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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  June 18, 2018 9:00pm-10:01pm BST

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hello, i'm karin giannone, this is outside source. these scenes from the us border with mexico of children separated from their parents are shocking america. even the first lady puts out a rare statement saying she hates to see children taken away from theirfamilies. but president trump stands firm and defends his immigration policy. the united states will not be a migrant camp and it will not be a refugee holding facility. germany's coalition also in turmoil over immigration. the interior minister threatens to shut the country's borders unless chancellor merkel strikes a deal with europe. it's day five of the fifa world cup and england has just beaten tunisia. we're live in russia for all the action. let's start by showing you some pictures at the centre
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of a huge controversy in the united states. they're from inside a detention centre in texas on the border with mexico. this video has been released by the us department of defence. hundreds of children are being kept here. caged. separated from their parents under a new "zero tolerance" policy introduced by the trump administration. and pictures like these are intended as a ‘deterrent‘ for those who might be planning to try to cross the border illegally. the president claims this is all the democrats fault. more on that shortly. here is donald trump defending the policy at the white house earlier. the united states will not be a migrant camp and it will not be a refugee holding facility. it won't be. you look at what is happening
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in europe, look at what is happening in other places, we can't allow that to happen to the united states, not on my watch. if the democrats would sit down instead of obstructing, we could have something done very quickly. good for the children, good for the country, good for the world. it could take place quickly. we could have an immigration bill, we could have child separation... we are stuck with these horrible laws. they are horrible laws. the problem is, the laws the president is referring to have only been interpreted this way by his administration. the new policy has only been in effect for a month. and one person who's spoken out against the policy is particularly significant — his own wife, melania. the first lady put out this statement. "mrs trump hates to see children separated from their families "and hopes both sides of the aisle can finally come together to achieve
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"successful immigration reform." and let me show you this from former first lady laura bush. she wrote this piece for the washington post. describing the policy as "cruel", "immoral", and saying it "breaks" her heart. and many americans agree. this is one protest outside a new detention facility in texas. they're chanting, "you are not alone", hoping the children inside can hear them. and these are pictures of democratic lawmakers. they toured a converted walmart supermarket in brownsville, texas, on sunday. it's housing around more than a thousand migrants. here's what some of them had to say after going inside. they call it zero tolerance. but a better name for it is zero humanity and there's zero logic to this policy. what we have seen today is direct evidence of a cruel and inhumane policy.
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you can have a secure border and you can still have a humane policy with respect to asylum. you can do both but the trump administration has decided not to. as we touched on earlier, donald trump blames the democrats for this situation. here's one of his tweets on the matter today. "it is the democrats' fault for being weak and ineffective "with border security and crime. "tell them to start thinking about the people devastated by crime "coming from illegal immigration. "change the laws!" let's be clear, no law has been passed that demands that migrant families be separated. the only thing that has changed is a "zero tolerance" approach announced last month by this man — mr trump's us attorney general, jeff sessions. he has declared all adults who cross into america illegally will be criminally prosecuted. that's changed a long standing practise of charging most migrants who crossed for the first time with a minor offence, and releasing them.
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we do not want to separate parents from their children, you can be sure of that. if we build a wall, pass legislation, close loopholes, we would face these terrible choices. america's homeland security chief has also been trying to defend the new practice. kirstjen nielsen tweeted: "we do not have a policy of separating families at the border. "period." and here's the perspective of the border agency. the zero tolerance policy is intended to deter people from breaking the law. adults. if they are accompanied by a child, that child is temporarily separated from them as they go through a judicial process and that is no different from a united states citizen parent. in most cases, families are reunited after the parents are released.
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but it can take days and weeks. and is clearly causing distress. translation: it was hard. the ha rd est translation: it was hard. the hardest day for me. it felt like i was losing my son. that's what i thought. that i was losing my son. over a six week period, nearly 2,000 children were separated from their parents after illegally crossing the border. one arrest was captured by photographerjohn moore. here it is. it's been going viral. a two—year—old honduras girl crying as her mother is searched and detained. it happened here. the thought that any state would seek to did her parents by inflicting such abuse on children is unconscionable. i call on the united states to immediately end the
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practice of forcible separation of these children. here's peter bowes in los angeles to expand more on mr trump's reasoning. his justification is that as he sees it the democrats won't come to the table and help the republicans passed new immigration legislation thatis passed new immigration legislation that is to the satisfaction of the president. immigration law and the bills that will be considered later this week in compass a number of issues and one of the key ones for the president is money for his border wall. that is what is amongst theissues border wall. that is what is amongst the issues the democrats are strongly opposed to. so what is happening is that the children are being brought into this argument and some people clearly saying that they are being used as pawns in this political debate, this political argument over the bigger issue in political terms of money for the border wall. how easy would it be to overturn or to reverse this policy?
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i think it was laura bush who said it would not take much at all.l i think it was laura bush who said it would not take much at all. a lot of people, including members of his own party, laura bush is a republican, married to george w bush, the former president, a lot of people quite close to president trump, say it would take a single phone call from the president to say, stop this policy of separating children from their parents, and what was noticeable from the speech he gave this morning was that he focused mostly on his anger towards the democrats, he didn't really address the issue head—on of the children being taken to these separate centres from their parents. he has in the past said he didn't like it but he certainly didn't address it today. it's day five of the world cup. and england has beaten tunisia in their first game of the tournament. the game finished just a short time ago. here are some highlights.
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the team got off to the perfect start via captain harry kane. but tunisia struck back, levelling the game in the 35th minute via a penalty. then it was a man of the moment again — harry kane — heading one home in the 9ist minute. two goals for the captain. there was a huge roar from the stadium behind me as that goal went in. there are many england fans inside the stadium but the few that were, a couple of thousand, made a huge roar of relief as much as anything when that second goal went in. a great header. fantastic relief for england. the tunisian players with their heads in their hands,
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couldn't quite believe it, so late in the game. let's take a quick look at the other day's games. sweden marked its first appearance in a world cup with a 1—0 win over south korea. the video assistant referee had a hand in the action. captain andreas granqvist was awarded a penalty. and he made no mistake. the video assistant referee had a hand in the action. captain andreas granqvist was awarded a penalty. and he made no mistake. and there was belgium versus panama in sochi. it's panama's first ever world cup appearance. it was never going to be easy against a belgium team full of class. they went down 3—0. a short time ago i spoke to sports journalist alison bender from moscow, and asked her about the remarkable humbling of some of the giants so far this tournament. mexico springing a surprise on germany. no one expected that. mexico have an exciting side but they were so brave and their manager
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has been under so much pressure lately that it was fantastic news for him. we saw brazil as well. argentina. lionel messi missing a penalty. iceland, we know how good they are. england learned the hard way at the euros. and then things came back to normal because belgium got the result earlier that we expected to see. other than that, all the big guns in this tournament have got off to a terrible start. so england beating tunisia. let's get the reaction. how heartbroken are people there? very much heartbroken. a lot of sombre faces around. we will come back to her when we can actually make contact. actually, i'm told we can. we can see you now as well as hear you. tell me what the reaction is. coming so close to drawing with england until the very
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last moments of the game. people were obviously gripping their seats until the very end. at least until england scored the second goal in the last three minutes of overtime. that is when tunisians started walking out, even before the game was declared over, saying it is over. they started leaving wherever they were watching from. a lot of disappointment. there was a lot riding on this game. it has been a very long time since tunisians have had anything to celebrate, especially in the last seven years, so especially in the last seven years, so people were whipping up some nationalistic fervour in the run—up to this game, hoping they would get something to be excited about and hopeful for something to be excited about and hopefulfor in the something to be excited about and hopeful for in the future. so a lot of disappointed people but many also feel bad tunisia held its own for much of the game. if you compare it to the england team, tunisia's capacities are much lower, so many
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feel they played well, but they were very disappointed with the defensive strategy that was employed that allowed england to score twice. how much passion is there for the sport of football in general in tunisia? it is the most popular game here before handball and entire generation of tunisians were inspired to play this game since 1978 when tunisia first one a game ata 1978 when tunisia first one a game at a world cup. that was their only winning streak and since then, in all the other competitions they have taken part in, they haven't won any games, so taken part in, they haven't won any games, so while people were realistic, they note tunisia is in a very difficult group, being with england, with belgium and with panama, they were hoping that at the very least they would draw with england. probably not win against
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belgium but maybe they would have a chance against panama. thank you very much. stay with us on outside source. still to come. the taliban has refused to extend the ceasefire in afghanistan. the government is to establish an expert panel of clinicians to advise ministers on the health benefits of medicinal cannabis. the move comes after ministers intervened to allow 12 year old billy caldwell, who has epilepsy, to be treated with oil, which had been confiscated from his mother by officials at heathrow a week ago. he has now been released from hospital. his mother, charlotte caldwell, says the treatment must be offered to other families.
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i will share with them my experience, which no matter what anyone says cannot possibly be imagined by anybody else. i will ask them to urgently implement a programme that now provides immediate access to the mess that billy so desperately needs and now more urgently than ever the many other children and families affected by this historic development. this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom. our lead story is. president trump has again tried to blame the democrats for his policy of splitting mexican migrant families as scenes from the border of children separated from their parents shock america. other stories from around the bbc newsroom right now
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israel has charged a former cabinet minister with spying for iran. that's according to the internal security service, shin bet. gonen segev, a medical doctor who served as energy minister in the 1990s, was allegedly recruited by iranian intelligence while living in nigeria. a military hat belonging to napoleon, said to have been salvaged from the battlefield after his 1815 defeat at waterloo, has been sold at auction for $325,000. the former french emperor was renowned for his "bicorne" hats, so—called because they had two points. a french collector of historical pieces had bought the hat, the auctioneer told french media. one of the most watched videos on our website is this extraordinary footage of a selfie taking that almost went horribly wrong. this man — forest ranger sanjay dutta — was called in by villagers in west bengal who had seen this 5—and—a—half—metre long python swallowing a goat. mr dutta rescued the goat — but then decided to pose for photos
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with the python wrapped around its neck. as you can see, that quickly backfired. mr dutta was almost strangled — but luckily, he was able to escape with no injuries. the us senate will vote later on whether to block a deal struck by the trump administration with chinese company zte. the tech giant has been on its knees since april, when it was slapped with sanctions for violating us trade agreements. after winning major concessions, the trump administration said earlier this month that it would lift a ban on the company's access to the us market. but that may now all be in jeopardy. let's cross to paul blake in new york for more on this. why is the senate trying to block this deal? it is a super interesting case because it puts many republicans, the party of donald
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trump, against the white house. the senators have a number of concerns but chief among them is they are pointing to the us intelligence agencies who say the company is too close to the chinese government, too close to the chinese government, too close to the chinese government, too close to the chinese communist party, and it may engage in some kind of espionage. secondly, they are still concerned about what originally got the company in trouble with the us government, which was evading us trade agreements about selling products to the likes of iran and north korea. and it fits congressional republicans against the white house ata time republicans against the white house at a time when the white house is trying to negotiate trade with china and the company is a major chinese firm. what are the possible outcomes of this vote? the language isjust in one bill which is part of a broader defence spending bill and there has been an effort to get that language stripped out of the bill. it doesn't appear this time that
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that effort has been successful. there will be able in the senate later today that includes the language, "including cte". —— zte. thank you very much. the chief executive of german carmaker audi has been arrested in connection with an investigation into the diesel emissions scandal. german prosecutors say they took rupert stadler into custody to prevent him tampering with evidence. the scandal erupted three years ago, when it emerged that cars had been fitted with devices designed to cheat emissions tests. the devices were initially found in vw‘s cars, but its audi subsidiary has also been embroiled in the scandal. last month it admitted that another 60,000 a6 and a7 models with diesel engines have emission software issues. that is on top of the 850,000 recalled last year by audi, although not all required a modification. damien mcguiness is in berlin.
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there is a worry either that he would hinder the investigation by tampering with the evidence or by trying to influence employees or witnesses who could also help the investigation. the suspicion lies on him because a male was discovered —— an e—mailwas him because a male was discovered —— an e—mail was discovered in which allegedly he knew and was informed already about the cheating software. this is the software that was installed in millions of vw cars, including it seems some audi cars, which would make it look as if cars we re which would make it look as if cars were cleaner than they were by faking emissions tests in the lab. it meant they were dirtier on the road than they were in the lab. it seems that he allegedly was told about this back in the end of 2015,
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autumn 2015, in an e—mail. he knew about this software, allegedly. he thenis about this software, allegedly. he then is suspected of having allowed then is suspected of having allowed the cars to still be made and still be sold. if this is true, that would mean he would be guilty of customer fraud. also that he would be guilty of. testimony under oath because so far he has said he didn't know about the cheating software. google is investing more than half a billion dollars in the chinese online retailerjd.com. it's part of google's efforts to beef up its challenge to amazon's growing power. tech industry expert susan standiford explains the move. google itself is not usually that consumer branded. they are tech brand. and a pretty impressive one as well. with the relationships they have built and what they are trying to do in south—east asia, i think this is that reached to further
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extend their market position as a consumer brand. i'm sure there are other ways in but this is certainly one way in and what you are going to find is that people trying to build those consumer products are going to look for ways they can immediately have a leg up and with a brand that is already known by the consumers in that space. to afghanistan now. look at these pictures. today, more than a hundred afghan peace activists arrived in kabul. they've walked 700 kilometres from helmand province demanding an end to the civil war. they started out as a group of only seven but as the march progressed, more and more peoplejoined them. here's one of the protestors. translation: in the 37 days of our journey, we met around 100,000 people. we got their support for the movement. we asked for an extension of the ceasefire in order to pave the way for peace talks. that ceasefire he refers to is one between the taliban and the government.
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unfortunately, that ended on sunday. the taliban are refusing to extend it. the government has said it will observe a unilateral ceasefire for ten days. but the violence has already started again — this is from our kabul bureau chief karim haidari yesterday: "after the end of taliban's ceasefire at 18:00 "local time today, the group launched two "separate attacks in helmand and kandahar southern #afg hanistan. " the bbc‘s afghan service followed some of the militants through the streets of kabul. mal—aeka ahmad—zai, is the first female afghan reporter, to interview a taliban soldier. take a look. that report from kabul. let's start by showing you some pictures at the centre of a huge controversy in the united states. they're from inside a detention centre in texas on the border with mexico. this video has been released by the us department of defence. hundreds of children are being kept here. caged. separated from their parents under a new "zero tolerance" policy introduced by
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the trump administration. the president claims this is all the democrats fault. plenty to talk about with world weather and we will start off in north america where i want to point out this will of cloud on the satellite picture through parts of the gulf of mexico. it is going to continue to bring the threat of some very heavy rainfall. more on that in a moment but if we zoom a little bit further south to mexico, this is the re m na nts of further south to mexico, this is the remnants of the depression which is still fringing with the west coast
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of mexico. still likely to produce some pretty intense rain during the course of monday. maybe some localised flooding. but we also need to focus close to texas where we could see at least 300 millimetres of rainfall, maybe as much as 500 in the next four or five days. that could bring some localised flooding as well. at the same time, we have got a weather front bringing some rain to the northern front. heavy rain to the northern front. heavy rain very much a feature in south asia with the monsoon now in full swing. we have seen some localised flooding across north—eastern states of india. also bangladesh as well, where extreme heat is going to be an issue over the next few days. and the satellite picture shows yet more cloud in the bay of bengal. we have got weather warnings in force. i suspect over the next couple of days
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we will see some very heavy rain. the vibrant colours denoting that. a weakening system will continue to bring some heavy rain across central and southern areas of japan, the korean peninsula and into central and southern areas of china through the middle of tuesday. further south, some heavy rain in southern vietnam, parts of thailand and also a little bit further north in myanmar, malaysia and indonesia. and the city forecasts show a good deal of dry weather for hong kong and bangkok as we head into the weekend. what is happening in europe? there is an area of high pressure building from the west and that will quieten things down quite nicely across spain and portugal. eventually we will see a change in wind direction and conditions warming up as well. showers in southern italy and mainland greece. further north, not as hot as it has been in scandinavia
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and some rain across parts of western norway but generally speaking it is a pleasant story. if we ta ke speaking it is a pleasant story. if we take a look at the city forecasts, it will stay quite quiet forecasts, it will stay quite quiet for the next few days. a good deal of dry weather, showers likely for moscow, warming up of dry weather, showers likely for moscow, warming up across of dry weather, showers likely for moscow, warming up across the uk. there is a forecast in half an hour's time. hello, i'm karin giannone, this is outside source, and these are the main stories here in the bbc newsroom: these scenes from the us border with mexico — of children separated from their parents — are shocking america. even the first lady puts out a rare statement, saying she hates to see children taken away from theirfamilies. but president trump stands firm and defends his immigration policy. the united states will not be a migrant camp and it will not be a refugee holding facility. germany's coalition is also in turmoil over immigration — the interior minister threatens to shut the country's borders unless chancellor merkel strikes a deal with europe. every day outside source features
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bbc journalists working in over 30 languages. your questions are always welcome. #bbcos is the hashtag. to germany where a showdown over migration is threatening chancellor angela merkel‘s governing coalition. ms merkel‘s coalition partner, the christian social union party, has backed a plan from its own interior minister, horst seehofer, to reject migrants at the german border if they have already registered elsewhere in the eu. the csu has given mrs merkel until the end of the month to find an alternative solution or they'll go ahead with it. but mrs merkel flatly rejects the plan. she says it goes against european principles. here she is... translation: the cdu supports the initiative of the federal interior minister, horst seehofer, to present a further
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master plan of migration and in everything we do. we, the cdu, are convinced that we must represent german and european interests at the same time and that is why we will not act unilaterally, unapproved and not at the expense of third parties. so chancellor merkel doesn't want to act "unilaterally" as she says, but instead find an eu—wide solution to the problem. she has a meeting with the eu next week where she wants to renegotiate the bloc‘s migration policy. the policy has come in for intense criticism, in particularfrom italy. let me remind you of last week's events... italy refused to let this charity boat full of migrants dock at its port in sicily. it says it's unfairly taking the brunt of the illegal migration to europe, as boats from libya and tunisia land on its shores. currently, the eu has a policy that migrants must register in first eu country that they arrive in. italy's new populist government headed by this man, prime minister conte, wants the rules changed. mr seehofer‘s plans to tighten germany's borders would play straight into mr conte's argument that the rest of the eu isn't doing enough to help italy.
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jenny hill is in berlin. angela merkel is in a really, really difficult corner, actually. today she has got herself, if you like, a temporary ceasefire. in a nutshell, it is a complex story, but her interior minister is playing hardball over the plan he wants to turn away migrants from the german border if they have already registered or formally sought asylum in another eu country first. she does not want to do that, she wants a european solution but he says he is going to do it anyway. normally the chancellor of course would fire an interior minister for such open insubordination. she cannot because horst seehofer is also the leader of the csu, that is the bavarian sister party to angela merkel‘s conservatives and their alliance is right at the heart of her coalition government with the social democrats. mr seehofer is no doubt in part grandstanding ahead of elections to be held in bavaria in the autumn. but what he has achieved is potentially going to topple her government if some kind
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of solution cannot be found. he has given mrs merkel a couple of weeks now to go away to a summit of european leaders and try to come back with some sort of agreement which he can go to his party with. i suspect what we are really seeing is the row simply kicked a little bit further down the road, give it a couple of weeks and you are going to see mrs merkel under attack all over again. and adding to the drama for this, jenny, even the president of the united states tweeting that the people of germany of germany are turning against their leadership, crime in germany is way up. does he have any truth in what he is saying? it is interesting, regardless of your opinion of angela merkel, you have to feel sorry for her. she has had this terrible row at home, then last night she had to watch germany getting beaten in its first match in the world cup. and now donald trump is putting the boot in, too. it is worth looking at his tweet
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in all seriousness. firstly, mrs merkel‘s popularity, she still tops the poll, the most popular politician in germany with an approval rating of 50%. those crime assertions, complete nonsense. crime is actually at its lowest level in germany since 1992. we looked at the federal police statistics which has shown it has certainly fallen year—on—year — 2017, by 10%. and even in the period 2014 to 2017, of course, when the migrant crisis happened, it was still, in general, falling. violent crime rose during that time, but there is no basis in truth for that assertion. and it has not gone down well in germany where people are frankly quite concerned about the impact of the domestic row upon this very fragile coalition government. mrs merkel herself is a rather weakened figure in germany. she led her party to a very poor election result in september and she really scrambled to get a coalition government together at all. she is constantly under attack from the far right anti—migrant party, afd, and she is really struggling
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to persuade the german electorate that what she says is true, that she doesn't intend, 2015, the height of the migrant crisis, to ever happen again to her country. it's the last week of campaigning in turkey before presidential and parliamentary elections on sunday. the vote was called early, back in april, when this man, the current president recep tayyip erdogan seemed to be in a very strong position. however, those opposing him have put up a surprisingly strong fight and are now threatening to end his 15—year hold on power. among his main challengers are the candidate for the main opposition republican people's party, muharrem ince and merahl akshiner, leader of the new nationalist "good" party. our correspondent selin girit is in istanbul with more on mr erdogan‘s chances of victory.
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the opinion polls show that recep tayyip erdogan distil the main leading figure but the gap is narrowing. the main opposition candidate is expected to get around 30% of the vote in the first round. if that is the case and no candidate gets more than 50% of the walks, and then there will be a run—off for the presidential elections. and, of course, on sunday there will be parliamentary elections as well and there is a good probability that recep tayyip erdogan‘s party could actually lose its parliamentary majority. here, in turkey, there have been concerns brought up as to whether the votes will be free and fairand bear in whether the votes will be free and fair and bear in mind, whether the votes will be free and fairand bear in mind, these elections are to be held under a state of emergency. as selin mentioned there, the voting is being overshadowed by the fallout from the failed coup ofjuly 2016, when a section of the turkish military launched a coordinated operation to topple the government.
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the bbc‘s reality check correspondent chris morris takes a look at how the government has cracked down on alleged supporters of the coup and how it could affect the vote. the attempted coup in 2016 shook turkey. more than 250 people were killed, many of them here on this bridge. now renamed the murk hughes bridge, it is open for business again. but turkey remains under a state of emergency. in response to the coup, there was a huge purge of state employees. since the lie 2016, more than 107,000 people have been dismissed by emergency decree. thousands of others were suspended, then reinstated. those dismissed included soldiers, police officers, judges, bureaucrats and teachers. —— july 2016. like this woman, who does not know what she has done wrong.
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translation: i have been a teacher for 15 years, my places in the classroom and i should be able to go back to my school and get myjob back. the chances are that are not great. the state of emergency commission has received more than 100,000 appeals and reviewed 19,600 so 100,000 appeals and reviewed 19,600 so far. but only 1010 people have been given permission to get back to work. the only people who know what they have been accused of are those who have been arrested and charged. more than 50,000 have been imprisoned, pending trial. many are suspected of loyalty to the exiled cleric. turkey has said has followers organised the coup but he denies it. some kurdish activists accused of supporting terrorism are also targeted. this man was running for president from present. this is how he appears at election rallies.
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last night, for the first time in 20 months, he appeared on television from inside of prison where he is being held. alongside a state employees, human rights activists, lawyers and journalists who are in jail. more than 150 john lists and media workers were detained and imprisoned since july 2016 media workers were detained and imprisoned sincejuly 2016 and they are currently imprisoned. the president's you? translation: you have to make a distinction between presidents and journalists. are we supposed to cause them journalist just because they have credentials and id cards? the opposition has a lwa ys and id cards? the opposition has always said that his firstjob after the election, ft won, would be to lift the state of emergency and suddenly, in the last few days, president erdogan is seeing the same thing. it could be that he is feeling the pressure. earlier i spoke to chris morris, and i began by asking him how the state
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of emergency is affecting the election. on the surface, the state of emergency is not affecting the ability of parties to hold an election rallies and pursue their campaigns. on the other hand, in the nearly two years that the state of emergency has been in place since the attempted military coup back in 2016, more than 100,000 public serva nts 2016, more than 100,000 public servants have been dismissed by emergency decree, more than 50,000 people have been imprisoned pending trial on a variety of issues relating to alleged terrorism. and also, many parts of the independent media have been closed down, so there have been concerns expressed both here in turkey and abroad, with people like the united nations human rights commission that it is difficult to hold a genuinely free and fair election in any circumstances. recep tayyip erdogan said we can do that and all parties
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are free to campaign as they see fit. one opponent to recep tayyip erdogan was even interviewed from prison last night. so there have been difficulties for some people and the fact that the election campaign is now in its full final swing in the final week. we know how central the economy has been in this campaign. how has the state of emergency affected well—being ? campaign. how has the state of emergency affected well-being? well, it does have an effect on the economy in this sense, you know, people feel the uncertainty and that has a knock—on effect on the economy. you go around the country and people say, yes, the number one issue in this election is the economy. but, for example, foreign investment has fallen within the last two years under the state of emergency. why? investors, for the most part, like legal certainty, we like to know where they are investing and that is why many people hope that soon after the election the state of emergency can
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be lifted. chris morris speaking from istanbul. stay with us on outside source — still to come... an independent train company has started running services on a railway line in cumbria where northern rail trains have been suspended for a month. there was widespread anger from businesses and residents in the lake district when trains between oxenholme and windermere were replaced by buses. danny savage reports. the train arriving at platform free is the unexpected service to windermere. passengers had resigned themselves to no trains on this line for most of this month, but campaigners took matters into their own hands and found the local private operator to provide the service. northern rail have failed to maintain the deal with the public and the taxpayer to run trains on this line, the bus services are fine
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and good and continue, but what you have here is a fair and free service which gives people confidence in this line that maybe they had lost. on board, passengers seemed delighted that the rail replacement service had been changed to a bus replacement wie service. really good thing. quickerjourney. nicer replacement wie service. really good thing. quicker journey. nicer than being stuck on the bus which we did not want to do in the first place. yes, it is a nice old train. everybody seemed to appreciate a ride through the countryside behind the heritage diesel. this is good as far as we're concerned, because we are offering back—up public service to the people of the lakes who have been without it. for me, it is an honour to be able to do that. this new train service basically only ru ns new train service basically only runs during core hours from ten in the morning to six at night. so running alongside it is the rail bus
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service. you basically have a choice on this very well resourced line. train or bus. campaigners have been assured that the department for transport will pick up the bill for this temporary service, which is expected to be running for several days yet. danny savage, bbc news, cumbria. this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom. our lead story is... president trump has again tried to blame the democrats for his policy of splitting mexican migrant families as scenes from the border of children separated from their parents shock america. other stories from around the bbc newsroom right now. . israel has charged a former cabinet minister with spying for iran. that's according to the internal security service, shin bet. gonen segev, a medical doctor who served as energy minister in the 1990s, was allegedly recruited by iranian intelligence while living in nigeria. that's on bbc persian.
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a military hat belonging to napoleon, said to have been salvaged from the battlefield after his 1815 defeat at waterloo, has been sold at auction for $325,000. the former french emperor was renowned for his "bicorne" hats, so—called because they had two points. a french collector of historical pieces had bought the hat, the auctioneer told french media. that's on the bbc world service. one of the most watched videos on our website is this extraordinary footage of a selfie—taking that almost went horribly wrong. this man — forest ranger sanjay dutta — was called in by villagers in west bengal who had seen this five—and—a—half—metre long python swallowing a goat. mr dutta rescued the goat but then decided to pose for photos with the python wrapped around its neck. as you can see, that quickly backfired. mr dutta was almost strangled, but luckily, he was able to escape with no injuries. this is colombia's new president elect, ivan duque.
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last night he was announced the winner of colombia's election, with 54% of the vote. his platform was strongly right wing, campaigning on tax cuts and economic reform. he is the protege of this man, hardliner and former president alvaro uribe. he has also vowed to toughen the 2016 peace accord signed with the revolutionary armed forces of colombia, or farc, in 2016. this was part of his victory speech ssource this was part of his victory speech. translation: that peace that we long for and that demand changes will have changes so that the victims are at the centre of the process, the guarantees truth, justice, reparation and no going back. the leader of farc was quick to respond. here he is congratulating duque on his win and offering to discuss any concerns with the peace accord. translation: acknowledging the
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outcome that resulted in the election of ivan duque, the farc expresses its interest to meet with the president so that we can get this agreement under way. it is necessary that good sense be imposed. what the country demands is an integral piece that will lead us to the awaited reconciliation. one of the first to congratulate duque via twitter was us republican senator for florida, marco rubio, he says this is an historic day for colombia, referring to the appointment of marta lucia ramirez, who will become colombia's first female vice president. female vice president. however duque's right wing economic policies and his desire to change agreements signed by previous administrations have drawn some comparisons with us president donald trump. here is political analyst jorge restrepo. that is what is going to murk his
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government, one that will try to accomplish reforms, that will be risky, in terms of coming back to the conflict and we destroy transitional justice, the conflict and we destroy transitionaljustice, but the conflict and we destroy transitional justice, but also the conflict and we destroy transitionaljustice, but also in economic terms, he is proposing donald trump light forms of economy by generous tax cuts that the colombian state is not able to afford. as germany grapples with its immigration policy and whether to curb how many people are let into the country, iceland is welcoming an increase of newcomers to its shores. to show you why that's so surprising, we have to remember that the country sits isolated in the north atlantic ocean — not exactly an easy spot to get to. but an economic boom and other draws, such as the country's robust social welfare system, has seen a surge in the number of people immigrating there. for more, i've been speaking to the bbc‘s valeria perasso. it has been quite striking. the population is now at around 11% of
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foreigners in a total population of 350,000. it is probably less than the number of people that watched the number of people that watched the first iceland match ever in world cup history! but it has been a huge growth. it went from 2% about two decades ago to now 11%, sohae 400% growth in a very short of time. begin your reactions to world cup matches as we speak. tell us the factors behind this increase. when you talk to most of the migrants, they have one word for you and that isjobs. iceland they have one word for you and that is jobs. iceland has they have one word for you and that isjobs. iceland has experimented with huge economic growth over the past 50 years, going from one of the poorest european nations to being one of the richest, and also being at the top of every possible ranking when it comes to well—being, development, environmental care, general quality, etc. it is a very
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attractive place for migrants from all over the world to move to and in particular, thejob market is in desperate need of manpower. so the had a rate of 2.2% unemployment rate, variable, and all the people that they need to cover the jobs that they need to cover the jobs that they need to cover the jobs that the need for the economy to continue to grow is around 3000 each year and they mostly need to come from abroad. so they get through that with good job offers or at least very good chances of getting a job within a short period of time. we're particularly world are they coming from? everywhere, but the polish community is the huge majority, so they are almost 40% of the immigrant population, followed by lithuanians and filipinos. there are by lithuanians and filipinos. there a re lots of by lithuanians and filipinos. there are lots of people from eastern europe that when these countries join the european union, poland
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being the most of this one, there has been the most recent hispanic migration from spain and latin america, from spain in particular after the crisis over the, they found that this was a very desirable new place to settle. when you think of the climate of some of those countries, coming to iceland must be quite a contrast, as well as the language, it is known for being quite challenging. yes, it is ranked as one of the most difficult one for english speakers to learn. the pronunciation is very difficult and the grammar is very complex and on top of that, they have ten uniquely identified letters in the alphabet of iceland. they agreed that learning the language was very difficult and resources in place are not serving the adequate because many were not used to such a big influx of migrants but they are so very proud of the language so they only want people to speak it
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perfectly or not at all. so they find that everyone has to share these concerns. if you do not speak these concerns. if you do not speak the language, you deserve it difficult to feel integrated and the icelanders are very proud of the language it is the backbone of the culture and they want to keep it pure, if there is such a thing. and they do not necessarily help you to learn it. michael wood they do not necessarily help you to learn it. michaelwood reporting on the huge increase in immigration to iceland. we will end on these pictures from hawaii's big island. we were bring a new updates on the irruption taking we were bring a new updates on the irru ption taking place we were bring a new updates on the irruption taking place there or for the last three weeks. this is the killer whale volcano that is continuing to erupt in a spectacular fashion. the larva river has been well over 100 feet across, perhaps 30 metres and moving really quickly. since the volcano began erupting
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several weeks ago, a huge coastline has been created dozens of miles into the sea it might look spectacular but this team can be dangerous to breed and tiny particles of glass like substances are contained within that. —— kilauea volcano as well as that, it has destroyed hundreds of homes and forced people to leave. before we 90, forced people to leave. before we go, we have to mention a world cup match between england and tunisia. england won 2—1, captain harry kane has been hosting a news conference within the last 30 minutes. you are never sure how it is going to go to start off with but we got into the game quickly with a few chances. we scored one and probably could have added to that. it gets to 1—1 and mental changes and i think they recovered well from that. it is a lwa ys recovered well from that. it is always on the back of your mind. —— the momentum changes. that is what character is about, that is why you
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work so hard to go to 90 plus minutes and thankfully we got another in the end. harry kane, thank you for watching outside source. hello. stark temperature contrast north and south of the country for the next 36 hours. choose the eddie dummett start across some areas. 18 degrees in central london for whereas the north it isa central london for whereas the north it is a good dealfresher central london for whereas the north it is a good deal fresher but also clearer. temperatures four, five celsius but i'd be some sunshine overhead. you have winds coming in from the north atlantic to the northern areas and the mid—atlantic to the south. separating any air mass is usually a weather front and this one has a bobble or a wave which will bring heavy rain later. to begin with with that schumacher era, cloud for england and wales, particularly across the western coasts and hills and that could continue all day. northern area ‘s
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cloud over later, certainly for northern ireland we will see outbreaks of rain the day. 1a for belfast and glasgow, contrast in the south—east at 2a celsius. for the evening and the early hours of wednesday, a spell of heavy rain as that waving weather front pushes across northern ireland, the south of scotla nd across northern ireland, the south of scotland and the north of england. on wednesday it allows the cold front to work its way south and thatis cold front to work its way south and that is the line by a band of cloud. it will turn showery as that pushes through wales, the midlands and east anglia. the southern flank as the humid air, 25m26 in london, to the north sunny spells all breakthrough. a few showers for the highlands and island is. that takes us into thursday and it is the day of the summer solstice. it is when we have the longest spell of daylight and in shetland that is close to 18 hours in total. it should be a fine day for many, a few showers in shetland
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but quite a breeze blowing, for most high pressure moving in and the low pressure m oves high pressure moving in and the low pressure moves off to the new continent. the winds are coming from the north—west. sunniest for the top and tail of the day. the cloud will spread out from many and not the temperature in lerwick, you get the longest delight and 11 degrees with those northerly winds. elsewhere met the high teens, though 20s in the south. high pressure builds on for friday and that means the strongest of the winds push out to the north sea. blustery for the east coast and that could feel cool but elsewhere the winds will be lighter and a touch warmer than we saw on thursday after a bit of a call start. temperatures will be starting to creep up once temperatures will be starting to creep up once more temperatures will be starting to creep up once more but generally, around the mid to high teens and 20s. that could be the case for saturday and sunday. high pressure again in charge. we have lost that northerly air and we are bringing in from winds from the atlantic. good sunny spells to start with and to
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end with. perhaps the chance of one or two match ours for the highlands and island is, but for most, temperatures will be up from the high teens and though 20s for the majority. that area of high pressure look set to dominate even into next week with most places being dry, but the potential for warmth to build an across the south and that is because we have this jet stream pushing across the south and that is because we have thisjet stream pushing in and that helps this ridge of high pressure to build on the bus only one side. down off of siberia, we might start to see an area of low pressure that does not want to move much and if that happens, with high pressure sitting across us, and the low pressure, they could drag out here in from the mediterranean. one to watch but it depends where that high pressure sets, but the potential for things to warm up next week. this is bbc news. the headlines at 10pm. the prime minister warns that tax rises will be needed to pay for more funding for the nhs. so across the nation, taxpayers will have to contribute a bit more in a fair and balanced
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way to support the nhs we all use. donald trump says the united states will not be a migrant camp as he defends his policy on separating families at the border. the government has lost a vote in the house of lords over its brexit plans. peers backed a call to give parliament a bigger say in the event of a "no deal" departure from the eu. also coming up — victory in volgograd for england. two goals from captain harry kane see the side beat tunisia 2—1 in their first world cup game. and we meet the 10—year—old who's just become
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