Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 19, 2018 8:00pm-9:00pm BST

8:00 pm
this is bbc news. i'm reeta chakrabarti. the headlines at 8pm. the home secretary announces a review into the medicinal use of cannabis, in a move prompted by cases of children with epilepsy not having access to cannabis oil to control their seizures. i will do everything in my power to make sure that we have a system that works so that these children and these parents can get access to the best possible medical treatment. republicans in the us senate say migrant families should be kept together while their immigration status is determined, as president trump faces increasing criticism for his zero tolerance policy. religious and community leadersjoin together, for a minute's silence, to mark the first anniversary of the finsbury park terror attack. also coming up: how's this for a telling off, not just from anyone, but the president of france. emmanuel macron reprimands a teenager for calling him
8:01 pm
‘manu,’ his nickname. and how a man who went missing in marshland on the norfolk coast, was saved by a drone. ito have admit that i thought, "i'm going to be lucky to live." i've got a feeling i'm not going to be allowed to go for walk on own any more. good evening and welcome to bbc news. the home secretary has announced a review of the medicinal use of cannabis, which could lead to more patients in the uk being prescribed drugs derived from the plant. the announcement follows a series of appeals from parents, who want their children to be able to access medications which can alleviate the symptoms of epilepsy and other illnesses. but sajid javid insists the class b
8:02 pm
drug will remain banned for recreational purposes. our special correspondent lucy manning reports. hello. how are you? six—year—old alfie dingley has his good days. but his severe epilepsy means many seizures. but alfie has a mother prepared to take on anyone to help her son and get the cannabis oil that improves his symptoms. we met the prime minister. she looked me in the eye and she said to me, "we will help you." and she met my child, and i feel now, having gone through the process that we've been through, have i been played? i'm a mother of a very sick child and was it all a stunt? that meeting was months ago. just hours after alfie's mum spoke out today, a very quick change of heart from the government. immediate help for alfie and a wider review that could see medical cannabis legalised in the uk. as a father, i know there is nothing worse than seeing your child suffer.
8:03 pm
you would do anything to take away their pain. that is why i have the utmost sympathy for billy caldwell, alfie dingley and many others like them, and for their parents, who have been under unimaginable stress and strain. i'm very overwhelmed. for me, that isjust life changing and for him it is life changing. i know now that he won't ever have to go through that again and for me, as his mother, that isjust an amazing thing to feel. he's been given a new lease of life. yeah. billy caldwell‘s mum has also been fighting for her son to get cannabis oil. common—sense and the power of mothers and fathers of sick children has burst the political process wide open. medical cannabis oil contains two compounds found in cannabis. in the uk it is licensed to treat ms but, until now, not epilepsy.
8:04 pm
it is legal in 26 other countries. they are living with the same fear that we lived with for 16 years, that epilepsy could take our son, and it did. and i don't want anybody else in that position. it is a horrendous thing to go through. for alfie's parents and all the other children, there is at last hope. with me is professor ley sander, the medical director at the epilepsy society and professor of neurology at university college london. thank you for coming in this evening. professor, medical cannabis, it seems as if it has been presented as an open and shut case, that they can help children with those conditions, is it as simple as that? i am afraid not. there is a
8:05 pm
lot of confusion. we basically have a plan to, cannabis and the two products that can be extracted from the plant, one is cpt, and the other. the oils may have different composition, different amounts of these products and eight. in this country it is not legal because to have the part as more than 0.2% because of the psychoactive substance, the part that gives you the high. the one without that is available as a food supplement and people can get it. there is also the development of what is a call from the great cpt, which is basically medicine, done with the extract of the cannabis plant. there is some
8:06 pm
confusion as well with street cannabis and i have seen people coming and talking and actually asking if they can use street cannabis for their epilepsy. could they? i do not think it is a good idea because there is no evidence for the use of cannabis but what we haveis for the use of cannabis but what we have is a number of anecdotes. no light is made of antidotes but we do wa nt clear light is made of antidotes but we do want clear evidence. this evidence we do not have four at the moment for the treatment of epilepsy or even for cpt. cbt we have better or more evidence than we have for the thc as it is called. how do you read a case like this where his mother says he respond so well to the cannabis oil? it might well be that this drug has a niche. we are not saying it is not effective but what
8:07 pm
we're saying at the moment is we do not know who it will work for, if it works for everyone. might work well for a niche, people with specific conditions. we know, for instance, the medical cpt, it works for some kids that have something and particular if they have a seizure type, which we call drop attacks. people seem to have a good response but it is not for other people with other conditions or other diagnoses for epilepsy. that does not seem to work. this is what we need to understand. so who will benefit from it so we can actually do the proper trials to give this drug evidence? you make it sound like it is an ongoing and complicated issue and one that will not be quickly resolved by a government review?” think the government review is to
8:08 pm
see how the process for medicinal cap to my cannabis will proceed and if it is going to be a development programme, if it can be made available. this is what the review will look. i do not think it is an open or shut case that this is going to bea open or shut case that this is going to be a panacea, a magic bullet for eve ryo ne to be a panacea, a magic bullet for everyone with epilepsy. —— for medicinal cannabis. thank you. and we'll find out how this story, and many others, are covered in tomorrow's front pages, at the slightly later time, because of world cup coverage, of 10:50 and 11:30 this evening in the papers. 0ur guestsjoining me tonight are the broadcaster and writer, mihir bose, and the senior political correspondent for the times, lucy fisher. a minute's silence has been held in north london to mark the first anniversary of the finsbury park terrorist attack. 51—year—old makram ali was killed, and nine other people were injured, when a van was driven into a crowd outside a mosque. our home affairs correspondent
8:09 pm
daniel sandford reports. london at rush—hour. but today, a minute of silence and reflection. among the leaders, the daughter and grandson of makram ali, who was killed in the finsbury park attack one year ago. and the iman, who preserved the rule of law, making sure the attacker was kept safe until the police arrived. this is our city. this is our way of life. those who seek to divide us should know this — you will never succeed. applause. darren 0sborne had deliberately driven a hire van straight into a group of muslims on a warm night during ramadan. 0ne survivor, abdirahman ibrahim, was hit by the van and then helped restrain the attacker to protect his more seriously injured friends. he says that many of those caught up in the violence are still suffering,
8:10 pm
either physically or mentally. the anxiety, the post—traumatic stress disorder. some of us have panic attacks. so, this will be ongoing. no matter how much counselling or therapy you take, no—one will ever forget what happened that night. makram ali, who was killed, was 51 years old and sat in the same chair for prayers at his local mosque every day. and there is now a memorial to makram ali overlooking the playground where he watched his six children grow up and, until last year, his grandchildren too. but at makram ali's mosque — lit up overnight with the #londonunited hashtag — they say that a tragedy that might have divided has actually brought people closer together. daniel sandford, bbc news. president trump has defended his controversial ‘separation policy', blaming the democrats for what he called an immigration crisis in a speech this
8:11 pm
evening in washington. but he's struggling to contain a growing political storm. tonight the senate republican leader, mitch mcconnell, said all republicans in the us senate support keeping migrant families together until their immigration status is established. president trump accused the democrats of drafting bad law that had worsened the immigration crisis on america's mexican border. these are crippling loopholes that cause family separations which we don't want. as a result of these loopholes, roughly half of a million illegal immigrant family units and minors from central america have been released into the united states since 2014 at unbelievably great taxpayer expense. nobody knows how much we're paying for this monstrosity that's been created over the years, legislation that nobody has any idea what they're doing, they don't even know what it means.
8:12 pm
and you have to see this, it's a mile high. child smugglers exploit the loopholes and they gain illegal entry into the united states putting countless children in danger on the perilous trek to the united states. they come up through mexico, mexico does nothing for us, you hear it here. they do nothing for us, they could stop it. they have very, very strong laws. try staying in mexico for a couple of days, see how long that lasts, 0k? laugther. applause. let's speak to our correspondent gary 0'donoghue who joins us from ursula detention centre in texas. this is one of the areas where children are being kept separately from their parents? this particular
8:13 pm
centre where i am now, is one of the centres were effectively deep pa rents a re centres were effectively deep parents are separated from the children, so as soon as they are arrested and come across the river and rio grande into the united states, they are caught and brought toa states, they are caught and brought to a centre like this one, behind me. the adults are processed into the criminal justice me. the adults are processed into the criminaljustice system and at that point the children are separated from their parents and sent on to other centres in southern texas and throughout the country. this has been one of the hugely controversial places in the last few days, just because of some of the images that have emerged about children being kept in cages, about children, small children crying for their parents when they are taken away. in the last few hours i can tell you all so that while we have been here, construction workers have been here, construction workers have been working on the fence here just behind us. you will not be able to see it from where we are here, they
8:14 pm
have been working on the face and all -- have been working on the face and all —— fence and they have been weeping this material in between the chain—link fencing so you cannot see them at all so they are doing their best to keep prying eyes out. donald trump will know well by now that he isa trump will know well by now that he is a deliberate controversial —— controversial list and he is digging in his heels, which way is this going to go? can you tell? there has been pulling in the last few days that suggests if you look at the polling, something like to — one americans are against this policy of separating children from their pa rents separating children from their parents but if you ask republicans, it is about to — one the other way around. this is in the context of the midterm elections here in the united states in november. republicans have a battle on their hands to maintain control of the house of representatives and indeed the president takes the view that it
8:15 pm
plays well with his base and that tough rhetoric on immigration is one of the things that took into the white house and the first place in this doubling down is pretty popular with base. i am not surprised about that and this is a big however, some of the key parts of his support have been expressing some worry about this policy. the separation of children, it makes everyone a bit an easy. what you are starting to see isa easy. what you are starting to see is a focus on the legislative solution. he says there needs to be a legislative solution, even though the administration actually decides on its own to introduce this separation policy, just six weeks ago. we have to leave it there but thank you very much. it's emerging tonight that the us is expected to withdraw from the united nations human rights council. the us ambassador to the un and the secretary of state are expected to reveal more at a news conference later. 0ur correspondent nada tawfik gave us this update a little earlier.
8:16 pm
us ambassador nikki haley really since last year has been consistently warning that unless there was reform of the un human rights council, that they would leave. she has two issues. the first of which, the biggest issue is she objects to the fact that israel is the only country that has a dedicated agenda item which means that every time the council meets, they have to discuss israel. she says that undermines the credibility of the council and that needs to be abolished. she says there is a chronic anti—israel bias on the council. and then secondly, she says that there needs to be more competitive elections. she doesn't like the fact that many states that are accused of human rights abuses themselves are really able to just get seats by having uncompetitive elections that regional blocs can basically barter whose turn it will be to have a seat. 0ur correspondent in new york there.
8:17 pm
time for the headlines here on bbc news. the home secretary announces a review into the medicinal use of cannabis, in a move prompted by cases of children with epilepsy not having access to cannabis oil to control their seizures. republicans in the us senate say migrant families should be kept together whilst their immigration status is determined, as president's trump zero tolerance policy faces increasing criticism. religious and community leadersjoin together, for a minute's silence, to mark the first anniversary of the finsbury park terror attack in north london. sport now, and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's tim. thank you very much. so much going on today and this evening and currently russia are playing egypt ina group currently russia are playing egypt in a group a game at the world cup. russia thrashed saudi arabia in their first game, whereas egypt
8:18 pm
lost to uruguay mohammed salah has returned from injury for egypt but a confident russia have had the better of the first half. they have had the better of the second. salah came close before the half—time whistle. the russian so much better in the second half. the egypt defender scoring on goal —— own gold there. that but the hosts ahead and let's look at life pictures because the hosts have scored two more. 2—0 and they just scored a hosts have scored two more. 2—0 and theyjust scored a fare as well. 3—0 with about half an hour of normal time remaining and frankly russia are through to the second round given their 8—0 goal difference from the first two games. egypt of course could score but there is the third russian goal. not quite sure who scored it but a lovely finish. 3—0 to the russians and all of them coming to the second half. earlier in group h senegal played their first world cup match since 2002
8:19 pm
when they famously beat france in the group stage. and they won it 2—0 against poland. __ to- —— to— one against poland. they took the lead in the first half thanks to a deflected strike going down as a thiago cionek own goal. and then disaster for poland as they gifted senegal‘s mbaye niang a second after a mix up in defence. poland getting a late consolation but 2-1 poland getting a late consolation but 2—1 ended there. in the first match of the day japan beat colombia 2—1, yuya 0sako with the winner, after ten man colombia had pulled level. remember one of the sides from this group could meet england in the last 16 if england make it through. and they are position after beating tunisia last night. after compiling a one day record score of 481 england's cricketers are looking to seal a series win in the third 0di against australia at trent bridge. it is looking really good at the
8:20 pm
moment. jonny bairstow and alex hales both hit centuries as england sailed past the previous record of 41m which they posted against pakistan two years ago. a few moments ago, australia... earlier former spinner graeme swann reflected on england's recored breaking performance sensational. they got off to a flying start and then alex hales came in and 140—7, and everybody came in and 140—7, and everybody came in and played the best. 481, it is simply believable that 500 was on the cards. i really thought it did. it look like we might get to 500. it has been an incredible day. andy murray's comeback after almost a year out with a hip injury has ended in a narrow defeat to nick kyrgios at queen's club. murray lost in three sets
8:21 pm
against the australian world number 21, asjoe wilson reports. nearly a year they have been waiting, he has been waiting. andy murray's pounded the practise courts and ran all the rehab. but only a match would tell us if he is really ready. by the first point at queens, it went 0k. his opponent, nick kyrgios, was belting wild serves out and helping andy murray taking the first set 6—2. andy murray was cracking on with the combat in trying to win the second set. to test his hip and his help, he was moving. . —— full stretch. so, andy
8:22 pm
murray would have to try to win and three the hard way and here was a twinge, he felt some pain but did not call for medical help. he kept going but the winners eventually stopped and a double fault was obtained. but he is back. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in sportsday at 10:30pm. thank you. now, in france president emmanuel macron seems to enjoy being in the spotlight and meeting people, but as one teenager found out, never call him by a nickname. the teenage boy addressed the president as "manu", short for emmanuel. but macron wasn't impressed, let's take a look. got more than he bargained for, i
8:23 pm
think. joining me now on webcam from paris is agnes poirier, uk editor for the french weekly marianne. hello, thank you very much for joining us. how has this gone down? well... it has gone normally, you do not address the head of state or a teacher or anybody in a position of authority with such nonchalance. he is about 14 i think, this young man is about 14 i think, this young man is and he was just told off by the president. what is interesting actually, a lot of head of states might havejust
8:24 pm
actually, a lot of head of states might have just chosen not to hear it, and you have a lot of people and they say many things and you just continue shaking hands but emmanuel macron is not that kind of man or head of state. he does not shy away from a confrontation. he never avoids questions. he likes to take them on. it is interesting because them on. it is interesting because the most interesting bit of the exchange happened just later and indeed emmanuel macron tweeted the whole exchange and after he told off the teenagerfor whole exchange and after he told off the teenager for addressing him whole exchange and after he told off the teenagerfor addressing him by whole exchange and after he told off the teenager for addressing him by a nickname. he said so you are going to ta ke nickname. he said so you are going to take your exam soon in the teenager said oh, yes, to take your exam soon in the teenagersaid oh, yes, i to take your exam soon in the teenager said oh, yes, i will have it and pass it no problem. and the president says well, perhaps you can aim higher, you will take the exam and perhaps you can aim for an honour. rather than just passed
8:25 pm
and perhaps you can aim for an honour. rather thanjust passed in the teenager shrugged his shoulders and what is the point, you know. and because they were celebrating french resista nce because they were celebrating french resistance that date the president says if you do not aim higher and live, imagine the resistance if they stayed at home and not do anything. and you say you do not address the president in that way but i think there are many people who think if he is out and about in meeting the people that he could drop the formality of bit top yellow —— drop the formality of little bit. he is not a prime minister, but for a teenager to address the queen as what is out, then she probably would not reply with anything but you would get the tabloids in rage over such a disrespectful attitude. so it is normal but a lot of teachers
8:26 pm
react and say i would do exactly the same. my pupil does not address me asa same. my pupil does not address me as a nickname. bank names in france are not that commonly used. contrary to britain or anglophone countries. very interesting difference. we will have to leave it there i am afraid. parents who get too involved in their children's lives, so called "helicopter parents", could harm their emotional and academic development, according to a new study. the research, carried out by the university of minnesota, found that children whose parents interfere in their play, grew up less able to control their emotions and behaviour and the more controlling a parent, the more likely the child is to not do as well social and academically, according to the report. it also claims it's vital that children experience a "range of emotions" and learn to manage these emotions on their own. with me is eva lloyd, professor of early childhood at the university of east london
8:27 pm
and also in our cambridge studio is parenting columnist and broadcaster, liz frazer. she's also a mum—of—four. welcome to you both. thank you for joining us here on bbc news. first to you, what do you think of this research? i am amazed at how easy it is to make parents feel bad about themselves and worried about where they might be going wrong. we have done it again, it is notjust in britain that this has attracted so much attention but in belgium and italy and all over europe. that is because it plays to a certain fear and all parents that they are getting it wrong? absolutely. my criticism so far has been as an academic looking at the design of the study. it becomes very complex to explain to all the parents listening and why i think the study
8:28 pm
cannot make these claims the way it does because it does not allow you to say one thing, the mother's behaviour with the child at age two leads to a particular type of behaviour in the child at age ten. so that is the technical side of things. the other thing that is clear from the study is that something we see more and more of is how academics are keen to bring their research which may be quite an an early stage to the attention to the public because they asked to create impacts and sometimes we go a bit too far. you think it is a bit too soon. can i bring you in, do you recognise this helicopter parent syndrome? not saying you are one, but you do you recognise that?“ anyone is not too sure what we mean, it is if you are hovering above your
8:29 pm
children all the time, you are there and watching them and you do not leave them alone to sort their own issues out. we are talking of children over the age of about one and a half or two, where at that age you should be hovering around your baby. i spent around 14 hours hovering around my six—month old they beat today but i do not consider myself a helicopter parent. lam consider myself a helicopter parent. i am really happy to see someone say that that this whole thing about the pressure on academics to release their research perhaps when it is in its intro stages or need something thatis its intro stages or need something that is not ready to be such a strong statement and they need more backing and more grants perhaps so it is important to get this work out there and then we as parents read watching your child a lot is bad for their emotional development which is very unhelpful. i am not saying that is the fault of the academics doing the research but the take—home message might be that actually as parents it is important to remember
8:30 pm
sometimes tojust parents it is important to remember sometimes to just step back and don't interfere all the time and let them grow on their own in their own way emotionally and socially and that could be good for them, that is probably the most we can take away from this i think. and presumably it is worse to give your children too little attention into much? absolutely. the effects of proper neglect and ignoring children will be much greater than the affect of any hovering over two—year—olds. we should also bear in mind that the press release that went with this particular research talked blithely of pa rents particular research talked blithely of parents when it is only mothers who have been studied briefly. and again we should look at those fathers and mothers but we should not generalise only we haven't actually studied the other parent. you really do not like this research at all, do you? i am very sceptical about it. is it fair to talk more
8:31 pm
about it. is it fair to talk more about mothers and fathers particularly when you talk about very small children because they are more likely to spend more time with their mums? i think it is fair to be talking like that because if we were to conduct this research across all the people that are involved in this, probably there will be more mothers and fathers looking after very young children in those early years and that is normal and natural andl years and that is normal and natural and i do not think that is a bad thing. i and i do not think that is a bad thing. lam and i do not think that is a bad thing. i am feeding my baby still soaring with her all the time so i am happy to be able to do that. i do not think that is a criticism of fathers, i do not think it is a sad thing from others either. i think it is how it is. we should not talk about parents if in fact the research only talked about mothers. ido research only talked about mothers. i do also think in my 20 years of parenting, many thousands of children i have seen grown up and move on. the hovering i would say is more often done by the mothers even when there is both mother and father
8:32 pm
present. i think perhaps we have more of a controlling side to our nature, many of us and maybe it is more often the dad and the mother more often the dad and the mother more often the dad and the mother more often saying don't do that. we will have to leave it there. thank you so much. time for a look at the weather with matt taylor. hello there, it has been an incredibly dry month so far for the majority of you. the rain is mainly across central and southern scotland, northern ireland and the far north of england. for south only a bit of drizzle in the west and many will stay dry under a muggy night. that will make its way further south and as we go through wednesday, the morning rain clears
8:33 pm
and a wet start across northern england and wales. 0nly and a wet start across northern england and wales. only a few showers as it heads to the west and south midlands. to the south and east staying warm with sunshine out and humid and mid—teens further north. continue through the first pa rt north. continue through the first part of the night, fading away into thursday and then it is dry all the way through the rest of the week and into the weekend with temperatures after a brief drop slowly on the rise again. this is bbc news, our latest headlines. the home secretary announces a review into the medicinal use of cannabis — in a move prompted by cases of children with epilepsy not having access to cannabis oil to control their seizures. republicans in the us senate say migrant families should be kept together whilst their immigration status is determined, as president's trump zero tolerance policy faces increasing criticism. religious and community leadersjoin together,
8:34 pm
for a minute's silence, to mark the first anniversary of the finsbury park terror attack in north london. the inquiry into the grenfell tower disaster is shown images of firefighters, entering the flat, where the fire began. the grenfell tower inquiry has been shown video images ta ken by firefighters, as they entered the flat in the tower block where the fire started. they managed to put out the kitchen fire which started in or around fridge freezer. but the blaze re—entered the flat through a window before spreading up the walls of the building. this report by our home affairs correspondent tom symonds contains some images of smoke and flames which some viewers may find distressing. at about seven minutes past one firefighters enter the flat... the first footage of the grenfell tower fire from the inside.
8:35 pm
firefighters enter flat 16 on the fourth floor. you can see the firefighters moving around the entrance hallway as they start to make an entrance into the first bedroom. the inquiry was shown the pictures on the left from a thermal camera. 0n the right, mobile phone footage of exactly the same time from outside. they search two bedrooms, smoke, but no flames. then... here is where the firefighters enter the kitchen for the first time. the yellow glow that you see is the fire that is down at the window and of the kitchen. a crucial moment, the two—man team act fast. the firefighters attempt to put water on the fire and you can see there where the hose reel is spraying water on the fire. they close the door. and then they open the door again to see that the fire is still present. six minutes later, the fire in the kitchen is out. but look what is happening outside the window. the flames have escaped.
8:36 pm
pieces of melting, burning cladding fall to the ground. within minutes the fire will be unstoppable. this is all evidence of something important. the fire broke out of the flat five minutes before firefighters broke in. professor mcdade's job is to explain to the inquiry chairman the first minutes of this disaster, specifically where the fire began. it is my view that it can be concluded with confidence that the fire which occurred in grenfell tower on the 14th ofjune started in the kitchen of flat 16 on the fourth floor of g re nfell tower. but also how it started. in the devastated kitchen she is able to spot the patterns of the fire. the burn marks where a fridge freezer stood. the signs of heat on the sides of that appliance. and she says the fire started here, in the area marked in red. but more investigation is needed to determine how.
8:37 pm
one theory is an electrical fault or surge, there is evidence a tripswitch was activated. was that a cause or effect of the fire? one of the many questions still to be answered. more now on our top story. the home secretary, sajid javid, has announced a review of the use of cannabis for medicinal purposes, but he said the ban on the recreational use of the drug would continue. charlotte caldwell, whose son billy has severe epilepsy, was granted a 20—day licence for the drug last week. she welcomed the home secretary's decision to review the law. i think billy's story and what billy as a little boy has had to endure this week has got into the hearts of the politicians in our country and into the hearts of the nation. you know... we all are very aware that billy
8:38 pm
should not have had to endure that. but what has happened on the positive side of that is our campaign has actually made history. they are now recognising that medicinal cannabis does have medicinal benefits. to get an international perspective we are joined via webcam byjodie emery, who campaigned for the legalisation of cannabis in canada. thanks very much forjoining us. here in bbc news. tell me more about the canadian experience of cannabis being legalized for medical use? the government of canada has always opposed medical marijuana access. u nfortu nately we have opposed medical marijuana access. unfortunately we have had to rely on peaceful civil disobedience to force changes to the law. here in canada, the charter rights of patients are based on our constitution, and it protects them from facing
8:39 pm
criminalization for cannabis. so the courts in canada have repeatedly ordered the government to provide access to cannabis to protect the charter rights of patients who would risk their safety and liberty if they encountered the criminal law trying to get them. of medical use has been legal for a trying to get them. of medical use has been legalfor a number of trying to get them. of medical use has been legal for a number of used —— here's now? has been legal for a number of used -- here's now? it is but the axis is still a problem. we still have government coming —— the government raiding and shutting down dispensaries on the street level that are providing immediate access. we even have federaljudges saying that dispensaries are the heart of access. but the governments in canada and beyond continued to say that cannabis is not medicine, that it is not good for you and that it is dangerous. that is why there are laws against it. in billy's case and in other cases we see, the criminal laws for cannabis cause far more harm to individuals than cannabis
8:40 pm
does itself. especially given that in this case, cannabis is saving the lives of babies and children. we we re lives of babies and children. we were speaking to an medical expert a little bit earlier who said that he could absolutely see in some cases it does work but he said that the jury it does work but he said that the jury was still very much out on exactly how cannabis works, who it works for and what concentrations. it is not necessarily as clear—cut as some people say, is it? human beings have been using cannabis for thousands of years. our bodies have something called the system which doctors and researchers best researchers are discovering that we interact with cannabis in so many ways that there is no other plant or medicine that can be used for such a wide variety of ailments. if we look back at human history, cannabis has been very effective medicine. it is
8:41 pm
only because of decades of prohibition and fear and reefer madness and hysteria that we will not fully explored the benefits of medical cannabis. 0f not fully explored the benefits of medical cannabis. of those historical records are coming out and more new research is coming out. so we know that cannabis is far safer than alcohol, opioids, pharmaceutical drugs and other substances. and the criminal law does not protect us from the harm of any drug. jodi amory, we will have to leave it there. thanks for talking to us. breaking news to bring you from london. police say a small number of people have been treated at the scene of a minor blast at southgate underground station in north london. the police we re station in north london. the police were called just after 7pm this evening to reports of explosions and people running at southgate underground station. there is still metropolitan police officers at the
8:42 pm
scene along with them is british transport police. there are cordons in place. they are not aware of any serious injury and the police are saying to follow them on twitter for any further updates. just to repeat that, please say a small number of people have been treated at the scene of a minor blast at southgate tube station in north london. we will bring you more information on that when we have it. the united nations refugee agency says the number of people forced from their homes by conflict has risen to a record high for the fifth year running — of 68 million people. 0ur correspondent dan johnson is in cox's bazar in bangladesh, where hundreds of thousands of rohingya muslims are living in makeshift camps after escaping violence in myanmar. if you want an example of the nature of life for displaced people, there are more than 700,000 of them living in this sprawling camp close to the myanmar border and it keeps growing because the aid agencies are taking advantage of the lull in the weather at the moment, it hasn't rained for the last couple of days, and the camp is actually being expanded.
8:43 pm
they are using some of the flat land on the edges to build more stable homes because you can see how these shacks have been built on the hillside, they are susceptible to landslides when the rain comes and weakens the earth. these are by no means the most precarious homes, there are some really steep cliffs. the other threat here is flooding and the disease that could be spread by standing water. there is also a risk that latrines like this that are really basic, really simple, more quickly overflow when the rain really intensifies. so there is a warning from the aid agencies here that these people who fled persecution about nine or ten months ago now face a new threat because of the weather that is about to hit here. it is certainly an example of how living this sort of life on borrowed land really does mean an uncertain existence. danjohnson
8:44 pm
dan johnson there. the monsoons have already begun for some parts of bangladesh and north east india — where dozens of people have been killed in flash floods. with me now is chris fawkes from bbc weather. from bbc this is a yearly occurrence in that pa rt this is a yearly occurrence in that part of the world. with many fears of course from what danjohnson with same. can you talk us through how this weather system works? the monsoon is this weather system works? the monsoon is cause this weather system works? the monsoon is cause basically by the heating that we get in the tibetan plateau which is to the north of india. and also the strong heating across the sahara desert and also the arabian desert. that draws these winds across the indian ocean into india. we get a low leveljet stream that creates a low pressure of —— that creates a low pressure of —— that sits over india. that drives the monsoon. the big problem we had last week is you see around bangladesh in northeast india the swirl in the winds. we have a
8:45 pm
monsoon depression which is an area of low pressure that essentially concentrates the moisture into a small area. what we saw across southeastern bangladesh in cox's bazaar, you have 50 mm of rain in the space a few days. that is about half the amount of rain that you would see any year in the uk that falls in the space of five days. it was unjust advantage but also across northeastern parts of india. what we are now seeing is the after affects of that. the rain set the stage and what we're seeing now is flooding affecting parts or some of northeast india. according to reuters, a million people or more have been displaced by floodwaters in this pa rt displaced by floodwaters in this part of india. it is notjust a problem to india. we've seen this in bangladesh and we have heard reports of 25 fatalities caused by the rain and flooding in the recent days. the monsoon is a and flooding in the recent days. the monsoon is a season, so and flooding in the recent days. the monsoon is a season, so it started and it will continue? that is one of
8:46 pm
the things i suppose. it sits about two weeks in this part of south asia. the thing is that monsoon season runs all the way until september. so it hasjust season runs all the way until september. so it has just begun and we already see big flooding problems. one of asia's big rivers is running very high at the moment. so more rain would cause big problems or even exacerbated problems or even exacerbated problems which we have seen in recent days. 0k. chris, we will have to leave it there. thank you very much. tributes have been paid to three graffiti artists who died after being hit by a train in south london. police have named the victims and given further details this reports from loughborough junction station. 23—year—old harrison scott was a beautiful artist his parents say. who love to travel. he was our only son, the love of our lives and we are beyond broken by this news they said. alberto carrasco who is 19 was
8:47 pm
said. alberto carrasco who is 19 was said to have had a passion for drawing at a young age and was due to study graphic design at the london college of communication. 20 three rd jack gilbert was the last to be formally identified. —— 23—year—old. is now believed the men we re 23—year—old. is now believed the men were killed by an out of service passenger train shortly after one am on monday. they say the evidence suggests men were on the track with purposes of spraying graffiti. this is an area which is popular with street artist and they came to remember them today. the kids out there. what they did up there may have been stupid but they are kids. if it was illegal, he did because he loved that. officers are said to be continuing analyse cctv with investigations still under way into the depths of the young men as their friends and family mourn lives short so suddenly. the headlines on bbc news. the home secretary announces a review into the medicinal use
quote
8:48 pm
of cannabis — in a move prompted by cases of children with epilepsy not having access to cannabis oil to control their seizures. republicans in the us senate say migrant families should be kept together whilst their immigration status is determined, as president's trump zero tolerance policy faces increasing criticism. police say a small number of people have been treated at the scene of a minor blast at southgate tube station in north london. a former soldier is to be charged with manslaughter by gross negligence, over the killing of a catholic man in northern ireland 30 years ago. 23—year—old aidan mcanespie was a sinn fein activist when he was shot dead at an army checkpoint manned by the grenadier guards in county tyrone. 0ur ireland correspondent emma vardy reports. what happened at this checkpoint has
8:49 pm
been a subject of contention for three decades. aidan mcanespie was shot as he crossed the border on foot on his way to a gaelic football match. he was killed by a gunshot wound to the back. his family have long campaigned for the british army to be held accountable. today, they we re to be held accountable. today, they were told that a former soldier would not be charged with manslaughter. we feel comfortable that the way they have handled this. we hoped that things would happen quicker but we're hoping this goes to prosecution and will present an opportunity for us to clarify issues that still exist. the soldier, david jonathan holden, was 18 at the time. he claimed his hands were wet. he fired his machine gun accidentally. manslaughter charges were dropped in 1990. this memorialfor manslaughter charges were dropped in 1990. this memorial for aidan mcanespie is now all that is left here at the spot where the army
8:50 pm
checkpoint once stood. but the controversy checkpoint once stood. but the co ntrove rsy over checkpoint once stood. but the controversy over his death has ever gone away. there are hundreds of ongoing investigations into incidents from the troubles like this one. and there is concern at westminster that there are fairly focused on former soldiers. in any conflict that will be disagreements and incidents in conflict, and there will be lots of versions of offence. these guys have been investigated before and i think at some point you have to draw the line and move on from this conference because you don't end up pursuing justice. you end up pursuing vendettas. the decision to prosecute in the case of aidan mcanespie was based on fresh evidence from a firearms expert.” think anybody who said that a shoulder shouldn't face prosecution for soldier axes more wrong. it should never be as a father and what is above the law. the soldier who is now 48 will be formally charged in the coming weeks. the american rapper "xxxtentacion" has been shot dead in florida. police said the 20—year—old was approached and shot by two armed suspects as he was leaving
8:51 pm
a motorcycle dealership in miami. his second album went to the top of the billboard chart in the us, but he was also facing a number of criminal charges, including domestic abuse. four water suppliers have been criticised for their response to the conditions caused by the storm known as the beast from the east earlier this year. the regulator 0fwat says poor preparation and an inadequate response led to significant hardship for people who were left without water for days, as our correspondent simon gompertz reports. first, it froze. and then it thawed. and the epidemic of burst pipes meant a shortage of water for essentials like washing, cooking and drinking, and tens of thousands cut off for days. i've been getting rainwater from outside and from my neighbours so it is not impossible. but i would say the worst thing is not being able to keep the washing up and the kitchen clean
8:52 pm
and also keep myself clean having a shower everyday. i've got five kids and literally without water for, like, since six o'clock yesterday morning. it's terrible. washing the bottles isjust a bit difficult and there's a lot of stuff covered in baby poo that i can't wash at the moment! one explanation for the failure to cope was that most leaks were in people's homes, rather than, like this, in the water network, which is easier to monitor. today, a finding that won't surprise customers. some suppliers' emergency planning and response were inadequate. they didn't anticipate the speed of the thaw, which led to a lot of bursts in customer pipes which they could not deal with. and also, the communications with customers were often poor, overreliant on social media, very reactive and actually, quite worryingly, dealing with vulnerable customers, a lot of companies struggled to identify vulnerable customers and give them the kind of support they need. thames water is accused of not taking proper notice of the weather forecast.
8:53 pm
it apologised, saying:. severn trent, also criticised, said: bottled water was a problem. the regulator says both southern and south east water struggled to make enough available. so what now? to prevent this happening again, those four companies are being told to come up with action plans by september. and there will be a review of compensation for being cut off for the next time there's a freeze, because of a big variation in what families were paid. simon gompertz, bbc news. a police drone helped to locate a missing man, who'd become stuck in deep marshland on the north norfolk coast. peter pugh, from brancaster, went missing on saturday while out walking. he was spotted by rescue teams 24 hours after his disappearance. the 75—year—old had become stuck in marshes in nearby titchwell.
8:54 pm
his wife said it was a miracle that he'd been found alive. debbie tubby has the story. this is the moment the police drone found peter pugh in the tidal reed the bed 24 hours after he went missing and when his family had lost bed 24 hours after he went missing and when his family had lost all hope that the rescuers would find him alive. we all came to the same conclusion at the same time that we were never going to see him again. i have to admit that i thought, "i am going to be lucky to live." because i'm 75 and my heart's not going to be enjoying this. peter pugh knows the titchwell marshes well, but he became disorientated. trapped in this tidal reed bed lying in the water and unable to swim out and left drinking the freshwater. i kept trying to escape but i couldn't. you know, i couldn't crawl because my feet got stuck. and if i stood up and tried to walk, the same thing, they got stuck. or i fell overagain. so, ithought, "well,
8:55 pm
at some point hopefully, they will start looking for me." he went missing on saturday. the drone filming these pictures found him on sunday. he remembers everything but the rescue. and then it took an hour and a half to winch him out. to actually see him and see he's still moving has got to be probably the best feeling i've had in my ten years in the police. it is dangerous. the salt marshes, it's one of those habitats that unless you've got a real familiarity with the very site—specific areas where you can and can't go, it is a bit of a lottery. you can be fine one day and then another day, you take a slightly different route and you can get stuck. more than 50 people helped in the rescue. we are just incredibly lucky that these people who take no glory and just help families like us and i will burst into tears in a moment if we don't stop! peter pugh is now expecting his wife to tell him off. i'm sure she will at some point. she hasn't so far.
8:56 pm
laughing. i've got a feeling i'm not going to be allowed to go for a walk on my own any more. debbie tubby reporting. the royal family has welcomed a new member after the queen's grand—daughter, zara tindall, gave birth to a baby girl. it's the second child for her and her husband mike tindall, pictured here last month. the baby was born weighing nine pounds and three ounces, her name has yet to be revealed, but buckingham palace said the queen and prince philip are delighted with the news. time for a look at the weather... with matt taylor. another day for us. separating the two has been an increasingly active weather front. this line up here which will separate the two air masses. but you see a lot of heavy rain developed through this evening.
8:57 pm
northern ireland, you can see in the radar increasingly into the far north of england as well. 0utbreaks of rain. heavy and praise —— places as we go through the rest of the evening and night. to the north we will have clear skies develop across shetland and later into... lots of clouds and patchy rain into the west. clear skies elsewhere. and like last light —— last night it will be temperature is sticking to the mid—teens for many. 0ur weather front will be unmoved southwards as we go into wednesday. it will encroach... we start humid in the morning. there will be early rises across scotland. especially northern england and scotland. heavy rain will work southwards into the rest of the midlands. eventually south west and east anglia through the afternoon. the blue disappears on the chart and we look closer to see isolated showers. we could see quite a lot of float clouds around in this
8:58 pm
channel. some fine —— sunshine, it enters a 25 and 26 for parts of the corner. we are back in the fresher air in the midlands had ending wednesday. bright in the second half of the day and much of northern england and scotland and northern ireland some sunny spells. a plushy northwest wind and a few sharers dotted around scotland and some gas into some sunshine in between. those showers keep going until tomorrow night. and into the early hours of thursday morning. they will clear into the north sea. that is because you have high pressure building in. this ridge of high pressure will be with us for a well. northerly winds. fresh start across some areas in the morning to with sunshine overhead. and a fresh date by large in the breeze. quad bidding up in spring out but will be sunshine. temperatures down across some areas. most sitting in the teens as of late. summer solstice on thursday
8:59 pm
and beyond that, high pressure remains in charge. lots of dry weather texas in the next week. just not the temperatures uk wide climbing into the 20s. —— dry weather. hello, i'm ros atkins, this is 0utside source. crying. this secret audio of children crying for their parents in a us immigration centre is unsettling america. but still president trump stands firm on his policies. we wa nt we want a country with heart. but when people come out, they have to realise they can get in or else this will never stop. he says illegal immigrants can't be allowed to, in his words, infest america. but even some top republicans want the tactic of separating children from their parents to stop. a row breaks out over the italian interior minister's plans
9:00 pm

27 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on