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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  June 19, 2018 9:00am-11:01am BST

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hello, it's tuesday, it's nine o'clock, i'm victoria derbyshire, welcome to the programme. has britain lost the war on cannabis? the former leader of the conservative party, william hague, thinks so and remarkably he is now asking whether it should be legalised for recreational and medicinal use. but as more and more mps in all parties call for a rethink, can they convince theresa may? it's the argument over the medicinal use of cannabis that led to lord hague‘s comments. just after ten, we'll be speaking to the mum of a six—year—old boy who she says suffers from up to 30 seizures a day and whose condition is helped by cannabis oil, which is currently illegal. she met theresa may three months ago and says she is still waiting for a response from hell. also today. we'll be taking a look at how far the nhs has come over the past 70 years as it celebrates its anniversary in a few weeks‘ time.
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how different is it for children now compared to then? there would perhaps be weekly of visiting or if they had an infectious disease like scarlet fever then visiting would only happen through a glass window. and a year since the finsbury park mosque attack in north london, we'll be there for a minute's silence at 9.30am and hearing from the local mp, labour leaderjeremy corbyn. we'll also talk to one of those who was injured in the attack. hello... welcome to the programme, we're live until 11 this morning. so where do you stand on legalising cannabis? if you use it, for whatever reason — medicinal or recreational — do let me know why and what you use it for. and if you're a parent — what do you think? we would really like your pertinent experiences this morning. do get in
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touch on all the stories we are talking about. use the hashtag victoria live and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. our top story today. the former conservative leader lord hague has called for a review of the law on cannabis, suggesting that it should be legalised. he says that the case of billy caldwell, the boy with epilepsy whose medicinal cannabis oil was confiscated, shows the government's approach is out of date. yesterday, the prime minister said that there was a "very good reason" for the current rules on cannabis and other drugs. our assistant political editor norman smith is in westminster. norman what else has lord hague been saying in his telegraph piece? lord haig says that continuing to fight the war on cannabis is like asking the army to reconquer the empire. in other words it is over, it is lost, forget it! he says now the use of cannabis is pretty much ubiquitous in society and the only people benefiting from the current situation are criminal gangs. he says it would be much better to
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decriminalise now, except that it is widely used and regulate it. and who knows. the taxpayer might benefit from that. whether he will be listened to is another thing. we are beginning now to see more movement on legalising medicinal cannabis. in pa rt on legalising medicinal cannabis. in part because of the controversy over the last few days but also more generally because i think most mps are now more sympathetic to that argument. notjust are now more sympathetic to that argument. not just the are now more sympathetic to that argument. notjust the labour party committed to criminalising cannabis, so are committed to criminalising cannabis, so are the snp and so are the liberal democrats. and it is interesting that quite a few tories as well. even traditional law and order tories like iain duncan smith are also sympathetic. so i think we are also sympathetic. so i think we are beginning to see shifting opinion, certainly when it comes to
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medicinal cannabis. on the recreational side of things what chanceis recreational side of things what chance is there of theresa may changing the legislation?” chance is there of theresa may changing the legislation? i must say i wouldn't hold your breath. because if you talk to people who have worked in government with theresa may they say that she remains one of the most implacably opposed to any reform of the drug laws. she made no moves to do it when she was an secretary, indeed she rebuffed calls for a royal commission to look at drug law reform. i think her view is that basically cannabis is a gateway drug which leads to harder drugs. it was interesting when she was asked about the billy caldwell situation yesterday, she once more alluded to how the government had to be mindful of the wider effects on drugs and families. however, further, this has got personal because we had an extraordinary interview this morning by the mother of alfie dingley,
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hannah deakin, who said that she had been to see the prime minister to ask for some relaxation in the law, and listen. i met the prime minister on march 20 in no 10. i appealed to her directly. she looked at me. she met my son and she told me that they would find a way in which our clinicians could be issued scheduling license to give my son the medicine he had in holland. she promised you that they would find a way of giving him the same medicine that he had in holland? she said that he had in holland? she said that to you face—to—face? that he had in holland? she said that to you face-to-face? yes, i believed her. and she also answered questions in prime questions and she said it would be dealt with speedily and that was three months ago —— she
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answered questions in prime minister's questions. victoria, you'll be speaking to hannah deakin later but very powerful testimony which i think cranks up the pressure on mrs made to rethink the laws surrounding medicinal cannabis. thank you norman. your views are of course welcome, especially if you use cannabis either for medicinal or recreational purposes. let me know what you think about this debate, what you think about this debate, what lord hague has said, a former leader of the conservative party suggesting this is quite remarkable, especially because when he was leader he advocated a zero tolerance approach to drugs. let us know your experiences, will talk about it in the second hour of this programme. send us messages on a twitter, whatsapp or facebook. joanna is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the rest of the days news. good morning. a minute's silence will be held this morning to mark the first anniversary
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of the finsbury park terrorist attack. one man died and nine others were injured when a van was driven into a crowd of worshippers near to a north london mosque. this report from jane—frances kelly. london remembers once again. 0vernight, #londonunited was projected onto the muslim welfare house in finsbury park, where a year ago, darren 0sborne deliberately ploughed his van into muslim worshippers. the mayor, sadiq khan, said the projection was an act of solidarity and a symbol of unity. the message has been used to mark the four terrorist attacks that hit the capital in 2017. ta hseen ahmed chowdhury and his father still vividly remember the horror. i saw the van come towards us, and a person, like, move me away from there. and i saw, like, people getting hit, and some people was under the van. 51—year—old makram ali lost his life. he had collapsed in the street before the attack, but he was alive and being helped by fellow worshippers. very quiet man, very nice man, makram ali. i am all the time missing him.
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the prime minister, theresa may, praised the bravery and spirit of the community and released a statement in which she said: this saturday, the islington faiths forum will be hosting an event at the muslim welfare house, in which people from all walks of life and all faiths have been invited to remember the attack, but also celebrate the bonds of a diverse community. jane frances—kelly, bbc news. donald trump has threatened to impose further tariffs on chinese imports, in an escalation of the trade dispute between the us and china. beijing has responded by accusing the united states of "blackmail" — and has warned that it will fight back — as our correspondent john sudworth explains. china has promised yet again to match the us tariffs measure for measure.
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a commerce ministry statement today describing the us action as blackmail, and promising to fight back firmly. it's worth i think pausing for a moment, james, to remember where we are. at the moment, the us has announced that it is going ahead with the tariffs on $50 billion worth of chinese goods, most of those will come into effect in a couple of weeks' time. now that looks like, therefore, that is going to happen and china has promised to respond in kind. what is more hypothetical, if you like, is the next step from america. this $200 billion worth of chinese goods, which would be unprecedented, which would have serious implications for the rest of the global economy. those are still conditional at the moment, they will be some months away. but there is no doubt about it, step—by—step and action by action, there is deep concern in this region and beyond, that as you say,
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we are heading into what looks like a full—blown trade war. passengers on northern rail services are bracing themselves for more disruption today, with the first of three planned strikes in just one week. members of the rmt union have walked out in a dispute over driver—only trains. northern rail has warned passengers to expect fewer trains. the strike action comes on top of existing cancellations and delays because of new timetables and staff shortages. well, we want meaningful talks, our members don't want to take industrial action and inconvenience passengers. but we've had a history... as i said, in six months, the last six months, only two times have we had any dialogue with the company and yet nothing's happened out of that. that to me is an absolute disgrace. it's shambolic, the way they are negotiating. the way they are operating the train service is shambolic and the way they are operating the negotiations is shambolic. president trump has defended his hardline immigration policy which has seen 2,000 children separated from their parents
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at the us—mexico border. his homeland security secretary is also under pressure to resign for implementing the policy, after democrats said it was "barbaric." 0ur north america correspondent david willis has more. they are the makeshift detention centres along america's southern border, where children separated from their parents are being kept in cages, and where, according to one news website here, these heart—wrenching sounds were recorded. children cry the recording features central american children between the ages of four and ten, separated from their parents at the mexican border last week. at one point a border patrol agent can be heard saying, we have an orchestra here. all that's missing is a conductor. at an acrimonious news conference, the homeland security secretary
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was asked if she had seen the pictures or heard the sounds. i have not seen something that came out today, but i have been to the detention centres. and again, i would reference you to our standards, i would reference you to the care provided notjust by the department of homeland security, but by the department of health and human services when they get to hhs. is that the image of our country that you want out there? the image that i want of this country is an immigration system that secures our borders and upholds our humanitarian ideals. congress needs to fix it. president trump maintains the current immigration system isn't working. he wants a wall along america's southern border to keep out anyone seeking to enter america illegally. but his critics claim he is simply holding children hostage in order to force congress to come up with the cash. the images of young children separated from their parents have certainly struck a nerve here, generating the kind of pr crisis that not even donald trump can easily dismiss. david willis, bbc news. the american rapper xxxtentacion has been
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shot dead in florida. the 20—year—old was shot while leaving a motorcycle dealership in miami. his second album went to the top of the billboard chart in the us, but he was also facing a number of criminal charges, including domestic abuse. the water regulator 0fwat has severely criticised four water companies for their response to the storm nicknamed the beast from the east. the watchdog says poor planning meant customers were badly let down. some people were left without water for days following the big freeze and thaw. universities should stop using predicted grades when people are applying for places, say lecturers and head teachers. in a call for an overhaul of the system, the university and college union says the uk is out of step with the rest of the world when it comes to admissions. the most recent figures show that the grades achieved by about three quarters of applicants were worse than their teachers had predicted. as of today you'll no longer be able to buy cosmetics containing plastic microbeads.
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face scrubs, toothpaste and shower gels containing tiny pieces of plastic will no longer be on sale. it's part of efforts to prevent them being washed down the drain and ending up in rivers and seas. an electric plane has made its maiden flight in norway as part of the nation's bid to tackle climate change and air pollution. the two—seater plane took a short flight around oslo airport. a bigger one is currently being developed. norway plans to have all short—haul flights powered by electricity by 2040. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 9.30. thank you. thanks very much for your comments on the legalisation of cannabis. paul farne hill says... i can't find it, i will find it in a moment! here it is. he says, the government has no authority to tell people what they can or cannot consume. cannabis prohibition is not
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enforcea ble consume. cannabis prohibition is not enforceable and only profits from gangs and smugglers, i use it spiritually, medicinally, and recreationally, and have done for 20 yea rs. recreationally, and have done for 20 years. anthony on facebook says that a lot of people are tempted to use harder drugs after trying cannabis. of harder drugs after trying cannabis. of cannabis was legal this would not happen, it's possible the number of people trying harder drugs would also be reduced. 0ne people trying harder drugs would also be reduced. one of the many advantages of legalising cannabis. susan texted to say that she was sickened to the core on hearing of the treatment of hannah deakin and her attempts to get clearance to the use of cannabis oil for her son. typicalfor use of cannabis oil for her son. typical for the system, she use of cannabis oil for her son. typicalfor the system, she has done the right thing and has been ground down by and feeling jobsworth bureaucracy, it is appalling inhumanity, theresa may, you should be ashamed! we will be talking live to hannah deakin after ten o'clock this morning. do let me know your experiences of
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using cannabis because we would like to talk to you in the second hour of the programme. let's get some sport with hugh. eventually, it was amazing the england supporters. but i was thinking, same old england. plenty of people thinking that. if you go into any office up and down the country, there will be people with an opinion, who played well and badly, but we finally have something by which to gauge gareth southgate's england at the world cup. it was and up and down performance in truth. all that matters was the win and it finished england i—i tunisia in volvograd. periods where you felt england would run away with it and periods where the match was so tense
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you couldn't really think much. but it was a good tune up for more nerve—racking moments to come. england left it very late for victory. so proud of the lads, it was tough. deserve to be ahead, could have scored more. i have not seen the penalty, but from my point of view, did not look like one. credit to the lads, kept going, that is what it is about, you go to the last second, absolutely buzzing. england have already made the 1000 mile journey back to their base. they got back at around for a back to their base. they got back at around fora uk back to their base. they got back at around for a uk time, they will be training a little later than usual as they start the preparation for game two against panama on sunday. lots of supporters saying, what is the point of the video assistant referee when it fails to spot the by referee when it fails to spot the rugby tackles on people like harry kane? yeah, when it was announced it
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would be used in the world cup, plenty of eyebrows raised. eight penalties already in 1a games, clearly been a tournament of decisions. at the moment, they seem to go against england. at times, you are right, more like a rugby match, harry kane wrestled to the ground on more than one occasion. u nfortu nately more than one occasion. unfortunately it seems neither the ref or via video assistant referees watching felt they were fouls but it has led to small consolation —— neither the referee or the video assistant referees. just when you thought it was all right to get back out on the ice... wait for it. dynamite. the wrestling one, pretty clear what everyone felt about that tunisian defending, pretty funny, but yesterday belgian weather once laughing —— belgium were the ones
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laughing —— belgium were the ones laughing hardest. romelu lukaku wrapped up the victory for them. first of three games today is on at bbc one today at 12:30pm, colombia against japan. and andy murray makes along where —— makes a long—awaited return. but he says he is not putting pressure on himself to win when he returns, a year out. the former world number one has not played competitively since wimbledon of last year, because of a hip injury. pretty tough first match back against the australian, world number21, nick back against the australian, world number 21, nick kyrgios at queens. he has been speaking about his time away. losing, obviously, but it is notjust away. losing, obviously, but it is not just about that, there is away. losing, obviously, but it is notjust about that, there is more to it. this has been my life since i
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was pretty young, i made the decision to play tennis professionally when i was 15 years old, 15, 16 years of my life, and i have not been able to do that, play tennis, for a year now. it has been tough. but you look at things differently as you get older and go through times like that so i am hoping that will help me through the comeback. all the action from queens at around comeback. all the action from queens ataround1pm comeback. all the action from queens at around 1pm on bbc two later on. more from you throughout the morning of course. good morning. today marks the first anniversary of the finsbury park attack. speeches have just begun on the steps of islington town hall and shortly we will hear from jeremy corbyn and the london mayor sadiq khan. on 19th june last year, 51—year—old makram ali died after being struck by a van driven by far right extremist darren osborne. nine other people were injured as they left the mosque in the north
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london neighbourhood. 0sborne was jailed for a minimum of 43 years after being found guilty of terrorism—related murder and attempted murder. one of those who was injured was shariff xamza who was struck by the van whilst bending down to help someone on the ground. in a moment, we'll be speaking to him about how he's still affected by the attack. he is here alongside his solicitor. also with us is fiyaz mughal, founder of tell mama, an anti—muslim hate monitoring and support service. thank you, all of you, for talking to us. i wonder how you are feeling this morning and how you reflect on what happened year ago? what has happened until now is i am suffering a lot of pain. i have a head injury. lost my left ear and still my shoulder is broken and i'm for surgery. it is terrible tragedy, i'm
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suffering for a long year in this time. but still, i'm getting on with my life, but it is very hard. the physical effects, but what about the mental effects? mental effect is lack of sleep and at nights, i cry, i kick. i do not know what i am doing. i feel heat on my boss of gully —— on my body, muscles shaking, i want to go back to work, but i am still suffering a lot. anxiety. psychologist, she is coming and helping me all the time, consulting me, what is wrong, what i'm feeling, but still, i am relu cta nt i'm feeling, but still, i am reluctant with it. you used to be a security guard? i used to work as close officer. but i like to continue my professionaljob because
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i have qualification the security —— close protection officer. everyone is demanding me to come back but u nfortu nately i is demanding me to come back but unfortunately i cannot do my work because you have to have responsibility working with vips, security, but i cannot do it still, iam security, but i cannot do it still, i am reluctant. let me bring you in, ifi i am reluctant. let me bring you in, if i made, the founder of tell mama, anti—muslim hate monitoring and support service. how do you reflect on what happened a year ago? clearly it was a turning point because many of us realised far right ideology which had be online had an impact and darren osborne had been consuming that material and triggered the attack. it also brought the community together quickly and rapidly and showed the resilience within muslim communities. the amount saved the life of darren osborne and also the community came together —— imam.
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that was the strongest thing out of all of this, the resilience. the impact could have been quite severe in terms of community relations. impact could have been quite severe in terms of community relationslj in terms of community relations.” will pause for a moment because we will pause for a moment because we will hear from james brokenshire will pause for a moment because we will hearfrom james brokenshire in finsbury park now. appalling act of terror. the timing after ramadan prayers was especially painful and poignant and i hope this weekend's focus on family and friends has provided some comfort and solace to makram ali's loved ones and all those injured. there was no question that the attack was intended to divide us. to spread hatred and fear. and it failed. it had, in
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fa ct, fear. and it failed. it had, in fact, the opposite result. with the imam's calm and courageous response and a wonderful, diverse community and a wonderful, diverse community and country, as makram ali's daughter put it so eloquently, showing strength in unity. and showing strength in unity. and showing in the weeks after the atrocities in london bridge and manchester that we stand together against hate and terror. whatever form they take. i think this is, ultimately, it is the best tribute we campaign to makram ali and all who suffered. communities that are open, free and tolerant, and all the strongerfor open, free and tolerant, and all the stronger for it. applause
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i would now like to call upon the right honourable emily thornberry, mpfor right honourable emily thornberry, mp for islington south, to speak. there is nowhere like islington. we have people from all over the world living here and many of them come to live here because we are from all over the world, we are from every type of background, we have our difficulties, we have extreme wealth living next door to the most desperate poverty. we live on top of each other. we hardly have any green space. and we like it that way. we are united as a community in a way that i do not believe that you can see many other communities across the world. and as a result, we are an example to the world. we are an example to the world of how people can live together and that is why the extremists and the racists hate
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us. and we will not let them divide us. and we will not let them divide us. we will not let them divide us and they can do what they like to us, but we are one because there is no other in islington, there is only us. applause i would now like to ask sadiq khan, the mayor of london, to speak. can i begin with the greeting of peace? barcelona —— we come together to remember makram ali, loved husband, father, grandfather and brother. killed a year ago in an attack that deliberately targeted innocent londoners, many of whom were returning home from their ramadan prayers. we send prayers, love, thoughts and best wishes to his
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family and friends, as well as to eve ryo ne family and friends, as well as to everyone injured by the attack that night. we also should take this moment to thank once again the heroic actions of emergency services and the brave bystanders who helps. we all remember and have heard from the local imam who insured others did not harm the terrorist before the police arrived. this is the kind of story that gives us hope because it shows our values will always be stronger than the hatred of the extremists. the terrorist attack in finsbury park a year ago was an attack on all londoners. terrorism is terrorism, no matter the target and regardless of what motivates the sick and twisted perpetrators who carry out these evil crimes. the way
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this community has responded and come together has inspired us all. when londoners face adversity we stand up for when londoners face adversity we stand upfor our when londoners face adversity we stand up for our values, we stay strong and we remain united. this is our city. this is our way of life. and those who seek to divide us should know this. you will never succeed. applause thank you. and thank you to all our speakers. we are now going to observe together a minute of silence and thenjeremy observe together a minute of silence and then jeremy corbyn will make some closing remarks. if you would all like tojoin with me and we will have a minute's silence, thank you.
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in the power of that silence, we remember what happened a year ago. ramadan is a joyful time, people coming home from late—night prayers, iftar suppers and joy and happiness around. a man ridden with racism drove a vehicle into a crowd of people and killed makram ali and tried to divide and destroy our community. i live just tried to divide and destroy our community. i livejust alongside where makram ali lost his life and where makram ali lost his life and where this terrible event occurred. we spent that night in the muslim welfare house in the mosque, sadiq khan and myself were in touch very quickly, as were richard and the chief executive of the council. the response from the emergency services, from the local authority and the local community was absolutely magnificent. magnificent in its immediate response to the
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crisis, but also in its human element. imam mahmoud did a brilliant and wonderful job element. imam mahmoud did a brilliant and wonderfuljob in making sure that that hatred of racism did not turn into violence and anger on the streets that night. he helped to ensure we came together asa he helped to ensure we came together as a community because that is the only response there can ever be to the racists that seek to divide us. makram lost his life and in retaliation for that we asked the community to come together. the following day there were prayers in the middle of seven sisters road, an eerie quiet on one of the busiest roads in the city, eerie as we came together, muslims, christians,
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hindus, artists, humanists, we all came together to show our solidarity with our community, from wherever they come, whatever their faith with our community, from wherever they come, whatever theirfaith is we will absolutely never allow them to divide us. the greatest answer to those who would seek to divide us by racism is to show that if we are divided, we cannot achieve anything. when divided we can blame each other for housing, health, schools, blame each other everything else, at the of that whole blame game absolutely nothing has been achieved. only division and hatred which then goes on into generation earlier. our children understand that. i was so proud of the response of all the children in the local schools who came together to say they wanted to be part of a multicultural, multi—faith community. the children
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of one school dressed in white and walked around all the streets playing all you need is love. . some months later sadiq came to unveil a plaque on the estate where makram lived. it is a plaque next to the playground where he used to play with his children and his grandchildren. in memory of makram the children playing and laughing together, they are the answer to our racists. we will be united for ever, strong for ever. they will never divide us. and in memory of makram stay united, stayed together, support each other that we can achieve that better, decent society that i believe we all fundamentally crave. thank you for coming today. jeremy corbyn, labour leader and
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local mp speaking at finsbury park. home secretary sajid javid and communities secretary james brokenshire weather and we heard earlierfrom london mayor brokenshire weather and we heard earlier from london mayor sadiq khan. in the studio one victim of the attack was heard explaining about the mental and physical effects of the attack. jill greenfield, his solicitor is here, together with the leader of an organisation set up to deal with hatred against muslims. i wonder what you feel is the best way to counter people like this man who drove his fan into the people leaving the mosque. clearly his background was of someone who couldn't hold down a job, it was a fragmented background, and he himself was vulnerable to
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radicalisation. he had been radicalised within a matter of weeks. using material online that is available through social media. as pa rt available through social media. as part of the problem. social media platforms haven't taken responsibility, notjust in the removal of content but even listening to some of the issues around hatred. it's notjust muslims, lgbt around hatred. it's notjust muslims, lg bt people, around hatred. it's notjust muslims, lgbt people, communities come even women are targeted so more needs to be done. jill, you have worked hard to get people like shariff help, he says he has not even been able to get back to work since. at was interesting because the law had changed just weeks before the attack. it used to be that if a vehicle was used for terrorism purposes, the insurer wouldn't support the victims. that changed on march one son of victims
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can access financial support through the insurer of the vehicle. which enables us to put in place rehabilitation so we can move quickly to support the community and make sure that whoever needs support, like physiotherapy, new housing, care and medical treatment got bad paid for by the insurance company and that was really helpful. thank you very much, thank you all for coming on the programme, thank you very much. now the latest news and joanna. lord hague the former conservative leader has called for a review of the law into cannabis committee says the case of billy caldwell, the boy whose use of cannabis oil for medicinal purposes was forbidden, shows the lawyers out of date. lord hague says there are good rules martial grounds for decriminalising cannabis and other drugs. 01 minute silence has been
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held for victims of the finsbury park attack one year ago. one man was killed and others injured when a van driver drove his van into a crowd outside a mosque. the way that this community has come together has inspired us all. when londoners face adversity we stand up for our values. we stay strong and remaining united. this is our city. this is our way of life. and those who seek to divide us should know this. you will never succeed. president trump has threatened to impose further ta riffs has threatened to impose further tariffs on chinese imports in an escalation of the trade dispute between the us and china. the president said the 10% tariffs would come into effect if china refused to change its practices. china has accused the rest of blackmail, raising fears of a full—blown trade war. passengers on a northern rail services are getting ready for more
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disruption today with the first of three planned strikes injust disruption today with the first of three planned strikes in just one week. members of the rmt union have walked out in a dispute over driver only trains. northern rain has warned passengers to expect fewer trains. this comes on top of existing cancellations and delays because of new timetables and staff shortages. the american rapper xxxtentacion has been shot dead in florida. the 20—year—old was shot while leaving a motorcycle dealership in miami. his second album went to the top of the billboard chart in the us, but he was also facing a number of criminal charges, including domestic abuse. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. thank you very much. thank you for your many, many messages through facebook, e—mail, texts and tweets about cannabis. mohammed in rochdale says our sun will be nine in september. he has been epileptic since he was six months old. so far various medicines including steroid and in particular diet have been
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tried but nothing has worked. it is heartbreaking to watch our sun having to 40s users a day and not being able to help. we have nothing to lose by using medicinal cannabis but oscar consultant at the royal manchester children's hospital but oscar consultant at the royal manchester child ren's hospital is not able to prescribe it. thank you for that. we'd be keen to talk to you in the second hour of the programme if we can. one viewers says that she was a victim of domestic violence and palmer had a psychosis caused by long—term users of the drugs and her daughter has had two boyfriends both induced with problems because of drug use. her nephew uses cannabis regularly, the drugs blitz up families and ruins lives. medicinal use may be different and good but care must be taken not to relax the law and cannabis for recreational use. many
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more messages where these came from, i worried as many as i can before the end of the problem. keep them coming especially if you have a pertinent experience like some of our textus. now the sport with hugh. england manager gareth southgate has heaped praise on captain harry kane after his two goals including this had helped england beat tunisia in their opening world cup match. it could have been easierfor england after wasteful finishing and public with the video assistant referee. budge on top of england's group this morning, this belter, and two goals from romelu lukaku helped them beat panama 3—0. and in tennis andy murray makes his return to competitive tennis today, he's missed almost one year after having hip surgery. he plays australian nick kyrgios at the queen's club this afternoon. more sportjust after ten o'clock. thank you.
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next month, the nhs turns 70. it was set up in 19118 and since then, there have been huge changes and advances, perhaps more for children than any other patients. our health correspondent, catherine burns, has been back to where it all started — manchester. this is home from home for four—year—old ziggy thompson. ward 84 at royal manchester children's hospital. ziggy has leukaemia and is having intensive chemotherapy. she's had a procedure this morning so is tired today. but when she grows up, she wants to be a superhero. so she's very excited about some special visitors to the ward. by day, andy fights crime as a security officer at the arndale shopping centre. but today, his alter ego is here. my name is manchester's dark knight, and i'm here with my group heroic alliance. we're here to see the kids today. team heroic! i can see those peepers peeping at me! the children are too busy giggling to notice that in the background, the nurses do their observations and change medications.
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some of these young patients are here time and again. at the minute, ziggy spends one week at home and one week year. when the superheroes leave, she has a rest. her mum emily is waiting for another visitor. andrea merrill was ziggy‘s age when the nhs started in 19118. she got tb and had a long stay in hospital. she's here to see how things have changed for child patients and their families ever since. hello! hi, how are you? when i was your age, i had my fifth birthday in hospital. but it wasn't a bit like this, not at all. how do you cope with being here all day? the night before i come in, i have to prepare myself for it. knowing that i don't leave the room
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for a whole week and i don't get to see my son, i don't get to take him to school. but once i'm in, you kind of, because it's a family unit, you talk to people, everyone's in the same boat. it's like a normal life. it's kind of part of my normal life now. how long have you been doing this for? so, she got diagnosed four months ago. on friday. so my initial, it came as a total shock to us. six consultants walked into the room, her and i were half asleep and theyjust told me, point—blank. they said, we can't say 100% but we're 99.9% sure, she's got leukaemia. it is treatable, it can be curable. when they told me, my husband wasn't there, it was just me and her in the bed. oh, that must have been awful. at ten o'clock at night. the funny thing was, when i rang him, isaid, we're not going to be home tonight. he said, how come? i said, she's got to have a blood transfusion, because her blood's really low. i said, i think you need to come up, he said, why? i said, they think she's got leukaemia.
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he went, she could have leukaemia. she was swimming yesterday, she was at school the day before. and it started from here. i was in here then for five weeks, i didn't go home at all. she says the days can drag by but they've built up routines here now. ziggy‘s favourite part of the ward is the school room and she likes to go as often as she can. newsreel: if you've ever been in hospital, you'll recognise the symptoms. yes, jane's being got ready for visitors. it's all a long way from how things started 70 years ago. back then, children were allowed visitors perhaps just twice week. daddies aren't always safe to have around, of course, especially when their hosts are only 17 months old. but the clasps of strong hands or the friendly smile, why, that's all that's needed between men. do you know what that would have been used for? stephanie is a historian here today to do a show and tell with the children. but her focus is on creating a social history of the nhs for the 70th anniversary. that was 19118, so that was when the nhs started. she's been gathering stories from patients and staff about their memories. people are telling us that they remember being taken in in an ambulance to hospital,
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parents would not be in the ambulance with them. when they were admitted, they would be on the same ward as adults. there would perhaps be weekly visiting or if perhaps they had an infectious disease like scarlet fever, then visiting would only happen through a glass window. there's been huge advances in child health over the last 70 years, from vaccinations and gene therapy, to better rights for patients. but now leading paediatricians say they want a renewed focus on children, because a healthy child often leads to a healthy adult. andrea is back on the ward as a visitor today, but she was a nurse herself in the 19605 and remembers how strictly visiting time was monitored. her earliest memories of hospital are as a child patient in 19118. they wouldn't let my mum and dad come in for me, because i used to make a big fuss, a really big fuss. i used to scream and shout. "i want my mum, i want my mum." so they said they couldn't
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come and see me. i was there all on my own. there were other children, but we weren't... so could they visit you during the day? no. it upset me more when i'd seen them because i couldn't go home. when i was nine, i caught scarlet fever. so, in those days, you had to be quarantined. i was in a room on my own, and i was in there for about five days. i really did, being that bit older then, i really did feel... isolated. and your parents weren't allowed to see you. you had to talk to them through the glass windows. being on my own then, in there, wasn't as bad as when i was ziggy's age. i think that i know that i can remember and feel it when i think back, that i hated them going and leaving me. i don't think she could handle me not being here, i don't think
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i could handle her being in for a week at the time and me not being there. you didn't have any choice. no, yeah, ijust don't know how... i wouldn't like to do it and i don't how she would like to do that. i think it's brought me and her a little bit closer. she's just totally resilient to everything, shejust kind of, she just gets on with it. it's like it's her everyday life now and she's not going to let it get her. it won't be forever. emily says she is positive about the outcome for her daughter. this is the most intensive stage, but hospital will be part of their life for quite some time. ziggy's treatment is expected to last for just over two years. medical professionals and patients have been sharing their memories of the nhs with us. you can read them via our nhs at 70 page on the bbc news website. you can get involved too by sending your stories to haveyoursay@bbc.co.uk. coming up...
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so much reaction from you about what william hague has written in the newspaper today. calling for a review on legalising cannabis for recreational use. we will be speaking to one of his conservative collea g u es speaking to one of his conservative colleagues who thinks he is wrong. more importantly we want to know what you think. particularly if you use cannabis and what you use it for, let me know. that is twitter, whatsapp, facebook. swimming pools, museums and parkland are among the 4,000 council owned buildings and pieces of public land that are being sold off in england every year, according to new research. the local government association says councils are having to sell land and buildings in order to raise money, and to save the cash they would have been spending on maintenance. let us talked jax lovelock who is
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from the friends of dewsbury park mansion. the council closed it in 2016 and the authority has been considering allowing the friends to ta ke considering allowing the friends to take it over but it is also considering selling the building to developers. also with us, tony armstrong, ceo of locality. we are the national membership body the community organisations, we help them be as successful as they can be. what is wrong with councils selling off buildings or land when they need extra money that they cannot afford to maintain anymore? the buildings and land are our property, local authorities hold them on trust for us, so we need to be careful about how they are used. the thing concerning us is local authorities are thinking in the short—term. they have financial problems, they have to close the gaps in their budget, but once the buildings and land are sold, they
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are sold forever and the budget hole has only been closed for one year. the worrying thing is that 4000 year properties, many of them include community to use buildings like libraries, parks, community centres, town halls. many councils are failing to consider alternatives, like community ownership. you are not saying, do not sell off the stuff, but think a bit hard about who you sell it to? yeah. some of the sales will be appropriate, bits of industrial land, for example, giving those for housing development, absolutely fine and a good choice, but councils do not have the data broken down about tee at that level which is worrying. no central data exists until we did this freedom of information request showing the scale of the sell—off —— the data broken down at that level. councils are losing huge amounts of land and buildings which could be lost forever to the local community.
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tell our audience, jax lovelock, wyatt is so important for you to save dewsbury park mansion? —— why it is. we started it off when the museum was shut down and taken out of the mansion and this year marks 125th anniversary of when the park was bought by the dewsbury corporation for the people of dewsbury as a place of recreation and sport to make sure that people we re and sport to make sure that people were kept healthy. we are just showing the audience a picture. it is an absolutely glorious building, beautiful. carry on. it is absolutely beautiful. the council we re absolutely beautiful. the council were initially talking aboutjust selling the building off witches in the middle of the 72 acre so immediately, the local concerns are about whether public access will be available in the area of the park and also the value that the museum
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had to the local community was immense. i know the local church did a lot of work with the museum and lots of local artists, they did a lots of local artists, they did a lot of work with the museum, and now it has disappeared, it is not happening at the moment. that means simple things bringing the community together like treasure hunts around the park, like community events, they are struggling to happen because there is no place for them to happen in the park.” because there is no place for them to happen in the park. i have got some figures here suggesting kirklees council has a waiting list of around 10,000 people for a council property, wooden building homes on this site really helped the local community? —— wouldn't building homes on the site really help the local community? it wouldn't because it is the only place available to the local community for recreation and coming together as a local community, so if
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you rip out just together as a local community, so if you rip outjust that little space where the mansion is, you are taking out things that would actually support a local community. there is nothing there that would celebrate and support what the local community is and our community is very divided, we are in the top ten or bottom if you want to put it that way of highly deprived areas in the whole country. you take it out and you put housing on there, you essentially destroyed the community. 0k. what chance of the friends of dewsbury park mansion getting control of this? we had a meeting yesterday with council officers and we are hopefully on a trajectory for christmas this year to have the community asset transfer in place. that is what the council say, they are actively working with a group, you, on the asset transfer of dewsbury park mansion. if you succeed, how we will be feel? -- how
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will you feel? it will be amazing. i will you feel? it will be amazing. i will get emotional, two years really ha rd will get emotional, two years really hard work, and what it will mean for our town which is a lovely, lovely town, some amazing people, but it has had bad press. it will mean that we can start really putting dewsbury back on the map. for some the things happening ready as a result of the community asset transfer. we can look at health and well—being, upskilling, employing people in a place where employment is quite low, we can make sure that all of that feeds into the well—being and the self—esteem of the town which has taken a real hit. we need to change the negative narrative into a positive narrative. i cannot even
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begin to explain in this short amount of time how much it will mean for all of us, the whole time, the whole area. you have done it, so interesting to see you well up about the building and a piece of land. it is heartening. yeah, it is so much more. i know that. iabsolutely understand that and the way you have described it, it is clear it is much more than that. the local government association tells us councils are facing significant pressure on finances, the decisions to sell land and buildings are not taken lightly. do you accept that? of course, they are undergreat do you accept that? of course, they are under great cuts. there have been hundreds of examples around the country, local organisations, using local buildings, they become more sustainable, they went out the building, the community can use it for events and festivities and
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groups —— they rent out. and they employ local people and invest back into the local community. the good local authorities and kirklees is a good local authority, they get this, they appreciate the long—term benefits to the social and economic health of the local area. thank you, both. good luck. thank you for coming on the programme. thank you for all of your messages about cannabis. this from mary, ijust do not understand what the government is thinking at times, recreational drugs cause unbelievable problems in this country and the background to much of the crime going on. legalising cannabis should not enter the debate. however, legalising the use of cannabis oil for medical reasons is a life—saver for many people and i suffer from essential tremor and i'm waiting to hear if i have been approved for inexpensive procedure on my brain done only on one hospital in the uk. surely be less at sensitive to provide —— less
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expensive to prescribe cannabis oil? another says, i was prosecuted for medicinal use of cannabis three yea rs medicinal use of cannabis three years ago. i grew my own, medicinal use of cannabis three years ago. i grew my own, so criminals would not make money from me, igrew criminals would not make money from me, i grew less than half a dozen pla nts me, i grew less than half a dozen plants just before christmas for my own use and i am plants just before christmas for my own use and i am now plants just before christmas for my own use and i am now being prosecuted for this. so many more, which i will read in the next hour. we will talk more about this. thank you for those so far. news and sport on the way. the latest weather now. a bit ofa a bit of a split in the weather in terms of temperatures overnight. living across england and wales, you may have noticed quite an uncomfortable night the sleeping, temperatures no lower than 16—18. the separation is with this weather front. to the north, much fresher night across scotland and northern ireland, temperatures more like 5—8. sunshine this morning in northern
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parts of the uk, and further south and west, rather misty and cloudy start in shropshire. we have the split of more cloud in southern areas and more sunshine in northern parts. generally speaking, the cloud will thicken up in northern ireland with eventually outbreaks of rain moving in and cloud thickening in western scotland and rain eventually by the evening. elsewhere, bright spells, staying quite cloudy and misty on coastal parts in the south and west. it will feel quite warm and west. it will feel quite warm and muggy once again. fresher further north. heavy rain moving into eastern and southern scotland and potentially northern england. temperatures staying in the mid teens across much of england and wales. during wednesday, heavy rain to start off across scotland. gradually clearing the way to the north sea. patchy rain spreading south and east on this band of cloud ahead of that in the south—east,
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keeping sunny spells. very warm, 27, 20 eight. behind that area of cloud, fresher condition spreading south. those temperatures more like 16—19, with sunny spells in the afternoon. the fresher air will eventually extend further south, or behind the cold front into thursday, all of us under the influence of the blues and greens. northerly wind bringing the temperatures down. starting off on a sunny note on thursday but we will see a bit of cloud developing in the afternoon, quite breezy at times across the north of scotland. temperatures down by a few degrees in the south—east. feeling fresher. temperatures similar to today and tomorrow. friday, the weekend, this big area of high pressure slap bang across the uk, keeping things very settled into the weekend, it will be dry, sunny spells for most of us,
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temperatures creeping up slightly into the weekend, 25 in london, low 20s elsewhere. bye—bye. hello it's tuesday june 19th, it's ten o'clock, i'm victoria derbyshire. welcome to the programme. our top story today. the former tory party leader lord hague steps into the debate over the legalisation of cannabis. he's said the war on cannabis is "comprehensively and irreversibly lost". so is he right? should it be legalised? this mother believes so. i met the prime minister on march 20th in no 10. i appealed to her directly. she looked at me. she met my son and she told me that they would find a way in which our clinicians could be issued a scheduling licence to give my son the medicine he had in holland. that's hannah deacon, the mum of six—year—old alfie dingley
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who has a rare form of epilepsy. she has appealed to theresa may to intervene to grant a licence so he can be treated with cannabis oil. at the moment it is illegal in this country. we'll be talking to hannah shortly. also a minute's silence has been held to mark the first anniversary of the finsbury park mosque attack. the terrorist attack in finsbury park a year ago was an attack on all londoners. terrorism is terrorism. no matter the target, and regardless of what motivates the sick and twisted perpetrators who carry out these evil crimes. a 47—year—old father of four drove a van into worshippers, murdering a father of six and injuring nine others. us rapper xxxtentacion has been killed aged 20 — described as one of rap's most controversial artists, he rose to fame with two hit albums. we will bring your reaction. —— we
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will bring you reaction. here'sjoanna in the bbc newsroom with a summary of today's news. the former conservative leader lord hague has called for a review of the law on cannabis — suggesting that it should be legalised. he says that the case of billy caldwell, the boy with epilepsy whose medicinal cannabis oil was confiscated, shows the government's approach is out of date. yesterday, the prime minister said that there was a "very good reason" for the current rules on cannabis and other drugs. a one—minute silence has been held to mark first anniversary of the finsbury park terrorist attack one man died and nine others were injured when a van was driven into a crowd of worshippers near to a north london mosque. the communities secretary, james brokenshire, said the country stood together against hate and terror in all its forms. there is no question that the attack
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was intended to divide us. to spread hatred and fear. and it failed. it had, in fact, hatred and fear. and it failed. it had, infact, the hatred and fear. and it failed. it had, in fact, the opposite result. president trump has threatened to impose further tariffs on chinese imports, in an escalation of the trade dispute between the us and china. mrtrump said the 10% tariffs would come into effect if china ‘refuses to change its practices'. beijing has responded by accusing the us of "blackmail" — raising fears of a full—blown trade war. passengers on northern rail services are having to cope with yet more disruption today, with the first of three planned strikes in just one week. members of the rmt union have walked out in a dispute over driver—only trains. northern rail has warned passengers to expect fewer trains. the strike action comes on top of existing cancellations and delays because of new timetables and staff shortages. the online fashion retailer asos has announced that it will no longer sell silk, cashmere, mohair or feathers on its platform.
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the brand, which has over 12 million customers worldwide, said the move was part of an update to its animal welfare policy. the decision has been welcomed by animal rights campaign group peta. in may, h&m, gap, zara and topshop also announced that they would stop using mohair. the american rapper xxxtentacion has been shot dead in florida. the 20—year—old was shot while leaving a motorcycle dealership in miami. his second album went to the top of the billboard chart in the us, but he was also facing a number of criminal charges, including domestic abuse. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 10.30. thank you for your messages about cannabis, we will talk about it shortly with the mother of alfie lee and also with two mps, one of them agrees with what william hague has written today the newspapers and one
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who does not. if you get up on that tablet, i will show your! let me read you these e—mails. one says, i've used cannabis or 30 years, i have multiple arthritis in hands and knees along with ptsd and other issues, year i was dismissed from work after 17 years in the same department after an manager found out that i used cannabis, from a colleague. and ifailed a drugs test. i have a young family, i am about to lose my home and everything you have built up because of the antiquated way companies look at cannabis use. the government have lied to us for years. it needs to stop, just because the government says it is wrong does not mean it is. andrew says as a police officer icame is. andrew says as a police officer i came across people under the influence of cannabis and it seemed only to make them more lethargic and compliant. on the other hand most of my time was spent dealing with the violence caused by alcohol which routinely made people aggressive,
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hostile, and dangerously violent. keep sending us in your views, especially if you use cannabis, whether for especially if you use cannabis, whetherfor medicinal or recreational purposes. here's some sport now with hugh. good morning, i guess we have to say the most important thing for england was to win the world cup opener, although they left it late and they had nerves jangling during their 2—1 victory over tunisia in volgograd. they were maybe unlucky at times. they were maybe unlucky at times. they scraped in at the end, harry kane the captain, scoring. captain harry kane was the hero on the evening... he opened the scoring from close range before england were unfortunate to concede a penalty equaliser for tunisia // but with the match into added time, kane headed home to send their fans into raptures. .. it is difficult to highlight intellectuals because... the squad has been brilliant, team selection was brilliant and to bring on the substitutes to have the impact they
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did, we have got this result over the last three weeks, notjust tonight, that has been down to eve ryo ne tonight, that has been down to everyone who worked so hard together. belgium may be even happier with the start to group h though. they're top, above england, thanks to a 3—0 win over panama. dries mertens opened the scoring before two from manchester united's romelu lukaku. our old friend var was centre stage in the sweden—south korea match. the referee didn't initially see this as a foul but changed his mind on reviewing the tape. hard as it was for fans to watch, captain andreas granqvist scored the penalty that gave the swedes a 1—0 win. these are the matches to follow today. at 1pm, colombia take onjapan. then at 4pm, it's poland versus senegal. and later, hosts russia play egypt, with coverage on bbc one and bbc radio 5 live. andy murray says he isn't putting any pressure on himself to win matches when he returns
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to tennis after a year out. the former world number one hasn't played competitively since wimbledon last year due to a hip injury, and he has a tough first match against world number 21 nick kyrgios at queen's. murray's been speaking about his time away. sport is about winning and losing, obviously but it is notjust about that. there is more to it. like this has been my life since i was coming in know, pretty young. i made the decision to play tennis professionally when i was 15 so it's been 15, 16 years of my life and i haven't been able to do that, play tennis for a year now. so it has been tough, but i think you look at things a bit differently as you get older and go through times like that, so i am hoping that will help me through the comeback. cricket news. scotland play a t20 match in the netherlands today, whilst england play their third one—day international against australia.
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england will be without the injured pair of ben stokes and chris woakes for the match in nottingham. they're 2—0 up in the five—match series before they play the tourists in a t20 match. that's all the sport for now. more a little later, thank you. theresa may is under pressure concerning the use of cannabis into the case of billy caldwell who has been refused cannabis treatment. lord hague writing in the press today says that the war against the legalisation of cannabis has been comprehensively and a visibly lost. he says, it must be asked if britain should join the other countries that permit medical grade marijuana or
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indeed join canada in preparing for a lawful regulated market in cannabis for recreational use as well. the home office has told us in a statement this morning, "there is strong scientific and medical evidence that cannabis is a harmful drug which can harm people's mental and physical health and can damage communities." let's talk to norman smith. now we will they overturn the law on this, will they? that's right, william hague says the war has been lost but theresa may is clearly in no mood to run up the white flag. she's always been implacably opposed to legalising cannabis, she resisted drug law reform when she was in the home office and chichi botched the idea of having a royal commission to decriminalise cannabis. her view is that cannabis is a gateway drug which leads to the use of other harder drugs. i think we saw that yesterday when she was asked about
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the billy caldwell case. part of her thinking was based on the impact of cannabis and families. so she won't change your mind on that. more interesting is whether there will be a change on legalising medicinal use of cannabis. this seems to be more fluid of cannabis. this seems to be more flu id partly of cannabis. this seems to be more fluid partly because of a high profile cases we have had recently and also because over time there's been a shift of opinion in parliament. not sort of high profile should come you don't have ministers suddenly saying, we should legalise medicinal cannabis but at a lower level, all the main parties signed to legalising cannabis for medicinal use. in the tory party this growing a cce pta nce use. in the tory party this growing acceptance of the argument, what i find surprising that it is often the
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most unusual tories as a book that move, people you would not imagine would be sympathetic to that kind of drugs reform, people likejulian lewis, mike penning, iain duncan smith, figures on the right of the party, as it were, they are willing to talk about it as well. what is not clear is whether the panel set up not clear is whether the panel set up by not clear is whether the panel set up by sajid javid to review this on a case—by—case basis, reviewing individual applications for licensing different cannabis medicines will extend into a broader review of the whole law. my impression at the moment is that the government haven't closed the door to wed but i am not saying definitely yes. but what is happening is that there's much more pressure on them extend that into a much broader review. thank you norman. let's talk to different people about this. co—leader of the green party and mp caroline lucas is in westminster, while conservative mp laurence robertson, joins me in the studio. and also from our westminster
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studio, conservative party politician crispin blunt, mp for the reigate constituency in surrey. what group of you with a blunt, do remind me? co-chair of the drug policy reform group. is lord hague right? yes. because the damage done to our society by a criminally supplied product, cannabis, which as he says is ubiquitous in our society, means you don't have a regulated and licensed supply way you can check that what people are buying is what it says it is and we have a market in the uk which doesn't care whether it sells to children or adults. and they sell the strongest possible stuff that they can manage, which is why 95% of cannabis sold in this country is street cannabis, skunk. and the evidence is that if people under 18, developing minds up to the age of
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23, say, use that, there is a risk, a more significant risk of psychosis from that product. so legalising it would reduce that risk? yes, it would reduce that risk? yes, it would mean that whenever it is retailed, in the same way as alcohol, there is a reason why people under 18 find it easier to get cannabis and alcohol, it is because there's no criminally supplied alcohol, and large, from a production point of view —— by and large. if you sell it to an under 18 you could lose your entire business. do you want your 18—year—old to be trying cannabis? i would want them to be making sensible informed choices and understanding what they are buying and what the risks are. if you try to ban something com pletely if you try to ban something completely and if we are in a place where alcohol is present throughout
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our society, a licensed and regulated drug which the vast majority of people in the uk are able to enjoy and properly manage their consumption of alcohol, at the margins, of course, there are people who can't. but the state gets a very substantial tax income from that and people are able to exercise responsible choices, part of growing up responsible choices, part of growing up in our society, helping people understand what a sensible way to manage consumption of alcohol is. exactly the same process could and should apply to the use of cannabis. let me bring in your colleague, conservative mp laurence robertson. tell your colleague why he is wrong. ido tell your colleague why he is wrong. i do not think we should conflate the two issues, the medicinal use of cannabis which has been used to develop certain treatments over very many years... you would back that being made legal? that is for the
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medical profession to decide. as it is with all drugs that are prescribed. the conflict that with the idea that we should legalise the recreational use of cannabis, i think it is to confuse the issue completely. i think we have heard that cannabis could be taxed. the best way to encourage the illicit trade, as we have seen with cigarettes, where a very high percentage of cigarettes smoked in this country are legally brought into this country, the best way to increase the illicit trade is to tax it. where will we sell the cannabis? next to mars bars in a shop? how does that system work? go to washington state and find out like i did at easter. do you smoke cannabis? no, i don't. one of the reasons i am able to enter this debate is i left school and went straight into the army and my university experience was as a soldier, where obviously this was
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prohibited, as it is for everyone else, but it would have been career fatal for else, but it would have been career fatalfor me to else, but it would have been career fatal for me to have anything to do with it. one of the politicians able to a nswer with it. one of the politicians able to answer the question, did you smoke cannabis at university? the a nswer smoke cannabis at university? the answer is no. caroline lucas, if you legalise cannabis the recreational use, do you encourage more people to use, do you encourage more people to useit? use, do you encourage more people to use it? looking at the evidence, there is no evidence that has happened in the countries that have gone down the route. what you do is reduce the harm associated with it and that needs to be the starting point for this debate. what we want to talk about is reducing harm. if it is regulated, then you have a much better chance of knowing what is in it and therefore you would not be having a very strong skunk on our streets today. i really think it is important, i agree with lawrence on this, that we separate out these two debates, a very big difference between the debate about medicinal cannabis and the wider debate on
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drugs reform, i'm in favour of both, but it is not helpful to combine them. we have children at risk of death because we have sajid javid pretending he is some kind of pharmacist deciding who he will and will not prescribe cannabis to. it is absolutely ludicrous. what we need to do is shift to the issue being treated as a health issue, not a home office issue. laurence says, leave it to the medical profession. unfortunately, we cannot because the politicians are getting in the way. my message to sajid javid today is for heaven's say, listen to the evidence, look at those people who are suffering right now, make sure you license medicinal cannabis without delay, and after that, we can have a wider debate if necessary about the issue of wider drugs reform. right now, people are going to die because of our politicians' relu cta nce to die because of our politicians' reluctance to have a bit of courage and get on and do this. an impassioned plea from you. in a
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moment, we will bring on hannah deacon, listening to everything you are saying, caroline, we will bring her onto the set now so she can have a conversation with you. let us talk about the recreational side of things, hannah deacon, the mum of one of the boys who would like cannabis oil for her six—year—old. the recreational side, you say there is no evidence from other countries where they have legalised cannabis the recreational use that it has led to increased use. what do you say to pa rents to increased use. what do you say to parents who have enough trouble as it is trying to control all sorts of stuff with kids growing up, teenagers, who will be thinking, oh my goodness, another thing i will have to worry about if we legalise cannabis in this country? by talking about legalising cannabis, i am not suggesting it should be available next to the mars bar in the corner shop, of course not. iwould next to the mars bar in the corner shop, of course not. i would look at the evidence from other countries we re the evidence from other countries were undercertain the evidence from other countries were under certain circumstances you can get hold of regulated cannabis,
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you would have to show you overeating, you might have to show you did not have any other underlying medical conditions —— over 18. i underlying medical conditions —— over18. lam underlying medical conditions —— over 18. i am the mother of two sons andl over 18. i am the mother of two sons and i would far rather we are in a situation whereby if they were getting hold of cannabis, we would have a better chance of knowing that it was likely to be safer than going as we are today with the kind of free for all where instead of this being regulated by the government, it is being regulated by gangs. we wa nt it is being regulated by gangs. we want to get this stuff out of the hands of gangs. i am not saying it is risk—free, nothing is, but the evidence shows the risk is massively reduced when it is in the hands of government rather than in the hands of gangs, a quick phone call from a 16—year—old, it can get them cannabis ina 16—year—old, it can get them cannabis in a matter of moments. at least if they were trying to get out of control, they would have to show some evidence of age. it is ludicrous we have such a difference when it comes to potentially
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dangerous substances —— if they were trying to get alcohol. laurence, talk directly to caroline lucas? we would have a great difficulty it is wrong to take performance enhancing drugs as a sportsman, we are legalising it, what kind of mixed message is that? we regulate it, just like alcohol. going back to the today programme this morning when a very eminent american who was talking about this issue said that when it was legalised in certain states in america, the illicit trade increased. we are sending the wrong message. parliament is notjust about enacting laws, it is about sending messages. the message we would be sending to young people, located take drugs. the police tell me many heroin users start on cannabis. it fuels the crime to enable them to go out and buy the drugs. i think it is fanciful to imagine that if we legalised it, the
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illicit trade would go away. but what is happening with cigarettes with the high tax rate on cigarettes. it is estimated 20—25% of cigarettes coming into this country are coming in illegally and very poor quality. i do not think it would address any of the points made. three months ago, the mum of a six—year—old buy called alfie dingley —— a boy called alfie dingley —— a boy called alfie dingley who suffered up to 30 violent seizures a day that the prime minister to beg her to allow him to continue taking the band cannabis oil. this is her talking to us cannabis oil. this is her talking to us at the beginning of march.” cannabis oil. this is her talking to us at the beginning of march. i have found something that helps him and i wa nt found something that helps him and i want everyone to get together and make this happen for him. it's his human right to be well. and this makes him well. and i understand, there's legal sides and legislation and there's red tape, i get that.
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but we need to act quickly and i want some sincere, i want some sincere, you know... interaction, commitment? help, from the home office. yeah, some commitment, sorry, yeah. that they will make this happen. and this is what they've offered us and i want it to happen quickly. hannah is back with us now in the studio. hello, good morning. he met the prime minister on the 30th... 20th of march. have you heard back? we met on the 20th of march, she met my children, my partner, ourfamily, we sat down with ministers and herself and she assured us in that meeting that we would find a legal way to provide alfie with the medical he was using in holland. it was clear his symptoms were greatly reduced, they accepted that, and
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they said they would find a compassionate and speedy way in which our doctors could prescribe for alfie. that was three months ago. she said to me, she looked me in the eye and she said, she would help me, and i believed her and i feel distraught today, to be quite honest, because we have had three months of wrangling, we have six people within our clinicians group saying alfie must have the medication to keep him well. it is clinician led. they have actually made our clinicians go through a process of pharmaceutical drugs... if you wanted to do research into cannabis, that is the same process we have been through. three applications, apparently all costing £4000 each, and that cannot change because they would have to change the law for us not to have to pay that money, so... why would pay £1 million if it meant my child was safe. i feel really let down —— million if it meant my child was safe. ifeel really let down —— i would pay. i have played the game,
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respected the law, the processes, i have been polite, done everything of me, while my son is still suffering, but i have respected that the routines and floors and i have understood it is a new thing —— and laws. where has it got me? that promise, three months ago, where has it got me? what are you calling on the prime minister to do now? when i spoke to ministers last tuesday, i was assured everything was in place, the doctors are signed up, the government and technical agreement, 25 pages long, it is in place. when my child had unlicensed drugs put into him, no one cared about his psychiatry, looking after him and keeping him safe, those steroids could have killed him and no one asked whether it was ok, apart from an apologist who said, you cannot carry on doing this. now we have a cannabis —based medicines used
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throughout the world and regulated, we have to jump through hoops and do an amazing amount of paperwork. i am told it is all done. the only thing outstanding is a compliance visit to the pharmacy where they have a licence to keep heroin. heroin and morphine, a substitute the heroin. if she is allowed to keep that in her pharmacy, she should be allowed to keep medical cannabis. we were only told this yesterday that the doctor should be there as well and he is not available at the moment. how is your little boy? he is better than before we went to holland because we are paying for him to be on cbd out of our own money and it reduces the intensity of the seizures, but still having them very regularly, and if we had the thc prescribe to us, they will stop. it is just infuriating. prescribe to us, they will stop. it isjust infuriating. hannah deacon, this is a conservative mp, laurence
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robertson, and another, crispin blunt, and caroline lucas, a green mp. what should your boss do for hannah deacon and her son?” mp. what should your boss do for hannah deacon and her son? i am not an expert on this medicinal issue, but my understanding is the cannabis plant has been used for a long time, many years, to extract certain properties from it to develop certain medicines and i think this should have happened a long time ago. i should have happened a long time ago. lam not in should have happened a long time ago. i am not in a position to say what works for anybody with regards to treating them medically, i am not a medical doctor, but if this is approved by the medical profession... which according to hannah it has been. i do not see what the hold—up should be. but do not think it is helpful to put william hague to conflate the two issues. i have every sympathy with the situation and i do not know who your own mp the situation and i do not know who yourown mp is, the situation and i do not know who your own mp is, it is practical to
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go... they have been very supportive. she has been to the prime minister! what do you say about this case regarding hannah deacon and her son, alfie? the government should immediately authorise the use of medicinal cannabis recommended by doctors for children with epilepsy in particular epileptic editions being suffered by alfie dingley, billy caldwell, and a numberof alfie dingley, billy caldwell, and a number of others waiting to see how this develops. meanwhile, the government should announce an immediate review of how we manage this process. i have made suggestions about the statutory instrument needed to change the legal framework. and then get this policy in the hands of the department of health. it is utterly, utterly ridiculous that the police minister is making decisions about medicines. it is a total nonsense. it has its origins in global drugs policy back in 1961 which has some
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pretty ugly antecedents as well in american policy towards afro—americans, but we need to get now up—to—date with the modern world with where 36 states in the us, half the states in the eu, they are now getting to a place where their people can have access to medicine from cannabis and we need to get on with this and act now. caroline lucas, you have said it is ridiculous the home secretary is acting as some kind of pharmacist, what should the prime minister do now? shisha and act on the pledge she gave to the mother of alfie and supply cannabis oil to anyone in the circumstances. i defy anyone to think that the current policy is right. i feel so angry on their
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behalf and on behalf of of parents like hannah who have done everything they have been asked to do and kept within the law and now they are being persecuted by the law. we need to have a review of the misuse of drugs act, it is no longerfit to have a review of the misuse of drugs act, it is no longer fit for purpose and meanwhile young lives are being put at risk because we don't have people in government with the bit off, you know, courage and commitment to deliver on promises they have made. the prime minister was listening today and will act immediately. this is mohammed, a one of our viewers. he lives in rochdale and we can talk to him on the phone. can you hear me 0k? and we can talk to him on the phone. can you hear me ok? this is victoria. good morning victoria. thank you for coming on the programme. in your e—mail you said your son was nine and has been epileptic since he was six and has
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how many seizures a day. mum at the moment he's having up to 40 a day but at one point he used to have up to 200 a day. goodness me, and you would like to use cannabis oil to help him. we have tried other medicines, we've also used other substances but nothing else has worked so far. basically, no other medicines were available at the moment. it is hard to watch having so many seizures a day. so you have had to consider whether you will break the law to relieve his suffering. i want to do anything thatis
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suffering. i want to do anything that is possible, since the beginning of this month, i bought oil from holland and barrett but it is not medicinal. and it is not illegal either. the one i bought is not illegal but it is medicinal.” discussed it with our consultant who said, you may use it but this is not medicinal. he spoke to the hospital pharmacy and they said, even if you we re pharmacy and they said, even if you were prescribed it, you wouldn't be able to get hold of it because it is not legal. what would you like the prime minister to do? for nine years we have tried so many remedies and nothing has worked, in our case
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nothing has worked, in our case nothing has worked, in our case nothing has worked. nothing is going to change for us because we have tried other medicines. we desperately want this to be allowed we don't want to have to get hold of and off the street, that's where we want, we want the government to act and save lives. thank you mohammad. thank you also, hannah deacon. we will follow your case, of course. we hope that the prime minister will stick to her pledge because what sort of a country do we live in when families like mine are not helped and families like that poor man, it brea ks and families like that poor man, it breaks my heart to listen to him, i know what it is to have to watch your child having seizures again and again and it is awful that these people are not being helped! laurence thank you for your time, crispin blunt, and caroline lucas, thank you as well, we appreciate it,
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thank you as well, we appreciate it, thank you as well, we appreciate it, thank you for talking to hannah deacon as well. thank you. your views are welcome of course. but despite we will come back to this issue again and again. let's bring you the headlines withjoanna. the former conservative leader lord hague has called for a review of the law on cannabis — suggesting that it should be legalised. he says that the case of billy caldwell, the boy with epilepsy whose medicinal cannabis oil was confiscated, shows the government's approach is out of date. this morning the home office has said the government has no intention of reviewing its classification. a one—minute silence has been held to mark first anniversary of the finsbury park terror attack. one man died and nine others were injured when a van was driven into a crowd of worshippers near to a north london mosque. labour leaderjeremy corbyn, whose constituency includes finsbury park, said the response of the community after the attack was a ‘model for us all‘. president trump has threatened to impose further tariffs on chinese imports, in an escalation of the trade dispute between the us and china.
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mrtrump said the 10% tariffs would come into effect if china ‘refuses to change its practices'. beijing has responded by accusing the us of "blackmail" — raising fears of a full—blown trade war. passengers on northern rail services are having to cope with yet more disruption today, with the first of three planned strikes in just one week. members of the rmt union have walked out in a dispute over driver—only trains. northern rail has warned passengers to expect fewer trains. the strike action comes on top of existing cancellations and delays because of new timetables and staff shortages. the online fashion retailer asos has announced that it will no longer sell silk, cashmere, mohair or feathers on its platform. the brand, which has over 12 million customers worldwide, said the move was part of an update to its animal welfare policy. the decision has been welcomed by animal rights campaign group peta. in may, h & m, gap, zara and topshop also announced they would stop using mohair.
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the duke and duchess of sussex are to visit dublin next month. kensington palace said prince harry and meghan are looking forward to learning more about ireland‘s history and experiencing its rich culture, as well as meeting the people who are shaping the country‘s future. that‘s a summary of the latest bbc news. thank you very much. here‘s some sport now with hugh. england‘s world cup campaign is up and running. last night, harry kane scored a dramatic injury—time winner to beat tunisia 2—1 in the russian city of volgograd. for a lot of the squad, it wasn‘t just their first game of this tournament, but their first game and andy murray makes his return to
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competitive tennis this afternoon. he faces the australian nick kyrgios at queen‘s later this year. that‘s all the sport for now. the first phase of the inquiry into how the grenfell tower fire happened continues this morning. it will focus on the facts around the events of the night. yesterday a fire safety expert explained how the stay put plan, relying on containment, was undermined by changes to the building which meant it failed to meet current fire standards. frankie mccamley is at the inquiry in central london. we are hearing from a professor of forensic science who has been speaking for 35 minutes and is expected to continue throughout the morning. her role in the inquiry is to look at how the fire started and where exactly. we know it started in flat 16 on the fourth floor but she
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is looking at where it started. so far she has been outlining who she is and how we will hear the evidence today. today we will see videos and images of the damage, we will see videos of flat 16, how the fire started so warnings and be put out to those watching coverage on tv, or online, or here, that there will be distressing images shown. she‘s already said she found insufficient information and analysis to determine the cause of the fire. she‘s explained a little bit of this already, she said jihad second—hand videos and photos and reports from people who are outside the tower that night, she was working on second—hand evidence because when she arrived in november virtually everything had been backed up. all
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the electrical equipment had been taken away, she said further examinations needed to take place to determine how the fire started, she did say that it left through the kitchen and made its way back in the bedroom, she said in her written report that you did not think the fire had been started deliberately. this is the second expert witness to give evidence this week. we expect two more. another witness will look at how the fire spread around the tower that night. victoria. thank you. thank you for your messages about the use of cannabis, either medicinally or recreationally. trevor said: "i sufferfrom prostate cancer and hypertension.
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i purchased cannabis oil in spain 3 months ago and have been using it daily since. my blood pressure readings have reduced and i am about to reduce medication which i have been taking for 45 years. there is so much testimonial evidence backed up by scientific research worldwide now available. let‘s take a sensible and enlightened view, knowing that many other responsible countries are legalising this powerful natural treatment. the time has come to legalise cannabis for medical and recreational use." and another viewer emailed in: "due to a muscle wasting condition i have suffered two decades of chronic pain; in the past herbal cannabis alleviated this avoiding the side effects from my prescription analgaesics. until receiving a police caution, i had cultivated cannabis strictly for personal medicinal usage, to avoid dealing with criminals. now unable to afford herbal cannabis on my pension and benefits, iface a life blighted by side effects from medication
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prescribed for my pain." thank you so much for those. it really informs the conversation. we really informs the conversation. we really appreciate it. thank you. the us rapper xxxtentacion has been shot dead near miami in florida. he wasjust 20. the up—and—coming star‘s second album had topped the us billboards chart in march, but he was a controversial artist. when he died, he was facing 15 criminal charges, including one for domestic violence. tributes poured in online following the news of the rapper‘s death. kanye west tweeted, "i never told you how much you inspired me. thank you for existing." and rapperj cole hailed the star‘s "enormous talent and limitless potential". away from the music industry, footballer daniel sturridge, who has played for liverpool and england, tweeted that today marked a sad day for music. while british documentary maker louis theroux added he was a huge talent and bringing a beautiful new feel to hip hop. let‘s get more now on what happened.
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joining me now from la is the entertainment reporter kj matthews. kj, what else do you know about what happened here? coq said he was a controversial figure, happened here? coq said he was a controversialfigure, he is from florida and he was about 40 miles from miami where he lived, on monday. he went into a motorcycle shop, allegedly to purchase a motorcycle, as he was leaving the parking lot, authorities say two gentlemen approached him and fired shots into his vehicle. the authorities say that allegedly somebody reached in and still his louis vuitton bag. they haven‘t confirmed it but they think it might have been a random robbery. he was taken to hospital and pronounced dead. he was only 20 years old as
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you said. he was a controversial rapper. he had only been on the scene for a couple of years and only reached the pinnacle of success within the last year and a half, last year he had his debut album and it was certified gold almost immediately. his second album came out this year, in march and went to number one on the billboard album charts. he had many fans in the rap community including kendrick lamar, kanye community including kendrick lamar, ka nye west, community including kendrick lamar, kanye west, the singer chris brown, they are all stunned. there seems to be two faces to xxxtentacion. the one of the artist who is extremely creative, has contributed to the hip—hop community, and then and more violent side of him. at the time of his death he had been charged with more than 12 felonies, including battery and false imprisonment of his ex—girlfriend, who was pregnant at the time. he had also been known
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to hit a fan at a concert, argue with the legendary rapper drake on twitter so this guy was extremely controversial. i understand some kind of reward has been offered to catch those responsible? they are offering $3000, the sheriff‘s office, for any information leading to the arrest of those responsible for killing him. thank you for talking to us from la. let us talk about england in the world cup. the campaign is up and running. last night, harry kane scored a dramatic injury—time winner to beat tunisia 2—1 in the russian city of volgograd. 18.31 million viewers watched harry kane‘s winner on bbc one last night. that makes it 2018‘s most watched tv moment so far, beating prince harry and meghan markle getting married.
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let us have a look at the goals. for a lot of the squad, it was not just their first game of this tournament, but their first game of any tournament, but their first game of a ny world tournament, but their first game of any world cup. you look tired, you we re any world cup. you look tired, you were actually in the stadium, you flew back at 4am, billy? that is right. amazing, karan and... sorry, paul. how was it for you? fantastic. bit nerve—racking. the middle, then it went horribly wrong, but nothing better than the 91st minute winner. the atmosphere in the stadium... the fans, really great vibe, the way the tea m fans, really great vibe, the way the team was playing, they had the spirit, kept going, when the ball
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went in, the place erupted. the tunisians thought they were there, having a big party. the england fans went berserk. it seemed like there was a bond between the fans and the team. what was it like from your point of view? i have a really sore throat because i have been screaming from the top of my lungs. no need to apologise. absolutely fantastic. i have never seen something like that, the england fans were absolutely superb, after the 91st minute, i do not think i will see anything like that again. i could have cried with happiness. i was in the middle of a section of tunisian fans, ijump from my seat and i punched the air and they looked at me a bit awkwardly. things you are not supposed to do when you are surrounded by fans of the opposition! how about you, paul? brilliant. the atmosphere was fantastic. the tunisians made it a great night as well. just relief at the end. we started brilliantly. the
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relief was phenomenal. when they we re relief was phenomenal. when they were missing a few chances, were you at the dock was a bit of you thinking, same old england?m at the dock was a bit of you thinking, same old england? it is all about luck. i think we have been quite unlucky in a lot of tournaments. not again. we were so brilliant in the first half. they got the penalty which i thought was a bit dodgy appetite. we do not get the replays you get. i was thinking, it looks a bit dodgy. luck has run out. second half, more defensive, made it harder for us, out. second half, more defensive, made it harderfor us, but out. second half, more defensive, made it harder for us, but england ke pt made it harder for us, but england kept going. i thought, it is coming, it is coming, four minutes is good. the extra time. should have been way more! you know that, but we did not know that at the time. karan and paul, what is the point of var if it fails to stop the rugby tackles harry kane was having to put up
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with? it was quite difficult to see. i was not sure why the penalty was given but i believe it was an elbow from kyle walker. var has not been the best mechanism to try and correct controversial moments in the game. we are still seeing problems. there was an issue with the game at the beginning of the world cup as well. i think it does need work. what about you, paul?” well. i think it does need work. what about you, paul? i agree. i think it was the france— australia game, the var has been patchy, not brilliant. perhaps they should have left it this tournament, started it when they had ironed it out a bit more. ok. marcus rashford and ruben loftus—cheek came on and did well, should they start against panama question someone asked me this morning, but i actually typical management move, tunisia pressing, got a little bit tight, bring those
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two on, they run rings around them. i thought, that is it, brilliant managerial move. ten, 15 minutes, it up managerial move. ten, 15 minutes, it up again. i think, actually, managerial move. ten, 15 minutes, it up again. ithink, actually, panama, of course we need a result, but i think the players are good enough to do what they have to do, bring them on later again and leave them for the belgian game, the big one. how much was harry kane and inspiration, paul? what a great leader. making him captain has been gareth southgate's best move. the guy was awesome. he got the goals. tell us about the bond you felt between the tea m about the bond you felt between the team and the england fans in the stadium, karan? absolutely magnificent. i was opposite the england fans, they got the tickets to the english fa, i was in the middle of the tunisian fans. when we
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scored, it was just me celebrating. you could see a great bond between the fans and the players. i think we are buying into this side because they are young, quick, they are everything we have wanted after the past failures in tournaments where we have had the golden generation which never really gelled as a team and because we know there is no real expectation on this side, we can really support them. if it had ended 1-1, billy, really support them. if it had ended 1—1, billy, how patient with the supporters have been? it is the press we supporters have been? it is the press we need to worry about. sometimes they get on the players' backs and the press have changed this time, new generation coming through, they understand. we were talking about it before, a whole week between now and then, can you imagine the pontification? bit of a nightmare. i think it isjust a good thing we got that result and we do not have to think about it. although there were some things are the
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defending was a bit panicky at times, all of the missed chances, those are things england supporters and the team need to think about? but the team are young, 26 years old, they will learn from the mistakes they have made and if the manager does not drop them, they will get confidence and not do it again. a few mistakes, we talked about it, but in the end, a header goes in, mcguire, had a couple of passes that went off, he lost a couple of passes, earlier in the game, but he got the header, final goal. there you go. are you going to panama? are you going to the panama game? at the moment, no, but you never know. quarterfinal, semifinal, final activity as well. england fans, obviously, a lot of them are scared to go, we talked about it a couple of weeks ago, but now people are talking, yeah, the atmosphere was fantastic. the russians were so brilliant. i had a russian host.
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really welcoming? totally. they said, we love england. they said, bring me some gifts, some tea. i brought tea, bre ntford bring me some gifts, some tea. i brought tea, brentford shirt, they gave me tours, all sorts of bits and pieces. to be quite honest, when england fans go over, be really hospitable and friendly, bring over trinkets, gifts, they are so happy with england fans. i was surprised. england, we love you, want to go there. wayne rooney, all of these england players, this is nothing like... not what you were expecting. interesting. thank you. paul thank you very much. karan, thank you. might speak to you again if you go back. we have talked a lot about cannabis this morning for obvious reasons. william hague has written in a newspaper today the government should consider notjust
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legalising it for medicinal use but also recreational use, like he said canada is about to do. so many m essa g es canada is about to do. so many messages from you about this. going to talk to christopher, originally from california, lives in the uk now, you was watching this morning, diagnosed with epilepsy in december, 2017. hello. good morning. what is your view on this? i am a complete cannabis optimist and i believe that this country should get behind this movement right now and legalise medicinal cannabis. i also agree with past contributors to the show today that the recreational side and the medicinal side should be very separated at the moment. we should just purely concentrate on the medicinal side of cannabis and hopefully this momentum will keep going and we will have it legal. why would it be important to you? well, i suffer with epilepsy, i have tried
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a few different really heavy narcotic —based drugs that my doctors have prescribed me and i have had terrible side—effects. so i have had terrible side—effects. so i have got myself off those and onto cdd oil with the smallest amount of thc, the illegal component —— cbd. you have to take a one—month‘s supply to get a tiny high ofsted, the amount of thc is so minimal, but the amount of thc is so minimal, but the effect is so great —— tiny high off it. how many years ago were you diagnosed? only eight months ago. i‘m sorry. i am just hearing that the home secretary sajid javid is going to make a statement in the commons today about this. i do not know what he is going to say, but it feels like there was some sort of momentum now, particularly on the medicinal side of things, still a
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lot of people are against legalisation of cannabis the recreational use, what is your view on that, briefly? well, yeah, again, i would be for it, but i am opposed to linking the two conversations right now. i think that it could distract the momentum we have got with the medicinal conversation, so iam very with the medicinal conversation, so i am very wary of commenting too much on that because purely i think that we should go for medicinal first, much like they did in california, colorado, and now they have taken it that next step further, after long—term of medicinal side of things settling into their communities. ok, thank you very much. we really appreciate it. simon texted to say, i have been using cannabis the ten years, i get chronic back pain because of scoliosis. i find it chronic back pain because of scoliosis. ifind it is chronic back pain because of scoliosis. i find it is one of the
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only drugs that can help alleviate the pain after work. i am unable to move them. also, alcohol is legal and has been proven to have worse health risks, so why not give it the same laws and regulations as alcohol, please, mrs may? so many of those. thank you for getting in touch, we really appreciate it. we will come back to the subject. bbc newsroom live is next. we will continue looking at cannabis tomorrow so we will feature your own experiences onto more‘s programme, have a good day. we have had a fair amount of cloud around today. so warm and quite muqqy around today. so warm and quite muggy across england and wales. this weather watcher photo sums it up for many, holes in the cloud from time to time to give us sunny spells, particularly in eastern and south—eastern areas of england. further west, more cloud,
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south—eastern areas of england. furtherwest, more cloud, misty south—eastern areas of england. further west, more cloud, misty and murky around coastal areas, perhaps even drizzle. rain spreading into the north west of scotland this afternoon. quite warm for england and wales. a little bit fresher further north and west. that is where the rain will spread in overnight tonight across scotland turning heavy in the early hours of wednesday morning. a bit of heavy rain spreading into the north of england. another warm night for england. another warm night for england and wales, and that rain across scotland will move into the north sea towards scandinavia. some patchy cloud spreading southeast but with sunny spells in the south—east, very with sunny spells in the south—east, very warm with sunny spells in the south—east, very warm again. further north and west, it will be sunny in the afternoon and fresher with highs of 16-19. afternoon and fresher with highs of 16—19. bye—bye. this is bbc news and these are the top
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stories developing at 11. the government rules out legalising cannabis following a call by the former conservative leader william hague to change the law. after ministers made an exception for billy caldwell, there is pressure to change the law. as the mother of another epileptic boy renews her appeal to theresa may to allow him treatment with cannabis too. she met my son and she told me that they would find a way in which our clinicians could be issued a scheduling licence to give my son the medicine he had in holland. a minute‘s silence is observed to mark the first anniversary of the finsbury park terrorist attack in north london. religious and community leaders come together in solidarity.
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