds. immigration rules are to be relaxed — it's expected more foreign doctors and nurses will be allowed in to help fill nhs jobs. in sport, hosts russia lead 2—0 in their world cup opener against saudi arabia in moscow. there is no body better to lead you out at the world cup and harry kane, according to his england team mick kiran trippier, but there are still concerns over injury. and johanna konta reached the quarterfinals of the nottingham open. she beat fellow briton heather watson 6—a, 7—6. more on those stories after 5.30. the football world cup has formally started at the luzhniki stadium in moscow. the hosts are playing saudi arabia in the first match of the tournament. they've got off to a great start and are currently two goals up. robbie williams performed
5:22 pm
at the opening ceremony, which was attended by president putin. there will be 6a games during the month—long tournament, with 32 countries competing. an estimated half a million football fans from around the world are expected to travel to russia for the competition during the coming month. 0ur correspondent sarah rainsford is in moscow. we heard a bit of robbie williams floating over the top of the luzhniki stadium behind me. but then we heard the sound that most russians were hoping for, which was the roar of the crowd at two goals we re the roar of the crowd at two goals were scored in the first half of this match. russia are ahead 2—0. bearing in mind that this is the worst ranked team in this tournament, that is a lot more than russia were hoping for. so the atmosphere has been extraordinarily good. there has been a really international crowd both here at the stadium and outside. and also in
5:23 pm
moscow itself. earlier in the city centre, we were walking around and it's the city like i have never seen it's the city like i have never seen it before. i have lived here for quite a few years, but what i saw over the past couple of days has seen over the past couple of days has seen the city transformed. many people around world come to russia. they have, so far, fun! more beautiful than i expected. i didn't know what to expect. it's surprisingly amazing. beautiful city. beautiful. i recommended to anyone. everyone is friendly. friendly. loads of different fans. not many english at the moment by the looks of it. most of them from south america. not many english fans yet, but a lot of people from a lot of countries.
5:24 pm
you were hearing some of the positive comments, a lot of people saying it is surprisingly nice in russia. that is precisely what vladimir putin wanted to happen. he is the man inside the stadium, russia's president, at the centre of a huge amount of controversy. we heard in the uk before the world cup, a lot of people calling for a boycott of the tournament. that didn't happen. instead, vladimir putin is at the centre of the world for the next month. and he is hoping this tournament will be a showcase for russia and it will show that this country is not isolated. but of course, politics will hang over the tournament, albeit, he hopes that football will now be at the forefront. sarah rainsford with the latest on the world cup. we'll have the latest from moscow in our sports bulletin just after 5.30. the government is due to announce the wording
5:25 pm
of a compromise amendment to the eu withdrawal bill — which would strengthen the hand of parliament in the event that brexit talks break down. theresa may was forced into a compromise — when she faced defeat on a commons vote on a so—called meaningful vote on tuesday. 0ur chief political correspondent, vicki young, joins me now. do we have the wording and do we have any sense of the response to it? we thought there would be an agreement by five o'clock. this has to be tabled for technical reasons by five o'clock today in order to be considered by the house of lords on monday. remember that the government only won the vote on this because it said to be remain conservatives on their side, don't worry, we will sort it out and we will please you. that is what the negotiations have been about. it is about ultimately, whether parliament can prevent the uk leaving the eu with no deal. this
5:26 pm
is what conservative rebels are trying to get to. so we have had conversations going on with people like dominic grieve, the former attorney general. he has become the de facto leader of these people. he has been at the negotiations all day. there were tweets saying the deal is being done and it is all sorted, and then it seems to have fallen apart at the last minute. there has been a tweet from anna soubry, another conservative rebel, saying that she understands the government has gone ahead and tabled this amendment in the house of lords, but it has not been agreed by dominic grieve. she says, we are grateful for the conversations, but without consultations, what was agreed earlier today has been changed. we think what happened is that they came forward with something, but again for technical reasons, the government has made this amendment and amendable, which means it could be used as a confidence vote. —— they made it
5:27 pm
un—amendable. confidence vote. —— they made it un-amendable. on that point, according to laura kuenssberg, our colleague, dominic grieve has said the wording of this amendment is unacceptable. he said at the end of the process, something was inexplicably changed. dominic grieve is one of the main campaigners in the commons for the right of parliament to have a final say on whether there is no deal. he said it was inextricably changed. it has not been agreed. the government has made the motion unamendable, contrary to the motion unamendable, contrary to the usual methods of the house of commons. therefore, it cannot be accepted. that is dominic grieve saying that. what kind of reaction will that get? number ten must have realised that he had not agreed this. they know that by doing this, there's conservatives are faced with there's conservatives are faced with the option of, if they want to get their way and reject a no deal scenario, they have to bring down there prime minister. that was never going to be acceptable to them, so downing street must have decided, we
5:28 pm
have got the numbers and we can get this through. i can't see how the king get this through the house of lords without dominic grieve being on board, so we are looking at a scenario now where it goes back to the lord's on monday. there will be various things being voted on. i can't see them accepting this, which means it goes back to the house of commons and then those 15 or more conservatives who were in that room with the prime minister and said they looked in her eye and she said, i would thought this for you, they then have to decide how they are going to defeat the government, or are they going to fall into line? so yet again, we are coming to a crunch point which can't be delayed for much longer. clearly, this raises the stakes even further. are we saying that there was a dispute about what the prime minister may or may not have promised the potential rebels? secondly, we are still in
5:29 pm
the area where there could be a defeat for theresa may on this area when it comes back to the house of commons? absolutely. she is trying to square the circle where she has the conservative remainers saying, we wa nt the conservative remainers saying, we want to reject a no deal scenario. then you have david davis and others saying, having no deal has to be on the table in order to get the best deal. they in brussels have do think that we will walk away with no deal. we can't have our hands tied in those negotiations. that has always been the problem, that david davis and others say you can't have parliament in control of negotiations. you can't do negotiations. you can't do negotiations with 650 people in the house of commons sitting behind you. that is not how it works. the government has to be in control, and they don't think that what the remain tories were demanding would allow them to do that. so they are trying to keep the power with them. and theresa may is as ever sitting in the middle of these two factions and trying to sort it out. but in
5:30 pm
the end, it will probably come down next week to whether those 15 0rken —— conservatives really want to defeat the prime minister on this, and there is speculation that they don't want to do that. they are not as ruthless as the hardline brexiteers, but we shall see. more uncertainty, certainly. thanks very much. vicki young, with the latest on the goings—on at westminster with the brexit process. let's take a look at the weather. storm hector is bringing unseasonably windy weather, particularly across the northern half of the uk. for scotland, northern ireland and northern england, the weather is causing some disruption. there are big waves around the coast. we had trees down disruption to travel. 0n the satellite image, you can see that the cold front is now clearing towards the east, but we still have
5:31 pm
a wraparound of cloud and in the north there are still windy conditions to be seen. further showers are rattling around for a time overnight. for the south, it is less breezy and quite a fresh night. a bit more comfortable than it has been over recent nights. a quieter day on friday. still some blustery showers across northern ireland, scotla nd showers across northern ireland, scotland and parts of northern england. in the sunnier spells, temperatures around 22 in the south and just 1a to 17 further north. the time is 5:31pm. this is bbc news — the headlines. commemorations and vigils have been held in west london to remember the 72 people who died in the grenfell tower fire a year ago today. dominic grieve, conservative mp has
5:32 pm
called for compromise to avoid defeat in the commons as unacceptable. more than a,500 jobs to be cut at rolls—royce in a major reorganisation to save hundreds of millions of pounds. immigration rules are to be relaxed, it's expected more foreign doctors and nurses will be allowed in, to help fill nhs jobs. and, it's a royalfirst, as the duchess of sussex joined the the queen, on a visit to chesire. at 5:32pm we are going to catch up with the sports news including the world cup. sarah is with us. welcome along, the world cup in russia is finally under way after all of the talking. the football is now taking over. the opening game has the hosts russia taking on saudi arabia. it's into the second half in moscow, going the way the home crowd, they lead 2—0. about 70 minutes gone. and our man in russia
5:33 pm
is 0lly foster. perfect start for russia. it really is, yes. great to talk about the football but many people we re about the football but many people were worried about the football because these teams are the lowest ranked in the world cup, russia at the lowest of them all, russia are a lowly 70th in the world but right now they feel top of the world against saudi arabia in this opening match. let's show you the first couple of goals because the first one has only just couple of goals because the first one has onlyjust gone in, it happened 12 minutes in, yuri gazinskiy scoring the header, lovely moment in the crowd, gianni infantino sitting in between president putin, who offered his hand of condolences to the saudi crown is, and that handshake was accepted. it was going to get worse for the crown prince and the saudi tea m for the crown prince and the saudi team by half—time as denis cheryshev who had just come on as a substitute
5:34 pm
a little earlier scored just before half—time. so 2—0 to russia. they we re half—time. so 2—0 to russia. they were up and running in this 21st fifa world cup command up and running in the last couple of seconds and enormous roar erupted from the 80,000 inside there, minus the saudi fans because artem dzyuba has made it 3—0 to russia. they were so has made it 3—0 to russia. they were so worried about getting off to a good start because there is uruguayan egypt still to come. they play tomorrow. 3—0, wonderful start for the hosts and it makes all the difference when the hosts are doing because everybody is so much happier. we see it in so many tournaments, derek twigg? i wonder what the reception and the role of the crowd was like at the opening ceremony with a bit of british interest ——. we? massive british interest, they are
5:35 pm
usually just a small affair 25 minutes before kick—off but robbie williams had a massive bit to play in it. a 15 minute set playing all of his old hits, angels, feeling, let me entertain you, rock dj and he wasjoined by a russian let me entertain you, rock dj and he was joined by a russian soprano and vladimir putin gave a short speech in russian welcome the world saying football brings people together and it would be a feast of football. it isa it would be a feast of football. it is a feast of goals so far and i imagine there will be another goal before this game is out. we still have another 25 minutes or so. 20 minutes to go in this match at the ms nikki stadium and russia heading for a win. ms nikki stadium and russia heading fora win. —— ms nikki stadium and russia heading for a win. —— ms we will keep you up with all of the action across the bbc. so the action under way — england begin their campaign on monday against tunisia. harry kane of course will captain the side and his tottenham team mate thinks he's the perfect man to lead his country.
5:36 pm
he's a great leader and you can see that on and off the field. a top professional. even off the field with one—to—ones he is a great person and if you ever need help he is there to help individually or as pa rt is there to help individually or as part of a group and there is no better person to lead as out to a world cup. british number one johanna konta says she feels fortunate to have beaten compatriot heather watson in straight sets at the nottingham 0pen. konta was taken to a tie break in the second set and it took an hour and 39 minutes to get past watson, who's currently ranked 69 places lower. she will face dele alli jakupovic slovenia in the quarterfinals. -- dalila jakupovic. strong crosswinds have made scoring difficult on the first day of the us open at shinnecock hills in new york state, although organisers say a tweaked course design may alleviate the problem. rory mcilroy has started badly and is 10 over from 1a holes so far with his round including five bogeys and three double bogeys. the weather conditions have made things difficult —
5:37 pm
but england's ian poulter is coping well. he shares the lead with scott piercy on one under — and they're the only two players to have broken par right now. and that is all your sport for now. we will be back at the bbc sports centre later on. we mentioned this story earlier, which is the government is to relax immigration rules to allow more skilled workers from outside the eu to come and work in the uk. the home office is expected to confirm that foreign doctors and nurses will be excluded from the government's visa cap — in february. nhs england had many thousands of vacancies for both doctors and nurses. they were finding great difficulty filling those vacancies. 0ur political correspondentjonathan blake has more details. working hard under pressure, but there just aren't
5:38 pm
enough doctors and nurses. hospitals across england are badly short—staffed. in february, nhs england had 35,000 vacancies for nurses, and nearly 10,000 doctors' posts unfilled. we have got substantial demand pressures on the nhs, an ageing population, and more patients needing health care services. also it is linked to a decision in 2010 when austerity hit, to restrict the number of nurses and doctors being trained in the nhs to meet that demand, which is why we have got so many vacancies across the nhs at the moment. the prime minister knows the health service relies heavily on workers from abroad, but for years, the numbers coming have been restricted. it was theresa may as home secretary who set a limit on tier 2 visas for skilled workers from outside the eu, atjust under 21,000 per year, part of a broader approach to restrict immigration. we will reduce net migration from the hundreds of thousands to the tens of thousands. it will not be easy. it will take hard work and a great deal of political courage.
5:39 pm
but the british people want us to do it, and it is the right thing to do, so we will do it. more doctors and nurses are being trained in the uk. but that will take time. and beyond the need to fill gaps in the health service, is this relaxation of the rules more than just a possible quick fix? i think there is a total change in approach with sajid javid and the prime minister. without her approval, none of this would be happening. it is a point to get across that, just because we are leaving the european union, it doesn't mean we are anti—immigration, we are not, we have to be flexible. we are told the prime minister is enthusiastic about this plan to fill staffing gaps in the nhs short—term. what is much less clear is how far this move reflects any broader shift in government policy on immigration, and what its long—term plan might be. jonathan blake, bbc news, westminster. let's talk more about the impact of
5:40 pm
this and the rationale of what the likely consequences are because we are joined likely consequences are because we arejoined by dr likely consequences are because we are joined by dr chaand likely consequences are because we arejoined by dr chaand nagpaul, chair of the british medical association council. thank you for joining us. how would you regard this, if someone said this is common sense what would you say? this is common—sense. it is putting patients above arbitrate ideological caps and we know the public have not supported this. what is important is this is an important first step which is good for patients because they have suffered and continued to suffer in a service where there are not enough doctors and nurses and they have to wait far too long, they don't have treatment in a prompt manner. service is an important first step. we hope that this will... first step. we hope that this will. .. the legislation first step. we hope that this will... the legislation will come through tomorrow morning, so we hope this will be implemented rapidly because there is a pressure and crisis as we speak. there is an urgent need? yes. given your
5:41 pm
position and reputation you have when you have made representations over many months what has been the response from the government? we have found this inexplicable. we have found this inexplicable. we have campaigned for this for months, there have been 2300 doctors who could have been working in the nhs who haven't been working because of this cap over the last six months. we have had no logical explanation. it is purely down to an arbitrate ideological cap, and what i think is important is to really put patients and the needs of the public‘s health first and i hope this will be the first and i hope this will be the first step of just first and i hope this will be the first step ofjust disassociating these policies that actually don't make sense to patients, they don't make sense to patients, they don't make sense to doctors, so yes, there has been no logical explanation. to what extent do you think it is tied up what extent do you think it is tied up with the more general difficult debate that people have been having about immigration? clearly these are doctors and nurses from outside the eu so it's nothing to do with
5:42 pm
brexit, however, there is a broader context to do with levels of immigration. has that been an unhelpful influence on the debate or not? you know, i think the british public and patients above all want health service that is properly staffed. we know that one survey recently showed the overwhelming majority had wanted this cap to be lifted. this is pure political intransigence that has resulted in this continued cap and the overseas doctor workforce has been part of the nhs since its inception and it is an integral part. that couldn't have survived without them. many of these doctors are highly capable, skilled. they come here for training, to have expertise and specialist skills in centres of excellence, so there is a wider issue here about the nhs being an inviting environment to the global medical workforce, a place where you will come and train, and as you
5:43 pm
train and acquire the skills you are providing a service. we should be embracing that and i believe the public want that and we should keep this away from the politics of immigration. i wanted to ask you about the impact of shortages on staff already in the nhs where they are having to take on more responsibilities, clearly they will be more stressed and anxious in those circumstances. how would you describe the impact of working in, let's say, a unit or a hospital somewhere as a doctor or a nurse where there are notable shortages in those places? it is extremely distressing for nhs staff to be working in understaffed hospitals we re working in understaffed hospitals were wards don't have sufficient nurses and they feel worried they cannot provide safe quality care. what this ends up doing is having a negative spiral because many of those doctors then choose to stop working. many, we know, at each stage of their career are leaving
5:44 pm
the nhs and working elsewhere. we have this issue that not only are —— do we need doctors from abroad to come and work in the nhs, we are losing home—grown doctors who go to work elsewhere. this comes back to the whole idea of having a nation thatis the whole idea of having a nation that is inviting rather than hostile. a very wrong message to a perfectly competent and capable doctor who has been offered a job in the nhs to be told the only reason you can't work here is because of some arbitrary cap and restriction. i hope it is the beginning of a much more welcoming approach to recognising the value of doctors from overseas working in the nhs.- nagpaul, thank you, the chair of the british medical council. it is 5:44pm. let's return to our main story — the memorial service in west london for the 72 people who died in the grenfell tower fire — a year ago today. survivors and relatives held white
5:45 pm
roses at the service in north kensington — and outside they released doves. at mid—day — a nationwide silence was observed across the uk. one group of people moved by the tragic events at grenfell tower was a community in cornwall which set up the group cornwall hugs grenfell — to offer families who survived the fire — free holidays in the region. in a moment — i'll be speaking to esme page who set up the group and was at today's commemorations. but first let's have a look at a music video they've released to raise awareness of their work. # beautiful memories lost to the fla mes # beloved and the lonely worm or than just names —— # beloved and the lonely worm or thanjust names —— were more than just names. # things
5:46 pm
# things left # things left unsaid # things left unsaid things left unsaid # things left unsaid # such a site that cannot be unseen. just a flavour of the rather uplifting and calming music that they have released on the video cornwall hugs grenfell.
5:47 pm
and esme page from cornwall hugs grenfelljoins me now. what does this mean to you and those reaching out to help? it is moving. about 250 have been down now. the courage here today and dignity and community is very lovely to be with them and to see how they are marking this time. in lots of very special and private ways. we had a memorial at sea for a group of survivors in cornwall in the half term week and that was special too. just to see those moments of private reflection, and to do that in a beautiful cornish setting was beautiful. i've seen both and i'm glad to be here today. we have some lovely images of the cornish seaside and some of those people have been enjoying it,
5:48 pm
esme. tell us a bit more about the genesis of this idea on how it has progressed over the last year and how it has developed. well, it really just plopped in how it has developed. well, it reallyjust plopped in on the morning of the fire when i watched dany morning of the fire when i watched da ny cotto n morning of the fire when i watched dany cotton talking and it was becoming apparent that this was something of a magnitude way beyond anything the fire brigade had seen in london before and thinking how hopeless it was and how people would need a horizon, some hope, and that has been very much the case. cornwall responded with a flood of accommodation offers and we have been bringing people since six weeks after the fire, sometimes in groups and sometimes individually. it is about making new memories, having a time asa about making new memories, having a time as a family that is after the fire so that you can save, "remember when," and it not be something that was before that. time to grieve, that song talks about it and it is only when you have time that you can
5:49 pm
do that. and when we reflect on why the fire happens it is healing in itself to be seen in your need and to be met, it is really significant. we have had over 20% of the people who lived in the tower that managed to get out, as well as close neighbours who saw it and firefighters. so it feels now, wandering around today, i'm bumping into people all the time, lots of hugs. it is interesting because they feel they belong now in cornwall, and ina feel they belong now in cornwall, and in a funny sort of way representing cornwall i feel i belong a little bit here too. representing cornwall i feel i belong a little bit here toolj should say something about the music video because it was lovely. tell us about how that came about and what you are trying to achieve with it. it was in the memorial service at st paul's in december which was so beautiful and listening to the bishop of kensington i felt there
5:50 pm
was a gap in the sense of what are we was a gap in the sense of what are we going to sing at a year and five yea rs we going to sing at a year and five years and ten years so that our children really understand the significance of this event. and also the legacy of love that came forward afterwards here in london and also all over the uk. so we wanted something that could people share, that they could express how they feel the same way that people sent clothes and donations, that they could actually do this together. nearly 5000 people across the world, auckland, buenos aires, minneapolis, moscow, and loss of cathedrals and schools dikili tomorrow are singing this in the uk and so that has obviously a need for people to say, "we are with you, we stand with you, we're not going to forget this and we are we're not going to forget this and we are going to preach love," which is what the bishop said and we need change because people are living in safe accommodation and screaming out about it and nothing is happening. i
5:51 pm
guess it is a song of solidarity. the survivors have been telling me and responding and they helped me check the words beforehand and we played it to them in cornwall for the first time and there were cheers and applause. one of them posted yesterday, "this song has become very close to my heart and then she wrote at "it feels right as it represents us and for us and the creators and the choristers at truro that was the best response we could have and to know that people wanted to sing it. lovely to talk to you, esme, and thank you for taking the time. thank you. and we'll be bringing you special coverage of the one year anniversary of the grenfell tragedy, including the silent walk from the wall of truth,
5:52 pm
just before 7pm — here on the bbc news channel. i want to bring you more on the proposed government amendment that was aimed at avoiding defeat in the house of commons which has been described as unacceptable by quite a few conservative mps including the former attorney general dominic grieve. one of his colleagues is at westminster and that is anna soubry, the conservative mp. thank you for joining us. for the viewers struggling to follow this could you tell us what has happened this afternoon at why you are unhappy with it? in short we want to make sure that as we leave the european union we don't leave without a deal that hasn't at least been properly considered and voted on by parliament. so we want parliament, which after all is meant to have taking back control, to have a vote and say, deal or no deal, and i
5:53 pm
believed, as many of my colleagues did, that the prime minister had agreed to that. on tuesday we didn't pushit agreed to that. on tuesday we didn't push it to a vote. we met the prime minister and the agreement was that dominic grieve, the former attorney general, would go and he would negotiate with people from the government and come up with an amendment to the eu withdrawal bill that actually delivered exactly that. so in the event of no deal they would be a meaningful vote and a debate in parliament. that was what was agreed. unfortunately, having reached an agreement, dominic and the solicitor general and others reached an agreement, it suddenly all changed, which is the way of things sometimes. the appalling things sometimes. the appalling thing is is that nobody actually spoke to dominic grieve before they tabled that amendment at 5pm this evening. i think that is
5:54 pm
unforgivable. now, you don't behave like this and i'm very, very disappointed. what is your reading of what has happened?” disappointed. what is your reading of what has happened? i think what has happened is there was a perfectly sensible compromise agreement that had been made and an amendment had been drafted to the bill. what it would have done is to ensure that in the event of no deal then the matter would come to parliament and parliament could decide, in effect, what happened next. some people, the hard brexiteers, who don't want a deal in any event, who want actually rather bizarrely to circumvent parliament, having said parliament should take back control. they are determined to get their hard brexit. and u nfortu nately, get their hard brexit. and unfortunately, it looks like the prime minister has sided with them as opposed to those people who accept as opposed to those people who a cce pt we as opposed to those people who accept we are leaving the european union and now want to get the very best dealfor our
5:55 pm
union and now want to get the very best deal for our constituents, and indeed the future of our country. so you know what's coming next. i want to ask you what your thoughts are and what will happen if this amendment goes to the lords, and what happens then if it comes back to the commons. what is going to happen then? one of the things we did today was that we tabled dominic grieve's original amendment he tabled very late on monday night. and which has been the subject of these discussions. we tabled that in these discussions. we tabled that in the lords. in effect, to take account of what we thought might happen. but we obviously hope it wouldn't happen. in some way an agreement would be made all we would go back on an agreement that had been made. dominic's amendment is there in the lords and has been tabled along with this amendment which has not been agreed to, by dominic grieve and other people like myself. both of those will be debated in the lords on monday night and then they will come back to the house of commons and it will be
5:56 pm
crunch time in my opinion and people will have to decide whether or not they are going to put their country and their constituents first, or whether they are going to put loyalty to the conservative party first. as a member of parliament i took an oath that i would always put my constituents and my country first, and that's what other collea g u es first, and that's what other colleagues have got to do. i think there will be many people who did there will be many people who did the right thing in their view on tuesday night. they decided to back the prime minister, they took her at her word. they may well now feel very badly let down and in that event they may choose not to just blindly go along with this really rather ridiculous amendment that has been tabled by the government, but instead that the original amendment that dominic tabled on tuesday night. this is lost on your viewers. they must be fed up to the back teeth of all this and i don't blame them. but it's really important because it's about the future of our
5:57 pm
country, the prosperity, peace in northern ireland. we are leaving the eu but we are notjust going to sit back and let these ideological hard brexiteers a cliff edge, damage our economy, destroy peace in northern ireland. we're going to do the right thing and put our country and constituents first. anna soubry, good of you to join constituents first. anna soubry, good of you tojoin us, thank constituents first. anna soubry, good of you to join us, thank you for coming over to the studio in westminster. anna soubry on the latest brexit controversy at westminster. it is 5:57pm. the newest member of the royal family, the duchess of sussex, has accompanied the queen on a visit to cheshire today, their first official royal engagement together without prince harry. meghan, who married the duke of sussex last month, attend a series of events, including the opening of the mersey gateway bridge, and the storyhouse theatre in chester. our royal correspondent nicholas witchell reports. she has been used to learning a role and now that meghan markle the actress has become the duchess of sussex, the royal, how better to learn the finer points of what's required than to accompany someone who has spent her entire adult life perfecting the techniques?
5:58 pm
the queen's masterclass for meghan took place on a visit to cheshire. there were the all usual elements, bunches of flowers to collect, displays by local schoolchildren which reminded the queen of a journey by canoe somewhere. the two of them were getting on famously, exchanging remarks and jokes. and then a short walkabout and another example of teamwork — the queen took one side of the street and meghan took the other. this is a very public endorsement from the queen. of the newest member of the royal family. and it is more than that. this is part of the process of handing on the baton to a younger generation. a day to watch and learn — there will be many years ahead to perfect it all. nicholas witchell, bbc news, chester. fiona is here with bbc news at six but here is sarah with the weather. the weather is lively
5:59 pm
across the northern half of the country and that's down to the fact we country and that's down to the fact we have storm hector, named by the irish met service because it is causing some disruption. we have had disruption to travel, various bridges, trees down, this is from one of our weather watchers on the moray coast. though strong winds still sticking with us at the moment but they will ease away. this is the satellite image showing the swirl of cloud associated with the storm, the cold front moving away towards the east so there is some late sunshine to be enjoyed, still windy conditions in the north. further showers do not across northern ireland and scotland, drierfurther south and fresh feeling night, 8-13d, south and fresh feeling night, 8—13d, not as warm and sticky as recent nights. after the fresh start on friday will be a quieter day, still pretty in the north with further showers. fewer showers further showers. fewer showers further south and in the sunshine we will see the temperatures around 22 degrees in the south, 14—i6d further north. it is another showery day to
6:00 pm
come on saturday. # when you're not strong #. a special service of remembrance at the local church commemorates those who died. jessica urbano. victoria king. raymond "moses" bernard. at the tower and across the nation a silence is marked for exactly 72 seconds. at the moment the first emergency call was made about the fire a year ago, the tower itself is lit up in green. it's been a day of remembrance, sorrow and solidarity for the community that lost so much one year ago. also tonight:

29 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on