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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  June 18, 2018 2:00pm-4:59pm BST

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hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 2pm: theresa may promises a £20 billion injection into the nhs — taxes will have to rise to pay for it. across the nation, taxpayers will have to contribute a bit more in a fairand have to contribute a bit more in a fair and balanced way, to support the nhs we all use. an urgent question in the house of commons over cannabis oil treatment — as 12—year—old billy caldwell is discharged from hospital after a health scare. gaming addiction is formally recognised as a mental health condition for the first time. he can't function because he can't live in a world outside of the gaming. to the point where he was hospitalised and he hasn't been to school for a year. coming up on afternoon live all the sport — hugh five hours to go! yes, the talking is almost overfor five hours to go! yes, the talking is almost over for gareth southgate and his young england side. we will
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look ahead to their first match with tunisia. what is happening with the weather? warming the south—east today. it will get warmer in the next few days. quite humid for sudden areas. fresher and perhaps some rain on the way. more details later. thanks xx also coming up —we all do it— some more than others. on average we get six and a half hours a night. but what happens if we don't get enough? we'll be talking to one of the world's leading experts in sleep science. hello, everyone — this is afternoon live. theresa may has said the nhs is the government's ‘number one' spending priority, as she announced a new long—term funding plan for the health service. the prime minister says the nhs will be given an extra £20 billion a year by 2023 — but she warned taxpayers
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would have to pay more it. there has been controversy over her claim that the extra spending could be paid for, in part, by what she called a ‘brexit dividend'. the health secretary has said any savings from brexit would not be ‘anything like enough‘ and labour said the claim was ‘not credible'. our political correspondent, jonathan blake, reports. nice to meet you. under pressure at work. her as well as them. the prime minister met staff in london this morning before delivering the news they had been waiting to hear, the government will put more money into the health service, long term. more money is needed to keep pace with the growing pressures on the nhs. it is notjust a question of more money this year or next, to deliver the world—class care the nhs needs to plan for the future with ambition and confidence. theresa may has announced the nhs in england will get an extra £20 billion a year by 2023 and over the next five years there will be an average increase in funding by 3.5%.
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where is the money coming from? remember this? the prime minister claims money saved by leaving the eu will, in part, fund her cash injection to the nhs. that has made brexit supporters in her own party very happy. as the prime minister has rightly said, it is a down payment on future receipts that will come into this country as a result of discontinuing payments to brussels. but critics say in the short term there will be less to spend after brexit, not more. some in her own party said talk of a brexit dividend is misleading. the government are deciding to bring back this referendum, very toxic, divisive debate back into the nhs proposals. i don't see why they are doing it. to my mind, the figures do not stack up. the health secretary and other cabinet ministers called into number ten this morning, know that to pay for this plan, the government
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will have to raise taxes. that is politically sensitive. the prime minister is probably planning to raise taxes or raise borrowing, in order to fund this. it isn't coming from brexit. theresa may has taken a gamble, by linking her funding announcement of the controversial claim that money will be saved as a result of brexit, she has handed the brexiteers a victory. but with tough negotiations coming in brussels, she may be expecting concessions from them in return. more money for the nhs will always be a popular move. raising taxes to pay for it could be a harder sell, but the government will have to find the money now theresa may has put her name to this. our health correspondent, james gallagher, is here. wighton £20 billion a year sounds
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like a lot. what will patients notice? elia it is an incredibly large amount of money. the current budget is a. it is a significant investment. the big question is whether patients will notice the difference. her terminology is that this is about keeping pace with the pressures on the health service. jeremy hunt said this is about stabilising and then looking to make improvements later. if we look at the health service, there is intense pressure from an ageing population having increasingly, located care requirements. a mds are struggling, not treating people quickly enough. cancer targets for treating patients quickly are also being missed. those pressures will grow in the future. the terminology is around controlling that and looking to improvements in the future. you might see more doctors and nurses in the future and a particular focus on
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improving our relatively low success rates in terms of treating cancer and mental health. reason may want to meet nhs bosses and hear what their ten year plan is. is this the moment you work—out, rethink what the nhs is? it is for treating sick people not perhaps for things, controversial things, say, ivf, transgender surgery, issues like that? does the nhs have to have a rethink? low they are already reassessing all these things co nsta ntly. reassessing all these things constantly. there is a big regional disparity between what services are available, takes, ivf. in york, your number of cycles of ivf is hero, but three in other parts of the country. there are already constantly big questions being asked about what services should be provided in which parts of the country. but a lot of the pressure at the moment is not about these, things that are more debatable, arguably. it is about
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social care. a&e, social care, really big things feeding into this. social care, that allows you to live in their own homes. that keeps people out of hospital if they are not having a full trying to do everything themselves. in a care home, they are being looked after and not trapped in hospital. many parts of this health care ward, people are seeing this as the two things need to be dealt with hand—in—hand. the nhs is going to be sorted out, we heard today. the question is how we are going to sort out social care as well. 90. health secretaryjeremy hunt has said he hopes that a review of the law on the medicinal use of cannabis oil can be completed within months. at the weekend the home secretary sajid javid intervened to allow a 12—year—old boy with severe epilepsy to be treated with the substance. billy caldwell has just been released from hospital after being able to take the medication which had been confiscated by customs officials at heathrow a week ago. his mother charlotte spoke outside the hospital, where she said she wants an urgent
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meeting with jeremy hunt and sajid javid. no matter what anyone says, my experience cannot be imagined by anybody else. i will ask them to urgently implement a programme that i'iow urgently implement a programme that now provides immediate access to the methods that billy needs. i will ask them to urgently implement a programme that now provides immediate access to the meds that billy said desperately needs. and now, more urgently than ever, the many children and families that have been affected by this historic development.
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i will also ask them to implement a review richard galpin is outside the hospital in southwest london. is an urgent question in the house on this this this afternoon. yes, i think charlotte caldwell has had a significant impact with the press conferences she has been holding over the past few days. she has really got steam behind her. it seems the health secretary, jeremy hunt, she feels years on her side and has high hopes that they will be able to act quickly. having said that, jeremy hunt has said it could be months, but the family here are hoping that today can turn it around within a matter of days. she has been saying, the mother, that she had a team of people around her who have come up with a solution for being able to make use of this
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cannabis oil legal, and have been working on this for some time and can present this to the various ministries. therefore she is hopeful that things can turn around very quickly. she is saying there are hundreds of people across britain you need this treatment. it's not just about her family, her son, billy, it's about a large number of people suffering from epilepsy and for whom the normal drugs are not working. she quoted a figure to us that there are around 64,000 people in britain suffering from epilepsy, 30% of whom, the drop —— the normal drugs don't work. these are thousands of people who could potentially benefit from the medicinal use of this cannabis oil. thank you. let's return now to that new long—term funding plan for the health service announced by theresa may this lunchtime. the prime minister says the nhs will be given an extra £20 billion a year by 2023 — but she warned taxpayers would have to pay more it. 0ur chief political correspondent, vicki young is in westminster.
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it is how it is funded really that is the question everyone is asking. yes, but we won't get the answers about bath until the budget in a few months. she has suggested, the prime minister, that taxpayers will have to fork out more. —— we want to know more about that. it could be some kind of national insurance or property tax. that has to be seen nearer the time of the budget. i am joined by shadow health secretary jonathan ashworth. presumably that is one of the questions you have, or do you welcome this news? we agree that the nhs needs more money but how the brain minister intends to fund this has completely unravelled. today she is admitting tax rises. the fundamental issue is that she is simply not getting the nhs the funding it needs. the fact that today she conceded that the legal obligations in the nhs constitution
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that you will be seeing —— scene within 18 weeks or four hours in a eddie hoare 60 days is that you have cancer, those legal standards will not be met. —— you will be seen in 60 days if you have cancer. howwood labour funds the increase? 60 days if you have cancer. howwood labourfunds the increase? you 60 days if you have cancer. howwood labour funds the increase? you say he would give it more than 20 billion a year extra? these are the plans that we would inherit should we form the next government, but we would go further till. we would increase tax on the very wealthiest in society, and the big corporations who have had multi—billion pound tax cuts. we would ask them to pay a little bit extra in tax to fund the nhs will stop if we were in government, we would be allocating an extra almost 9 billion for the nhs and social care. people have disputed the idea of a brexit dividends, but it is a ten year plan so dividends, but it is a ten year plan so that we would be paying in the short—term, eventually we won't be. why not put it into the nhs?
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short—term, eventually we won't be. why not put it into the nh57m short—term, eventually we won't be. why not put it into the nhs? it is not a brexit dividends it is a brexit deceits. the spending plans go brexit deceits. the spending plans 9° up brexit deceits. the spending plans go up to 2023, not with the next ten years. every credible economist has come out and rubbished it completely. these new plans for the nhs will be funded by increases in borrowing, the tories putting up borrowing, the tories putting up borrowing and increases in taxation. jeremy hunt and theresa may and the chancellor have to level with the british people and tell us which taxes are going up to pay for the nhs changes. a suggestion from the prime minister about another reorganisation may be of the nhs and the way it is working, she suggested it wasn't right for whitehall to dictate from the centre that things may not be working as they should be. with labour like to see that? absolutely. the health and social care, a big reorganisation of the nhs underthe care, a big reorganisation of the nhs under the tories, it has cost billions and driven privatisation.
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it means that more and more services in the nhs have gone out to the private sector. often offering poor quality. we are saying if you were going to end privatisation that is a good thing. we don't want this extra money coming into the nhs to flow out of a public nhs and go to the virgin care's of the world. that is a test of the changes to the reorganisation. thank you. there is some well, from some quarters that the nhs will be getting more money, but certainly an all full of questions particularly about social care. how that integrated system the government wants is going to work in practice. thank you very much. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. the prime minister admits that taxes will have to rise to pay for a multi—billion pound spending increase for the nhs. an urgent question in the house of commons over cannabis oil treatment — as 12—year—old billy caldwell is discharged from hospital after a health scare. gaming addiction is formally recognised as a mental health condition for the first time. and in sport...
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england's players are in volgograd ahead of their first world cup match with tunisia later. manager gareth southgate says his players will have learned from their past mistakes but won't be burdened by them. england's tommy fleetwood says he'll take so many positives from this year's us open, despite finishing a just a shot behind winner brooks koepka. and eddie is our man — the rugby football union give their backing to the england head coach, despite a fifth straight test match defeat at the weekend. i'll be back with more on those stores later. england open their world cup campaign today as they take on tunisia in volgograd in the far south of russia. gareth southgate says his young squad has a hunger and desire for success and is looking forward to getting going. let's hear from some fans and speak to our correspondent sarah rainsford. that go to natalie pyrgos who is in
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the stadium at volgograd. let's go to sarah first, in fact. what sort of atmosphere is building up with only a few hours to go? the atmosphere is definitely building. the atmosphere is getting hotter and the noise is getting louderfull. i don't know how much you can hear and see behind me but there is a big crowd of tunisian fans who have been bouncing, singing and waving their flags, using players outside the stand zone or other bands have been watching the previous match. the tunisian fans be in the majority of the moment. after a fairly low profile day yesterday, a lot of people have headed into volgograd today wearing their england shirts and flying the flag. there are a couple of england fans with me here, you have come all the way from... phoenix, arizona. cheltenham, england. how he found the
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atmosphere? friendly. brilliant. there was a bit of concern about what kind of greeting england fans would get here, the dictionary after the 2016 euros. have you had any concern about the mood here? nothing, it has been brilliant. lots of friendly faces. he told you are from england and a hi—fi than try speak english to you. how about with the tunisian fans? very lively, as you can tell. everyone in parties berets. not many people here from england? know, in moscow, very few. i probably counted about five england shirts and half of those we re worn england shirts and half of those were worn by people who were not english. we have seen a few since we have been here. tonight i think there will be more than you see now. things are building up now. the
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number is growing. i have been told it is the lowest number of inward bands ever to a world cup, but the crowds and the mood building and getting livelier. thank you very much. let's go inside the stadium as natalie... gareth southgate talking about hunger and desire. that's certainly true of the midges!m about hunger and desire. that's certainly true of the midges! it has been horrendous. i was here at 9pm last night, the same time as kick—off will be here. we had two hours ahead. they are out in force. no amount of terror spray can stop them. being with players will be covered in them. —— no amount of hair spray. let me give you a tour. it is around 29 degrees here. as sarah said, quite a low figure in terms of england fans coming. we are told 2,100 tickets have been bought by when fans. but 42 and a half
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thousand tickets have been sold which is 3,000 short of the capacity of this volgograd arena full top and arena cost £205 million to put up. the third biggest of all the stadiums aperture and on. tickets are still on sale so it could be that some other bands will arrive. we are expecting a lot of locals. england will still feel their presence. got the sound system work? yes, as you can tell! —— does the sound system work? have a very good day met natalie. sleep, it's something we all need, but many of us don't get enough of. the consequences of this can include an increased risk of cancer, dementia and heart disease. but why is sleep such an important part of our lives? joining me now is matthew walker, professor of neuroscience and psychology at the university of california, berkeley, and one of the world's leading experts in sleep science. he's written a book, why we sleep, on the science of sleep and dreams. thank you for coming in. thank you
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for having me. some of us are upset with sleep, why is it important? we don't really know, do we? —— obsessed. the general public doesn't really know but in science we have had an explosion of understanding. sleep used to be one of the last great divide the mysteries that that's no longer true. we have discovered that every process within the body and every operation of the mind is wonderfully enhanced by sleep, when we get it, but demonstrably impaired when we don't get enough. feedback translated into society. every disease that is killing off in the developed world now has begins. causal links to a lack of sleep? yes, links between sleep loss and cancer. the link has become so strong that recently the world health organisation classified
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any form of night—time shiftwork as any form of night—time shiftwork as a probable carcinogen. the question eve ryo ne a probable carcinogen. the question everyone asks is how much do we need? it does differ between us. it's like asking how many calories we need, i can give you an average but that difference based on your physiology, what you were doing. for most adults, seven to nine hours of sleep. once people get below that, we can start to measure impairment. if you were to ask me the number of people who can survive on six hours of sleep or life without showing any empowerment, rounded to a whole numberand empowerment, rounded to a whole number and expressed as a percentage is zero. really? we all say i can catch up on my sleep at the weekends. that's not true, is it? sadly it is not. sleep is not like the bank, we can't accumulate a detrimental to pay it off at a later point in time. if i deprived you of
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sleep for an entire night and then gave you although the recovery sleep you want on a second and third night, you do sleep longer but you never get back that eight night, you do sleep longer but you nevi get back that eight : ' " ' night, you do sleep longer but you nev i‘ aet backthat certainl a; f'7 t get bit n risk. ris note 737 r s: sleep, ‘ life. an: kathleen . . . an: kathleen a . .
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amount of deep sleep will drop the amount of deep sleep you have by 20%. —— kathleen, one cup of costly. —— caffiene. what about people who snore, people who live with someone whose stories western market you have disturbed sleep, how damaging is that? very damaging. snoring in its severe form is what we call sleep apnoea, which means an absence of breath. you can have a disruption in the airway which reduces your blood oxygen saturation. you can stop breathing sometimes. when that happens, people may stop breathing 20 or 30 times throughout the night. imagine someone coming into your bedroom and strangling you 20 or 30 times in the night and you not knowing? you would
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not imagine waking up feeling restored. sleep apnoea, heavy snoring is one of the most underdiagnosed sleep disorders and it isa underdiagnosed sleep disorders and it is a killer, associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease, stroke, diabetes, obesity. how do you give yourself the best chance of a proper night's sleep? there are probably five things people can do right now to start getting better sleep: the first is regularity, if there is a thing or piece of advice, go to bed at the same time and wake up at the same time, no matter whether it is the weekends or you had a bad night of sleep. tablature weekends or you had a bad night of sleep. tablatu re is weekends or you had a bad night of sleep. tablature is important, about 18 celsius. darkness, we are a dark deprived society. —— temperature is important. didn't half the lights down in the last hour before bed. stay away from screens. don't stay in bed awake. if you do that is, your brain learns the association that union that is about; awake
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a sedative. all also through the night. alcohol will also block your dream sleep, your rent sleep, which is criticalfor block your dream sleep, your rent sleep, which is critical for many functions. it makes me deeply unpopular but i would suggest abstaining from alcohol and tuohy and try to get the in as well. i will stop it there. that's been enough! depressing! but important. very good of you to come and talk about this. sleep well! three men — who are
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believed to have been in their twenties — have been killed in south london after being hit by a train. british transport police have confirmed they're investigating whether the men were graffiti artists. officers were called to the incident near brixton at around half past seven this morning. superintendent matthew allingham is from the british transport police — he gave this update to our correspondent sophie long a few moments ago. we were called to the junction at 7:34am this morning to reports of three bodies on the tracks. when we attended, it was quite evident that we have three males that had been hit by a train. we know that, the identity of one of those males and we have spoken to the next of kin in relation to that. we still don't know the identities of two of them. all we know is that they are male and in their20s all we know is that they are male and in their 20s will stop what lines of enquiry are you following? any idea why they were on the
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tracks? our main lines of enquiry or see these tv, forensics and any witnesses. we don't know why they we re witnesses. we don't know why they were on the tracks, we are trying to ascertain that and ascertain how they access to the tracks. the main line of enquiry is trying to identify them so we can eat to the next of kin and let them know. what stage is that app? —— we can let the next of kin know. - people "5.224! a! l4". l155}?! keg}! 5,145.52 — —— — —— the of the of ti we next , l l stage? yes. reported - take a stage? yes. is, eported take a ' ' stage? yes. is, the ted take a " stage? yes. is, they at| take a f the - " the ' f
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on the tracks ? reported 3 males on the tracks and reported that he was. but i wasn't that that he was. but it wasn't that train who get the individual. we are trying to ascertain which train that was. we know it was probably sometime- to was. we know it was probably sometime - to that. it. have of baa? lines 012227125457" ’" f" ” " there are some lines of enquiry are we to look there are some lines of enquiry are we - to look at. is this the we need to look at. is this the problem, graffiti artists getting onto the tracks and putting themselves in danger? clearly being on any railway track is very dangerous. when graffiti artists do get onto the tracks, there is massive risk. more on that throughout the afternoon here on afternoon live. now time for the weather. who is going to wind? belgian! belt against panama. no one has mentioned that yet. i have focused
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on something else. we are focusing on something else. we are focusing on this stadium here. you can see this cloud of a cloud of midgesjust waiting to dissent. horrible! this is what we can do with our graphics. but i can't see any. i was joking! volgograd... pay attention! volgograd... pay attention! volgograd is on the longest river in europe. it is in between... you can't really see it on this map but it is in between, quite far south, middle of a big landmass. the between the caspian sea and the black sea. a week ago, it was much cooler than this. but it has warmed up. when you have a large landmass,
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such as russia, in the middle you get massive fluctuations in temperature. depending on where the wind is coming from, south or north, cloud cover or not, what we are seeing at the moment is a warm wind coming in and lots of sunshine. temperatures getting up to 27 or 28 degrees will stop by the time we get to kick off, it will be about 21 or 22 degrees. the important thing for the midges is that the winds drop and then they all defence. so they will have fun. yes, i suggest you go watching the game at the stadium, not at home, where one of those hats with... someone will tweet a picture! someone's going to do it. what is the score going to be? who are we playing? tunisia. i think it going to be 3—1. are we playing? tunisia. i think it going to be 3-1. to england? i didn't say that! good, we will hold
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his about. but we've got to have a forecast. we have got this band of cloud here. it will bring some rain, precious little against the south—east where it is very dry. most of the rain across the north. we are seeing the cloud increasing already. this is in scotla nd cloud increasing already. this is in scotland and eastern parts of england where we have more blue skies. temperatures will be typically into the mid—20s or so. there is more cloud coming into western parts of england, wales and northern ireland. it is blustery in the north—west. most places dry for the north—west. most places dry for the next few hours. what happens overnight? the cloud tends to topple its way southwards into england and wales. clear skies the northern ireland. the far north of england and scotland we have cooler, fresh
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air. it could be no lower than 18 in london. underneath the cloud that is pretty humid. the weather front is bringing the cloud that we saw early on. there is a little ripple on the weather front, what we call a wave. it focuses the rain, if you like. but ripple will push its way towards northern ireland. turning wetter in the north of the country in the afternoon, and probably turning much wetter into scotland in the evening. for england and wales it will be cloudy. it should brighten up in the south—west eventually. it does not need much sunshine. we have got this warm aircoming in need much sunshine. we have got this warm air coming in from the south and south—west. the northern parts of the uk, a very different wind direction. hence, cooler, fresher conditions. the cooler fresher air will push down across the uk from wednesday into thursday. that weather front will bring rain into scotla nd
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weather front will bring rain into scotland tomorrow evening. there is very little rain heading down across england and wales. a band of cloud with patchy rain and drizzle. cooler, fresh air to the north. temperatures in scotland struggling to make 40 degrees. there is some warm in the south and east anglia. temperatures could be up to 26 or 27 degrees. then as we had to the latter pa rt degrees. then as we had to the latter part of the week, we are all in the same mix, high pressure but cooler and fresher. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. the prime minister admits that taxes will have to rise to pay for a multi—billion pound spending increase for the nhs. labour says the promise of £20 billion is not enough. an urgent question in the house of commons over cannabis oil treatment — as 12—year—old billy caldwell is discharged from hospital after a health scare. gaming addiction is formally
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recognised as a mental health condition for the first time. sport now on afternoon live with hugh. there is one story in town.|j there is one story in town. i am slightly disappointed that darin did not even know who would be playing! ifi not even know who would be playing! if i have not been clear enough, today's the day england are kicking of their world cup campaign against tunisia. our sports correspondent natalie pirks is that the volgograd arena for us. there are preparations for what will happen on the pitch but they will have to prepare in a different way with a bit of insect repellent? they will have to have a lot of insect repellent. we are two hours ahead of the uk. i went out earlier and they were out in force. they are just in your face and for
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someone like jordan pickford who we are expecting to start, it could be difficult if he is not kept busy. let me step to the side. they are about to start rehearsing. we might get a blast of some national anthems ina minute get a blast of some national anthems in a minute which will make talking a little bit difficult. you can see the volgograd arena. it is about 29 degrees today. it is quite nice and pleasant, not too hot, not too difficult. this stadium was built especially for this tournament. it isa especially for this tournament. it is a 45,500 seater. tonight we are expecting 42,000 fans. 2100 will be england fans. the police said they are expecting maybe 2500. local officials said they are expecting around 3000 england fans. what it means is there will be a lot of
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locals in the england end and it is rare to hear the england fans have not travelled. i think the mix—up thatis not travelled. i think the mix—up that is scaremongering from back home and political tensions. the ones who are here are happy with the way they have been received. gareth southgate was asked a lot about his young inexperienced side. he said they will not be bothered essentially by the failures of the past teams and he expects his young lions to be brave tonight. the future is ahead of them and they have to be thinking about what is possible. the players of the past and the opportunities of the past are gone. this team is looking at things ina are gone. this team is looking at things in a different way, trying to play in a different way. they have a hungerand play in a different way. they have a hunger and desire. we have better technical players than we have had in the past coming through our academies. there is a real enthusiasm and they are looking forward to getting going.“
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england will approach this in a slightly different way. how will tunisia see it? they are nine places below england's —— they are the highest ranked african side. they are organised and crucially, they are organised and crucially, they are confident. it is not the first time england have met tunisia in a world cup game. they last met in 1998 in marseille. there was a lot of violence in the build—up to the match but england ended up winning 2-0. match but england ended up winning 2—0. paul scholes scored the winner. gareth southgate would take that tonight. we will be hoping for a similar, if not the same result. natalie pirks, thank you forjoining us. the bbc will bring you england's first match of the tournament live across television, radio and online. all the build up on bbc one begins at 6.15. well there is one game already under way — sweden are playing south korea in group f. another penalty given thanks to the help of var at this world cup was calmly converted by the sweden
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captain andreas granqvist. the swedes lead 1—0 into the last 15 minutes. let's bring you up to date with a few other sports headlines, and tommy fleetwood says he'll take "many positives" from his second placed finish at the us open. he became just the sixth player to shoot a 63 at the us open but missed out by a single stroke to the american brooks koepka who successfully defended the title he won last year. it's understood the rugby football union is still backing the england head coach eddie jones. despite a fifth straight test match defeat at the weekend. jones compared the 23—12 defeat by south africa to a "horror movie" but as it stands, jones will be given until after the autumn internationals to turn the team's fortunes around. and both ben stokes and chris woakes will miss the rest of england's one day series against australia. stokes has torn a hamstring and woakes has torn his quad.
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both are expected to be back in action next month. that's all the sport for now. thank you, took two later. —— talk to you later. addiction to electronic games has been formally recognised as a medical disorder by the world health organisation. the change means sufferers will be eligible for treatment on the nhs. to be diagnosed, players will have to demonstrate that for at least a year, the addiction has significantly impaired their lives. zoe kleinman reports. for plenty of people, young and adult, video gaming is fun, an exciting escape from reality that gives you the opportunity to do things that you wouldn't dream of doing in real life. the good thing about fortnight is the graphics and, like, how you can play with people, your friends, online and people around the world. my favourite computer game is probably fifa because i spend the most time on it, now. most of my friends play that, now. but, for some, there's a darker side, when gaming becomes something you simply can't stop doing.
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it's beyond frightening watching your own child deteriorate like that, at such a rate. he was hospitalised at christmas. and couldn't function. so, he wasn't washing, eating, so, yes, by the time it got to that... and then because he wasn't going out, he became too frightened to go to school. a recent study by oxford university found that gaming was less addictive than gambling, but if you do have a problem, currently, you might find it difficult to get help. there are no designated treatment providers at the moment in the nhs, dealing with gaming disorder. my wish for the future is that these centres do get set up, in order for parents, for families, who are beginning to struggle with their children, in order for them to receive the education and support they need. the uk games industry is critical of the latest report. it means treatment will now have
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to be made available on the nhs, with private consultants already seeing increased demand. downing street says the government will bring forward its own bill to outlaw upskirting — before the summer recess next month. on friday, a conservative mp, sir christopher chope, blocked a private member's bill to ban the practice of taking photographs up someone's clothing without consent by calling out "object" in the commons. he's said he was opposed to the idea of legislation being passed with minimal debate, and now claims he has suffered by a "storm of injustice". i'm delighted we have now got to the
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end of it and that the government have said they will legislate for this matter rather than leave it for the private member ‘s procedure. that is what i have been arguing for andi that is what i have been arguing for and i am delighted i have achieved my objective. any regrets? the only regrets are that other people have cruelly misunderstood what i did. and since i spoke to gene martin who is behind all this, immediately after the events in the house of commons on friday, and she understood my motives i never had —— gina martin. so you feel misunderstood? i feel greatly misunderstood? i feel greatly misunderstood and maligned because i have been ascribed motives which i never had. i think it is a really unpleasant storm which should not have happened, and ifeel for all those people who are affected by
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similar storms of injustice. so in terms of what that private members bill wanted to achieve, you are 100% behind that? exactly. they legislated on this in scotland in 2009 and we have never got around to doing anything about it in england, why not? there is an issue here which needs to be addressed. i would be the first to agree that i don't think it should be addressed without any proper debate. a senior expert in fire safety standards has been giving evidence at the inquiry into the grenfell tower disaster. dr barbara lane said that the fire escape doors had not been replaced since 1974 and would not pass current safety standards. frankie mccamley was listening to the evidence. the focus today of the enquiry was really looking around the fact of the tower itself, the renovations, what the layout was like both before and after the renovations took place. doctor barbara lane, a fire
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safety engineer, went into depth about the state put policy. she said the concrete walls in the block of flats, both inside and outside were relied upon to contain a tower block fire. she said this allowed firefighters to deal with fires inside the tower block, rather than the outside. she said fire engines we re the outside. she said fire engines were not suitable to deal with fires in tower blocks. doctor lane said the design of this building resulted in the loss of this state put policy which she said was the only safety condition provided to protect its residents. she went into detail about the works and renovations that took place, saying certain fire doors did not comply with new fire safety regulations, especially when it came to ones next to beam shoots and stairwells. she said the new lifts that were installed did not comply with new fire safety
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regulations, —— bin chutes. this afternoon doctor lane will talk about the cladding which she said in her report was substantially to blame for the tragedy. later we will hear about the science surrounding the fire and we will also hear the 999 call, the first one that place. i have seen breathed family members come here today. they are watching proceedings take place. this is day one of phase one of the enquiry which is mainly to gather evidence and this is expected to go on for a couple of months. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. the prime minister admits that taxes will have to rise to pay for a multi—billion pound spending increase for the nhs an urgent question in the house of commons over cannabis oil treatment — as 12—year—old billy caldwell is discharged from hospital after a health scare. gaming addiction is formally recognised as a mental health condition for the first time. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. the owner of clydesdale bank
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and yorkshire bank, has agreed to buy virgin money for £1.7 billion. under the deal, all the group's retail customers will be moved to virgin money over the next three years. it will be the uk's sixth—largest bank, with about six million customers, but 1500 jobs are likely to go. gas and electricity suppliers are forcing too many customers to use prepaid meters. the regulators ofgem said the number of gas meter devices installed using a court warrant rose by 6.9% last year. the regulator said meters should be "an absolute last resort" for recovering debt, and suppliers should be putting households onto repayment plans first. and cash has been knocked off its throne. debit card payments have overtaken cash use for the first time. a total of 13.2 billion debit card payments were made last year, a rise of 14% on the previous year, according to banking trade body uk finance. an estimated 3.4 million
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people hardly used cash at all during the year. let's begin with the latest twist in the diesel emission scandal — today the audi chief executive rupert stadler has been arrested? yes, he has been arrested and will be questioned on wednesday. this relates to diesel gate when volkswagen was forced to admit it had fitted special software, so—called diesel emissions cheating softwa re so—called diesel emissions cheating software in millions of its diesel ca rs software in millions of its diesel cars within the us. nearly 600,000 ca rs we re cars within the us. nearly 600,000 cars were sold with the software fitted, worldwide 11 million diesel
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ca rs we re fitted, worldwide 11 million diesel cars were thought to be affected. what that meant was when put on the open road, the diesel cars are emitted 40 times the levels which we re emitted 40 times the levels which were reported in lab conditions. initially it was thought to be a problem with bw cars that then audi was involved and last month audi admitted another thousand models had the emissions software issues. that is on top of the cars recalled last year. admittedly some only needed modification. scandal is the right word but you rarely hear of the boss being arrested or ta ken word but you rarely hear of the boss being arrested or taken by police over an issue like this? yes, often with stories like this the men and women at the top of a company say i cannot be held responsible for what the men and women beneath me or up to. but this does not seem to be what happened. rupert stadler‘s
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arrest comes after martin winter corn was accused of misleading regulations. he was added to this list of mid—level bw experts who had been arrested. two have pleaded guilty and two of them are serving time. this proved what the us attorney general said at the time that he believed the scandal went to the very top. however, it is worth mentioning that even if mr winterkorn is found guilty, it is unlikely that he will seek a court room because germany does not extradite its citizens. there is another story coming out of the states. the us and it is to vote on whether to restore penalties on a chinese telecoms giant zte. our us correspondent can tell us more. what
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is the likelihood that this will pass? this is the latest chapter in this ongoing saga regarding zte, the company which has been caught in the cross hairs of the us china trade dispute. what we are looking at here is the first sustained push from congress to one of donald trump's trade policies. we have seen people speak out about tariffs that this is the first sustained push we have seen when it comes to an doing some of donald trump's protectionist trade policies. senators are worried about the possibility that zte could be using its technology to spy on us citizens. they do not want this company to continue to exist. they wa nt company to continue to exist. they want to see the sanctions put back in place on zte. they are also worried about an even bigger chinese company, huawei, both of whom are called in the cross hairs of this
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ongoing trade dispute between the us and china when it comes to intellectual property and whether or not china is playing unfairly off when it comes to the theft, so says the united states, of some of the intellectual property that american companies have invested in overtime. thank you. the markets? lets see what is happening. it is a bit of a reshuffle day. ocado and gdc holdings bothjoining reshuffle day. ocado and gdc holdings both joining today. reshuffle day. ocado and gdc holdings bothjoining today. ocado is hacking the trend. gvc is up over 196. losing streak with oil? not at the petrol pump prices it is not.
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this is that the manufacturing end. there is an upcoming opec meeting and we will find out whether there will be any changes to supply. alice, thank you very much. the duchess of sussex's father has given an interview in which he shares insights into the royal couple's relationship and their wedding. thomas markle said he was sure meghan cried when he told her he could not attend the ceremony, and despite having not met prince harry face to face he revealed they had held conversations about politics, including donald trump's presidency, and brexit. our royal correspondent, nicholas witchell, reports. she was the bride who memorably walked up the aisle without her father. thomas markle pulled out of meghan's wedding. health problems were given as the reason for his absence. his place was taken for the last part of meghan's walk to the altar by the prince of wales. now, in an interview on itv‘s good morning britain, mr markle has expressed his gratitude. i can't think of a better replacement than someone like prince charles.
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he looked very handsome, and my daughter looked beautiful with him. i was jealous. i wish i had been there. i wish it had been me. but thank god he was there, and thank him for that. mr markle said meghan had wept when he told her he couldn't attend the wedding, and he had wept as he watched the service on television in california. and he spoke about the moment harry had phoned him to ask his permission to marry his daughter. harry got on the phone with meghan and they called me together and harry asked for her hand over the phone, and i said "you're a gentleman. promise me you will never raise your hand against my daughter, and of course i give you my permission". they also apparently talked about american politics and president trump. our conversation was, i was complaining that i didn't like donald trump. he said "give donald trump a chance". i sort of disagreed
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with that, but... i still like harry. that was his politics, i have my politics. harry said mr markle was an interesting guy who'd made a good choice in his daughter. he expects them to have children soon. as to the future, mr markle says he's looking forward to having a good relationship with his new family. nicholas witchell, bbc news. don't forget — you can let us know what you think. tweet ussing the hashtag afternoonlive. all the ways to contact us on screen right now. we will be going to the house of
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commons for our statement this afternoon about use of medicinal cannabis. then we will have an urgent question from wera hobhouse about the issue of upskirting. that will be going through as a government bill. there is an urgent question on that later on. we will also be hearing from the health secretaryjeremy also be hearing from the health secretary jeremy hunt also be hearing from the health secretaryjeremy hunt on that long—term plan for the nhs. we will have coverage of that on afternoon live. and get in touch with us, anything you want to say, get it off your chest. time for a look at the weather. here's darren bett. on the scene at the moment and for the next couple of days will be this band of cloud which will bring cloud to northern parts of the british isles. precious little in the south. seeing the cloud coming into scotla nd seeing the cloud coming into scotland and other areas of the uk, though the east we have more sunshine. it is warmer and muggy.
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temperatures are probably going to get into the mid—20s across eastern parts of england or the south—east. as we head further west, it is windy and cloudy. overnight we will see cloudier skies pushing down across england and wales. a little bit of drizzle here and there. clear skies the northern ireland, the far north of england and scotland. it will be much more difficult for sleeping further south. 18 is the minimum in the centre of london. different area across the uk north and south. the cloud will be thickening up on that little ripple on the weather front and that will bring thicker cloud but it will also brings outbreaks of rain. that rain probably setting in through the day across northern ireland and arriving in scotland after dark. ahead of it, some pockets of drizzle here and there. though the east it will be dry and
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bright. temperatures into the mid—20s, much cooler further north—west, particularly with the rain setting in across northern ireland. we have differences across the uk because our air is coming from different directions. from the south it will be much warmer and cooler air south it will be much warmer and coolerair in south it will be much warmer and cooler air in the northern half of the uk. the weatherfront cooler air in the northern half of the uk. the weather front will push its way southwards and eventually drag down the cooler and fresh air across the whole of the country. heavy rain overnight in scotland will clear away by the morning as the band of rain moves its way southwards. then we get sunny spells following on behind. a few blustery showers returning to the north—west of scotland. it is much cooler and fresher. the heat is still there for one more day across the south east of england and east anglia. it will be cooler and fresher everywhere by thursday. hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 3pm: theresa may promises a £20 billion injection into the nhs — taxes will have to rise to pay for it. across the nation, taxpayers
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will have to contribute a bit more, in a fair and balanced way, to support the nhs we all use. three people die after being hit by a train in south london. it's understood that spray cans were found at the scene. gaming addiction is formally recognised as a mental health condition for the first time. he can't function because he can't live in a world outside of the gaming. to the point where he was hospitalised and he hasn't been to school for a year. coming up on afternoon live all the sport with hugh and the wait is over for england. yes, england will be playing their first match of the world cup against tunisia. we will hear from gareth southgate who has been talking about how our relationship with the media has helped support growth. we will
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hear more about that later. and with the weather... a bit warmer today from any easter in areas of the uk. or sunshine around as well. the next few days, and band of cloud bringing some range of the north. we need the rain in the south—east, my garden is a bit dry. getting a bit warmer. more details later on. urgent questions over cannabis oil treatment — following the release of 12—year—old billy caldwell from hospital. we'll be live in the house of commons. hello, everyone — this is afternoon live. theresa may has said the nhs is the government‘s ‘number one‘ spending priority, as she announced a new long—term funding plan for the health service. the prime minister says the nhs will be given an extra 20 billion a year by 2023 — but she warned taxpayers
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would have to pay more it. there has been controversy over her claim that the extra spending could be paid for, in part, by what she called a ‘brexit dividend‘. the health secretary has said any savings from brexit would not be ‘anything like enough‘ and labour said the claim was ‘not credible‘. our political correspondent, jonathan blake, reports. let me introduce my team. hello, nice to meet you. under pressure at work — her as well as them. the prime minister met staff in london this morning before delivering the news they had been waiting to hear — the government will put more money into the health service, long term. more money is needed to keep pace with the growing pressures on the nhs. but it‘s not just a question of more money this year or next. to deliver the world—class care we all want and expect, the nhs needs to be able to plan for the future with ambition and confidence. theresa may has announced the nhs in england will get an extra £20 billion a year by 2023. over the next five years there will be an average
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increase in funding of 3.4%. so where is the money coming from? remember this? the prime minister claims money saved by leaving the eu will in part fund her cash boost for the nhs. that‘s made brexit supporters in her own party very happy. as the prime minister has rightly said, it is a downpayment on future receipts that will come into this country as a result of discontinuing payments to brussels. but critics say in the short term, there will be less to spend after brexit, not more. some in theresa may‘s own party say talk of a brexit dividend is misleading. the government are deciding to bring back this referendum, very toxic, divisive debate back into the nhs proposals. i just don‘t see why they are doing it. certainly to my mind, the figures do not stack up. is the brexit dividend real? the health secretary and other cabinet ministers called
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into number ten this morning know that to pay for this plan, the government will have to raise taxes. that is politically sensitive for a conservative government...difficult decisions put off for another day. in all likelihood, if the prime minister is being honest with us, she is probably planning to raise taxes or raise borrowing in order to fund this. this ain‘t coming from brexit. theresa may has taken a gamble. by linking her nhs funding announcement to the controversial claim that money will be saved as a result of brexit, she has handed the brexiteers a victory. but with key votes in parliament this week and tough negotiations coming brussels, she may well be expecting concessions from them in return. more money for the nhs will nearly always be a popular move. raising taxes to pay for it could be a harder sell, but one way or another, the government will have to find the money now theresa may has put her name to this promise. earlier, our political correspondent vicki young spoke to labour‘s health spokesmanjon
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ashworth. she has suggested, the prime minister, that taxpayers will have to fork out more. it could be some kind of national insurance or property tax. that has to be seen nearer the time of the budget. i am joined by shadow health secretary jonathan ashworth. presumably that is one of the questions you have, or do you welcome this news? we agree that the nhs needs more money but how the prime minister intends to fund this has completely unravelled. today she is admitting tax rises. the fundamental issue is that she is simply not getting the nhs the funding it needs. the fact that today she conceded that the legal obligations in the nhs constitution, that you will be seeing seen within 18 weeks or four hours in within 60 days if you you have cancer, those legal standards will not be met. so how would labour
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fund the increase? you say you wuld give it more than 20 billion a year extra? these are the plans that we would inherit should we form the next government, but we would go further still. we would increase tax on the very wealthiest in society, and the big corporations who have had multi—billion pound tax cuts. we would ask them to pay a little bit extra in tax to fund the nhs if we were in government, we would be allocating an extra almost 9 billion for the nhs and social care. people have disputed the idea of a brexit dividend, but it is a ten year plan so that we would be paying in the short—term, eventually we won‘t be. why not put it into the nhs? it is not a brexit dividend, it is a brexit deceit. the spending plans go up to 2023, not for the next ten years. every credible economist has come
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out and rubbished it completely. these new plans for the nhs will be funded by increases in borrowing, the tories putting up borrowing and increases in taxation. jeremy hunt and theresa may and the chancellor have to level with the british people and tell us which taxes are going up to pay for the nhs changes. there was a suggestion from the prime minister about another reorganisation, maybe. of the nhs and the way it is working, she suggested it wasn‘t right for whitehall to dictate from the centre that things may not be working as they should be. would labour like to see that? absolutely. the health and social care act, a big reorganisation of the nhs under the tories, it has cost billions and driven privatisation. it means that more and more services in the nhs have gone out to the private sector. often offering poor quality. we are saying if you are going to end privatisation that is a good thing.
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we don't want this extra money coming into the nhs to flow out of a public nhs and go to the virgin care's of the world. that is a test of the changes to the reorganisation. thank you. there is some welcome, from some quarters that the nhs will be getting more money, but certainly an all full will be getting more money, but certainly an awful of questions particularly about social care. how that integrated system the government wants is going to work in practice. joining me now is lucy watson, chair of the patients association. your reaction to the announcement of an extra £20 billion a year? our reaction is of course that this is good news, more funding coming into the nhs will stop at our concern would be that all the reviews undertaken and analysis of what the nhs needs is that it is going to be enough. it won‘t be enough to just
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bring the nhs back to where it needs to be asked of the years of austerity. so patients won't notice any difference? i think they will notice some difference. hopefully they will see some improvements in terms of the workforce and staffing, but that will take time as it takes time to train staff. but i don‘t think the nhs will be able to do all the things that the government say they would like it to achieve. isn't they would like it to achieve. isn't the point that this is the moment, and the prime minister wants a ten year review from nhs authors, the moment where we work out what the nhs is for? absolutely. what would —— what we would be saying really strongly is that this money must be used for community services to be able to help the poor stay well at home, prevents people going into. apart from people who really need it. our population has changed, patients are older and frailer. i‘m sorry, we are having terrible
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sound problems. you are talking about social care. no, notjust social care, proper community health services. the sorts of services that can be provided in people‘s homes, district nursing services, the investment needed in primary care. as having services that are joined and coordinated people get tired —— get qera when they need it. would people be prepared to pay more tax to do this? i think that is the general consensus. people value their health service. they value particularly this year when we are celebrating that the nhs is 70, they value what the nhs has meant to us for the last and the years. without this money, what with the future look like for the nhs?|j
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this money, what with the future look like for the nhs? i think the future would look very bleak. we have already seen people having to wait much longerfor have already seen people having to wait much longer for surgery, have already seen people having to wait much longerfor surgery, wait have already seen people having to wait much longer for surgery, wait a long time in ama, agents worrying about weather they will get safe ca re about weather they will get safe care because of the huge demands. —— in accident and emergency. i think the future would look bleak without this money. thank you very much. thank you. three men — who are believed to have been in their 20s — have been killed in south london after being hit by a train. british transport police have confirmed they‘re investigating whether the men were graffiti artists. officers were called to the incident near brixton at around 7:30am this morning. superintendent matthew allingham is from the british transport police — he gave this update to our correspondent sophie long a few moments ago. we were called to loughborough junction at 7:34am this morning, to reports of three bodies on the tracks. when we attended, it was quite evident that we had three males that had been hit by a train. we know the identity of one of those males and we‘ve spoken to the next of kin,
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in relation to that. however, we still don‘t know the identity of two of them. all we know is that they are male and in their 20s. what lines of inquiry are you following at the moment? have you got any idea why possibly they were on the track? our main lines of inquiry at the moment are cctv, forensics and also if there were any witnesses. we don‘t know why they were on the tracks, we are trying to ascertain that. we are trying to ascertain how they actually accessed the tracks, as well. but the main line of inquiry at the moment is to try to identify them, so we can speak to the next of kin and let them know. what stage is that at, at the moment? like i said, we have identified one and we are working on trying to identify the other two. local people talking about three graffiti artists being on the track, graffiting, is that one possibility? it is one possibility. can you confirm they weren‘t working as part of the rail network? they weren‘t employed to be on the line? no, they weren‘t. what‘s the next stage? the train that went through at 7:34am noticed
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three males on the tracks. we are trying to ascertain which train that was. it have been during the hours of darkness. if there are other graffiti artists on the tracks... clearly being on anywhere with track is a very dangerous situation. there is a massive risk. you‘re watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. the prime minister admits that taxes will have to rise to pay
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for a multi—billion pound spending increase for the nhs. three people die after being hit by a train in south london. it‘s understood that spray cans were found at the scene. an urgent question in the house of commons over cannabis oil treatment — as 12—year—old billy caldwell is discharged from hospital after a health scare. more now on the announcement from the prime minister that the nhs will be given an extra 20 billion pounds a year by 2023, as part of a new long—term funding plan for the health service. with me now is siva anandaciva, chief analyst at the king‘s fund, a think tank specialising in health care policy. this looks like a lot of money.
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this looks like a lot of moneym isa this looks like a lot of moneym is a substantial amounts. it is well over £100 billion. a large amount of money but there are questions over weather it is large enough to see all the changes and improvements that people want. the criticism is that people want. the criticism is that it that people want. the criticism is thatitis that people want. the criticism is that it is just enough to keep things as they are. it is substantial but less than what many organisations thought was needed. we got 4% on year increase is needed not just to got 4% on year increase is needed notjust to maintain services but to transform them, to improve how primary care and general practice works. to improve, or blurred the boundaries between mental and physical health or between health and social care. we were hoping for more funding. social care does seem to be at the heart of what everyone says will be crucial for the next ten, 20 years. more and more people will be over the age of 85 than ever before. absolutely. we have an ageing population. if the last few yea rs have ageing population. if the last few years have taught us anything, it is how closely related the health and social care systems are. you can‘t
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find one part and expect that the whole system will perform well in the face of that rising demand. we urgently need a social care funding settle m e nt urgently need a social care funding settlement as much as we needed this nhs funding settlement will stop the criticism we hear every time is that the more money put into the nhs, the more it‘s wasted. the more money put into the nhs, the more it's wasted. if you look at the evidence, since the recession, the nhs's evidence, since the recession, the nhs‘s productivity has outperformed the general economy. £1 of investment in the nhs is worthwhile. but we need to really celebrate our expectations have not expect too much. we have 100,000 workforce shortages in the nhs, chronic underinvestment in buildings and maintenance. this additional funding will take time before it makes some difference in patient care. you will also have called for this is —— for this to be the moment when we rethink what the nhs is for, at its heart. treating people who are ill or is it for helping others less
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fortu nate or is it for helping others less fortunate with other issues? which some would regard as not illnesses. the core principles of the nhs that it is universal, everyone can access it, other offences, a wide range of treatments, and free at the point of use. there is limited appetite to fundamentally change those principles. what the public sees is a service that hasn‘t got the funding. or they prepared to pay more in taxes to fund it? good question. when we have looked that polling, it is quite surprising how consistent the messages. over 60% of people we polled, regardless of age, economic status, they are willing to put their hands in their pockets to provide additional taxation, additional revenue to fund the nhs. thank you very much. thank you. england open their world cup campaign today as they take
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on tunisia in volgograd in the far south of russia. gareth southgate says his young squad has a hunger and desire for success and is looking forward to getting going. our news correspondent sarah rainsford gave us the latest and spoke to fans outside the volgograd stadium the noise is getting louder. i don‘t know how much you can hear and see behind me but there is a big crowd of tunisian fans who have been bouncing and singing and waving their flags will stop using players outside the stand zone or other bands have been watching the previous match. the tunisian fans be in the majority of the moment. after a fairly low profile
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day yesterday, a lot of people have headed into volgograd today wearing their england shirts and flying the flag. there are a couple of england fans with me here, you have come all the way from... phoenix, arizona. cheltenham, england. how he found the atmosphere? friendly. brilliant. there was a bit of concern about what kind of greeting england fans would get here, especially after the 2016 euros. have you had any concern about the mood here? nothing, it has been brilliant. lots of friendly faces. he told you are from england and they high five and try speak english to you. how about with the tunisian fans? very lively, as you can tell. everyone in party spirit. not many people here from england? no, in moscow, very few. i probably counted about five england shirts and half of those were worn by people who were not english. we have seen a few since we have been here. tonight i think there will be more than you see now. things are building up now. the numbers growing. i have been told it is the lowest number of inward getting livelier.
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let‘s go inside the stadium as natalie... gareth southgate talking about hunger and desire. that‘s certainly true of the midges! it has been horrendous. i was here at 9pm last night, the same time as kick—off will be here. we are two hours ahead of the uk. they are out in force. no amount of hair spray can stop them. the players will be covered in them. let me give you a tour. it is around 29 degrees here. as sarah said, quite a low figure in terms of england fans coming. we are told 2,100 tickets have been bought by when fans. by england fans.
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but 42 and a half thousand tickets have been sold which is 3,000 short of the capacity of this volgograd arena. an arena cost £205 million to put up. the third biggest of all the stadiums aperture and on. the third biggest of all the stadiums. tickets are still on sale so it could be that some other bands will arrive. we are expecting a lot of locals. england will still feel their presence. two people have been charged with minor lizard —— hooliganism offences. two british people, minor hooliganism offences and being drunk in public. the government‘s position on the medicinal use of cannabis oil will be set out in the house of commons later this afternoon. campaigners are pressing ministers on the issue following the case of billy caldwell, a 12—year—old boy who was discharged from hospital earlier today.
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his supply of cannabis oil, to relieve epilepsy, was seized from his mother at heathrow airport. the case prompted health secretary jeremy hunt to suggest a review of the law was under way, but that was later denied by downing street. his mother charlotte spoke outside the hospital, where she said she wants an urgent meeting with ministers. i am now calling for an urgent meeting with the health secretary and the home secretary. and in that order. i will share with them my experience, which, no matter what anyone says, cannot possibly be imagined by anybody else. i will ask them to urgently implement a programme that now provides immediate access to the meds that billy so desperately needs. and now, more urgently than ever, the many children and families that have been affected by this historic development. i will also ask them to implement a review of how the government,
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our government, our uk government, can make cannabis—based medication available to all patients who urgently require it in our country. earlier, my colleague richard galpin spoke from outside the hospital. yes, i think charlotte caldwell has had a significant impact with the press conferences she has been holding over the past few days. she has really got steam behind her. it seems the health secretary, jeremy hunt, she feels is on her side and has high hopes that they will be able to act quickly. having said that, jeremy hunt has said it could be months, but the family here are hoping that they can turn it around within a matter of days. she has been saying, the mother, that she had a team of people around her who have come up with a solution for being able to make use of this cannabis oil
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legal, and have been working on this for some time and can present this to the various ministries. therefore she is hopeful that things can turn around very quickly. she is saying there are hundreds of people across britain who need this treatment. it‘s notjust about her family, her son, billy, it‘s about a large number of people suffering from epilepsy and for whom the normal drugs are not working. she quoted a figure to us that there are around 64,000 people in britain suffering from epilepsy, 30% of whom, the normal drugs don‘t work. these are thousands of people who could potentially benefit from the medicinal use of this cannabis oil. thank you. we are awaiting an urgent question on this issue when the house of
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commons. they are talking about the use of medicinal cannabis. we will ta ke use of medicinal cannabis. we will take you there as soon as that question is asked. addiction to electronic games has been formally recognised as a medical disorder by the world health organisation. the change means sufferers will be eligible for treatment on the nhs. to be diagnosed, players will have to demonstrate that, for at least a year, the addiction has significantly impaired their lives. zoe kleinman reports. for plenty of people, young and old, video gaming is fun, an exciting escape from reality that gives you the opportunity to do things that you wouldn‘t dream of doing in real life. the good thing about fortnight is the graphics and, like, how you can play with people, your friends, online and people around the world. my favourite computer game is probably fifa because i spend the most time on it, now. most of my friends play that, now. but, for some, there‘s a darker side, when gaming becomes something you simply can‘t stop doing. it‘s beyond frightening watching your own child deteriorate
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like that, at such a rate. he was hospitalised at christmas. and couldn‘t function. so, he wasn‘t washing, eating, so, yes, by the time it got to that... and then because he wasn‘t going out, he became too frightened to go to school. a recent study by oxford university found that gaming was less addictive than gambling, but if you do have a problem, currently, you might find it difficult to get help. there are no designated treatment providers at the moment in the nhs, dealing with gaming disorder. my wish for the future is that these centres do get set up, in order for parents, for families, who are beginning to struggle with their children, in order for them to receive the education and support they need. the uk games industry is critical of the latest report. it means treatment will now have
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to be made available on the nhs, with private consultants already seeing increased demand. darren bett has the weather. hello. more and more cloud spilling into western parts right now. further research, particularly england, more sunshine and quite a bit warmer than yesterday. mid 20s. more cloud further west, windy in the north west of scotland were we have a few showers. increasing cloud across wing —— england and wales. drizzle here and there, mainly over the hills of wales. clearer skies for northern ireland and scotland.
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fresher air here, eight or 9 degrees. morse humid further south. 18a minimum degrees. morse humid further south. 18 a minimum in the centre of london. either side of that weather front, bringing in the clouds, some more persistent rain. that will be pushing towards northern ireland during the second half of tuesday. arriving in scotland overnight. not much rain for england and wales. brighter skies and some sunshine in the south—east. temperatures again into the mid—20s. cooler under the rain further north. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. the prime minister admits that taxes will have to rise to pay for a £20 billion pound spending increase for the nhs. labour says the settlement is not enough. three people die after being hit by a train in south london. it‘s understood that spray cans were found at the scene. 12—year—old billy caldwell is discharged from hospital after a health scare following the confiscation last week
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of his supply of cannabis oil. his case has prompted an urgent question in the house of commons over the legality of cannabis oil treatment. that‘s coming up very shortly and we‘ll bring it to you live when it happens. sport now on afternoon live with hugh. there seems to be a feeling of real optimism around the england squad? it is something we always have but without any back—up at all! it is something we always have but without any back-up at all! you are right, there is a sense of optimism. it is such an experienced squad. right from the moment the squad was announced, all 23 players were made available to the media before they flew out to russia. that was an unprecedented move by the fa. captain harry kane and team—mates have been open, honest and engaging.
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that is something which has helped bridge gap between the public and the players which had not existed going into previous tournaments. the only issue had been about raheem sterling‘s gun tattoo. he did receive support after that. the manager gareth southgate believes the relationship between the players and the public is important. there has been a lot of perception about our players for some time and i don't believe that is the truth. it is good for the public to see with how much it means to the players to play. to see the different sides of their personality. and as harry says, it is how they perform and how we play in this tournament. there is a bigger picture for us but with a young group of players who i think we'll be together for a long time, i think it is important that people see the enthusiasm and the hunger that they have got to play for their country. also gareth southgate is
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one of the reasons why the relationship has changed completely because he has encouraged the relationship between the media and his players. what can we expect, four or 5—0? england might have a challenge because we do have a certain perception when it comes to smaller footballing nations, but tunisia are the highest ranked african team at the highest ranked african team at the world. they recently provided very stiff opposition to spain and portugal so it will be a pretty tricky first game for england, especially given they do have an inexperienced squad. frank lampard hopes youthfulness can be a positive for them. it will be incredible. i can imagine how they feel because i had ita
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it a long time ago. that first one, especially when you are this long into the tournament, this build—up of watching everyone us play, you're desperate to get out there and do it yourself. there will be a mixture of excitement and nerves amongst the hall. i hope it is that fearlessness of youth where they have not been there before and they have not suffered before at a world cup, hopefully they will use it in the right way because we have a lot of young talent in the team. well, also in england‘s group belgium face panama in a game you can watch on bbc one at 4. there has already been one match completed today and saw the video assistant referee involved once again, as sweden beat south korea 1—0, watched by nick parrott. exactly the stadiums that world cups or almost a given. unfortunately, the quality of the matches played within cannot be guaranteed. sweden have not won their opening game since they hosted the tournament in 1958. what they would have given to field their recent icon. the first shotin field their recent icon. the first shot in this match took 20 minutes to arrive, the second longest wait to arrive, the second longest wait to final since 1966. south korea we re eve n to final since 1966. south korea were even worse, failing to register
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a single shot on target. both sides tried to register penalties but the officials did not fall for the antics. the video assistant referee intervened in the second half. the outcome, a spot kick to sweden with the captain leading by example. that was as good as the finishing got. not that the swedish bands were complaining. their team are top of their group alongside mexico. with wimbledon nowjust two weeks away, the grass court season is under way at queen‘s club. and we‘ve already had a first british defeat. cameron norrie proved light work for three—time grand slam champion stan wawrinka. the swiss player is currently well down the world rankings after an injury lay—off but looks to be back into the swing of things, winning in straight sets against the british number two. england will be without two of their all—rounders for the rest of their one day series against australia. chris woakes has injured a thigh muscle while ben stokes is recovering from a torn hamstring. neither have played in the series which england lead 2—0. that‘s all the sport for now.
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we will have more for you in the next hour. we are scheduled to go to the house of commons for a statement on the use of medicinal use of cannabis oil. a senior expert in fire safety standards has been giving evidence at the inquiry into the grenfell tower disaster. dr barbara lane said that the fire escape doors had not been replaced since 1974 and would not pass current safety standards. we can go back to the house of commons for the urgent question on the use of medicinal cannabis oil. minister nick hurd. mr speaker, over
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the weekend, my right honourable friend the home secretary issued an emergency licence to allow billy caldwell‘s medicinal team to access cannabis —based medicine. this was a procedure led by a senior clinician with the support of the medical director at chelsea and westminster hospital. i‘m sure the whole house will want tojoin hospital. i‘m sure the whole house will want to join me hospital. i‘m sure the whole house will want tojoin me in expressing genuine concern for billy‘s health, and will be pleased with the news that he has been discharged from hospital today. the course of action in this case, mr speaker, was unprecedented. i should explain that ourguiding unprecedented. i should explain that our guiding principle is that any principle must be clinical lead and evidence —based. today put up policy has been to permit the production, supply and production of raw cannabis, solely for research purposes under a home office licence. the cannabis —based medicine is currently the only one
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that can be prescribed in the uk because there is a proven case for its safety and efficacy. however, this case and that of our feeding me and others, has shone a light on the use of cannabis —based medicine in this country, and highlighted the need for the government to explore theissue need for the government to explore the issue further and our handling of these issues further. i recognised the need to ensure the approach to licensing works more effectively. as a first step, i can announce today that the government is establishing an expert panel of clinicians to advise ministers on any individual applications to prescribe cannabis —based medicines. this is consistent with the principle that a clinician must be at the heart of the process. and i have asked dame sally davis if she would take forward this important work. let me be clear. whether home
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secretary and die, as fathers, as the rest of the house, as the rest of the country have been profoundly moved by billy‘s stories, as well as others like it. but i want to reassure the families and the public today that home secretary and i are working together to do all we can to ta ke forward working together to do all we can to take forward the necessary steps at pace and more announcements will be forthcoming. i would like to thank the ministerfor coming forthcoming. i would like to thank the minister for coming to the house to discuss this urgent question, but now the home secretary has conceded that cannabis have medicinal benefits by crunching the urgent licence, when can we expect to see more import licences to make cannabis available to all that would benefit? and moreover, world the government support my honourable friend for newport west‘s bill on the legalisation of cannabis for medicinal purposes when it returns onjuly the medicinal purposes when it returns on july the 6th? medicinal purposes when it returns
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onjuly the 6th? on 20th of february and urgent question was raised about alfred in new‘s case. billy caldwell is in exactly the same situation. the minister told the house he would undertake to explore every option within the current regulatory framework. 119 days later the government still has not granted alfie being leaked his medicine, medicine available in 37 other countries # alfie dingley. billy caldwell, hospitalised last week, it is excellent news that he is out from hospital today. but after having his prescribed medical cannabis taken off him by customs officers. and honourable members will have heard with alarm the health secretary say this morning it will take months before a system is in place to get medicinal cannabis applies to children, but it is not just these children, it is to other
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patients who require this. will the minister give an assurance that when alfie dingley comes to parliament on wednesday with his mother, he will have had his medicine? moreover, i have had his medicine? moreover, i have two children in my constituency, the only two in wales, two of 15 in the uk who have a very rare genetic disorder, a serious life limiting condition. charlie jones is six and the other is one. both suffer from debilitating seizures and both would benefit hugely from using medicinal cannabis according to their consultant with whom i spoke to earlier. charlie‘s grandad in gilmore has been in contact with the home office since 2014 when he learned of the benefits of cannabis for charlie. but he has been given conflicting advice, he has been passed from pillar to post and fobbed off. can the minister say when his department will get a grip of these procedures? why the delay
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until now? why is his announcement —— why is an announcement not being made today that this medicine will be available now to all who need it? and many patients are illegally... and many patients are illegally... and this is what i have a problem with. many patients are illegally accessing cannabis which opens them up accessing cannabis which opens them up to using the wrong form of the drug. the government has a duty to protect these patients and sufferers and when will it act? order. forgive me. i have granted this question because it is urgent, but the honourable lady has already exceeded hertime by honourable lady has already exceeded her time by 50%. honourable lady has already exceeded hertime by 50%. i honourable lady has already exceeded her time by 50%. i assume she is drawing towards a conclusion, very briefly, with a couple of question marks? why is the government stuck in the dark ages? what can the government do to speed up this process ? government do to speed up this process? next week, next month, in due course, these answers are simply not good enough, minister. due course, these answers are simply not good enough, ministerlj due course, these answers are simply not good enough, minister. i think the honourable lady for those long
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list of questions and i will do my best to answer them. she asked about recognition of medical benefits of some cannabis —based medicine. that is, as! some cannabis —based medicine. that is, as i said in my response to the urgent question, already recognised by the fact that for example, one drug can be prescribed in the uk because there is a proven case for its safety and efficacy. it has been tested. she will know the responsibility the government has to meg shall medicines are safe. there is within the system are licensed to prescribe medicines once they are established and tested. she mentioned the case of alfie dingley which i‘m very familiar with and close to and i made it clear at this dispatch box, however, we may feel about the current rules, i undertook
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to try and find a solution within the existing rules for alfie dingley. it is unprecedented territory because it is the first time we are considering a personal licence. this is new ground for eve ryo ne licence. this is new ground for everyone but i can confirm to her as i confirmed to the family, that that process of applying for a licence to find a long—term sustainable legal solution for alfie is well under way will stop it is now clearly clinically led, and i have given assurances that we will drive the process as hard as possible, and indeed, a date has been set for a compliance visit which is a necessary pa rt compliance visit which is a necessary part of the process. we are pushing that as hard as possible andi are pushing that as hard as possible and i would like to place on record my thanks and appreciation and respect for the dignity of patients, of alfie‘s family and this difficult situation. she challenges us to change fast will stop what i think i
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have made clear is the recognition that we do, as prime minister said this morning, we have to look very ha rd this morning, we have to look very hard at our processes and how we handle these situations and make sure as the health secretary made clear today, that our policy is fully up—to—date in terms of the best possible understanding of the most used —— recent guidance. we have to get the detail right. we do not have the luxury of opposition. we have to work through the detailed get this right. there is a recognition today in our statement that not only are we taking immediate steps to improve our processes so it is more clinically led than it is at the moment, with the introduction of a new clinically led panel of experts to advise ministers, but i have also indicated that we are taking a wider look at policy processes and will be making forthcoming announcements. iain duncan smith. i welcome my
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honourable friend‘s statement. i am by no means a supporter of recreational cannabis use. however, i woman recreational cannabis use. however, iwomani recreational cannabis use. however, i woman i know was given two weeks to live with a diagnosis of a tumour on the brain. there was nothing more they could do. she took to using a form of this and for the last seven or eight years has notjust reduced it but got rid of this tumour and now basically runs her own company which she started. the point i would make is somewhat wider than this. the biggest problem he faces is the health department —— in the health department it is not considered a good thing to do to investigate the properties of this particular drug. i would urge him to get some coalition on this to get this investigated, because there clearly are medicinal reparations which could be used and it would be really helpful if he made sure he drove that. i suspect everyone in the house have personal knowledge of
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people indirectly or directly, of people indirectly or directly, of people who swear by the benefits of cannabis —based medicine. it has helped them in very difficult circumstances. i completely do understand that. to his point about building a coalition across government of updating the evidence, i think government of updating the evidence, ithinki government of updating the evidence, i think i have said more than my remarks that is exactly what is happening. i have the minister of health sitting alongside him and i refer him to the comments that the secretary of state for health made this morning which make it clear that the government issues are looking again at our processes and how we handle these cases. diane abbott. is the minister aware that the public is increasingly dismayed by the government‘s handling of this question of cannabis oil for medical use? and let me remind the minister that the concentration of the releva nt that the concentration of the relevant compounds in cannabis oil is so small that nobody could
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possibly get any recreational use from it. iaccept possibly get any recreational use from it. i accept the home secretary moves swiftly to allow short—term supply for billy caldwell, but overall, the government‘s management of the current system of issuing licences for cannabis oil has been lamentable. it has left people in pain and suffering and families anxious and distraught. it seems to us on the side of the house that the current system, even with the expert panel he refers to, is simply not fit for purpose. this is why labour in government, mindful that this oil is legal in many otherjurisdictions will move towards a legal framework which allows the prescription of cannabis oil for medical use. which allows the prescription of cannabis oilfor medical use. we believe that such a move, taken with
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all due care and tests and so forth, would have support on both sides of the house, and would be welcomed by the house, and would be welcomed by the british public, who are weary of the british public, who are weary of the chaos and the confusion and the personal tragedies caused by the government‘s current management of the system. i thank the right honourable lady for recognising the speed of movement this week by the home office in response to an emergency request from clinical leads at chelsea and westminster. the home secretary overruled nothing in this process. we work together very closely during this week and responded, as i said, very decisively to an emergency request for a limited license and direct call from the senior clinician and medical director at chelsea and westminster. i do understand the points she made about public
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sentiment on this. i think people are unsettled by what they have seen as we totally understand. what i do regret, and i regret she is trying to make a party political point about this, because she was in power and labour were about this, because she was in power and labourwere in about this, because she was in power and labour were in powerfor a long time. they did the square root of very little in this context in the system we are trying to work with and the rules we have we inherited from the last labour government. i don‘t think anyone in politics is in a position to take a moral high stand on this issue. we have to undertake that policy and processes are most informed by the most up—to—date evidence and we challenge ourselves further to make sure our processes a re ourselves further to make sure our processes are more clinically led in the past. doctor caroline johnson. i refer members to my declaration of interests as a consultant paediatrician. some compounds with cannabis do have anti—convulsants properties. one has been shown in
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animal studies to show it has anti—kearns olsen properties. but another has anti—and pro—convulsive properties and they may be responsible for causing psychological problems like psychosis if it is used over a long period. a pharmaceutical grade project is made with cannabis oil and is legal in this country and in children. the oil is available on the internet or at health food shops are not subject to that scrutiny, do not have the same level of quality assurance and have various levels of consideration. does my right honourable friend agree with me that there is a huge difference between these two products, the quality assured one and the not quality assured one and the not quality assured one, and what we need to do is investigate the best possible scientific evidence to assure that
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the usage and benefits of cannabis —based medicines so they can be used properly to the best effect on our patients? i deferred to my honourable friend‘s medical knowledge and her intervention reinforces the point i am making that this process has to be clinically led as far as possible. with certain cannabis medicines the evidence is at best mixed. she makes a fundamental point about our responsibilities as regulators, to make sure that people are accessing using products which are tried and tested and safe as possible. imagine the consequences of prescribing an unregulated medicine that goes wrong. imagine the scenes in this house. in our understandably emotional response to recent events, we must also make sure that we do policy right and get it right. that is why we require a little bit more time to come back to the house with
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more detailed plans. the scottish national party is in favour of the decriminalisation of cannabis for medicinal use, given the evidence of the benefits it has in alleviating some serious conditions, such as that suffered by young billy caldwell and young alfie dingley. what we would like the government to do is look very seriously at the evidence for decriminalising the use of cannabis for medicinal use. if they‘re not prepared to do that, we would like them to devolve the power to scotland so the scottish government can take steps. i stress we would like to see this done for everybody in the uk. i have two questions for him. when can we expect the government to look seriously at the evidence and bring forward these matters for proper debate in this house? and if that is not going to happen, when will he allow the scottish government to ta ke allow the scottish government to take the appropriate steps for people in scotland? thank you. can i thank the honourable lady for that
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question. she is absolutely right to insist on the importance of an evidence —based approach. the home office does regularly keep evidence under review. as i have said that this dispatch box before, one of the key milestones in this process is to review what the who feel about this as they are conducting a major review on that. what we are actively considering now, as to whether there is an outlet for taking more urgent steps in terms of reviewing the evidence and the processes and the way we handle these cases and i will keep the house informed of it. does my right honourable friend accept that there is nothing new and no inherent contradiction in having available for medicinal use it dipped to drugs, which one would not allow for recreational use, and can i illustrate this by my personal experience 32 years ago, when recovering from severe back surgery, when i was given a rather pleasant
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drug for which i asked for a repeat prescription, only to be told that as more fear, which is what it was, was related to heroin, there were limits on how much they could give me. white can‘t common—sense prevail in the case of marijuana as in that case as well —— morphia. in the case of marijuana as in that case as well —— morphialj in the case of marijuana as in that case as well -- morphia. i thank my right honourable friend for sharing that personal experience. i understand the point he makes, we are absolutely serious about reviewing urgently our processes and policy in this area to make sure we are consistent and as up—to—date as possible. i have signalled today that we have recognised that we need to make some changes in how we handle these cases, which is why i have introduced the first step that will be taken today. norman lamb. thank you. isn‘t it actually utterly
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shameful that in this country we continue to criminalise people who use cannabis in various forms form additional purposes, including the release of pain, pushing people into the hands of criminals who have no interest in their welfare at all? and what on earth is a home office minister doing responding to a health issue? surely it should be the responsibility for the department of health? to the two points. the honourable gentleman and igo points. the honourable gentleman and i go back a long way and i have a great deal of respect for his position and experience. in terms of the rules, they are as they are and as he is a former minister, he knows ministers are bound by the rules. we can debate in this place and we can challenge in this place as i think we are beginning to do, whether those rules are fit for purpose. that is the right thing to do in a representative parliament. in terms of my role, i have signalled today that we are looking again very clearly at our processes and how
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these cases are handled, and i have signalled freie clearly that we believe strongly these need to be more clinically led, hence the appointment of a panel —— i have signalled very clearly. and we will consider how we handle these cases more effectively than in the past. can my right honourable friend give an assurance that having taken this important initiative, other similar cases will be treated with similar leniency now and not wait for the wheels of government to grind along slowly? i don't think the wheels of government have moved slowly this week at all, far from it, government have moved slowly this week at all, farfrom it, in response to an emergency request. we issued... studio: we will leave nick hurd there. his announcement that the government is establishing an expert panel of clinicians to advise on the medicinal and fits of cannabis, headed up by dame sally davies, the
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chief medical officer. he said the billy caldwell case had shone a light on the use of medicinal cannabis and highlighted the need to explore it further. diane abbott for labour said it was amicable and had left people in pain and suffering. —— lamentable and had left people in pain. now the weather. hello. the temperature in the south—east of the uk is not far behind that of all the grad in russia. on the scene at the moment and for the next couple of days will be this band of cloud here which will bring rain to northern parts of the uk. precious little in the south—east where it has been very dry. cloud coming across scotland and western areas of the uk. though the east we have more sunshine and it is warmer. quite ugly feel. temperatures will get into the mid—20s across the south—east ——
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quite a muggy feel. it is still quite a muggy feel. it is still quite windy in the north west of scotland. overnight we will see cloudy skulls pushing down across england and wales. some drizzle across the western hills. clearer skies for the far north of england and scotland. it is difficult for sleeping in the south with 18 the minimum temperature in london. we saw the cloud early on, that will thicken up on a little ripple on the weather front and that will bring thicker cloud and outbreaks of rain and that is probably setting in through the day across northern ireland, arriving in scotland after dark. ahead of it a few pockets of drizzle here and there. further east it will be dry and bright. temperatures again like today into the mid—20s. much coolerfurther north and west with rain setting in across northern ireland. we have our
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coming from different directions. for the south that is coming in from the south—west, much warmer. cooler north—westerly coming into the northern half of the uk. that weather front will move southwards and drag the cooler fresher air across the whole country. this band of cloud moves its way southwards, there will not be much rain on that. we get sunny spells following on behind. blustery showers returning to the north—west of scotland. it is much cooler and fresher. the heat is still there for one more day across the south—east of england and east anglia. temperatures could get higher than the mid—20s but it will be cooler and fresher everywhere by thursday. theresa may promises a £20 billion injection into the nhs —
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but taxes will have to rise to pay for it. across the nation, taxpayers will have to contribute a bit more, in a fair and balanced way, to support the nhs we all use. three people die after being hit by a train in south london. it‘s understood that spray cans were found at the scene. as 12—year—old billy caldwell is discharged from hospital, ministers agree to an expert panel to advise on the medical use of cannabis in future cases. gaming addiction is formally recognised as a mental health condition for the first time. he can‘t function because he can‘t live in a world outside of the gaming. to the point where he was hospitalised and he hasn‘t been to school for a year. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport. hugh. well, we are only talking about one
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thing, england expects. we should get used to talking about england at the world cup. the first matches england against tunisia and they go into it with renewed vigour. darren is with a few daisies. yes, but a secret, i am in the studio in front of green screen. don‘t a tell anybody! warm weather across the east, more cloud is coming again bringing grain but once again, england and wales should be warm and humid and it should be generally dry. all the details later. mf generally dry. all the details later. mp has generally dry. all the details later. mf hasjust been shattered! thank you very much. also coming up — we‘re live in the house of commons for an urgent question following the controversial blocking of a bill to criminalise so—called "upskirting". hello, everyone. this is afternoon live. theresa may has said the nhs is the government‘s ‘number one‘ spending priority,
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as she announced a new long—term funding plan for the health service. the prime minister says the nhs will be given an extra £20 billion a year by 2023, but she warned taxpayers would have to pay more for it. there has been controversy over her claim that the extra spending could be paid for, in part, by what she called a ‘brexit dividend‘. the health secretary has said any savings from brexit would not be ‘anything like enough‘, and labour said the claim was ‘not credible‘. our political correspondent, jonathan blake, reports. let me introduce my team. hello, nice to meet you. under pressure at work — her, as well as them. the prime minister met staff in london this morning, before delivering the news they had been waiting to hear — the government will put more money into the health service, long term. more money is needed to keep pace with the growing pressures on the nhs. but it‘s notjust a question of more money this year or next. to deliver the world—class care we all want and expect, the nhs needs to be able to plan for the future with
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ambition and confidence. theresa may has announced the nhs in england will get an extra £20 billion a year by 2023. over the next five years, there will be an average increase in funding of 3.4%. so, where is the money coming from? remember this? the prime minister claims money saved by leaving the eu will in part fund her cash boost for the nhs. that‘s made brexit supporters in her own party very happy. as the prime minister has rightly said, it is a downpayment on future receipts that will come into this country as a result of discontinuing payments to brussels. but critics say, in the short term, there will be less to spend after brexit, not more. some in theresa may‘s own party say talk of a brexit dividend is misleading. the government are deciding to bring back this referendum, very toxic, divisive debate back into the nhs proposals. i just don‘t see why they are doing it.
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certainly, to my mind, the figures don‘t stack up. is the brexit dividend real? the health secretary and other cabinet ministers called into number ten this morning know that to pay for this plan, the government will have to raise taxes. that is politically sensitive for a conservative government — difficult decisions put off for another day. in all likelihood, if the prime minister is being honest with us, she is probably planning to raise taxes or raise borrowing in order to fund this. this ain‘t coming from brexit. theresa may has taken a gamble. by linking her nhs funding announcement to the controversial claim that money will be saved as a result of brexit, she has handed the brexiteers a victory. but with key votes in parliament this week and tough negotiations coming in brussels, she may well be expecting concessions from them in return. more money for the nhs will nearly always be a popular move. raising taxes to pay for it could be a harder sell, but one way or another, the government will have to find
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the money — now theresa may has put her name to this promise. joining me now is professorjohn appleby, chief economist at the nuffield trust — a charity that seeks to improve healthcare through independent evidence and analysis. so, £20 billion a year sounds an awful lot of money. well, it is. to put that into context, the nhs every day spends about £410 million across the uk. so it is big business, the nhs, and health care is a big spender. 20 billion is a lot of money so it is good news. it has been used to 1% real rise above inflation over the last eight years and the new announcement is not the 3.4% advertised, it is like 3%. it leaves out specific budgets like public health, medical training and other things. even so,
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public health, medical training and otherthings. even so, it public health, medical training and other things. even so, it is not a bad deal. the nhs is not starting from a flat ground, it is starting from a flat ground, it is starting from a flat ground, it is starting from a bit of a hole. does this dig them out of it? well, not instantly. we know over 4 million people on waiting lists for elective care. we know about a&e in terms of waiting times and difficulty getting a gp appointment. these things are not rectified instantly and the nhs, like all health care systems, it is labour—intensive and you have to employ the people and they are not readily available. let me just look at what the patients might notice. when this starts. will there be a difference? there will be, definitely. the money is meant to be flowing next april. so, 2019, 2020. i would not expect on april the 2nd, the start of the financial year,
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suddenly everything will be better and we will notice great things happening. i would expect the nhs to plan from now how it will spend this money. that is what she wants to hear? absolutely. she has outlined broad areas like mental health, cancer, prevention. something she did not quite touch on which the public will expect is that some of the headline targets on waiting times will be addressed and what one to see is that rather than going got, they going down. where does this put us in relation to other countries, we now nearer the top? that is interesting and the answer no, simply. we are about middle of the pack. if you look at the old eu 15 countries who we might want to compare ourselves with, we spend about 9.7% of gdp on both nhs and private and you have to add those together to compare with other countries. that puts us in the middle of the pack. this new money
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will add about 0.6%, 10.3, 10.4%. that leaves saw —— was almost exactly where we were in 2016, it is only 2023 when that kicks in. where other countries will be by then, we don‘t know. yes, it has improved the amount of money, the percentage of gdp putting into health care, but not so much compared to other countries. what about the nhs's ability to spend this wisely? there isa ability to spend this wisely? there is a perception every pound spent, and amount of that is just wasted, is that there? i don't think it is so much now. there was a complaint is that during the tony blair and gordon brown years when a lot of money did go into health care, that is what people wanted, there was a feeling even in the nhs that it was too much, too quickly. but there are issues about pay. public sector workers have had a pay freeze for a long time now. there is going to be
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a pay dealfor the nhs long time now. there is going to be a pay deal for the nhs which long time now. there is going to be a pay dealfor the nhs which i think is going to be funded on top of this extra money anyway. the nhs will learn the lessons of that, i think. the amounts going in not so great per year. big thing with this deal is, consistency. if it can really be guaranteed not just for five is, consistency. if it can really be guaranteed notjust for five years, but for ten years. but that takes us into another parliament and one parliament can‘t commit the future public finances for another parliament. we will see. that is the key to this. from the nuffield trust, thank you very much. thank you. three men, who are believed to have been in their twenties, have been killed in south london, after being hit by a train. british transport police have confirmed they‘re investigating whether the men were graffiti artists. officers were called to the incident, near brixton, at around half past seven this morning. superintendent matthew allingham is from the british transport police. he gave this update to our correspondent, sophie long. we were called to loughborough
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junction at 7:34am to reports of three bodies on the tracks. when we attended, it was quite evident that we had three males that had been hit bya train. we had three males that had been hit by a train. we know the identity of one of those males and we have spoken to the next of kin in relation to that however, we still don‘t know the identity of two of them, or we know is that they are male and in their 20s. what lines of inquiry are you following at the moment, have you got any idea what possibly they were on the tracks? our main lines of inquiry cctv, forensics and also if there are any witnesses. we don‘t know why they we re witnesses. we don‘t know why they were on the tracks, we are trying to ascertain that and we are trying to ascertain that and we are trying to ascertain how they are accessed the tracks as well. but the mainline inquiry is to identify them so we can speak to their next of kin and let them know. what stage is that bad at the moment? we have identified one and we‘re working out who the other two are at the moment. local people are talking about tree graffiti artists being on the
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tracks, is that one was ability? graffiti artists being on the tracks, is that one was ability7m is one possibility, yes. can you confirm they were not working as pa rt confirm they were not working as part of the rail network, there were not employed to be on the line? no, they were not. the identification of they were not. the identification of the other two? the identification of the other two? the identification of the two and find a train that hit the two and find a train that hit the individuals. we know it was not the individuals. we know it was not the trainer reported that, so take is true that, 7:34 a:m., passing through. the train going through noticed the three males on the track and reported that but it was not the train that hit individuals. so we are trying to ascertain which train that was. we know it was probably sometime prior to that. and it may have been during the hours of darkness. some lines of inquiry that we need to follow up. is this a problem, graffiti artist getting onto the tracks and putting themselves in danger, in this local area? clearly, being on any railway track is a very dangerous situation to be in. and when graffiti artists
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do get onto the tracks, that is a massive risk for them. the case of a severely ill 12—year—old boy, whose supply of cannabis oil was confiscated then released back to the family, has been raised in the commons in the last hour. billy caldwell was discharged from hospital earlier today — he‘d suffered relapses after the cannabis oil, to relieve epilepsy, was seized from his mother at heathrow airport. the government now says it is establishing an "expert panel" of clinicians to advise ministers in future cases where medicinal cannabis may be used. billy‘s mother, charlotte, spoke outside the hospital this morning, saying she wanted an urgent meeting with ministers. i am now calling for an urgent meeting with the health secretary and the home secretary. and in that order. i will share with them my experience, which, no matter what anyone says, cannot possibly be imagined by anybody else. i will ask them to urgently implement a programme that now
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provides immediate access to the meds that billy so desperately needs. and now, more urgently than ever, the many children and families that have been affected by this historic development. i will also ask them to implement a review of how the government, our government, our uk government, can make cannabis—based medication available to all patients who urgently require it in our country. well, in the last hour, the home office minister nick hurd told mps that billy‘s case had shone a light on the issue, but care had to be taken and doctors must be at the heart of the process. let me be clear, mr speaker, but the home secretary and i as fathers, as the rest of the house and the rest of the country have of course been profoundly moved by billy‘s story as well as others like it. but i want
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to reassure the families and the public today that the home secretary andi public today that the home secretary and i are working together to do all we can to take forward the necessary steps at pace and more announcements will be forthcoming. you‘re watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: the prime minister admits that taxes will have to rise to pay for a multi—billion pound spending increase for the nhs. three people die after being hit by a train in south london. it‘s understood that spray cans were found at the scene. as 12—year—old billy caldwell is discharged from hospital, ministers agree to an expert panel to advise on the medical use of cannabis in future cases. and in sport, england‘s players are in volgograd ahead of their first world cup match with tunisia later. manager gareth southgate says his players will have learned from the past mistakes, but will not be burdened by them. and in the first of three games today, sweden beat south korea 1—0 after the video assista nt south korea 1—0 after the video assistant referee again helped to reward a penalty, belgian and panama
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or in england‘s group and they are level. but‘s cameron norrie has been knocked out of queen‘s in the first round, beaten by three tank grand slam winner stan wawrinka 6—2, 6—3. —— three—time grand slam winner. i will be back with more of those stories just after half past. addiction to electronic games has been formally recognised as a medical disorder by the world health organisation. the change means sufferers will be eligible for treatment on the nhs. to be diagnosed, players will have to demonstrate that — for at least a year — the addiction has significantly impaired their lives. zoe kleinman reports. for plenty of people, young and old, video gaming is fun, an exciting escape from reality that gives you the opportunity to do things that you wouldn‘t dream of doing in real life. the good thing about fortnite is the graphics and, like,
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how you can play with people, your friends, online and people around the world. my favourite computer game is probably fifa because i spend the most time on it now. most of my friends play that now. but for some, there‘s a darker side, when gaming becomes something you simply can‘t stop doing. it‘s beyond frightening watching your own child deteriorate like that, at such a rate. he was hospitalised at christmas. and couldn‘t function. so, he wasn‘t washing, eating. so, yes, by the time it got to that... and then because he wasn‘t going out, he became too frightened to go to school. a recent study by oxford university found that gaming was less addictive than gambling, but if you do have a problem, currently, you might find it difficult to get help. there are no designated treatment providers at the moment in the nhs, dealing with gaming disorder. my wish for the future is that these centres do get set up, in order for parents, for families, who are beginning to struggle with their children,
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in order for them to receive the education and support they need. the uk games industry is critical of the latest report. it means treatment will now have to be made available on the nhs, with private consultants already seeing increased demand. psychologist richard tunney joins me now, from the university of nottingham. on the face of it, this looks a big deal. yes, it is quite interesting, it has been a long time coming. academics and clinicians have long debated the extent to which gaming and indeed gambling as behavioural problems can be classed in the same way as other
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substance addictions. because are you addicted before you take up the gaming or is it the playing of the game that makes you addicted? well, i think we have to be very cautious about demonising the games themselves and indeed, the people who exhibit these topological behaviours. my own view is that the majority of people can engage in many different kinds of activity in a recreational sense, without necessarily becoming addicted. so in excess of 80% of the population of the uk drink alcohol, a very small number of people become addicted and become alcoholics. and it is similar with gaming. the majority of people will enjoy games, it is healthy, normal activity. but a small number
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of people will exhibit abnormal behaviour around those games. and the debate is, whether or not we call that addiction. my own view is that the problem is not the games themselves, it is that we are now in a position where we can identify people who have problems and it becomes manifest in this way. for pa rents, becomes manifest in this way. for parents, this is difficult. where is that line between, they like gaming, they spend too much time on it, but at what point is that the problem? you as a psychologist would have to ask the same question to diagnose this. well, i think the key diagnostic marker that the world health organisation have identified is the same marker that‘s true or present in other addictive behaviours. that is a loss of control over a long period of time, in this case, 12 months. so, loss of control is one of the key defining
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markers of problem gambling. and as it is with problem behaviours with respect to other addictions. that is actually quite a rare symptom. and it is really quite extreme and excessive. so it is something above and beyond spending prolonged periods alone. it is much more than that. and i think it would clearly be manifest as an illness, as opposed to a hobby that people spend a lot of time doing. richard, what is it that people who play these games too much addicted to? some of the gamers introduce things where you have subplots you can bet on and they have a separate type of addiction, what is it about sitting there with a game that becomes something cute can‘t drag yourself
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away from? well, that is the real source of debate. we have two behavioural addictions now. we have gambling and we now have video gaming. the two quite similar in many respects. but it‘s difficult to see what the addictive property is when we compare it to things like alcohol and opioids. we know what the addictive substances. with behavioural addictions, the substance is difficult, if not impossible, to identify. with gambling, money is involved and it is clear psychologically that money has reinforcing properties to which the person who is likely to become, suffer from the person who is likely to become, sufferfrom addiction or the person who is likely to become, suffer from addiction or become dependent will spend an excessive amount of time and effort in
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pursuing. with gaming, it is even more difficult to identify what that substance is that is the nature of the debate. i am really grateful, it is good to talk to, thank you very much for your time this afternoon. straight to the house of commons. a debate on upskirting. in some circumstances, there is a gap in the law. offences may be used to capture upskirting but the public order offence is limited as the offence needs to take place in a public place and two people need to be present. conversely, the voyeurism offence needs to be a private act and must take place in a place where one would expect privacy. maybe activities photographed in schools which are not caught by either provision. this
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law will close the loophole and in short there is no doubt that this activity is criminal and not tolerated. we will also ensure that for the most serious sexual offences, the offender will also be placed on the sex offenders register. mr speaker, because upskirting is an invasion of privacy which leaves victims feeling humiliated, we will be bringing legislation before this house in government time to ensure that this practice becomes an offence. we will be introducing it in the house of commons on thursday, with a second reading before recess. the leadership that the honourable memberfor bath leadership that the honourable member for bath has shown and the outstanding campaign ofjean martin has shown how it is possible for individuals to make a difference and iam individuals to make a difference and i am looking forward to work in with collea g u es i am looking forward to work in with colleagues from across this house to progress this matter and make upskirting and offence.
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wera hobhouse. thank you, mr speaker, i thank the minister for thank you, mr speaker, i thank the ministerfor her thank you, mr speaker, i thank the minister for her response and the fantastic teamwork we have on the issue so far. does the minister share my appreciation of the prime minister saying on the andrew marr show yesterday that the practice of upskirting is degrading and offensive and she will take the bill and put it through government time? will the minister congratulate june martin and hellboy for this fantastic work to bring this issue as far as today. my bill remains on the box and will be reached again on friday the 6th ofjuly, will the minister provide me with a full timetable of the government‘s planned timetable for this proposed bill? the bill must travel to the commons and lords to become legislation. if the government does not introduce this legislation until the end ofjuly, these changes will not be in soon enough for the summer
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and they leave further potential victims vulnerable to this kind of file practice. it is a shame we are here today because of the right honourable member for christchurch objecting to the bill on friday. the private members‘ bill system must be modernised, but this is a matter of a difference day. the government must bring this important change to the law, making upskirting a specific offence, as soon as possible and will it ensure the bill has the full support of all its members? i think the honourable memberfor her comments and i do agree with the prime minister that upskirting should be an offence and it should be prosecuted. i understand, having spoken to gina martin, the offence and humiliation. our priority is that this will become an offence as soon as possible. we be it on thursday and i understand but this has considerable support across the
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house and i welcome that cross—party support. mrs maria miller... as you saw, the process of making upskirting a criminal offence, taking a step forward with the announcement of the government is to back a bill through the house of commons following the earlier on friday of wera hobhouse, who had tried to take a private members bill through the house that was stopped by sir christopher chope on friday. it has been picked up by the government and they will carry through their own bill. so a welcome response to the government announcement in the house and we will bring you more reaction to that a little later. england open their world cup campaign in less than three hours‘ time, as they take on tunisia in volgograd in southern russia. gareth southgate says his young squad has a ‘hunger‘ and ‘desire‘ for success and is looking forward to getting going. as indeed is sarah, who is outside
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the stadium. it looks a bit quiet for a few hours, the england fans actually there? they are here. they are a little bit shyer than the tunisian fans. but they are here, just not in great numbers. about 2,000 england fans have made it here to volgograd. this is not rio dejaneiro and perhaps thatis is not rio dejaneiro and perhaps that is one reason why and it is the politics preventing people and those worries about who" after what happened at the euros in 2016, clashes between russians and england supporters. not huge numbers for england, lively gradually livening up england, lively gradually livening up as the day has gone on. if we look around here, the crowd is building. the turnstiles are open and people are coming in. i was speaking to a russian girl outside and she said she had bought a ticket
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and she said she had bought a ticket and it was sold out so they are expecting a full stadium even if the english quota is quite small. i have heard this is the smallest number of england fans who have made it to any world cup in history. the england players have to be repellent because there is a huge midge problem! there is, although it has got better this evening. today, it was horrible. we were up by the amazing statue of mother russia on the hill and we were being attacked by swarms of these things and standstill for a minute and they jumped you. it was horrible but they are only midges having a nipple and nothing worse. people worrying about what it meant for the players. —— they were only having a bite. a month ago, his bride with sets aside and they have done it again and the hope is to hold the midges at bay and they would be replaced by mosquitoes! yes, they are only midges having a bite. you should be
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commenting on the game later! we will leave it there. sarah, in volgograd. let‘s look at the weather. darren is here with that. and we start with the football. the big game has kicked off, belgium against panama and the last i saw, it was 0—0. it is all ice on the stadium in southern russia between the black sea and the caspian sea. it is not affected by the sea, it is more by the long river. this is the longest river in europe, very close to the arena, which is why when the wind is light, you get these midges coming from the water. temperatures up to 27,28, from the water. temperatures up to 27, 28, so hotter than it has been. certainly hotter than where england are staying and training so this is quite different. it will be cooler by kick—off. it is getting dark. the
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sun is going down. temperatures pleasant, 21, 20 2 degrees. as you said quite rightly, england players will be repellent! i thought that was a good line! we had to wait how many years?‘ long—time! we had to wait how many years?‘ long-time! let's look at the forecast. at home, temperatures in the mid—20s in the south east of the uk. not far behind that of russia. this cloud will have the big impact, it will bring rain starting tomorrow across scotla nd bring rain starting tomorrow across scotland and northern ireland but little for england and wales. we have sunshine today across eastern parts of england, that was north yorkshire, this is in staffordshire and is much more cloudy with cloud spilling in to wales, western parts of england and northern ireland and scotland, so eastern areas with the best of the sunshine and best temperatures, so warmer than it has been over the weekend in eastern england. this evening and overnight, more and more cloud coming down
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across england and wales. it could be big enough to give pockets of drizzle. clearer skies for a while in northern ireland, northern ireland and scotland. we have cool and fresh air here some more co mforta ble and fresh air here some more comfortable night. in, not so further south under the cloud, temperatures no lower than 18 in central london. differences either side of that weather front. we saw the band of cloud on the weather front and that cloud is beginning to give this area of rain. through the afternoon in particular, we will see the rain set in across northern ireland. and eventually, reaching scotla nd ireland. and eventually, reaching scotland during the evening. across england and wales, still pockets of light rain or drizzle and a lot of clouds tomorrow. it should brighten in the south east and it should be quite warm, very muggy so not much sunshine needed to lift those temperatures. further north, north—westerly breeze and this is cooler, fresh air and to the south, we have warm and muggy airflow and the difference is either side of
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that weather front. as that move south, it introduces cooler and fresh air across more of the country on wednesday and by thursday. not much rain is left by the time we get to wednesday, it is dry by the morning in scotland and this rain is a band of cloud, patchy rain moving south across england and wales. north of it, we get sunshine, showers in the north west and it is quite a bit cooler. it is still warm and humidity across the south east and humidity across the south east and east anglia ahead of any rain later in the day. 25 in london, even higher, 27, 20 8 degrees. in contrast further north across scotla nd contrast further north across scotland and northern ireland in the cooler air, 15, 16 degrees and that cooler air, 15, 16 degrees and that cooler air, 15, 16 degrees and that cooler air arrives across all areas by thursday. see you later. theresa may promises a £20 billion injection into the nhs — but taxes will have to rise to pay for it. three people die after being hit by a train in south london.
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it‘s understood that spray cans were found at the scene. as 12—year—old billy caldwell is discharged from hospital — ministers agree to an expert panel to advise on the medical use of cannabis in future cases. gaming addiction is formally recognised as a mental health condition for the first time. ido want i do want to give any secrets away and he was not listening, but he was expecting to do a live interview but now he will have to do an interview with me. kick off in a few hours, what will the score be, hugh?|j think what will the score be, hugh?” think it will be a far tougher game than england fans will be aware of. we played tunisia back in the world cup in 1998. back when we played
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them we won 2—0. it was rather co mforta ble them we won 2—0. it was rather comfortable but it was a very different tunisia back then. now they are the highest ranked african tea m they are the highest ranked african team who have qualified for this world cup in russia. they have very recently played both spain and portugal and given them a very tough ask. portugal other european champions and spain the world champions. it will be a test for gareth southgate‘s squad. as he has been saying, a fresh squad, younger squad and a squad who have not had the baggage of previous world cups and some of those defeats and in out in the group stage in 2014, the defeat against iceland in 2016 was a low point as well. he says they will go into it with renewed vigour. they have to be thinking about what is possible. the players of the past and the opportunities of the past are gone.
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this team are trying to play in a different way. they have a hunger, they have the desire. we have better technical players than we have had in the past coming through our academies. there is a real enthusiasm that they are looking forward to getting going. the bbc will bring you england‘s first match of the tournament live. all the build—up begins on bbc one from 6:16pm this evening. panama taking on belgium. it is panama‘s first appearance at a world cup finals. they qualified dramatically of the united states last october. we saw some of the emotional scenes of this world cup for the central americans‘ national anthem. belgium have kevin de bruyne and eden hazard in their team. it is still goalless after half an hour. one match has already finished
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today. sweden beating south korea 1-0 today. sweden beating south korea 1—0 in group f. another penalty was given thanks to the help of var. it was converted by the captain for the only goal of the game. with wimbledon two weeks ago, the grass court season is under way at queen‘s club. we have already had a first british defeat. cameron norrie proving right work for the three—time grand slam champion stan wawrinka. he is currently well down in the world rankings after an injury lay—off. he took it in straight sets against the british in the two. england will be without two of their all—rounders for the rest of their one day series against australia. chris woakes has injured a thigh muscle while ben stokes is recovering from a torn hamstring. neither have played in the series which england lead 2—0. that‘s all the sport for now. we will have more for you in the next hour. which england formation will tunisia
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be most worried about? dis- harry kane upfront, he is the one to worry about. that is why you get paid the big bucks! thank you, hugh. you are watching afternoon live. the foster carers of the parsons green bomber, ahmed hassan, have told the bbc that if they had been told by surrey county council that he had told immigration officials he had been "trained to kill" by isis, they would never have taken him in. ron and pennyjones also say that two weeks after the bomb partially exploded, they were asked by surrey to be trained on the government‘s anti—radicalisation programme. today, a letter to the home affairs select committee from the home office permanent secretary, has detailed a series of failings on the part of the government‘s prevent programme in hassan‘s case. our legal affairs correspondent clive coleman reports. that‘s a card he sent me on my birthday. ron and pennyjones with the birthday card sent to them by ahmed hassan, the young man they fostered and who made a bomb on their kitchen table, designed to kill and maim innocent commuters.
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not only would it have taken these out, it would have damaged the houses opposite. you can see i have got houses behind me. it would have damaged those as well. over 40 years, the couple fostered 269 children, and received an mbe for their work. but what were they told by surrey county council‘s social services about ahmed hassan? i was told he had been captured at the age of 11 by isis, and he had witnessed people being killed and then he had got away. and that he was frightened of them. ahmed had told immigration officials that he had been trained to kill by isis. if you had known that, what would you have done? no, he would not have come here, no way. i can‘t put my family at risk. my grandchildren, we‘ve got seven children between us. i could not have put any of those at risk and i wouldn‘t. were there any warning signs? he was going to the wrong mosque and i reported the fact
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that he was not going to the big mosque in hounslow, he was going to a small mosque which the police had pointed out to me several times was a mosque they had found radicalisation in. he seemed to have a lot of phones? he was always changing his phone. i said you had an iphone yesterday, what went wrong? oh, the battery don‘t last so i have got rid of it. and in the bedroom where ahmed hassan slept and hung out, danger. high explosives hidden under the bed? yes, that's the only place he would have kept it. after the event, i was phond up at my son‘s house, and said, there‘s a programme running tomorrow in croydon nine o‘clock for prevent, you are on it. can you get yourself there? no. so this was surrey county council calling you ? yes. but this was after the bomb?
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yes, two weeks after the bomb. had partially gone off? yes. why do you think it was two weeks after the bomb had partially exploded, surrey county council is asking you to be trained for the prevent programme? because they needed to cover their backs and they could use me to cover their backs and that is all there is in it. i am the one who is going to carry the can for them, because i was supposedly trained. but you had not been trained beforehand ? no, i had not been trained beforehand, but nobody would look at that, would they? so you are talking about a level of cynicism here that people will find very troubling. we have been troubled. we have been troubled ever since this happened. we have had nights where we don‘t sleep. surrey county council have come to the conclusion that you two are now no longer fit to be foster carers. i feel betrayed by surrey county council, totally betrayed. and we‘re now in a situation
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that we are getting ourselves into debt, because we cannot pay our bills. we intended to see the two lads that we had through to the end, which would have been three or four macro years. we had put money away but where the money came to a stop just like that, we have used what savings we have got to try and keep our head above water. in a statement, surrey county council said: a powerful earthquake has struck japan‘s second city, osaka, leaving tens of thousands of homes without power. three people were killed, including a nine—year—old girl, and more than 200 have been injured. the 6.1 magnitude tremor struck during the morning rush hour, leaving tens of thousands of people stranded on commuter trains. rupert wingfield—hayes reports. this was the moment the quake hit, caught on a weather camera, overlooking osaka castle. the trembler was short, but shallow and violent, the most violent to hit this city in 100 years. lorries and cars swayed
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alarmingly on highways. food was sent flying from supermarket shelves. translation: when i was coming down on the escalator i felt a strong jolt, it was really scary. translation: i had no time to think what has happened. i was terrified. it was just very scary. the quake hit at 7:58am, right in the middle of the morning rush, as the city‘s commuters were heading to work. tens of thousands were left stranded, as all train services and most highways in the city were shut down. a number of major water pipes have also been ruptured. huge geizers spewing water into the streets. japan‘s famous bullet trains were also brought to a halt for hours as the lines had to be checked for any signs of damage. tragically, there has also been death and injury.
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this wall toppled by the quake crushed a nine—year—old girl, who was walking to school. an 80—year—old man was crushed when this wall collapsed. and another elderly man is reported to have been killed by a falling bookcase. hours after the quake, transport in the city is still paralysed. many tens of thousands of people are being forced to walk home from offices and schools. but considering the violence of the quake, damage has been remarkably light. there are many broken windows and plenty to clean up and repair, but there have been no major building collapses. partly, that is luck, but in large part, it is down to japan‘s tough building regulations. and a major effort to reinforce public buildings, following the devastating earthquake back in 1995, in which more than 6000 people were killed. rupert wingfield—hayes, bbc news, tokyo. in a moment, the business news with alice.
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first, a look at the headlines on afternoon live. the prime minister admits that taxes will have to rise to pay for a multi—billion pound spending increase for the nhs. three people die after being hit by a train in south london. it‘s understood that spray cans were found at the scene. as 12—year—old billy caldwell is discharged from hospital ministers agree to an expert panel to advise on the medical use of cannabis in future cases. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. the owner of clydesdale bank and yorkshire bank, has agreed to buy virgin money for £1.7 billion. under the deal, all the group‘s retail customers will be moved to virgin money over the next three years. it will be the uk‘s sixth—largest bank, with about six million customers, but 1,500 jobs are likely to go. gas and electricity suppliers are forcing too many customers to use prepaid meters. the regulators ofgem said the number of gas meter devices installed using a court warrant rose by 6.9% last year.
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the regulator said meters should be "an absolute last resort" for recovering debt, and suppliers should be putting households onto repayment plans first. and cash has been knocked off its throne. debit card payments have overtaken cash use for the first time. a total of 13.2 billion debit card payments were made last year, a rise of 14% on the previous year, according to banking trade body uk finance. an estimated 3.4 million people hardly used cash at all during the year. stock markets are jittery because of a row between him and china? yes, thatis a row between him and china? yes, that is right. we have seen a sell—off today, not a huge one. in
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london we have seen the ftse slightly less affected. this follows a sell—off we saw overnight in asia and also the us. it follows on from friday‘s announcement that the us was going to impose these 25% ta riffs was going to impose these 25% tariffs on $15 billion worth of chinese goods. we then heard of retaliatory tariffs from china. this is the ripple effect from that and it is global. we also seeing it infiltrating currencies. sterling is struggling against the dollar. it hit near a seven—month low. the ricochet effect of all of this is permeating a lot of different levels of financial markets. however, we will have to see what happens throughout the week, because as i was saying, markets are down but they are not too down. and the markets in london have some new names? we are seeing an index reshuffle today. new stocks appearing. ocado the online grocer,
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thatis appearing. ocado the online grocer, that is appearing. and also gbc holdings. what normally happens is when a stop cuts upgraded to the ftse100, we normally see the stock get a little bit of a boost but that has not happened for ocado. it was languishing down about 8%. ocado bucking the trend but yes, some new names “— bucking the trend but yes, some new names —— gvc holdings. bucking the trend but yes, some new names -- gvc holdings. and the huge deal to buy virgin money?m names -- gvc holdings. and the huge dealto buy virgin money? it is being billed as two of the big challenge banks coming together on the scene to compete with the more established lenders on the high street. as you say, it will create the uk‘s sixth largest bank, supposedly more nimble, more tech savvy, perhaps appealing more to younger people out there. the bad news is that we do expect some 1500 jobs to go. lots of unions have had
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things to say about this potential merger. let‘s get more on all of these stories, beginning with the big potential takeover in the banking world. joining us now is sue noffke, uk equities fund manager, at schroders. what do you think is behind this in the banking world? firstly it is cost and being able to invest more digitally to go faster, certainly at virgin money. because clydesdale and yorkshire bank is a little more advanced on digital services to customers. secondly, it is getting bigger to be able to compete with the big four macro. it will still be quite a bit smaller, but it diversifies its business mix and gains access to better sources of funding to be able to compete. i think bigger is quite often a bit better in banking. we will have to
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wait and see. let‘s talk about the online grocer accardo nowjoining the ftse100 today. unlike gvc holdings, its shares are trading down today which is not typically what happens when a stock gets upgraded to the ftse100. what is the story there? the story is how strong accardo's year—to—date has been. the shares at january were close at £4 on friday they topped £10. they have been extremely strong and the reasons why they have been extremely strong this year is the numberof extremely strong this year is the number of deals which accardo has been able to sign with international food retailers to be able to supply them with the software and logistics to enable them to be internet food retailers. what we have seen today is people have generally bought the shares that they wanted to. they
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knew it was going into the ftse100 index a couple of weeks ago and one major broker has decided to take some profits on the buy recommendation and downgrade to a sale today. we talked about the downward trend happening around the world. it is largely because of the looming trade war between the us and china. do you think this will continue? it is a big threat to potential markets. although they are down modestly, they are still quite near the highs of this year. and so we saw an escalation from china and the united states broadening out to encompass europe, then that is quite a threat to potential profitability. no one is a winner in a global trade war. so this could be, if we saw an escalation, a threat to markets, we
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do not expect that trend to continue, but much more will continue, but much more will continue to unfold across this week and coming weeks. we will have to see. thank you. let's have a look at the markets and those new names are appearing. yes, they are indeed. accardo suffering from the broker downgrade from buy to sell. and gvc holdings on its first day up nearly 2.596. brent crude up slightly after the sharp sell—off we saw on friday. brent crude up slightly after the sharp sell-off we saw on friday. the accardo thing, normally when things go on the market for the first time you expect them to be in the green. what are they saying? sue thinks there is some profit—taking here,
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that there was a broke ridge downgrade from buy to sell, perhaps based on people‘s fear that accardo‘s transition from an online retailer to something bigger might not happen as successfully as others are predicting it might. it does not quite tally. if it is being upgraded into the ftse100, why is the downgrading it —— ocado. we will have to keep a close eye on it. thank you. the duchess of sussex‘s father has given an interview in which he shares insights into the royal couple‘s relationship and their wedding. thomas markle said he was sure meghan cried when he told her he could not attend the ceremony , and despite having not met prince harry face to face he revealed they had held conversations about politics, including donald trump‘s presidency, and brexit. our royal correspondent, nicholas witchell, reports. she was the bride who memorably walked up the aisle without her father. thomas markle pulled out of meghan‘s wedding. health problems were given
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as the reason for his absence. his place was taken for the last part of meghan‘s walk to the altar by the prince of wales. now, in an interview on itv‘s good morning britain, mr markle has expressed his gratitude. i can‘t think of a better replacement than someone like prince charles. he looked very handsome, and my daughter looked beautiful with him. i was jealous. i wish i had been there. i wish it had been me. but thank god he was there, and thank him for that. mr markle said meghan had wept when he told her he couldn‘t attend the wedding, and he had wept as he watched the service on television in california. and he spoke about the moment harry had phoned him to ask his permission to marry his daughter. harry got on the phone with meghan and they called me together and harry asked for her hand over the phone, and i said "you‘re a gentleman. promise me you will never raise your hand against my daughter,
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and of course i give you my permission". they also apparently talked about american politics and president trump. our conversation was, i was complaining that i didn‘t like donald trump. he said "give donald trump a chance". i sort of disagreed with that, but... i still like harry. that was his politics, i have my politics. harry said mr markle was an interesting guy who‘d made a good choice in his daughter. he expects them to have children soon. as to the future, mr markle says he‘s looking forward to having a good relationship with his new family. nicholas witchell, bbc news. that‘s it from your afternoon live team for today, next the bbc news at 5 with reeta chakrabarti. time for a look at the weather. here‘s darren bett. hello there. we are seeing more and
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more clouds filling into western parts of the uk right now. further east in particular with more in the way of sunshine, it will be warmer thanit way of sunshine, it will be warmer than it was yesterday. you can see the cloud further west still windy in the north of scotland where we have got a few showers. increasing amounts of cloud coming into the uk tonight. clear skies the northern ireland, the far north of england and scotland. much more humid further south. 18 perhaps minimum in the centre of london. either side of the centre of london. either side of the weather front which is bringing in the cloud will bring in some more rain. that will arrive in scotland
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overnight into tuesday. not much rainfor overnight into tuesday. not much rain for england and wales. away from the western hills brighter skies in the sunshine in the south—east. much cooler under the rain in the north. today at 5. the prime minister warns that tax rises will be needed to pay for more health funding. theresa may said the 20 billion a year cash boost for the nhs in england would allow it to move forward with confidence. so, across the nation, taxpayers will have to contribute a bit more, in a fair and balanced way to support the nhs we all use. we‘ll be examining theresa may‘s claim that money will also come from a brexit dividend.... the other main stories on bbc news at 5... three people have been killed after being struck by a train — police are investigating whether they were graffiti artists. after 12—year—old billy caldwell is released from hospital —
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ministers announce they‘re setting up an expert panel to look at the health benefits of medicinal cannabis. excitement is building — ahead of england‘s world cup opener against tunisia — we‘ll be hearing from fans.
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