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tv   The Papers  BBC News  June 18, 2018 11:30pm-12:01am BST

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as a local company, she believed they could help. we just want to do a professional job on the railway. the tracks are there for a purpose, and they're not being used. and it's very important for the economy, for the whole of the lake district. the department for transport has indicated to campaigners that it will pay for this service. it is very popular, with every seat taken. a better day, then, on the trains here, ahead of a strike by some northern rail staff tomorrow. danny savage, bbc news, windermere. there is a warning about the future health of what has become known as the millennial generation. a report by the health foundation think tank suggests that insecure jobs and the housing crisis could be setting them up for an unhealthy middle age. i spoke earlier to martina kane, who wrote that report, and 23—year—old nia dokova, a millennial, and asked if the findings of the report chime with them. i certainly have a lot of friends who have spoken to me about the troubles that the insecurity of the
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life that millennials have that is brought to them, like not being able to afford the house. , not having a sta ble to afford the house. , not having a stablejob, not to afford the house. , not having a stable job, not going to university and working on 0—hours contracts. in your early adulthood, set up to you are going to be. and setting you up asa are going to be. and setting you up as a very secure a are going to be. and setting you up as a very secure a human are going to be. and setting you up as a very secure a human being. tell us as a very secure a human being. tell us about the report itself. you have talked to quite a large number of young people about their experiences and you try to draw out some common threads from that in a sense to help predict what might happen in ten 20 yea rs predict what might happen in ten 20 years so obviously it comes with all the caveats about predictions? absolutely. and she just articulated it very well, some of the big factors which set you up for a healthy middle—aged, absolutely laid during foundations. basing a very different future and a different housing market and job market. those
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things are factors that can change. they are not determinants. any factors which can change the economy, presumably there is still an opportunity to change this. absolutely and it's not a done deal. and if you determine someone's health, it is things like income. a lot of their skills and qualifications, they develop during the ages of 12 and 24. if young people are being pushed down particular paths because of the way the system is set up, they need to have the opportunities when they are looking into the world of work to be able to capitalise. i thought your generation was supposed to be healthier in so many ways compared to my generation which was born at the end of the 605. you drink le55, you are the end of the 605. you drink le55, you a re le55 the end of the 605. you drink le55, you are less likely to become pregnant at a very young age and all the effects that can have on your income pro5pect5, whatever thejoy
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of having a child is. and you are taking fewer drugs, you are not smoking. yes, it's safe to say we are more avocado than human. but it doesn't mean that our mental health is not affected in a much worse way. being physically help —— healthy as a basis for any happy life. it doesn't mean the insecurity that you will experience through your early adulthood and later on as you admit middle —— reach middle age is not going to create a great deal of trouble. the picture of the prospects for the millennial generation. matt has the weather. for some of you it has been quite a humid evening so far. for others it ha5 humid evening so far. for others it has turned into quite a fresh start for the night and those contrasts will continue over the next couple of days. this strip of cloud is responsible. it is a week and
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wriggling weather front, to the south of it humid airfrom wriggling weather front, to the south of it humid air from the mid—atlantic. south of it humid air from the mid—atla ntic. to the south of it humid air from the mid—atlantic. to the north of it, something fresher, and where you get those temperature contrast, the weather fronts. with the those temperature contrast, the weatherfronts. with the humid those temperature contrast, the weather fronts. with the humid air comes a lot of cloud across england and wales. spots of rain and drizzle, especially across hills and coasts in the west. the odd spot further east. further north, clearer skies, a few showers in the highlands and islands, and temperatures in rural areas could get down to five or six degrees compared to 17 or 18 in central london. humid across england and wales, the exception being the far north of england, to start with. spots of rain and drizzle around, further north lovely bright, sunny start, but gradually clouding over from the south—west through the day. sunny is the longest in 0rkney, shetland, and 18 degrees is possible in aberdeen. when the cloud breaks towards the south and east, 24 as possible. cloud used in the west, spots of rain and drizzle but across northern ireland, things turning
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wetter later in the day. heavy rain spreading across northern ireland, central and southern scotland to ta ke central and southern scotland to take us through the night and into wednesday. it is due to this wave on the weather front which moves its way out towards northern europe through the day and in doing so this cold front works its way southwards, introducing fresh air to more robust. the defining part of that will be this line of cloud and showers. northern england and north wales to start the day, pushing down to the midlands, wales, towards east anglia by the end of the afternoon. sticking with the humid air across southern counties, and any sunshine breaking through will lift temperatures to 26 degrees, a big contrast to further north and west. you will have the sunshine, admittedly, at times, but temperatures only in the low to mid teens for many. that fresh air comes across to all through the night so if you have been struggling to sleep by the next couple of nights, —— for the last couple of nice, by thursday it will be better. two showers for the summer solstice, but most will
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have a dry day on thursday and temperatures generally mid to high teens, may be low 205 in the south. hello, this is bbc news. we will be taking a look at tomorrow mornings papers in a moment. first the headlines: theresa may has confirmed that taxes will have to be increased to pay for the extra £20 billion funding for the nhs. she said taxpayers would contribute a bit more, in a fair and balanced way. donald trump says the united states will not be a migrant camp, as he defends his policy on separating families at the border. the government has lost a vote in the house of lords over its brexit plans. peers backed a call to give
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parliament a bigger say in the event of a no deal departure from the eu. he went for it, and it is in from harry kane again. two goals from captain harry kane see england beat tunisia 2—1 in their first world cup game. hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are the comment and features editor at cityam, rachel cunliffe, and the political commentator lance price. the daily telegraph leads with comments from former conservative leader lord hague, who says the war on cannabis has been lost. he is urging the prime minister
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to legalise the drug. president trump's comments on immigration leads the guardian, as mr trump said the us will not become a migrant camp like europe. the tax rise announced by the prime minister to pay for the nhs funding boost leads the i. the ft says the chancellor has been given the green light to put taxes up to pay for the £20 billion boost. but the express say we will have to wait until the autumn budget to find out who will be paying more. and the times leads with a warning from the chancellor, philip hammond, that there will be no money for other policies outside the health service funding boost. the mirror features the television interview with meghan markle's father, who said that prince harry could only marry his daughter if he vowed never to assault her. and england's late show in russia, despite a swarm of insects in the stadium, leads the sun. so a variety of stories on tomorrow's front pages. let's begin with what was the big
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story really domestically, at least until the football result, and that is the decision to increase nhs funding. the times has rather a stark message from the chancellor. yes, the times has some detail from the cabinet reefing from the chancellor ahead of the announcement —— briefing, which has made it clear that there may be some money for the nhs, although we are not entirely clear where it will come from, but if there is, other departments should not expect a similar bounty for them. on one level i think the government will be quite pleased with this story, because the presumption behind it is that there is more money for the nhs, and therefore they are moving on to...
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but it will be tough all—round elsewhere. but some interesting quotes are attributed to the chancellor, if they are to be believed, in which it almost seems that he accepts the idea that there is this brexit dividend helping to contribute money to the nhs. i would be very surprised if philip hammond believes there is a brexit dividend. he has read the government forecast an independent forecasts and he knows full well that certainly by 2023 there will not be a mass of money. so why are the government saying this? well, i think there is a lot of politics, of course. they wa nt to a lot of politics, of course. they want to give something to the ardent brexiteers, to that half of the warring cabinet, so they can say they have that ridiculous £350 million plastered on the side of a bus which was actually a coach. so they want to be able to give them something in the hope they can move on from that argument. but actually, imean, on from that argument. but actually, i mean, some people today have been
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calling the prime minister are ba refa ced calling the prime minister are barefaced liar for talking about a brexit dividend. one mp tweeted tosh. a conservative backbencher, yes. and some have gone further than that. it is hard to believe that philip hammond really believes there isa philip hammond really believes there is a brexit dividend. the question is a brexit dividend. the question is where will the money come from, whether we will see the promised cut in corporation tax disappear or the rise in personal allowances disappear. but what is absolutely clear is that there is a very hard spending round still to come. 0ther spending round still to come. 0ther spending ministers will look at this and think this is another battle to be fought down the line.|j and think this is another battle to be fought down the line. i was talking to stephen doyle, former tory secretary, a little earlier, saying great to have the money but it is still not enough. he was suggesting the politics have not caught up with where the public is, that the government remains nervous about talking about tax rises, whereas he thinks the public have kind of already accepted the
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argument. maybe they have accepted the argument. i think it is very difficult when you have a government trying very hard to force through its brexit agenda, which was one partly on the basis of that slogan on the side of a bus/ coach, to then turn around and say they will spend the money on the nhs but you will have to pay for it. and that is what i think brexiteers a particular worried about, because they don't wa nt worried about, because they don't want that claim to come to light. this is probably going to be funded through stealth tax increases of some kind by not increasing the tax bands in line with inflation. and alliances will be —— allowances will be frozen. and what this shows to me is that philip hammond has been fighting really hard to rein in spending, to stick by the fiscal rules, and to keep his reputation as spreadsheet fillip. why anyone would wa nt spreadsheet fillip. why anyone would want that reputation, i don't know
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—— spreadsheet phil. want that reputation, i don't know -- spreadsheet phil. and the brexiteers have said we have this money. she has fudged it are calling ita money. she has fudged it are calling it a brexit dividend, no one believes that, and now you are absolutely right. 0ther believes that, and now you are absolutely right. other departments will see what they can get as well. does this bring back memories from your time does this bring back memories from yourtime in does this bring back memories from your time in government? when tony blair was prime minister and i was working for him, there was a much bigger increase than this announced and we decided to take a bit of a gamble. we said they will be a tax increase, it will go up by a penny in the pound, and it was remarkably popular. there are times in politics where you have to do that, where you have to grasp the nettle and say it will cost a lot of money, it is something we believe in, something we support, and this is how we will pay for it. and that tax rise,
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despite the fact that tony blair was oi'i despite the fact that tony blair was on the whole against tax rises, as all prime ministers, was a popular one. there is some talk on the front of the telegraph, and we will come back to this, that spectacular photograph of harry kane. you can't get away from it, can you? you can't get away from it, can you? you can't get away from it, can you? you can't get away from it, and it has only just begun. this is setting up another fight for the many four hours. the eu withdrawal bill went through the commons and back to the lords and they suffered 15 defeats in the house of lords, because the house of lords is generally quite pro— europe, quite pro—eu. house of lords is generally quite pro- europe, quite pro-eu. they call it ping—pong, but it is rather slower than that. slower than ping—pong, and you canjust get the highlights. and theresa may had a sort of crisis moments, and these tory rebels... it is difficult to say tory rebels, because there are
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rebels on both sides. they said they wouldn't back it unless they had assurances they would get a meaningful vote on the final deal, and if indeed we crash out without a deal, theresa may gave some assurances that it turned out they are not assurances at all. it has gone back to the lords and they have suffered another landmark defeat. it will have to go back to the commons, back and forth. she basically doesn't have the numbers in the lords, and the remainer tory rebels are so infuriated at the way they feel they were misled last week that they have threatened to vote against it even if it means bringing down the government. that is quite serious. that is a very good up sum, summary of the situation. the question is whether this vote in the house of lords is a meaningful vote. it isa house of lords is a meaningful vote. it is a very substantial vote, a very big majority, and they are clearly mightily miffed at the way theiramendment was clearly mightily miffed at the way their amendment was treated by the
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house of commons and the shenanigans which went on around trying to get the tory rebels on the pro— europe side to back down. the only question that really matters is what happens when it goes back to the commons, because ultimately the commons does decide and can't be overruled by the house of lords indefinitely. and whether or not these rebels will actually see their way through to voting down the government, and forcing theresa may to do something that she doesn't want to do, even if they were to win, it would still be a meaningful vote, it would still be a meaningful vote, it would still be a vote of yes or no on the package very close to the deadline, too close to be renegotiated. so for a lot of people watching and listening to this discussion, trying to follow this discussion, it is not straightforward. they will wonder why people are getting so uptight about it, whether it will make any difference. i think the question with this is,
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jeremy corbyn, in the last set of commons votes, labour abstained and they weren't going to bring down the government becausejeremy corbyn and is one of the most sceptic mp5 would had the lot of internet ——a lot of his mp5 are not. will the tory rebels actually vote against the government or risk bringing down the government or risk bringing down the government or risk bringing down the government or will labour vote against the government? willjeremy corbyn put aside his eu feelings with the possibility of defeating the government. could we have a snap election? please, no. let's move on. arguably, if it wasn't the morning after the england victory on the football field, this might actually be of big story for all the papers. not known as the most small l
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liberal. he is to be leader of the conservative party and when he was, he was vehemently against any relaxation of the laws as to be fair almost every leader of either the conservative or labour party always is in office. despite what other ministers might say, and what of —— what a lot of experts might say, they simply believe it is politically impossible to be seen to be soft on drugs and that is what this story is all about. i don't think anybody thinks the war on cannabis, in the weights described here, was ever going to be successful, and that cannabis was going to be taken off the streets of this country. that was never a war that was going to be won. the question is whether or not the politics are changing. clearly in other parts of the world, the absolutely art. we have the canadian
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government allowing the sale of cannabis for recreational purposes. and a numberof cannabis for recreational purposes. and a number of states have done that. there is the medicinal argument we have already had which clearly the government is on the wrong side of. there is an interesting argument here over the recreational use rather than the medicinal use which is a different argument altogether i can't see a former home secretary like theresa may ever allowing this to be government policy. although the current home secretary has been very liberal. this is a case where the medicinal and recreational use is our kind of lending because the reason this is in the public consciousness is because of the awful case of a boy who had severe epilepsy, cannabis oil is the only thing that will treat him. she imported this cannabis oil last week, it got confiscated at the border, he is having sieges. and
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sajid david intervened to make sure he got the medicine. nobody could look at that and not think he should get the medicine he needs. the only person who is not convinced by this is theresa may who according to this article in a cabinet meeting, sajid david and jeremy hunt, the health secretary, tried to raise this in relaxing the laws for medicinal purposes and she blocked it so her aversion to this even extends to denying a sick child medicine he needs. that has changed public concert is —— consciousness and than william hague to step in and say yes, medicinal, but also lets stop pretending that we can stop people taking this. make let's it safe and legal. very progressive. talk about suffer the little children. 0n the front of the guardian, donald trump is making himself unpopular with his policy of separating children when
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they arrive at the border with mexico. the pressure is mounting considerably. not only from where you are expected to come but also some quite senior members of his own family, his own wife has come out and said she found that appalling. aides to see children separated from their families aides to see children separated from theirfamilies in aides to see children separated from their families in this way and the country should be law—abiding but nations should be governed with a heart and she clearly doesn't think a husband is doing that. would had similar comments from lord bush and other first lady 's and the question is whether or not that has any impact whatsoever on donald trump himself. he doesn't seem to be persuaded by the arguments nor an emotional call to change his mind and if anything, emotional call to change his mind and ifanything, he emotional call to change his mind and if anything, he seems to dig emotional call to change his mind and ifanything, he seems to dig in his heels even further. nancy
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pelosi, the senior democrat on the house, the former house leader, was saying that he seems to be saying oh, well, it's a terrible policy but it's not really my fault. he says, i'm not the reason it's happening. he is blaming democrats in saying it's because they are not working with them on a policy. this is a change in policy that is entirely in the executive branch. documented migrants —— migrants are not separated from their families. he's taken a tough stance. we had audio recordings of them crying in these converted warehouses. laura bush said in her intervention it was reminiscent of japanese internment camps. the whole of the world and most of america sees this as incredibly inhumane and he says it is the fault of the democrats because they won't what, exactly? they won't change his mind. also, in
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the ft, he's getting on angela merkel and saying that he doesn't wa nt merkel and saying that he doesn't want the us to turn out europe. angela merkel is facing her own serious issues. the coalition partner has threatened to start rejecting asylum seekers at the border of germany. germany had an opendoor policy. that's not very popular in germany. that's the understatement the evening. we saw this in italy as well. i can remember talking to the maltese interior minister because they had a huge problem in the number of people arriving by boat and landing is the first port of call and he said he spoke into the then home secretary who said, we are sorry, we can't ta ke who said, we are sorry, we can't take any ourselves because public opinion won't wear it. in so much of
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the european union, the one exception recently had been spain with the new socialist government did open its doors. they want something in response. i everybody would agree, and there is always —— there is always an exception. almost everybody would agree the only way to deal with this is through international agreement, is through sharing out across the globe and recognising the seriousness of the problem. we do have a responsibility to people who are genuine asylum seekers or in danger of their lives. what we see now with donald trump attacking angela merkel is that he doesn't really care who he takes out when it comes to this sort of thing. it used to be world leaders would come together in the need to form an agreement. let's end on a happier
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note. the picture that is on the front page. it's harry came. are we alljust wild front page. it's harry came. are we all just wild about front page. it's harry came. are we alljust wild about harry tonight? working very hard to dampen down any enthusiasm to england. it's been like, don't get your hopes up and then scoring a last—minute goal in injury time? very exciting. exciting view? i'm always pleased when other people are happy. i'm not particularly interested in the football. the daily mirror had captain fantastic, which i think was an elton john record captain fantastic, which i think was an eltonjohn record from the 19805. no one is actually got got the harry england and st george. you have an
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important prediction you can share with us. psychic pets, we'd take videos of your or dog, or any kind of pet, making a prediction about who is going to win and i did one on sunday and she predicted that england is going to win. my cat is psychic. how was this prediction achieved? three psychic. how was this prediction achieved ? three bowls psychic. how was this prediction achieved? three bowls of food labelled england, tunisia and draw. treat in each and she ate the england one. very patriotic. i can't follow that. thank you both. lovely to have you with us. they give are joining us. you can see the front pages of the papers online on the bbc news website. if you missed the programme, you can watch it later. thank you very much. many of the start of the day of a
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cloudy note but it broke to give us some spells of sunshine through the day. this was earlier in parts of wales as the crowd began to break apart. we saw highs of 27 degrees. the big contrast further north. the reason for the contrast is the air was coming from different places. we had cool polar rare flowing in. air coming in from the subtropics. the air france separates these two masses. the jet stream air france separates these two masses. thejet stream is air france separates these two masses. the jet stream is starting to kick this weather front and develop it. that lump of cloud is going to be racing towards the shores, bringing outbreaks of rain.
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before we get there, have got a wea ker before we get there, have got a weaker weather front. bringing in narrow but persistent branch of rain. very muggy. still 20 celsius at the moment. that cloud is going to continue to feed in. but outbreaks of rain pushing as well to northern ireland. that rain is going to turn out to be quite heavy but where we see the best of the warm airand sunshine, we where we see the best of the warm air and sunshine, we could see temperatures going up and we will see sunshine boosting temperatures high the rain is turning heavier and pushing into central and southern scotla nd pushing into central and southern scotland before before sliding southwards. and as it begins to move, it will begin to weaken off. a5 move, it will begin to weaken off. as we head into wednesday, we'll have this lump of cloud, bits and pieces of rain, south—east, we are
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still into the warm air. again, temperatures likely to reach the mid— 205. further north, fresher conditions. some heavy showers across the north—west of scotland. pressure builds to the west of the uk. we start to get northerly winds. that is going to be bringing some and it will still be pleasant in the sunshine with temperatures not as high. temperatures will build during the second half of the weekend. it could be quite hot some of us. you can find out more on the bbc weather up. i'm rico hizon in singapore, the headlines —
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president trump under fire for his zero tolerance immigration policy that's seen thousands of children separated from their parents. yes! joy for england as their world cup campaign kicks off with a win against tunisia. i'm kasia madera in london. also in the programme — the boss of audi, rupert stadler is arrested over the diesel emissions scandal. one of the world's largest orangutan populations is under threat because their habitat is being burnt in indonesia.

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