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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  June 17, 2018 6:00am-7:01am BST

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hello this is breakfast, with chris mason and sally nugent. theresa may announces a five year plan to pump billions more into the nhs. she says the extra spending will be partly paid for by a brexit dividend, but there could be tax rises. we are making the nhs our priority. we are making the nhs our priority. we are making the nhs our priority. we are putting the significant amount of extra money into it, we need to make sure that money is spent wisely. good morning, it's sunday 17thjune. also this morning: pressure grows for a change in the law, after the government allows a boy with severe epilepsy to be treated with an illegal form of cannabis oil. here in valencia in spain, the first of the ship carrying the sum of the
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630 migrants and refugees has arrived in port in the last few minutes after a 1500 kilometre journey. and in sport, iceland produce another remarkable result, this time at their first ever world cup, as they 1—1 with argentina as lionel messi misses a penalty. and nick has the weather. good morning, a mainly cloudy day ahead, while some of us will remain dry, there will be patchy rain gci’oss dry, there will be patchy rain across western parts of the uk. not going to be as wet as it was for some of us it yesterday. join me for the full forecast, a little later on. good morning. first, our main story. theresa may has announced new funding for the nhs in england. it will mean an extra £20 billion a year by the end of a five year plan. the prime minister said some of the funds would come from money the uk will no longer have to pay into the eu budget after brexit. but she hinted the rest may have to come from higher taxation. our health editor hugh pym has more details. with pressure mounting on the nhs,
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demands for a funding boost were intensified theresa may made it clear she wanted to come up for a long—term plan for the nhs in england, which remove the need for annual last—minute budget top ups. in recent weeks there have been some kinds acrimonious talks between the health secretary and generally halt, calling for increases from the chancellor. the new plan covers the next five years. will involve average annual increases of 3.4% in real terms of. the budget the day—to—day running costs is about £115 billion this year, under the plan there will be £20 billion more by 2023. theresa may says some of the funding will be found from money saved arthur —— after brexit and some probably from higher taxes. what i am announcing it will mean that in 2023 there will be about
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£600 million a week in cash, more in cash, going into the nhs. of course we have got to find that money. that will be through the brexit dividend. the fact that we are no longer spending vast amounts of money every year to the eu once we leave the eu and we as a country will be contributing a bit more. ahead of nhs england simon stephens, said the settle m e nt nhs england simon stephens, said the settlement provided the funding new to shape a long—term plan for key improvements in services. but the health foundation think tank argued it was not enough to address the fundamental challenges facing the nhs. and you can see more of that interview with the prime minister on the andrew marr show a 9 o'clock on bbc one. campaigners are calling for medicinal cannabis to be made legally available in the uk, after the home secretary intervened to help a 12 year old suffering from epilepsy. sajid javid granted billy caldwell the right to use cannabis oil, after he was admitted to hospital with extreme seizures. simonjones reports. 0f
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of the family spite that they hope will benefit not just of the family spite that they hope will benefit notjust billy caldwell, but others like him. on monday they flew back into britain with cannabis oil bought in canada —— canada to treat epilepsy, but he campaigned an ingredient which is anti—. the drug which has kept his seizures under control for more than a year was confiscated. days later he was back in hospital. the home secretary has now intervened, allowing billy to use the oil, but his mother says that is not enough. my his mother says that is not enough. my experience throughout this leaves me in no doubt that the home office can no longer play a role, in fact, play any role in the administration of medication for sick children in oui’ of medication for sick children in our country. sajid javid, though, has not announced a change in the law. he said... but those who have been helping to
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ca re but those who have been helping to care for billy caldwell believe sajid javid needs to go further. from here it is a ripple effect. this means to me that there is hope, not just for this means to me that there is hope, notjust for billy, this means to me that there is hope, not just for billy, which this means to me that there is hope, notjust for billy, which is why this can paint is so important. it is for all the families who need it. the family of six old alfie bingley have appealed to the premise that for the same access to cannabis trimmed for his epilepsy and say it would be cruel to delay it any further. some experts point out that the use of marijuana for medical conditions isn't always a way straightforward. billy has been granted a special 20 day licence for cannabis oil, what happens after that and two others, is unclear. and we'll be talking to billy's mum charlotte at around twenty to eight. firefighters have spent a second night at the scene of a huge blaze at the glasgow school of art. it's the second fire to engulf the famous mackintosh building
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in four years. officials say the flames have now largely been extinguished, but small pockets remain. a nightclub and a music venue nearby have also been damaged. russian police are questioning the driver of a taxi which ran into a crowd of people in central moscow. it's believed some of the eight people injured were mexican football fans visiting the city for the world cup. it's not clear whether the collision was a deliberate act or an accident. sajid javid has revealed he was the victim of a moped mugging shortly before he was appointed home secretary. in an interview with the sun on sunday newspaper, mrjavid said he was about to make a call when thieves rode on to the pavement and grabbed his phone. he said the incident left him "angry and upset" and he was hoping to give police more power to pursue moped thieves. it is six minutes past six. that have a look at some of the newspapers. i am going to start with
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the sunday express. like lots of the papers this morning, they are leading on the same story we have. this announcement that we heard from theresa may yesterday, it has only come out today. the interview took place yesterday. they are saying on the front of the express, £600 million week in the brexit onus for the nhs. she position this money yesterday as a consequence of exit. and there will be those who make the argument that it is, the idea of a brexit dividend is a myth because of the likely cost associated might be greater than the money saved. that will be an argument which we will return to. the sunday times, the striking picture of charlotte caldwell and her 12—year—old son billy. will be talking to charlotte little later on breakfast. —— we will be. the decision yesterday from the home secretary to grant him the access to that medicine, the
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medicinal cannabis that he requires. i have a big pile of papers here, i will pass you a view. —— few. i have a big pile of papers here, i will pass you a view. -- few. let's have a look at the front page of the observer. again, the same story we are talking about, i want to show you that picture, that very, very striking picture taking yesterday, heartbreaking fire. we will be talking to our correspondence wise there are a little later on this morning. it is desperately sad, just four years after the last fire there and so much work to place their to repair everything and there we have, it has been on fire again the. and looking at the sun on sunday. the sun suggesting that he might have
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found new love with his personal assistant. hundreds of migrants who've been at the centre of a row between european countries over where they should go are due to arrive in spain shortly. both italy and malta has refused to take them after they were picked up off the coast of libya. our europe correspondent, damian grammaticas is in valencia for us. morning queue, damien. this is very much on to be happening while we are on airthis much on to be happening while we are on air this morning. —— going to be. the first of the boat is there?m has just arrived in the last ten or 15 minutes. this is the aquarius, an italian coastguard vessel. those 630 people rescued by the aquarius a week ago in those waters between libya and italy were transferred to three different ships. there is some on the aquarius, which is offshore, to more italian coastguard vessel.
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around 260 odd are here now. this is a week after they were rescued in the middle of the mediterranean because italy and malta refused them entry. they may be sitting on —— 1500 kilometre journey to valencia to find a port. the authorities here, the government in spain, the new government had said it would welcome them and said it is a humanitarian obligation to take people in and assess their claims to asylum. we are going to start to see in the next few minutes people starting to come off. they have literally brought down the plank to start at. what will happen to those people once they are there? what the spanish government has said is that they will come off. there is a huge tea m they will come off. there is a huge team in place to deal with them. 2500 people, that includes 1000 red cross volunteers, 400 translators.
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because we know there are 26 different nationalities amongst those 630 refugees and migrants. they will have their medical needs assessed first. anybody who needs to go to hospital will go straight there because somewhere in a pretty poor condition when they were picked up poor condition when they were picked up from their dinghy. then they will be disbursed while their claims are being investigated. thanks very much indeed. —— disbursed. —— dispersed. will keep you up—to—date as the main boat comes in and the processing of those people as they come off the boat and also talking about what is go to happen to the next. we go to talk to damien throughout the morning. check on the weather. expect a good deal of cloud. some of us had a very
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wet saturday, particularly in scotland. for the day, although there is a bit of rain, it would be there is a bit of rain, it would be the same intensity we saw yesterday. the shower is possible just about anywhere today but i think particularly across western parts of the uk. patchy rain from all of the cloud that is coming in at the moment. on the satellite which is coming in from the south—west which means the further north—east you are, you're going to see some sunny spells. or even here, cloud is going to increase. very limited sunshine. this is how the day is going to play out. already we see a bit of light rain affecting parts of south—west england and wales. as the cloud spread east, they few dots of light blue. chance of catching a shower story many eastern areas, will hold on dry weather. still a few sunny spells, east scotland. from the cloud at the debit of patchy rain sta rts cloud at the debit of patchy rain starts to appear in north—east england, northern ireland and later in the day towards western scotland as well. from the temperatures you
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can see miller is particularly warm. getting close to 24 some into aberdeenshire, parts of eastern england, but most of us for a few degrees short of that and the breeze sta rts degrees short of that and the breeze starts to pick up. it is a process that continues tonight and into tomorrow. it is increasingly breezy. this evening we take more this patchy rain further east, if you are looking for something in southern england, barely anything on the way. later in the night, the cloud begins to clear out. temperatures are not dropping too far. may see into northern scotland some single figures but across the south—east england, holding around 15 or 16 degrees going into monday morning. monday will be a breezy day. some sunny spells around, particularly during the first part of the day, as you can see. the wind picks up further in northern scotland and northern ireland is the wind gust of around 15 mph or so. some outbreaks
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of rain moving into parts of northern ireland, north—west england and later into western areas of scotland. some of that rain into western scotland could turn heavier late in the day. it is a northwest southeast spurt in terms of weather and capricious. that rain towards the north—west, 12 degrees. some really warm sunshine coming to across parts of south—east england, temperatures heading towards the mid— 20s. that northwest southeast split will continue during the first half of the week ahead and then settle down later on. it has british summer settle down later on. it has british summer written all over it. 40 minutes past. —— 14. his name is synonymous with home innovations, but sirjames dyson is notjust a billionaire vacuum cleaner inventor. he is also one of the largest owners of farmland in the uk. sirjames, who is an outspoken supporter of brexit, thinks he has come up with a way of transforming how we farm
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after we leave the eu. countryfile's tom heap was given an exclusive look at the scheme. we know brexit poses challenges for ukfarming and we know brexit poses challenges for uk farming and food production, but the westminster government says it does have a plan. it outlines a more dynamic and self—reliant agricultural industry where technology helps to boost productivity and farmers collaborate more to make the business more profitable and competitive. one landowner embracing this vision of future farming is sirjames dyson. he may be better known for his household technological revolutions, but he is also helping change the face of modern agriculture. he has given us exclusive access to see that change in action. is perhaps not surprising that innovation is right at its heart. a use this to
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develop technology to make farming more efficient and profitable and use fewer chemicals and things that damaged the soil. it is high—tech for low input. exactly that, yes. it is not just for low input. exactly that, yes. it is notjust with the latest technology where he believes he is ahead of the curve. we have built 95 miles of hedging, 15 converse of dry stone wall, repairing the ditches, about 650 pairs. —— hectares of. all this increases the biodiversity, next the farm. is improvements have cost him next the farm. is improvements have cost hi m £75 next the farm. is improvements have cost him £75 million, so can the typical uk farmer ford to keep up? colin chapple's farm is a tiny fraction of the size of james'. colin chapple's farm is a tiny fraction of the size ofjames'. he believes small farmers will need to band together in the future. we are going to have to cut costs or share machinery, share farming, why not?
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are farmers go to embrace that?” think we are going to have to, we have no alternative. although sir james runs once —— one of the uk's largest farming businesses, it still depends on subsidies. so with plans to change how farming is supported after brexit, will this multimillionaire still be able to afford to farm? i think we pay farmers an equivalent amount of money, that of which european farmers are getting, for being good farmers. that is a perfectly good way to give subsidies. if we don't get grants, we cannot grow food, we have to do something else on the land. it seems whatever your size of farm, the future will still mean subsidies if uk agriculture is to compete with other nations. you can see the full report tonight.
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a big exclusive. we'll have all the headlines at 6:30, but first it's time for the film review with jane hill and mark kermode. hello and welcome to the film review on bbc news. to take us through this week's cinema releases is mark kermode. so mark, what do we have this week? we have ocean's 8, stanley a man of variety, a passion project of timothy spall, and rupert everett‘s the happy prince which is an oad to the last days of oscar wilde. ocean's eight, is it fun? it is fun. i went in feeling rather ambiguous about it, because actually, the ocean sequels have got progressively worse. this is an all female gang planning an audacious jewellery heist. they want to steal a famous necklace from a famous neck. they have got to rope in a fashion designer,
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played by helena bonham carter. here is a clip. how did i get here? you spent 18 million dollars in two years and had two houseboats on the seine. i'm old. you're not old. and i'm going to prison. not necessarily. we could make all of this go away. even get your passport back. how? dress daphne kluger for the met ball. are you mad? no, hang on a minute. are you journalists? absolutely not. absolutely not! the thing about this is, it zips along, it is kind
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of fun, it's frothy. it is not much in the way of substance, but you do not go to a oceans movie looking for substance. i really enjoyed watching this. i thought it was, you know people say, popcorn entertainment, generally a phrase i hate, but that was what it was like. it was breezy. it zipped along at a good pace, and suddenly, james cordon turns up, and he appears to be playing james cordon. there was a gag aboutjulia roberts' character impersonating julia roberts, and i wondered if they were going to refer to him as james corden. i enjoyed it more than i expected to, and i went in with fairly lowered expectations, thinking, has this series run its course? and it is not a waste of all that talent?
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because there are some genuinely fantastic people in this. i love cate blanchett, sandra bullock's great. yes, a really good cast. it is like one of those variety spectacular movies anyway, wherever you look there is a famous person. i enjoyed it, and you know how grumpy i can be. i read a thing that said it was too many cameos, but that didn't annoy you? it didn't. i felt generally well disposed towards it, except when james corden was being james corden. sta nley. this is brilliant. timothy spall is brilliant. he is good in many roles. psychological chiller devised by timothy spall. he is incarcerated in a bizarre kind of prison where he appears to be for a very long time.
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he is obsessed with old variety comedians like max wall. he desperately wants to go out and visit a loved one's grave, and all of these characters come and visit him, and they are all played by timothy spall. that is why it is called stanley a man of variety. at the beginning you cannot really understand what is going on. it reminded me a little bit of tideland. a few people reviewing it has said that it is kind of a feature length of version of the league of gentlemen. it is also a bit like funny bones. people have forgotten about that. it is not for everyone. there is no question about that, but i have seen it a couple of times, and timothy spall is great in it. it is one of the very few movies in which a single actor could win an award for best ensemble cast, the whole ensemble being him. it is a curiosity. it is very strange, it is very, very odd, and quite creepy. i think it has got something,
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but i am not quite sure what it is. definitely want to see and judge yourself. the third choice this week, the happy prince. i found that such a sad film. inevitably so. rupert everett, writing, starring and producing, as well. a film about the final years and days of oscar wilde. having spent time in prison for indecency, he comes out of prison and goes abroad.
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his friends rally round to some extent, but his health is declining, his finances are ruined. his reputation is in tatters, and he is estranged from his family, which breaks his heart. here is a clip. constance... my dear, good, beautifulwife. there is nothing i can ever say that will undo the great hurt that i have caused you. we both know that. for two years, i have lain on hard boards, knelt on cold stone, dined on shame and thought of little else. you and my sons are the only things in my life. worried not for the hope that one day i would meet you all again, i don't think i could go on. my desire to live, dearest constance, is as intense as ever. although my heart is broken, hearts are made to be broken. that is why god sends sorrow to the world. write to me as soon as you can, and tell me that i am still your oscar.
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there it is interesting, because it shows you the religion, but it is that strange balance between tragedy and humour. there is humour in here, but a huge amount of tragedy. it is interesting how it juggles those elements. i felt it did so rather successfully. i thought it was very, very interesting visually, and it was quite dreamlike, which i liked. i love the fact that it is about the final years, because people watching will think they know everything about oscar wilde, but actually, nobody talks about what happened once he was... once he left prison and had to leave the country, and that is why it is interesting. did you feel that it managed
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to juggle the different time frames? one of the ways it is clever, is the way it goes to his past and his presence. it does that rather well, and that can be very complicated. i always felt there was an emotional call through it. it made emotional sense. i felt that worked, i felt it worked. in the whole dreamlike state, and how much of that because he was terribly ill, and who knows what lotions and potions he was on to try and alleviate his symptoms, and that all tied into it. there is a hallucinatory sense to it. and there is an intangible anger about the way he was mistreated. although the film never shouted, you can feel that anger underneath the story, and this extraordinary talent was brought to this circumstance.
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at one point, he says, the natural home of the hypocrite is england. and you feel like the whole film is agreeing with that phrase. and the most powerful elements are when you are reminded of the his hostility dramatically. there are moments of real cruelty in the film. beautifully acted. great performances. rupert everett was born to play that role. my goodness, you are making me feel old with your best out this week. i am surrounded by youngsters in the newsroom who haven't heard of it. the piano. the first film ever to win the palm d'or. it was up for a bunch of oscars and it won three of them. here is the thing about the piano. it is clearly brilliant. it has inspired a huge amount of thought about its form and what it means. the only thing that i would say is that when i first saw it, i didn't like it as much as i admired it, and one of the reasons that i am that it is being reissued, is that i'm going to see it projected on a big screen, because i think you need to see it on a big screen to appreciate it. i am going to see it on a big screen next week, and and see whether i have grown up
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enough to admire it and like it. i remember it being quite a hard film and thinking it was beautiful and amazing to look at. and we all love the fact that... it was about a woman and directed by a woman, so unusual. i don't remember loving it. i remember loving holly hunter. all the different elements are amazing, but i don't remember loving it. black panther? have you seen it? you must see it? i am the only person in my entire circle who has not seen it. it is real good fun. when it came out, there was a huge amount of politics, and all the rest of it, but it is really well made. well constructed, there are a number of different storylines, all of which... it looks fantastic. when it needs to do serious, it can do it. i sat there thinking it is the most entertaining superhero film i have seen in a very long time,
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and you will really, really enjoy it. now it is on dvd. sit down and watch it. it is a real pleasure. there is a lot of really enjoyable stuff out at the moment. ocean's 8 in the cinema, and stanley, if you can find it, you have to seek it out. it does not have a wide release. really interesting week. cracking week! a quick reminder before we go that you'll find more film news and reviews from across the bbc online at bbc.co.uk/markkermode. and you can find all our previous programmes on the bbc iplayer. hello, this is breakfast
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with chris mason and sally nugent. good morning, here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. theresa may has announced new funding for the nhs in england. it will mean an extra £20 billion a year by the end of a five year plan. the prime minister said some of the funds would come from money the uk will no longer have to pay into the eu budget after brexit. but she hinted the rest may have to come from higher taxation. some people might remember some people might remember seeing a figure on the side of a bus awhile back of £350 million a week in cash.
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what i am announcing will mean that in 2023, 2024, there will be about £600 million week in cash, more in cash, going into the nhs. campaigners are calling for medicinal cannabis to be made legally available in the uk, after the home secretary intervened to help a 12 year old suffering from epilepsy. billy caldwell has been given back the cannabis oil, that was confiscated from his mother at customs on monday, after doctors made clear it was a "medical emergency". the oil, which contains a substance called thc, is illegal in the uk. billy's mother, charlotte said they had "achieved the impossible." ships carrying more than 600 migrants, which has been refused entry by both italy and malta, are beginning to arrive in spain. the spanish government says it has accepted an offer from france to take in some of the migrants rescued off libya. a huge banner saying ‘welcome' in several languages will greet the vessel at the port of valencia. we will be back there with our
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correspondent, later this morning. firefighters have spent a second night at the scene of a huge blaze at the glasgow school of art. it's the second fire to engulf the famous mackintosh building in four years. officials say the flames have now largely been extinguished, but small pockets remain. a nightclub and a music venue nearby have also been damaged. russian police are questioning the driver of a taxi which ran into a crowd of people in central moscow. it's believed some of the eight people injured were mexican football fans visiting the city for the world cup. it's not clear whether the collision was a deliberate act or an accident. time to talk all things sport. world
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cup, at the moment every single channel, it feels like at any time of day, there it is, the foot all. is everywhere! who needs love island when you have the world cup? will be talking england in a moment because he is getting close! they play tunisia in the opening game. we will all be doing the viking clap. wasn't it brilliant? they continue to battle and a maze of. we know what they did against england at the euros at. against argentina of all teams! iceland's goalkeeper their hero. elsewhere croatia beat nigeria, var and goaline technology was needed in france's win over australia, while there was another missed penalty as peru lost to denmark, which drew savage can tell us about. a first walcott point for iceland
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and another magic moment for their fa ns to and another magic moment for their fans to celebrate. —— world cup. argentina have won two world cups, iceland had never played in one before. so when sergio aguero demonstrated what he usually does for manchester city, it looked like business as usual. but as england among others have discovered, it doesn't pay to underestimate iceland. scores the first goal, it is their first ever at the world cup! this looked like argentina's lifeline. messi bundled over, a clear penalty. his first big moment on this year's world cup stage, snatched away by hannes haldorsson. not the hardest penalty he'll ever have to save, but definitely the most famous. so it isn't messi and argentina who find themselves top of group d, but croatia — who beat a surprisingly
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lacklustre nigeria 2—0. oghenekaro etebo's own goal was followed by a luka modric penalty, and the croats were celebrating. here's a bit more world cup history. initially this wasn't a penalty, but the video assistant referees suggested this challenge on france's antoine griezmann was worth a second look and it became first world cup penalty to be awarded, after a video review. and griezmann became the first man to score one as well. france went on to win 2—1. paul pogba's shot did cross the line after hitting the bar. video technology used again to confirm it, in this case seeming to make things clearer. in the same group, peru's first world cup match for 36 years had its own piece of history, var gave them a penalty they wouldn't otherwise have had against denmark. christian cueva, the man fouled, took the responsibility of puttting it away, which might well be a decision he regrets. the danes didn't create many chances, but only needed yussuf poulsen to score this one. delightful if you're danish. peru must pick themselves up before they play france on thursday.
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so, to england. gareth southgate taking the unusual step of telling his players yesterday who will be starting their opening match against tunisia in volgograd tomorrow. southgate did so to settle nerves after such a long lead up to their opening group game. there were one or two positions still if up for grabs, certainluy in defence where one of those harry maguire is expected to start. there's no doubt about it. we are going to the game trying to get three points, we won't go there and be happy to come away with a draw. we wa nt be happy to come away with a draw. we want the three points. it is massive. the first game in any group stage is, being tournament football, you can't lose the first game. three points would make a lot easier to qualify. that's tomorrow — and if you cant wait until then there is a feast of footballing action to enjoy today. first it's costa rica against sweden. then things really get going, as the holders germany face mexico at four, that one's here on bbc one. but if that wasn't enough,
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this evening, brazil take on switzerland. so that's the day sorted then. mo salah didn't have the best of birthdays on friday. he had to watch from the bench while his egypt team mates lost one nil to uruguay. the squad did their best to make up for it though, giving him this massive birthday cake in the team hotel — with a golden boot on top. and the news is that he will be fit to play russia on tuesday. you can see how much they need him. why is he having to wear his accreditation? everyone knows who he is! he is wearing the accreditation. iam is! he is wearing the accreditation. i am wondering if that is the golden boot he won in the present —— premier league too. not much to celebrate for england's rugby team, after losing a fifth straight test in a row. head coach eddiejones described it as a "horrow movie", as they lost their series to south africa with defeat in the second match in bloomfontein, prompting matt dawson to suggest jones may have lost the dressing room, ahead of next year's
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world cup. ireland won though against australia, while wales beat argentina to go through the summer unbeaten. james burford reports. what was a purple patch turned into a poor period. but could this now be deemed a crisis? just as last week, england raced into a handsome lead. mike brown touchdown. but for the second time injust mike brown touchdown. but for the second time in just seven days, eddiejones‘ men took their eyes off the ball. south africa battled back, the ball. south africa battled back, the lead came their own and with the series surrendered, there is yet another painful lesson. so back—to—school for england's group. ireland meanwhile, have done something england couldn't. respond to defeat with victory. a thrilling win against australia which levels their test series, they can hardly believe their team ‘s performances. 13 wins in14 believe their team ‘s performances. 13 wins in 14 matches and a chance now to earn a first series triumph
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in the southern hemisphere for 19 yea rs of. in the southern hemisphere for 19 years of. one side who have done thatis years of. one side who have done that is wales, another professional performance against argentina. the 13- 12 performance against argentina. the 13— 12 when included this stunning solo try from josh adams, which are seals off their tour in style. how england could do with some of that right now. and a few hours ago, scotland lost to the united states for the first time. blair kinghorn had put the scots ahead with an early try, but the usa then went ahead and kinghorn wasn't celebrating at the end when he missed a conversion in added time that would've won it for them. 30—29 it finished. justin rose is one shot behind a four—way tie for the lead, going into the final round of the us open at shinnecock hills in new york state, but it's phil mickelson that everyone's talking about. he deliberately hit his ball while it was moving, knowing he'd be given a two—shot penalty, but deciding that was better than trying to play the ball from further down the slope. several former players said he should've been disqualified. that is not on! several players said
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he should be disqualified. he is still in there, but obviously he was bending the rules. some would say he is plain to the rules but others would say he should this disqualified. —— playing. someone say that is clever, some would say thatis say that is clever, some would say that is cheating. it is certainly using the ball, crawls to their advantage. not a great day all round for australia yesterday, we've heard they lost in the rugby and in the football. well they were beaten by england in the cricket too. england with their highest one—day score against their opponents thanks to a hundred from jason roy. and the aussies chances ended when shaun marsh was bowled for 131, england are 2—0 up in the series. andy murray will return
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to tennis for the first time in almost a year, next week and he says he can still win grand slam titles. he hasn't played since wimbledon last year and he's been really struggling with a hip injury that needed surgery injanuary. he'll play in the first round at queen's on tuesday.. is not a gamble by me going on to that court that i will injure my hip while playing, it isjust that court that i will injure my hip while playing, it is just you that court that i will injure my hip while playing, it isjust you never know exactly when you are ready. especially after this amount of time. iam especially after this amount of time. i am sure if i tried to play, ifi time. i am sure if i tried to play, if i missed the grasscourt season, the same doubts would still be there. also out on the grass isjohanna konta who's through to the final of the notthingham open after beating the defending champion donna vekic. the british number one lost in the final to vekic last year, but she overturned that result, winning their rain—interrupted match in straight sets. she'll play australia's ashleigh barty for the title today. i know we were talking about the viking hand clap, well iceland have been making plenty of noise in other ways, notably their commentators describing messi's miss. have a listen.
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screaming amazing, right? you can hear a lot of them saying his name. the goalkeeper. you have got to hope that icelandic throat lozenges are up that icelandic throat lozenges are up to it. he is still going! that icelandic throat lozenges are 'ii that icelandic throat lozenges are up to it. he is still going! i love to know what he's saying. i love that. that were such a brilliant moment. everybody was up out of their seat watching the television. first world cup, first world cup goal and they saved a penalty from
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the enormously. and that we no icelandic for the call laney. can you say it again, go on. no. not with the can of gusto needed to replicate that. singers from hereford cathedral will make history later this month when they become the first anglican cathedral choir to sing at a papal mass since the reformation. the group has been invited as part of the pope's programme to encourage church diversity. our reporter, kevin reide, went along to hear their final rehearsal before they head to rome. after christmas and easter, the feast of st peter and paul is the most important annual event in the vatican. singing. and now, orthe first time, the hereford cathedral choir has been invited as special
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guests. they are performing a rehearsal in a pretty empty hereford cathedral, but in a few weeks' time, they will be performing in front of 125,000 people, and tens of millions of people will be watching on tv. 125,000 people, and tens of millions of people will be watching on tvw is great fun and you get to see amazing places. as long as we do not mess up, it'll be fine. it is all happening at the end ofjune, and there will be two performances, in fa ct. there will be two performances, in fact. they will be performing in the sistine chapel with the choir of the sistine chapel with the choir of the sistine chapel, attended by the diplomatic corp of the vatican. then we will see the huge people mass, the feast of st peter, in the square. they have not had the closest of relationships, but in
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recent yea rs, closest of relationships, but in recent years, the vatican has been building bridges. the fact we have been invited speaks volumes of the roman catholics wanting to reach out to us and wanting to return the invitation, delighted with what we have been asked to do. the choir will perform on wednesday the 27th and friday the 29th ofjune. bbc news, hereford. the first time since the reformation. amazing. since the reformation! extraordinary. here's nick with a look at this morning's weather. did not expect much sunshine. good morning. for some of us, work yesterday, especially in scotland, more dry today. not completely dry everywhere. a bit of rain across
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western parts of the uk. you may catch a showjust about western parts of the uk. you may catch a show just about anywhere. the satellite picture. —— shower. lots more cloud is starting to spread in from the south—west, leaving the north—east of scotland with the best of the sunny spells. cloud will increase. here comes, in from the south—west. patchy rain in south—west england and wales. developing in parts of northern ireland. north—west england this afternoon and later in the day in western parts of scotland as well. the east of that, spots of rain. eastern part of the uk, staying dry today. cloud is increasing. sunny spells. eastern scotland, 20 degrees. the same in england. most of us will stay short of that. quite
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a breeze. tonight and tomorrow morning, the winner gets stronger, especially in northern scotland. —— wind gets. this evening, patchy rain eased across the uk. not amounting to much. skies clearing once again. overnight temperatures, cloud and breeze, not going down far. the north of scotland, single figures to be the south—east of england, 15—16. —— figures. that is the end of the night. tomorrow morning, many of us will have morning sunshine. cloud will have morning sunshine. cloud will increase once again, especially in northern ireland and parts of wales, northern england, scotland through the day, with outbreaks of rain coming back. a windy picture across the uk. scotland, the north, 50 miles per hour. you can see afternoon sunshine, especially in the south—east of england, temperatures getting into the low and perhaps even mid—20s here. there
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isa and perhaps even mid—20s here. there is a north—west and south—east split setting up for monday which will continue for a few days. further north—west in the uk, cloud and breeze and the further south—east, a chance of rain. light winds and high temperatures. later in the week almost moving the differences. it will be dry and settled as high pressure builds in across the uk. you may see a bit of rain, but a bit of cloud to come. thank you very much indeed. it sounds a little bit mixed. a lot of cloud around. the travel show have a nack of finding warmer climes. coming up on this week's show: i meet the new robot helping to keep beaches clean here in thailand. i'm cleaning the beach! and we go behind the scenes at the lab that looks after priceless old masters in florence.
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we are starting this week in thailand, a country with over 2000 kilometres of coastline, and every year, millions of tourists come here to enjoy its tropical sandy beaches. but some of those tourists are having an impact on the marine environment. they are the ones who leave their rubbish behind when they've finished their day at the beach. and it seems that smokers are among some of the worst offenders. so much so that thai authorities have now introduced a smoking ban at some of the country's most popular beaches. it is now illegal to smoke at 24 beaches across the country,
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and if you're caught smoking or dropping cigarette butts, you risk a fine of up to 100,000 thai baht - that's over £2000 — and a year in prison. i have come to songkhla in the south of thailand to find outjust how big the problem with cigarette butts is. yupa was part of a team which sampled different beaches around thailand to count the number of cigarettes. this beach in songkhla was found to have more than anywhere else in the country. wow, that's a lot. is that normal? normal. almost all cigarette butts contain plastic and take years to decompose. on the beaches where smoking is banned, there are designated areas where people can smoke and dispose of their cigarette ends
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responsibly. cleaning up thailand's beaches has become a priority for a network of volunteers called trash heroes. the group operates in 35 cities across the country. yupa started a branch here in songkhla after she was shocked by the rubbish problem, following some time working away. the first time that i came back to my home i said, "what happened with my hometown? why is it like this? everywhere is full of the trash." itjust made me think, i must do something for my hometown. so much plastic!
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yupin runs weekly cleanup sessions, and people of all ages and tourists are encouraged tojoin in. this place, where i grew up, so many tourists come to this beach, but if the beach gets dirty, no—one will want to come. so i started this project. how does it actually work? the robot is digging in the sand about five centimetres deep. shaking to separate the sand and move the trash into the back. how much rubbish do you actually collect? if we do about 80 metres we get about four kilograms of trash. four kilograms in 80 metres! ok, i'm dying to have a go, to control it. sure. easy to control.
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forward and backwards, ok. turn left and right. this is the controller speed. if you push this down, it is digging in the sand. this is great. i'm cleaning the beach! dr a and his team are working on a second prototype that will separate the shells out from the trash. at the moment that has to be done by hand. we'll end this week in the historic city of florence, birthplace of the renaissance and home to some of the most famous old masters in history, from rafael to giotto and da vinci, but all those fragile historic works don't look after themselves. we sent keith wallace for peak a behind the scenes at one of the world's most important art restoration labs. sometimes on warm summer afternoons, it feels like half of europe has come to florence.
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here, here's the view. and why not? the whole city centre is a giant open air art gallery. this is what happens when you've got a really lovely bridge, it's full of lots of people taking selfies. and here's one of its stars, the ponte vecchio bridge, built in the 13th century. it's not exactly off the beaten track though. so this is the historic centre. it's all unesco world heritage listed. firstly, because it's incredibly beautiful, and secondly because the museums and galleries down there have some of the most important and famous works of art the world's ever seen basically. but you'll notice there's a river cutting right the way through it. as you can imagine, it's very important to make sure that never
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breaks its banks. but tragically, in 1966, it did. 101 people died and it's estimated around 14,000 artworks were damaged, ma ny lost forever. so this is the high watermark from the flood, which is almost five metres. and just over there, you can see the santa croce basilica, which is stuffed with all sorts of artworks and relics, so you can see that might have caused quite a problem. it's ta ken half a century to restore some of the art inside. only two years ago, work finished on one of the most important masterpieces, giorgio vasari's depiction of the last supper. the damage was so profound that for 40 years, nobody dared touch it. so instead the opificio delle pietre dure, now one of the world's foremost restoration labs. at the beginning, i was scared, very scared, because many colleagues told me that you are totally crazy, it's impossible to do something, but i trust in my people and with a long, long work, we found the way. the opificio still deals
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with the aftermath of disasters. it's currently looking after works damaged in italy's recent run of damaging earthquakes. this is an interesting canvas painting coming from emilia. of course, it remained under the bricks of the church that collapsed. it was made in the beginning of the 17th century. each artwork can have a big meaning for the local community, because if it is the main altar of the church of that little town. so these were by bricks and stone and — i mean it looks lucky that they didn't go right through the painting. it must have happened to a lot of other paintings. yes, the mechanical damage is the most common during an earthquake. it's a painstaking business. as each artwork arrives, the damage is thoroughly assessed and the structure secured.
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so the back, this is what the back of a renaissance artwork looks like. a lot of the restoration happens here first. the behaviour of the planks was the first cause of damage, because the radiation of the moisture of the environment, then we have an hydroponic system to measure the micromovements of the planks. considering you've got high—tech in there, you've got someone putting glue onward and poking it it into the painting. yeah, there is high technology and traditional good working technology, because the original, the colours of the front comes from the back. i see. ooh, don't fall into it. it's only after the back is sorted out that the process of replacing each minuscule brushstroke can begin. caterina here has been working on this 15th century altarpiece since 2012. what's surprising me is that you seem to be mixing the colours by hand. is that hard? will you have a big party when it's over? the opificio isn't normally open to tourists but you can catch their work all around florence, and of course you can
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see their highest profile success, the last supper, hanging in the santa croce basilica. what's surprising me is that you seem to be mixing the colours by hand. is that hard? will you have a big party when it's over? the opificio isn't normally open to tourists but you can
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catch their work all around florence, and of course you can see their highest profile success, the last supper, hanging in the santa croce basilica. well, that's all we've got time for this week. join us next week when... ade heads to cairo to discover the new music craze that's taking the city by storm. i'm about to meet a band who has had a hit that has had 125 million youtube views. and in the meantime, if you want to find out where we are in the world and share your travels, you can find us on social media. but until next time, from all of us here in thailand, it's goodbye. hello, this is breakfast with chris mason and sally nugent.
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theresa may announces a five year plan to pump billions more into the nhs. she says the extra spending will be partly paid for by a brexit dividend but there could be tax rises. we are making the nhs our priority. we are putting a significant amount of extra money into it, we need to make sure that money is spent wisely. good morning, it's sunday 17thjune. also this morning: pressure grows for a change in the law after the government allows a boy with severe epilepsy to be treated with an illegal form of cannabis oil. and we

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