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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 16, 2018 9:00am-10:01am BST

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hello this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and jon kay. a massive blaze at glasgow's world —famous school of art. it's the second time the mackintosh building has been badly damaged by fire in four years. people, the citizens of glasgow, and people further afield, will have to prepare themselves for what is a seriously damaged building. good morning it's saturday the 16th ofjune. also this morning: theresa may says she's disappointed after one of her own mps blocked legislation to make upskirting a criminal offence. new health checks for the over—forties in england — they're to receive advice on how to reduce the risk of dementia. in sport, a world cup thriller, as ronaldo, scores a hat—trick against spain. this stunning late freekick made it 3—3, as both sides, served up
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a classic. it certainly was. and nick has the weather. showers around for many. nowhere will be wet all day long. it is cooler. tomorrow, plenty of cloud, but more of us dry. your full weather forecast coming up... thanks. good morning our main story. a fire has devastated glasgow's world —famous school of art. the alarm was raised just after 11 o'clock last night and the mackintosh building was said to have been engulfed by flames within minutes. it was undergoing a multi—million pound restoration project following a similar blaze four years ago. our correspondent, alexandra mackenzie reports from the scene. the smoke and flames could be seen for miles around as they lit up the night sky. glasgow's school of art mackintosh building was engulfed in flames for the second time in four years. a multimillion—pound restoration
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project was due to be completed next year. pretty much everyone is just in shock because, i mean, its iconic, isn't it? there's no salvaging it. it's heartbreaking. the scottish fire and rescue service say no casualties have been reported but nearby buildings were evacuated. more than 60 firefighters have been tackling this major blaze for several hours and it now looks as if the flames have spread to a second building. the first minister, nicola sturgeon, said, "my first thoughts are the safety of people "but my heart breaks for the city's beloved glasgow school of art." alexandra mackenzie, bbc news, glasgow. terrible pictures. earlier we spoke to the chief officer of the scotland fire and rescue
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service who described the impact the fire had on the building. this building has extensive damage. every pa rt this building has extensive damage. every part of the building has been involved in five. people, the citizens of glasgow, and people further afield need to be prepared for what they will see, which is a seriously damaged building. —— involved in fire. our priority was to stop the spread of the fire. we managed to hold it for a while. the fire did spread to a nearby cinema adjoining it. crews were in there early on trying to extinguish the fire. conditions were such that they had to withdraw. in addition to the school of art, the adjacent buildings in sauchiehall street which comprises a theatre and shops have suffered some damage. that is the main focus at the moment. we
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have the fire under control. we are continuing to work and dampen down. with partial roof collapses and the like, it becomes difficult to get to the fire. the crews are continuing to work. but other buildings have been damaged on sauchiehall street. we are working with partners, trying to get the city back to normal, get this fire out, and allow us to do the final checks to make sure everybody is safe and well. at this stage it is far too early to tell that. alexandra mackenzie joins us now from glasgow. so many people getting in touch on social media, saying they cannot believe they are seeing these pictures and seeing the same news story as they did almost exactly four years ago. absolutely, people cannot believe this has happened again, just four yea rs this has happened again, just four years later. this is an ongoing incident, as i'm sure you can see behind me. ithink incident, as i'm sure you can see behind me. i think i incident, as i'm sure you can see behind me. ithink i mentioned incident, as i'm sure you can see behind me. i think i mentioned 60 firefighters in my report there. at the height of the fire last night we
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we re the height of the fire last night we were told that there were more than 120 here last night. the fire service said they are getting resources from across the country due to the significance and extent of the fire. people have been sending in messages on social media. we have had an update from the glasgow school of art. they are saying this is very much alive and complex. they have said that some residents have been evacuated from their property, they have been provided with shelter overnight there is hope they will be able to return to their homes at some point today. they have also said they are very upset about what they call this precious place. the mackintosh building means a lot to many people across the world. the glasgow school of art has also said please heed the advice from the emergency services to stay away. this is an ongoing
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incident. we've also had a comment from the scottish secretary, david mundell, he has said that he is devastated to hear about the fire. he also said the uk government stands ready to help financially or otherwise. also, the first minister, nicola sturgeon, she has sent out an update. she has said that they are so update. she has said that they are so relieved that there has been no loss of life here. so full of admiration and gratitude for scottish fire and rescue service, but it is difficult to find words to convey the utter devastation for the mackintosh building. and i think many people across glasgow, and further afield, willjoin her in that sentiment today. they certainly will, because it is such an important and iconic building. so significant, isn't it? we shall find out, as the day goes on, just how badly damaged it is. thank you. advice on preventing dementia will be added to the nhs health check for the first time,
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after a successful pilot project. the test, offered for free to people in england aged between a0 and 7a, focuses on reducing the risks of cardiovascular disease. earlier on breakfast, jamie waterall from public health england said evidence now shows dementia can be preventable and isn't just down to ageing. what we're trying to say is what is good for the heart is good for the brain so by taking those actions on those big risk factors like blood pressure, smoking, physical inactivity for example, you're not only benefiting your heart but you're benefiting your brain and reducing the risk of dementia in future life. theresa may says she is "disappointed" an attempt to make upskirting a criminal offence in england and wales did not progress through parliament after one of her own mps blocked it. conservatives have criticised sir christopher chope for objecting to the private member's bill. if passed, the new law would have seen offenders who secretly take photos underneath victim's clothes sentenced to up to two years in jail. i was shocked, i was angry and i was disappointed and, for the record,
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i shouted "shame" very loudly after the member objected because it seems to me this is a case where the law has not kept up to date with what's happening in the modern world so parliament needs to be flexible, and parliament needs to react. let's talk to our political correspondent, jonathan blake. good morning. it's a bit confusing. we were talking about this yesterday morning, talking to nmb you had been supporting it, —— talking to an mp who had been supporting it. they didn't seem to be any voices against it at that moment. that's right. it had support on all sides of the house and had the backing of the government. but it only took one man and one word to stop it in its tracks. sir christopher chope
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shouted object as the bill was being read out. because it was a private members bill it is something any mp can put forward and that is all it ta kes to can put forward and that is all it takes to effectively get thrown out. it will come back to parliament later. but it didn't stop mps on all sides, particularly the conservatives, voicing their reaction to christopher chope. many shouting shame. nick bowles said he was a politician whose knuckles dragged along the ground. as to why he did this, well, he hasn't spoken in public but he told one of the campaign is involved in getting this bill to parliament that he wasn't objecting to the content of the bill, in fact he didn't even know what upskirting was, it was an objection on the point of principle that this new law wasn't getting proper parliamentary debate and scrutiny. he has form on this. he has done it any other private members bills in the past. but it seems to have hardened the government's resolve to act here.
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the prime minister has said she wa nts the prime minister has said she wants other plans to make this a specific and not offence to come before parliament are very soon. thanks very much. hundreds of civilians are said to be trapped in their homes by the latest round of fighting in yemen. pro—government forces, backed by saudi arabia, are said to have the upper—hand in the battle to take the city of hudaydah. the port is a vital lifeline for aid supplies for millions of people threatened by famine. a mother seeking permission to use cannabis oil to treat her sick son has said he is in a life threatening condition. 12—year—old billy caldwell, who has been at the centre of a dispute over the use of cannabis to treat his epilepsy, has been admitted to hospital suffering from seizures. his mother, charlotte, says her son could die unless he receives cannabis oil. she travelled to canada to obtain more of the drug, which is illegal in the uk, but the supply was confiscated when she arrived at heathrow airport on monday. sinn fein could change its approach to abortion to ensure the party's mps in the irish republic support new legislation being introduced there.
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currently, it is not in favour of allowing abortion without restrictions during the first 12 weeks of pregnancy. the issue will be debated at its annual conference in belfast. the party leadership have backed the change but some members say they should be able to vote according to their conscience. you might remember earlier in the week we told you the story of trevor the peacock who was looking for love. he had been keeping residents in a county durham village awake after being on the loose for more than two weeks. and here's the reason why. shrieks. his shrieking mating call was causing sleepless nights for villagers after he was dumped by his peahen mate, bonnie. how dare she! callous woman!
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chuckles he is now set to be introduced to a new love interest called poppy. bird experts from blyth wildlife trust in northumberland spent more than an hour capturing him from a roof of a house. now, safely ensconced, ready to meet the potential new love of his life. let's hope so for all of the residents. you have upset some trevors. naga said the name trevor was not good enough for such a fla m boya nt was not good enough for such a flamboyant creature. was not good enough for such a fla m boya nt creature. lots was not good enough for such a flamboyant creature. lots of trevors have been in touch to say they are plenty flamboyant, thanks. did you say that i took my comment back? sorry, trevor, trevor, trevor. more people than that got in touch. more than half of adults say developing dementia is one of their main health worries, that's according to new data from public health england.
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now the nhs is to offer free advice on how to spot early signs of condition. it will be included as part of health checks offered every five years to those over a0. jamie waterall from public health england and gp dr farhat ahmad join us now. dr farhat, dementia is one of these things that people really worry about now, particularly from middle age. understandably there is a lot of anxiety about developing the condition. it does sound good that if you have an idea of your risk of developing the condition thereof things that you can do, actions you can take which will reduce it. that does sound good. we do health checks anyway. most gp surgeries do... that is normally for blood pressure and heart rate, isn't it? can you test for dementia? great question. simple answer, there is no one easy screening test we can do at a gp
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surgery screening test we can do at a gp surgery to say yes or no. there is advice we can give, signs we can pick up on and think, this looks looking —— this looks like it is worth looking into further. it is more complicated than that. worth looking into further. it is more complicated than thatm worth looking into further. it is more complicated than that. it is more complicated than that. it is more complicated. some people have beenin more complicated. some people have been in touch saying that you cannot predict when or if you are going to suffer with dementia, so what do these tests do in terms of preventing the onset of dementia or the risk of dementia? it isn't about testing for dementia, it's about raising that point about we can look it your risk of having a heart attack or stroke over the next ten years. simply what we are trying to do now is say that it is those same risk factors like smoking, high blood pressure, drinking, obesity, which all increase your chances of getting dementia. a third of dementia cases could be prevented. how do you know that a third of
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dementia cases could be prevented? there are strong scientific evidence coming from papers injournals which are showing us now that there is a link. there was a story that was run only this week which looked at people and these people are only moderately high blood pressure, and found that they had significant increases in chances of developing dementia, and they were outside the age group we would normally look at. and it is only moderately high. the evidence is growing a lot stronger. this isn'tjust a normal part of ageing. is this something you reflect when you are talking to patients? i'm not sure how well that would be received, if i am honest. the idea is great. the idea of being able to prevent dementia is great. we do it. we do nhs health checks. in your health check we are covering all of that. you have your blood pressure checked and we talk about cholesterol. the problem we have is
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that we are swamped. already swamped. if you are telling people these are the out for four dementia, you've got to make sure you have the subsequent things in place. —— if you are telling people these are the things to look out for for dementia. if people come forward and say that they think they might have dementia, i don't have the services in place for them to talk to. so in that way you are giving people more of a worry without helping them find a solution. it is something we are doing already. like recycling the stuff that we are already doing. but you have got to be careful you have everything in place further down the line. if it is a third that are preve nta ble, line. if it is a third that are preventable, that means a lot is not. people have been in touch are saying theirfamily not. people have been in touch are saying their family has a history of dementia and there is nothing they can do. there are certain types that are not preventable. but that one
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third is preventable, and many people in the public don't know that. what is good for the heart is good for the brain is an important message. and i certainly would want to know. grateful to both of you. it is one of these things that affects so is one of these things that affects so many families. everybody worries about it potentially. so thank you very much. there is some sunshine coming our way. nick will tell us more about it. the whee kim doesn't look too bad, does it? —— the weekend. that's right. but we have chosen a damp and cloudy weather watcher picture. it is quite damp and drizzly in respect. but there is rain around for parts of the uk, particularly this morning, clearing to sunshine showers later. the sunshine will be pleasa nt to showers later. the sunshine will be pleasant to end the day. tomorrow, more cloud, but looking drier than today. low pressure to the
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north—west of the uk, pushing through weather fronts, that is why if it is raining where you are, and the closer you are to this system the closer you are to this system the heavier the downpours around. we could see the rain moving across scotla nd could see the rain moving across scotland today. if it is dry where you are you are likely to see that, but the northern isles should stay dry. some of this rain could be heavy and thundery. northern ireland, scattered showers could be heavy after sunny conditions right 110w. heavy after sunny conditions right now. further showers which could be heavy for the midlands. sunny spells for wales in south—west england, showers following. for east anglia and the south—east, a lot of cloud, and the south—east, a lot of cloud, a lot of dry weather around. at the end of the day you will brighten up but may catch a shower. cooler here. and for most parts of the uk we are looking at temperatures between the mid—to upper teens. if you are going
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out and about, many areas will be brightening up, still some sun around. any showers will clear away. then we are dry and clear for a time overnight. tebbit is to big into single figures, particularly for eastern scotland and north east england. —— temperatures dropping to single figures. the cloud is going to increase tomorrow morning. north—east scotland and down the eastern side of england, the best place to stay dry and see some occasional bright or sunny spells. lots of cloud in the west. limited brightness here. and for wales and western parts of england, northern ireland and western parts of scotland, there will be some patchy rain at times. not amounting to much. temperature is similar. maybe a little higher than today. but it warms up as we go a little higher than today. but it warms up as we go into next week, particularly across england and wales. the north—south split at the start of the week. the further
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north, heavy winds. south of the divide, warmer and, winds. north, heavy winds. south of the divide, warmerand, winds. —— calmer winds. thanks very much. from anti—freeze to lemon coloured snails that could potentially fight cancer, the oceans of antarctica are full of unique animals that scientists hope could hold the key to some major global problems. members of the british antarctic survey in cambridge spend months diving in freezing waters. 0ur science correspondent, richard westcott, has been given special access to the creatures they bring back to study. up top, antarctica is a frozen desert. but venture beneath the ice and its waters are teeming with life. creatures that hold clues to how the animal world will cope with climate change. we have been given a rare behind—the—scenes glimpse at some of the creatures scientists have
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brought back to the uk to study and there are some bizarre animals, believe me. this is one of my favourite creatures. so it's just like the other starfish we were looking at. except one obvious and very obvious difference. can you flip it over so we can see the mouth? yeah. this one may be that it would take a whole limpet... in fact, it might well have something in their that it's feeding on. studying these animals could help save lives. from the sea spider that can grow as big as a dinner plate, to the starfish that looks a bit like bagpuss. many are full of natural antifreeze that could be useful in the medical world. the humble sea lemon has no predators. the chemical putting them off might also fight cancer or infections. so there's a range of animals within the antarctic from things
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like this to sponges and other animals that have grown on the rocks and they could potentially have really important chemicals for human society. so it's like the rainforest where you find medicines. absolutely, yes. you go through the ice and suddenly it's all pitch black and as your eyes adjust, you look up and you've got this amazing ice cover with the colours, the browns, the greens, it's like this almost cathedral—like feeling. and then obviously i sink to the bottom and start my work and i could be anywhere. living in 0 degrees waters makes these animals grow much slower and much bigger than usual. so this is the same group of animals as the woodlice you find grow in your garden but obviously one major difference, it's pretty big. and this is another example of polar gigantism, so where animals, because of the cold, because of the cold water they live in, can actually be bigger. from health and food supply to the impact of warmer oceans, these animals are helping us to understand the world our children will grow up in.
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richard westcott, bbc news, cambridge. i felt that. fascinating pictures. yes, lovely. you're watching breakfast from bbc news, time now for a look at the newspapers. the writer and columnist tim walker is here to tell us what's caught his eye. shall we start with the prime minister? i wonder if we have ever had a more enigmatic prime minister of our lifetimes, to be honest. she is revered and reviled in equal measure. we try to find out the inner theresa may. we learn over and again that she likes watching homeland. it is about survival. it
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is keeping the dysfunctional family, which is now the conservative party, somehow together. he writes about how nick clegg, when he was trying to get her to make a decision when she was at the home office, wrote almost admirably in his memoirs about her extraordinary art form that she makes of inertia. sometimes honestly, i think inertia is a great asset to have. the prime minister that was going to lead this country through brexit, it was always a tha nkless through brexit, it was always a thankless task. it is pretty accepted or assumed that this is an interim job, isn't it? i accepted or assumed that this is an interimjob, isn't it? i interviewed ming campbell once, and he said the tragedy with theresa may is that we will never know what prime minister she could be. we remember the speech she could be. we remember the speech she made, talking about a new vision for society. but because of this single issue she has been stuck with it and all of the arguments that go with it. sadly that will be her
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monument. the other question is, who would want the job at the moment? either side. indeed. a piece about stretchy skin in the sun. this appears to be a major scientific breakthrough on the basis of a few paragraphs in the sun. but this is a story about some scientists at university in saudi arabia have developed artificial skin which is stretcha ble, developed artificial skin which is stretchable, and even feels things, and is self—healing it has extraordinary applications. it says it can be used in the throat box and transmit sounds. for burns victims. exactly, and plastic surgery. it could be extraordinary and it could revolutionise science. 0ther could be extraordinary and it could revolutionise science. other written that paper i would have made a big song and dance of it and put it on the front. -- ifi song and dance of it and put it on the front. -- if i was in charge of that paper. it can stretch up to
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3000% of its size and reduce back to its original shape. and it can conduct electricity... it's an amazing achievement. they don't talk much about it. the skin is the biggest organ of the body. if they have developed artificial skin which actually works, i don't know, i could have a new face every now and again. and the fact it can feel. absolutely. you will have two convince me about the merits of this story. i love animals, i love animal stories, but the rough guide to speaking fluent dog. at the university of salford they have, apparently, got 37 dogs and their owners to take part in this study. they have tried to find out how to speak in dog language. the sadness of this story is the language they have managed to translate is not extraordinarily surprising. when a dog rolls on its back it means,
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scratch me. if it holds its paw up, it wants its toy. and jumping up and down means, open the door. you would have thought they would use the word please every now and again. holding the paw like that means get my toy. 0pen the paw like that means get my toy. open the door come on the left here, when they jump up. and when you do that, tickle my tummy. 0r scratch me, yeah. tummy. or scratch me, yeah. it does give you paws for thought! chuckles you have an animal mad this morning. but the piece we saw in the antarctic from richard westcott. you cannot go wrong. i cover the south—west of england in my dayjob. i know when the shark stories start summer is here. you are quite right. and it is also the hottest day of
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the year, then the coldest day of the year, then the coldest day of the year, then the coldest day of the year, as you will know as a journalist. this is not a man eater, but it is a relation. very handsome. indeed. it was caught off wales. in environmentally minded chap. he put it back in the sea. if i was a swimmer around there, i don't know ifi swimmer around there, i don't know if i would be hugely grateful. but not a man eater. true, but i would not a man eater. true, but i would not want to come across it if i was swimming. we had jaws for thought now we have jaws for thought. chuckles this would freak me out. —— we had paws for thought now we have jaws for thought. this is doctor -- this
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is octopods, it is raining octopods. thanks for that. stay with us, headlines coming up. hello, this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and jon kay. coming up before ten, nick will bring you the weekend weather. mike will bring us the important sport. but first a summary of this morning's main news. a fire has devastated glasgow's world —famous school of art. the alarm was raised just after 11 o'clock last night and the mackintosh building was said to have been engulfed by flames within minutes. it was undergoing a multi—million pound restoration project following a similar blaze four years ago. earlier we spoke to the chief officer of the scotland fire and rescue service who described the fire's impact. this building has extensive damage.
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it is damaged in every part of the building. every part has been involved in the fire. i think people and the citizens of glasgow and further afield need to be prepared for what they will see in the next few hours which is a very seriously damaged building. earlier bbc scotland's arts correspondent, pauline mclean told us about the historical significance of the building. we have come through the whole period of rebuilding and drawing the money together for the campaign to restore the building and we were just weeks away from being given access to the building again, particularly the library which was so badly damaged and had to be restored and repaired. we were about to have one last glimpse before the building packed up and got ready for the final stage before it completely reopened in the spring or summer of next year. this is shocking news that it has all been put back. the other amazing, horrible piece of timing isjusta
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other amazing, horrible piece of timing isjust a week other amazing, horrible piece of timing is just a week and other amazing, horrible piece of timing isjust a week and a half other amazing, horrible piece of timing is just a week and a half ago it was the 150th anniversary of the birth of charles rennie mackintosh and there have been a lot of events to celebrate that and it is a work of art but also a working arts school and that has always been really important. it's a bike because it is surrounded by people who understand its importance, who use it every day, studying in it, tourists can visit, it was very much a living building. i think that is why people have taken it so much to heart and will be so heartbroken to heart and will be so heartbroken to hear that it has been put back so dramatically. theresa may says she is "disappointed" an attempt to make upskirting a criminal offence in england and wales did not progress through parliament after one of her own mps blocked it. conservatives have criticised sir christopher chope for objecting to the private member's bill. if passed, the new law would have seen offenders who secretly take photos underneath victim's clothes sentenced to up to two years in jail. hundreds of civilians are said to be
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trapped in their homes by the latest round of fighting in yemen. pro—government forces, backed by saudi arabia, are said to have the upper—hand in the battle to take the city of hudaydah. the port is a vital lifeline for aid supplies for millions of people threatened by famine. a mother seeking permission to use cannabis oil to treat her sick son has said he is in a life—threatening condition. 12—year—old billy caldwell, who has been at the centre of a dispute over the use of cannabis to treat his epilepsy, has been admitted to hospital, suffering from seizures. his mother, charlotte, says her son could die unless he receives cannabis oil. she travelled to canada to obtain more of the drug, which is illegal in the uk, but the supply was confiscated when she arrived at heathrow airport on monday. advice on the prevention of dementia will be added to the nhs health check for the first time following a successful pilot project. the test is offered for free to people in england aged between a0 and 7a and currently focusses on reducing the risks of cardiovascular disease.
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experts say choices that improve the health of the heart can also help the brain. cycling just under 22 miles in one hour might not sound that impressive. it sounds good to me! this is even more impressive. but it was a new british record for the endurance athlete mark beaumont. we spoke to him yesterday. that's because he did it on a penny farthing, covering 21.91 miles at the herne hill velodrome in london. the british record had stood for 127 years but beaumont was 300 yards short of breaking the world record, which is even older. it must be so frustrating, just a few yards short! he was absolutely exhausted. last year he became the fastest person to cycle 18,000 miles around the world although he did so on a modern bike.
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a lot of records and i wonder what records are being broken in the world cup. more from cristiano ronaldo, the first person in history to score at eight successive tournaments come all the way back to 200a but he is a team player because he tweeted, come on, family. very much a team effort even though he pretty much got the draw against spain on his own. i wonder if we're looking at a record number of goals for this part of the tournament. no goalless draws at the moment and hopefully none to come. today we'll get a chance to see lionel messi in action, but last night it was all about cristiano ronaldo. he scored a hat—trick as portugal drew 3—3 with spain in their opening group game. elsewhere, there were late wins for uruguay and iran but friday's headlines were written by ronaldo, as ben croucher reports. not all heroes wear capes.
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some wear the number seven. cristiano ronaldo, a man whose talents are spelt out, who superpowers have this world cup at his feet. and the world cup sees cristiano ronaldo at his absolutely scintillating best. that best came in book ending a breathtaking contest against spain, winning and scoring winning and scoring a fourth—minute penalty. in diego costa, though, spain have a striker built with strength and a sixth sense of where the goal is. ronaldo was not letting him hog the limelight. this effort proved david de gea's kryptonite and portugal were ahead again. as costa equalised, this game was fast becoming a world cup classic. all it needed was a goal to match. and driven into the back of the net! an absolute peach of a goal by nacho to put spain in front! no topping that, right? remember that portuguese superhero? it's ronaldo. 0h, he's done it!
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he has only gone and done it! 3—3, tres—tres, a thriller in any language. sometimes defensive teams win but i'm happy we can watch games like this where two team really going for it and hopefully an amazing world cup is coming ahead. elsewhere in the group, iran against morocco was not going to live up to that. it did give the fans and excuse to dig out the face paints but offered little in the way of artistry. the game's only goal came in stoppage time, morocco's aziz bouhaddouz with the header at the wrong end. flat on the canvas. the artwork in yekaterinburg was more like it but egypt's mo salah painted a gloomy figure. benched on his birthday, unable to shoulder any blame. for all of uruguay‘s firepower, a defender was their hero. jose gimenez giving the two—time champions a 1—0 win.
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iam sure i am sure mo salah will get his chance. peru will be making their first appearance, at a world cup in 36 years. they take on denmark in saransk, later this afternoon. already the peruvian fans have been making a name for themselves in russia, helping a wedding couple celebrate their marriage. it's estimated around a0,000 peruvians have made the journey over for this once in a generation experience. now, if you needed any further proof of the power of football and what a world cup goal can do in bringing people together, just watch what it means uruguay. every school there has cancelled their normal lessons so they can cheer on the team and these were the scenes after their country's late goal went in to beat egypt in their opening match. absolute pandemonium at this school in montevideo. pupils pouring out into the playground, unbridled joy, screaming and running around without any worry of detention. they eventually come back in! no danger of detention and all lessons cancelled! there was a lot of sugar
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in those kids! so today kicks off with one of the favourites, france, against australia. that's on bbc one. argentina against iceland is at 2pm, with the first ever meeting between peru and denmark at 5pm. the late kick—off sees croatia open their tournament against nigeria. probably not with their traditional chickens, they have not been able to ta ke chickens, they have not been able to take them into the stadium. that game on 5 live. archilles the psychic cat has done it again after using his taste buds to predict russian beating saudi arabia, he went onto to correctly call that iran would beat morroco. he only forecasts games, taking place in his home city of st petersberg, he's top of the animal prediction league and put his rival r2d2, known as the psychic sausage, in his place. he's known for sniffing a result but his winning run is over. for the confused hound, who ate all the spanish chorizo,
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but didn't go near the portugese sardines but this prediction, that spain would win, was undone by ronaldo's free kick. i have to tell you about the mystic ferrets. ferrets? not ferrets, meerkats! judging by this, either there is a lot of goals going into there is a lot of goals going into the england net or they are predicting an england win. or maybe there were no treats in the tunisian goal? it is a very even contest. england are going to win. fake news comes to mind! how dare you doubt the psychic animals?! world number one dustin johnson, is the only player under par at the halfway point, of the us open with a host of big names failing to even make the cut. included in that bunch
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is rory mcilroy who finished on ten over par — 1a shots off the lead. also missing this weekend are tiger woods, sergio garcia and jason day, but english trio justin rose, ian poulter and tommy fleetwood are just five off the pace. mention penalties to any england fan and they will break out in a cold sweat. you don't need any animals to predict that! but when it comes to the knock out stage in russia, matches could once again be decided by a penalty shoot out, and england know the pain like no other nation. 1990, 96, 98, 200a, 2006 and 2012. however, it doesn't have to be this way, and to help i've been to learn from the best penalty taker of all time. face to face with the best penalty taker the game has ever seen in this showdown at 12 yards. in all his professional career, matt le tissier missed just one of a9 penalties but even though i did not stand a chance, he was not brave enough to look me in the eye! i went the right way. until i realised why. i did not like to make eye contact with the goalkeeper at all,
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i did not want to give him any clues so my focus would be on the ball orjust above it so i could see what the goalkeeper was doing and what his movements were like, if he went to early. for me, this alone did not make much difference. oh no. you need to be at that angle, not this angle. the run—up is quite slow and before the ball you almost accelerate into it and get the speed on the ball. post! practice your technique side footing the ball accurately. there we go! matt believes that, like me, the current young england side will have learned from the past and the nightmares of penalty shoot out defeats, like the one manager gareth southgate was part of in 1996.
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you have to work really hard on dismissing all the negative thoughts that go through your head when you're stepping up to take a penalty. i used to imagine the crowd erupting when i scored the penalty. yes! sent the keeper the wrong way. i have relegated to ball boy as the youngsters from the fa skill school learn from the best penalty taker of all time. strike it as hard as you can with the inside of the foot. don't worry about him moving. go to the goalkeeper‘s left! sent the keeper the wrong way! there you go. if this is the future, penalty pain will surely be the scourge of previous generations. he said don't worry about where the keeper is going but hit the corner. don't look at where you're going to go. aim to know where you're going and you can shoot there and the goalkeeper can go the other way.
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full of confidence but still a bit haunted by the past... how do we think england are going to do in a penalty shoot out? terrible! terrible?! ‘s this is where you need to start, the age you need to be training people to get good at penalties. and one—year—old reuben sent the goalkeeper the wrong way! kane and company, i hope you're watching! england should be ok by 2038. england should be ok by 2038. england go out on penalties in the quarter finals england go out on penalties in the quarterfinals this time england go out on penalties in the quarter finals this time it would probably be regarded as a success for them. don't say that! not yet! thank you. england fans might feel their team has been "stitched up" at past world cups but the bbc took that phrase more literally when making trailers for the current tournament. the short animation, called "history will be made",
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was created using 600 hundred frames embroidered with 227,000 metres of thread. in a moment we'll pin down two of the people behind it. first, let's take a look at history in the making. music: alex baranowski with the london metropolitan 0rchestra featuring sirjohn tomlinson — 0chi chernye # 0chi chornyje # 0chi strasnyje # 0chi zhguchije i prikrasnyje
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# kak ljublju ja vas # kak bajusj ya vas # znatj uvidjil vas ja vdrobryi chas # kak ljublju ja vas #. i assumed it was just cartoons but we have the proof in our hands. this is one of the sequences, harry kane at the back. i have another one. this is lionel messi and ronaldo. we can talk to the people behind it, james cross is the creative director for bbc creative and james parry, the head of marketing at bbc sport. when you are sitting around thinking
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about this, did you think that this much work would be worth it? it is stunning. a lot of work. there was a lot involved. but it was a real labour of love in the last few months. and it has been fantastic the way the audiences have reacted. 0ther broadcasters as well also do you think people know it is a tapestry? when people first see it, they asked the question. when we followed up with the film, the level of craft involved has really taken be blowback. why tapestry? -- taken people aback. you think of russia and you might think of russian dolls or ballet but you went for tapestry. it was a case of getting away from the obvious russian queues. we looked at the big exploration of
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russian culture and found in folklore a lot of the people in russia would traditionally make these dresses and waistcoats with fantastic embroidered stories on them. that to us was a brilliant way to do it. that is the one we have got here. the one we'd just so awful thatis got here. the one we'd just so awful that is messi and ronaldo. how did it work that you are the one we've gotjust here. it was a labour of love asjames gotjust here. it was a labour of love as james says, gotjust here. it was a labour of love asjames says, designing each frame individually and there are 604 altogether. you take them and we gave them to the london embroidery company about something like ten sewing machines going 23 hours a day for three weeks in order to stitch each one. each frame as different levels of the red and we had to have conversations about the thickness
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certain stitches —— different levels of thread. the football is a piece of thread. the football is a piece of leather sewn on. you are like sewing specialists now! we worked with them, fair to say! how does it translate into the promotions we are seeing? we then take them all these frames, and we had to photograph each one and then it is putting them together to a fluid motion. the easy way to do it would've been a cgi. would it been easier and cheaper? certainly easier but i don't think we would get anywhere near as much attention as we have if we done that. it really was a labour of love and what we have and the coverage we have had in the past week has been, it has made it worthwhile. what is going to happen to it afterwards? there are a lot of different things,
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the film you have seen is pretty much the starting point. the thought is that history will be made at every world cup throws up its own iconic moment. we have captured that within the film and created also a seven metre tapestry that is in the football museum in manchester, we presented that earlier this week and it looks incredible. you can see that now and after the world cup we will find out what the iconic moment is and we will add to it. the whole feeling of it will be taken through a lot of the bbc sport output over the next month or so and we have also had contact from a gallery in moscow that also wants to take it on and we have sent them some of the pieces and that will be exhibited in moscow. iconic moment, england lifting the world cup. that would be amazing! you're leaving a gap at the end for that? optimistically! thank you forjoining us. beautiful piece of work. coffee coasters? maybe not! we can talk to nick to find out what
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is happening with the weather and it is happening with the weather and it is going to brighten up. it is actually raining quite heavily in parts of scotland. not a brilliant start the weekend but where it is and when you did see some sunnier weather coming through later. this is the view from wales where we have seen cloud and outbreaks of rain and also in northern england. some wet weather around even though it brightens up later, more others stayed dry tomorrow but not much sunshine. low pressure of a computer and the closer you are to wit, the heavier the rain and particularly in scotland. the downpours moving slowly eastwards already. there's a band of showers moving across northern ireland. northern england getting some showers from the end of
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the rain but it will brighten up. the bulk of the rain in scotland and maybe the far north of the northern isles. elsewhere for england and wales, a few showers with some sunny spells in the afternoon. a lot of cloud holding on across much of east anglia and south—east england and it is all until later in the day when it is cooler particularly in the breeze. tonight, initially some showers, maybe a couple reaching east anglia and south—east england but then they are gone and it is quiet for a time overnight and temperatures dip under clear skies. when it stays clear for longest, maybe around four or 5 degrees. 0thers work cloud increasing from the west again so a weaker system coming in tomorrow. let's have a look at sunday, some early sunshine the further east you are, so many bessborough sunny spells in
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north—east scotland. cloud increasing in the east, mainly dry, from the cloud there will be some patchy rain around in the west. it will be drier in scotland compared to today. as for the temperatures, the mid to upper teens up to about 20 degrees in south—east england and it will get warmer next week, particularly in southern parts. still fairly unsettled for a time in scotla nd still fairly unsettled for a time in scotland and northern ireland but through the week, it looks like all of us will settle down. this is how the whee kim is shaping up, some wet weather had some sunny spells coming through as —— how the weekend is shaping up. enjoy the rest of your weekend. if you are planning to go to a school fete today, you are not alone. over the next few weeks, millions of pounds will be raised from the sale of tombola tickets, bric—a—brac and home—baked cakes. but one school in kent has caused a stir by taking a more 21st century
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approach to fund—raising. it has published an online wish list asking parents to donate basic items like stationery and even toilet paper. let's talk about this in more detail with anna macgowan, who is a parent and blogger, and steve marsland, who is a head teacher. the fact that a school is asking pa rents to the fact that a school is asking parents to donate them it is almost like a wedding list. can you imagine a situation where a school would be in that position? evidently varies. when i was a young boy, we had the school fete and we raised money but not for essential items. we had a pta meeting for our summer fair, not for essential items. we had a pta meeting for our summerfair, it is for playground markings which are not really essential but great to have. normally it is to raise money
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for extras. yes, but for toilet paper and pencils and paper, it is getting a bit desperate. how does it go down with parents? had he been asked to give money before? not for toilet paper but our school is to do a scheme where you could do a standing order and some parents did it. i think it feels a bit weird. in our school, and i think it has always been the case, you have a mixed community and the best thing is to organise something that is fun and everyone can get involved and you can raise some money for the you might be specific about what it is for, in our school recently it was for, in our school recently it was for cove rs for, in our school recently it was for covers for the bike park because it is manchester and it rains all the time. i suppose you could have a fairorfund raising the time. i suppose you could have a fair or fund raising money for lewell— buck i think fair or fund raising money for lewell—buck i think you would just be crying all the way you round! it isjust weird —— for toilet roll.
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the government says core school funding will rise to a record £a3.5 billion by 2020, the highest ever, with 50% more per pupil in real terms compared to 2000 and impact this year a typical primary school will get 130,000. local authorities are getting more money for every school this year. so are you miss spending it? what they don't tell you is unfortunately, because of the cutbacks with local authorities, it means that services become stretched and tightand means that services become stretched and tight and disappear and the schools still have to have a speech therapist or a psychotherapist for children's mental health, and because they are not in the local authorities you have defined the money to buy them in, that is what schools are having to do. and after the ten years of no pay rises, we
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have just got a pay increase of 1%, that comes from the same budget. inflation rate has gone up. increase is not line with inflation. yes, there is more money coming but there are very serious concerns there is more money coming but there are very serious concerns in schools about the quality of the services that are available. with life so busy and a lot parents working and all sorts of demands on your time, i just wonder whether this approach are going online and clicking to buy stuff for the school might be prefera ble stuff for the school might be preferable for some people than having to bake cakes every friday and turn up for this and that. having to bake cakes every friday and turn up for this and thatm can be tedious stuff. i always rememberthe yearwhen my can be tedious stuff. i always remember the year when my fella agreed to do the tombola stall, he only had to do an hour, and at the
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end of it he said he would rather give the school a cheque for £100 every year than do that again! that is how it should be. most schools are doing it, there should be a range of ways to do it. the fact is it needs to be done. it does and i wonder what theresa may would say about that school in kent in her constituency. i wonder what she would say about the fact that school is doing that. to be honest, if we arejudged on the is doing that. to be honest, if we are judged on the quality of our tombola prizes it has begun a divisive system! my parents cannot afford to have direct debits to get out for pencils and pens and goodness knows what else. the system is going to get wider in terms of those who have and have not. we had to leave it there but thank you very much for coming in. ifeel like to leave it there but thank you very much for coming in. i feel like we are in saturday morning detention! that's all we've got time for this morning on breakfast. chris and sally will be here
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from 6am tomorrow here on bbc one. until then, whatever you do, have a good day. bye— bye. this is bbc news. the headlines at ten: one of scotland's architectural landmarks — the glasgow school of art — goes up in flames, for the second time in four years. people, citizens of glasgow, and people further afield need to be prepared for what they see in the next few hours, which is a seriously damaged building. the mother of 12—year—old billy caldwell who wants to use cannabis oil to treat him says he is in a life threatening condition. "disappointment" from the prime minister as a conservative mp blocks legislation to make upskirting a criminal offence. also in the next hour... a crucial game for england's rugby players — and a stunning goal from ronaldo in the 2018 world cup. commentator:
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